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The Key West citizen. [volume] (Key West, Fla.) 1879-current, September 14, 1940, Image 1

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Associated Press Day Wire
Service
For 60 Years Devoted to the
Best Interests of Key West
VOLUME LXI. No. 220.
HITLER SENDS ULTIMATUM TO BRITAIN
Demands Surrender
Or London Will Be
Totally Destroyed
British Refuse To Consid
er Threat; Believe Ger
man Air Offensive Is
Weakening
(By Amiorintpd
LONDON, Sept. 14.—Adolf Hit
ler transmitted a strong ultima
tum to the British today demand
ing that Great Britain surrender
or suffer complete destruction
of London.
Lato advices stated that the
British have ridiculed the de
mand. adding their belief that
the ultimatum is another in the
series of Hitler “bluffs”. They
believe that the Germans are be
ginning to shew the effects of
their blitzkrieg in shortage of
pilots and ammunition and point
ed out that raids today were
much lighter than heretofore.
The eight-hour raid staged by
the Nazis last night, however,
brought no indication of any les
sening in the air war. British
anti-aircraft defenses and balloon
barrages were again quite effec
tive in keeping a major part of
the raiding bombers from central
parts of the city, and a number of
enemy planes were shot down.
Many fires were set by incen
diary bombs last night, but this
morning all of them were report
ed to be out and the city ex
perienced its first dav in a long
time free from smoke palls.
In the meantime, as per sched
ule each night for the past two
months, the Royal Air Force
continued to pound away at Ger
man invasion ports, dropping
huge demolition bombs on sever
al France and Holland seaport
cities where Hitler may be pre
paring an actual invasion at
tempt.
No invasion talk was heard in
Berlin today, nor has it been
ever definitely discussed by the
Nazis. All that came from the
Nazis this morning was opinions
on Hitler’s ultimatum sent the
British.
“It will be murder if the war
continues”, the Germans averred.'
and apparently they held out
hope that the British would capi
tulate before more “all-out”
maneuvers are f directed at Lon
don and other big English cities.
Weather conditions over Great
Britain today continued to favor
the Nazis, with light rains and
clouds making it possible for
planes to fly high over objectives
without being observed. New
type detectors on anti-aircraft
guns were said to be coping with
this problem effectively, how
ever.
Two buildings in the House of
Commons groups were reported
hit this morning in raids last
night. The great west window
of Westminster Abbey was de
stroyed when a bomb fell nearby.
Advices from Moscow today
hinted at trouble for Germany
when it was stated that the
Soviets were not at all satisfied
with the axis-power maneuvers
in the Balkans. It was alleged
that Germany had “passed many
lies’’ about the Russians in Ru
mania.
A WORD TO THE WISE... PAINT YOUR CAR AND PROTECT YOUR INVESTMENT. LOU SMITH AUTO SERVICE, DUVAL AND DIVISION, PHONE 9153 TR §
®hu 2Cry West Citizen
THE SOUTHERNMOST NEWSPAPER IN THE U. S. A.
SENATOR ANDREWS
IN RADIO ADDRESS
Y Special to The Citizen!
WASHINGTON. Sept. 14.
Senator Charles O. Andrews
will speak over Columbia
Broadcasting Syst2m, nation
wide hookup, tonight at 9:15
o'clock, from this city.
Senator Andrews will dis
cuss the consequences of the
recent destroyer-naval base
exchange with Great Brit
ain, the half-billion dollar
Export - Import bank in
crease for Latin-American
financing and conscription.
The effect of these projects
on the entire program of
Western Hemisphere defense
i will be highlighted.
NOVEL APPROACH TO
BOOK-LENGTH CASE
i
flly tMiicimril Urrnsl
PUEBLO. Colo., Sept. 14.
! Harry Vories was attorney in an
involved traffic case.
I After studying the facts he
cleared his throat, looked at the
judge and said:
‘ Telling how this accident oc-•
curred is going to be as difficult
as explaining falling in love”.
ADVISORY
j 10:00 A. M.. EST—The tropical j
(hurricane attended by gales over!
i wide area and hurricane winds
j near center was central 7 A.M.
