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Associated Press Day Wire
Service
For 60 Years Devoted to the
Best Interests of Key West
VOLUME LXI. No. 221.
Conscription Bill
Now Law; 60,000
Guards To Camp
Roosevelt Signs Draft
Measure This After
noon ; Bankhead Serv
ice Held
i—

IHy Aumrliird Prriia)
WASHINGTON, Sept. 16.
President Roosevelt signed the
new conscription bill as passed
by Congress and amended by
I
joint Congressional action last
weekend, shortly after 3:00 o'-
clock today in his office at the
I
White House.
The measure calls on 16,500.000 !
young men of the nation, be- \
tween the ages of 21 and 35, to i
register for duty in the military
branches of the government.
Today was further marked
with military and defense im
portance when it was announced
that 60,000 National Guardsmen,
the first of some 400,000 even
tually to be called, had been or- .
dered into encampments for a
year’s training.
The ranks of the guardsmen
will be reduced somewhat when
those with dependents and having
physical handicaps, will be ex
cused. Their ranks, however, are
(Continued On Page Four)
OUR DEFENSE
(EDITOR S NOTE: This is the third of a series pre
pared by the National Defense Advisory Commission in re
sponse to numerous requests for articles on our national
program. Future releases will appear in The Citizen on
Thursdays and Mondays.
THE UNITED STATES NAVY
From Navy Yards To The Fleet
According to the United State*
Navy, it takes about a year and
a half to build a ship to the
launching point. As soon as it is
launched, it is towed to the fit
ting-out basin and the crescendo
of work increases. Under the
great cranes, the additional half
billion pieces that go into a ship
must be nestled into their ap
pointed piaces.
Under the current speed-up
program, when the ship arrives
at the fitting-out basin, the pre
fabrication of deckhouses, bulk
heads. and fighting equipment
will be done to such a point that
the cranes seem to lift whole
ships through the air as these
parts are on the way to being
welded into place. All over the
yards individual shops are busy
finishing their work on the deli
cate entrails of the engines and
on the tough hide of the turret
armor. Far away in the optical
shops of inland cities, men with
skill gained, not through years,
but through generations of de
votion to ten-thousandths of an
inch, are gently rubbing slices of
glass, bringing them to the focus
that will aim the guns. In other
places’, dark men wade through
fields of cotton, picking the bolls
that will eventually, become
powder guards, awnings, and
mattresses. Down the nation's
communication lines roll these
tons of material, each arriving on
time to be picked up by the
cranes and dropped into place.
Arming A Ship
A year passes. Finally the
cranes pick up the great naval
guns. These may be as big as the
battleships' 16-inch guns, with
each tube 60 feet long and as big
GENUINE FACTORY MUFFLERS AND PIPES FOR YOUR CAR. CALL LOU SMITH FOR AN ESTIMATE TODAY. DUVAL AND DIVISION STS PHONE 9153 OR S
(Ehe ICcg lllest Citizen
THE SOUTHERNMOST NEWSPAPER IN THE U. S. A.
COUNTY RECEIVES
37 TEXTBOOKS ON
NATIONAL DEFENSE
SENIORS GET MATERIAL FOR
COURSES IN APPLIED
MATH AND SCIENCE; MORE
BOOKS TO COME LATER
*
(Special to The Citizen >
TALLAHASSEE, Sept. 16.
The State Department of Educa-1
tion has provided 37 books re
lated to national defense for the
use of Monroe County boys who
will graduate this school year
from high school. The book is
the first of a series giving ele
mentary instruction in general
mechanics, engines, aeronautics,
radio, photography, and the arm
ed forces.
As quickly as additional copies
can be printed the books will be j
available to the schools as public j
free texts, to whatever extent j
plans are made for their use in
each school. Approximately 8.-
000 have been distributed
throughout the state to make
them immediately available to
senior boys and to teachers of
physics, chemistry, and mathe
matics.
The first book of the series in
(Continued on Page Four)
around as a flour barrel, ready to
be dropped into place in the steel
turrets. Lighter guns, the 8-
inchers and the 5-inchers, are
fitted into their places on the
decks. The antiaircraft guns and
the “Chicago Pianos” are put in
to place. The latter are groups
of twenty machine guns mounted
on a single pivot which can fill
, the air with flying metal.
When the men have finished
their work, the builder's trials
begin. The ship is run forward
and backward, tested for speed,
fuel consumption. stability
everything the imagination of the
Navy inspectors can suggest.