EST, about 475 miles east-north
‘ east of Nassau, moving north
• northeastward or northeastward
112 to 14 miles per hour. Caution
! advised all ships in its path.,
; Storm will probably pass near t
j Bermuda Sunday afternoon.
WEATHER BUREAU.
I 1
C.C.C. Enrollments To ;
Be Taken Next Month
The next enrollment for CCC
will be in October, according to
a report issued by the Key West
Welfare Board, the selecting
agency.
Since the eligibility standards
have been slightly changed, the
following bulletin is being given
as a interpretation and clarifica
tion for tne terms "unemployed
and in need of employment”.
The following are excerpts out
lined by J. J. McEntee, director
of CCC headquarters. Washing
ton, D. C.: *
During the early years of the
corps, enrollment was limited
strictly to young men on relief
and war veterans, the latter
group constituting about ten
•percent of the CCC. The Act of
June 28. 1937, extending the
life of the Civilian Conserva
tion Corps, opened the way for
the enrollment of young men
who were not on relief. This
, law simply stated that "the
Civilian Conservation Corps is
established for the purpose of
providing employment, as well
as vocational training. for
youthful citizens of the United
States, who are unemployed
and in need of employment”.
i
EXTENSION PLANS
•• * *
Jax Official Was Here
FOR WPA CLASSES
Announcement was made to
day that the extension of the
WPA classes in Citizenship, Nat
! uralization and Literacy here is
■ ibout to get under way as plan
! ned by Mrs. Rolla A. Southworth.
j P. & S. State director.
The plans were broached by
Louis A. Guessaz, Jr., of the
i Jacksonville office, director of
j curriculum for the past four
years, who, with his wife, was a
first-time visitor to Key West
this week. He arrived Wednes- i
day afternoon and left the fol- i
; lowing day.
At present Mrs. Grace Crosby '
conducts a class each school eve
ning at the High School, 8:00 to
9:00 o’clock, to assist the foreign
born to speak English. Knowl
edge in government is also taught
to enable students to pass exami
nations for citizenship in No
vember.
Similar classes are conducted
for the colored aliens at Doug
lass School, led by Mrs. Grace
Palacious.
Adult classes, now open to the
public, in shorthand and type
writing are also featured by Mrs.
Crosby. All persons not enrolled
in an elementary or high school
over 16 years of age. are eligible
for attendance. ,
RIGHT-THINKING
PEOPLE ALL SIT
ON RIGHT SIDE
< Ilv ANNocifitfd PreM>
PLEASUREVILLE. Ky„
Sept. 14.—Every person at
tending the Baptist church
in this town of 300 sits on
the right-hand side.
The custom has been ob- >
served so long that even the
oldest members are unable to
remember exactly how it
started. However, the most j
plausible reason is that the
church was constructed to
seat almost twice as many
persons as there are in the
congregation, and the mem
bers began sitting together
on one side to avoid being
scattered over the large
room.
Pews on the left-hand side
are practically new.
Immediately following pas
sage of the 1937 Act, the en
trance regulations of the
Corps weie revised to permit
the enrollment of young men
from families who needed aid
but whose names were not on
public relief rolls. Later, these
regulations were modified to
permit the enrollment of a
third group which consisted of
young men from families
whose incomes were below the
normal standard of living in
the community in which the
applicant lives.
The latest modification in the
regulations defining the terms
"unemployed and in need of
employment”, reads as follows:
“For the purpose of CCC se
lection the phrase ‘Unemploy
ed and in need of employ
ment’ shall be understood to
cover unmarried junior ap
plicants otherwise qualified by
age, citizenship, fitness and
character; not in attendance at
school, nor on temporary vaca
tion therefrom: not possessing
other regular or full-time em
ployment, and who needs the
employment, the job training,
i (Continued on Page Four)
KEY WEST, FLORIDA, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 1940
MARINE SERGEANT
FOUND GUILTY ON
STATUTORY COUNT

TRIAL LASTED UNTIL LATE
HOUR LAST NIGHT; JURY
BROUGHT IN VERDICT THIS
MORNING
Alton Hinton, marine corps
! sergeant, was found guilty of a
'statutory offense of felonious na
ture this morning in Criminal
.Court, in one of the most sensa
i tional trials held for some time.
The case was called yesterday
| morning and first witnesses for
|the complainant. Vioiet Valdez,
,were heard before court recessed
at noon. Continuation of the
trial started at 1:30 o’clock and
a steady stream of witnesses
were heard, for both sides, not
ending until shortly after 11:00
o’clock last night.
The jury, composed of Aurelio
Lastres, Sr.. Herman L. Roberts,
John J. Romero, Jr., Robert Lee
Albury, Leon Peacon and Harry
Dongo, was instructed by Judge
William V. Albury. then depart
ed to the jury room for delibera- '
tions. In that they had not
reached a verdict at midnight,
they were taken to the La Con
cha hotel for the rest of the
night, and reported early today
for continuation of deliberations.
The verdict was rendered at
10:00 o’clock this morning. De
fense attorney W. Curry Harris
then stated that he would pre-"!
pare a motion for retrial, which
will be heard on Wednesday
morning at 9:00 o’clock. The de
fendant was held by the court on
$2500 bond.
Frank Sosin was found guilty
of assault as charged by Samuel
Higgs, in court this morning. The
charge originally read “assault
and battery”, but the jury ren
dered only the assault verdict.
Sosin will have sentence passed
Wednesday morning when court
convenes to hear the motion in
the Hinton case.
Frank Johnson’s sentence was
deferred this morning when he
agreed to pay the Conservation
Department license for dealing in
sea products.
FOUR SHIPS ;
NOW IN PORT
Captain A. S. Carpender, com
mander of the Kev West Patrol,
announced the list of naval ships
now based here, today.
Destroyers Bainbridge. Sands
and Noa are now in port as is
the converted seaplane tender
Goldsborough.
Submarine Sea Raven, escorted
by the destroyers Lawrence and
Humpheys. is out on experi-;
mental operations, and the U.S.S.
King, destroyer, is on neutrality •
patrol duty.
What Really Mattered
(Hr Ptfm)
BOWLING GREEN, Ky—The
Roosevelt - Willkie Presidential
campaign was forgotten as more
than 150 men 75 or over gather
ed for the annual Warren Coun
ty Old Men's Reunion. They were
interested more in the heated
Hays-Tilden race of 1876.
S. A. COHEN, Representing
THE MAXWELL CO., Inc.
WHOLESALE
Furniture, Furnishings, Restaurant
Equipment and Venetian Blinds
WILL BE IN KEY WEST AT
OCEAN VIEW HOTEL
1317 Duval Street Phone 9114
THIS AFTERNOON—SATURDAY AND SUNDAY
For Interviews or Contacts With Anyone Interested
JANITOR OF COURT
•• • •
Thief Raided Locker Room
HOUSE LOST SUIT
The sensational trial held at
the county courthouse yesterday,
.lasting as it did until after 11:00
P- m., attracted a large crowd of
i onlookers who paraded in and
out of the courtroom and into
other offices.
I Some of the onlookers, it was!
reported this morning, used the
occasion to do some investigat
ing as to possibilities of picking
up property that didn’t belong to
them, and taking it home with
them.
• Such was the case of the court
house janitor, Thomas Whit
marsh. who reported that a suit
of clothes he had hung in the 1
locker room had disappeared.
“They took the trousers and coat, j
but left the belt hanging on the
hook”, he lamented.
It appears that the belt was
initialed—and the thief, or
thieves, feared detection if caught i
with it on his person.
BOULEVARD |
WORK OKEYED
.
SCHRODER WIRES BERVALDI
TODAY; PROJECT WILL j
BE REOPENED SOON j
County commission chairman ‘
Carl Bervaldi stated today that
he had received a telegram from
Roy Schroder. WPA state direc
tor, which told of approval of
the Roosevelt Boulevard resur
facing project.
This project was two
months ago for lack of spon
sorship arrangement, but is
now to be resumed.
Continuation and completion
of the project, now assured as
soon as Miami headquarters gets
the word, will bring rescarifying,
filling, rolling and oiling of the
boulevard on the northern side
of the island.
Commissioners approved a
measure Wednesday night that
allows the county clerk to act on
letting a contract for oil for the ‘
project.