If a hundred thousand men
down the nation's production
line have done their job. if the
designers' slide rules told the
truth, if the men who placed the
parts have done their job. the
ship does better than the mini
mum predictions made for it by
the Navy Board and Chief of
Naval Operations, when they
first made up the specifications.
Final Trials
Then the ship wil be tried out
under the Navy’s guidance, over
the deep water mile in the cool,
clear waters of the Gulf of
Maine. If it makes the grade
here, it is a full-fledged ship-of
the-linc in the Navy. But it is
not yet a unit of the fleet It
must go through a six months’
shakedown cruise. The guns
must be fired in every conceiv
able position. It must worm its
way in and out of tight places un
til every last man from the Cap
tain on the bridge to the Phar
macist’s Mate knows what it can
(Continued on Page Four;
!
’4O’S FATAL TO
GERMAN RULERS
j
(Hr Anaoclnted Prn)
PARIS, Ky., Sept. 16.
Mrs. Ira E. Smith calls at
i tention to history which
shows the '4O years have been
fatal to rulers of Germany.
Frederick I died in 1440,
George William in 1640,
Frederick William I in 1740
and Frederick 111 in 1840.
i rjrMjrjrjFjpjirMr*
NEW COMMANDER
ASSIGNED TO BASE
COMING FROM SAN DIEGO;
RESERVE OFFICER REPORT
ED YESTERDAY
Captain W. F. Jacobs, com
j mandant at Key West Naval Sta
j tion, announced today that Lt.
! Comdr. Edwin Fisher, U.S.N., re
tired, had been ordered to report
to this station by September 30.
Commander Fisher will come
from San Diego, his home city.
Captain Jacobs did not state to
which department he would be
assigned.
1 Lt. J. H. Fessenden. U.S.N.R..
of Scbring. Florida, reported
; for temporary duty with the air-
I force and destroyer fleet here for
! two weeks.
Dating The Depression?
<n> AMandated Prru)
NEW YORK—The world’s dia
mond production last year broke
all records with nearly two-and
. a-half metric tons of stones, says
the Jewelers’ Circular. Less than
one-fifth were gem stones, the
; ethers being industrial. Even
so, this made about 1.000 pounds,
, or half a ton of gems.
Beatty Says Adolf Hitler’s ‘Surprise
! For Britain’ May Be Phosgene Gas
By Morgan M. Beatty, AP Feature Service Writer
WASHINGTON, Sept. 16
When the Germans tell you that
they have a great surprise in
store for use against the British,
and the British admit the peak of
air war is not yet. it adds up. for
the military expert, to the prob
able use of poison gas in the near
future.
And you can bet one gas that’s
coming will be deadly, almost in
visible phosgene.
If the Germans use it first—
and they were the first to use
chlorine in the World war—air
experts expect they will drop it
from the sky.
The purpose would not be to
decimate the population as so
many people seem to think, but
to spread panic and fear when
panic and fear are already taking
hold of the civilian population.
Phosgene would be the fav
orite for this purpose for these
reasons:
1. It is almost invisible, and
therefore will have a terrifying
effect on civilians subjected to
the first attacks. People will ap
KEY WEST, FLORIDA, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 1940
STATE CHAMBER INVITES CANADIAN
••• ••• •••
President Brorein Relays Message To Defense Minister
WAR FLYERS TO TRAIN IN FLORIDA
OTTAWA, Canada, Sept. 16.
.Canadian and American business
! leaders are urging Dominion of
ficials to give earnest considera
: tion to the proposal made by Carl
D. Brorein, president of the
Florida State Chamber of Com
merce, that Canada train flyers
;in Florida this winter.
| One of them, whose name was
not divulged, has written Col. J.
L. Ralston, Canadian Minister of
(Defense, in support of the plan
:as follows:
“One of my very good friends,
fCarl D. Brorein of Tampa, presi
dent of the Florida State Cham
| her of Commerce, telephoned me
that they have heard
SAY—ISTHE FERRY
•• • ♦
Visitor Was Told So?
STILL OPERATING?
Odd stories concerning lack of
knowledge about Key West come
quite frequently out of Miami,
but the prize, in the opinion of
The Citizen, was presented this
morning when the reporter met
and talked with Mr. and Mrs. A.
C. Hersey, of Kingston, Jamaica,
8.W.1.
The Herseys came down from
Miami to purchase transportation
to Havana, for the ship sailing
this morning. They were told
by “some travel bureau’’ in Mi
ami that the ferry was still in
operation to Key West and that
“they would have to take their
chances on catching it” as the
reporting information-giver didn’t
know the ferry schedule.