UQUOR LICENSE 1
SALES TO OPEN:
LADD ANNOUNCES FIRST TO
GO ON SALE NEXT
MONDAY
County tax collector Frank
Ladd announced this morning
that beer, wine and liquor
licenses would go on sale at his
office next Monday morning.
All establishments selling ei
ther light alcoholic beverages or
liquor will have to have licenses
by the deadline date. October Ist.
Mr. Ladd stated that those
places within city limits would
have to secure their city liquor
licenses before he could issue the
.state licenses.
Council failed To Act
On Collection Of Taxes
Capt. Jacobs urns
Eight New Projects
Million And Quarter Ap
propriation For Key
West Station Itemized
In Report
Captain W. F. Jacobs, com
mandant cf ths local naval sta
tion, today released the figures
on the $1,250,000 in projects au
thorized by Congress in the sec
ond supplementary National De
cense Bill pasted earlv this week
and signed into law by the
President.
The amount is broken up into
right projects as follows:
Marine railway—ssoo,ooo.
Cold storage plant—s7s,ooo.
Rehabilitation of piers and
bu lkheads—s3oo,ooo.
Dredging—sloo,ooo.
Improvement of power facili
ties—sloo,ooo.
Battery charging facilities—
sso,ooo.
Storage facilities—s7s,ooo.
Improvement of buildings, shops
and housing and miscellaneous
structures—sso,ooo.
The New Deal
(EDITOR'S NOTE: While Jack Stinnett. AP Washing
ton Feature Service Writer, is on vacation, the apace usually
devoted to his c&lumn is made available to the two major
parties for a pro-and-con presentation of aa agreed Hat at
political subjects. Neither side has seen the other's article*
and there will be no rebuttal. The first of these articles.
"National Defense", began in The Citizen Wednesday, fol
lowed by "The New Deal", which concludes today).
The Democratic View
By SUSAN BRANDEIS
Daughter of Louis D. Brandeis. retired justice. Supreme Court
of the United Stales
WASHINGTON, Sept. 14
I believe Franklin D. Roosevelt
to be the right man for the tre
mendous responsibility that rests
on the shoulders of the President
of the United States, because he
has shown in almost eight years
of performance how effectively
he can steer the ship of state.
With problems of unemploy
ment such as we never had be
fore, President Roosevelt and his
administration conceived and
tjNSf} effectively operated a relief
ancpV. ork program which has lit
erally saved the lives of thou
sands of men. women and chil
dren in this country' and have at
the same time created great and
useful public improvements which
we could not have had in any
other way.
• • • *
President Roosevelt and his
administration w'orked out and
put into effect such remarkable
achievements as the Social Se
■ curity board, the National Youth
administration, and other parts of
NEW YORK BABY WILL
BE CHRISTENED HERE
Long distance talapkoat
call to Everett Rivas last
night announced the birth at
a boy. six pounds and one
ounce, to Mr. and Mrs. Jobs
Arthur Green, of Ly—brook.
L. L. yesterday.
Mr. and Mrs. Green are
regular visitors to Key Want
having journeyed from thotr
home here 14 tunes m the
past five years. They have
a large circle of friends xn
the city who will rejoice with
the New Yorkers in Ins
event.
The little son has haem
named John Arthur Green
Jr. He will be cnnrtewri
in Kay Waat whan fc s
: parents come here for the
Christmas holidays.
HANDS OFF!
(•< twrtoif4 rw—i
GLENDALE. Cattf —Ondak ■
citv council has decided it dorse >
want shoppers to pick up and
handle f*d in grocery stores
An ordinance providing penal
ties has been passed.
a great program to extend Hr
service given bv the government
to the people of the United State*
I could enumerate many other
measures which will make PJh-si
dent Roosevelt stand out m his
tory as one of our greatest Presi
dents. but I shall mention only
one—the National Labor Rela
tions Act How' many people real
ize that strikes were 45 percent
lower in 1939 than they were m
1937 and 1938 as a result of this
important piece of legislation.' It
is a matter of record that ance
the NLRA was declared consti
tutional industrial disputes have
steadily declined.
• • •
It is important during the forth
coming election to bear in nunc
that the continuation of the
National Labor Relations law ■
still in danger As recently as last
winter, there was a fight at it a
Congress and the fight is still go
ing on.
It is impossible to forget that is
(Continued on Page Four)
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