Officials of the Overseas High
way commission were wondering
today, when acquainted with this
story, whether or not their ad
vertising in and around Miami,
and all the “free advertising”
obtained in the press of the na
tion. was worthwhile. “We cer
tainly felt that tour agencies, at
least, knew that the ferries have
long since departed”, one of the
officials stated.
AGED FAMILY MEET
PITTSFIELD. Mass.—The mem
bers of one family, all over 80,
recently held a reunion, celebrat
ing the birthday of the oldest of
the clan, who was 96. They were
David Parsons. 96; Mrs. Celia M.
Sears, 94: Mrs. Catherine Pills
bury. 92 ;Mrs. Emma Hutchinson,
90; Frank Parsons. 80, and Wal
ter Parsons, 84.
pear to drop dead like flies for
no apparent reason.
2. It is easy to store in bomb
like containers and drop from the
air.
3. It is highly adaptable to use
in the British Isles at this season,
because the atmosphere is often
hazy, almot foggy. The thin
white cloud of the stuff will be
invisible under tnese conditions.
(Phosgene is no good in very
wet weather, for water absorbs
and dissipates it more rapidly
than air.)
4. The Germans know that the
British population has been lax
in their use of gas masks.
I have it from well-informed
military' observers that both the
Germans and the British have
big stores of gases for use under
desperate conditions—the Ger
mans for the peak of their air at
tack against the islands, and the
British to use against land inva
sion.
As protection, the British au
thorities have already distributed
30.000.000 gas masks among their
people. They have rigged up
(Npt-rial to The Citizen)
m the South preparations were
underway to tram Canadian
aviators in the southern United
States during the winter months.
"Mr. Brorein is very anxious
to have the Air Force seriously
consider Florida. He is one of the
ablest men I know in the South
and flew for us in our last war.
If any program as suggested
does get under way. I sincerely
hope Florida will be given earn
est consideration. 1 have a win
! ter home there and know the
countiy very well—it would he
lan ideal place for any such work.
!. “I should also be* delighted to
give you any assistance in my
fiower if it would be of any help
(n the event Canadians train in
he States. Canada is duung a
great job, and I feel our country
is rapidly getting under way and
that we shall be of still greater
assistance in the future”.
Brorein recently requested the
United States War Department
to designate some Florida air
port as a Canadian training
ground. Canadian authorities say
this is unlikely in view' of the
United States Neutrality Act, but
it is hoped some plan can be
worked out to train the Cana
dians in Florida as civilian pilots
and complete this with military
and combat training in the Do
minion next Spring.
HUNGRY TOURISTS
CAN BE CARED FOR
HOTEL COMMISSIONER LISTS
3957 SEATS IN COUNTY
RESTAURANTS
(Siipflrl to Citizen)
TALLAHASSEE, Sept. 16.
Ample facilities for tourists and
those who want to “eat down
towm” are available in the 102
restaurants and cafes licensed to
operate in Monroe county, ac
cording to W. M. Taylor, state
hotel commissioner.
Combined capacity of the res
taurants and cafes in the county
is 3.957. Commissioner Taylor
said.
Each of the restaurants and
cafes listed operates under strict
health sanitation and safety reg
ulations of the state hotel com
mission.
Commissioner Taylor reported
that the current license year saw
permits issued by the commis
sion to 8,551 cafes and restaurants
in the state. These had a com
bined seating capacity of 301,-
582 persons, he said.
thousands of underground anti
! gas shelters. One gas-proof sub
way shelter in London can
’ house 8.000 people.
I Phosgene is ideal for the Ger
mans to use at the peak of their
air war because it has all deadly
effects and mysterious presence
attributed to war gases in popu
lar fiction, and not because it is
widely destructive of human life.
It disappears too quickly to be of
maximum value as a weapon
against trained troops.
But as a panic producer amdhg
civilians it is highly effective
Some experts figure one bomb" of
phosgene would produce more
panic and fear among civilians
than 100 actual explosive bombs.
The stuff is a simple combina
tion of chlorine—the purifier you
get in drinking water in minute
quantities—and carbon monoxide.
It is easy to compress into a
liquid, and upon release becomes
a gas.
Slight concentrations smell like
fresh-cut corn in a field. Heavy
concentrations smell like a silo
full of fermenting ensilage. When
a man smokes a cigaret in the
Hitler’s Invasion Fails
i
i
To Materialize; Attacks
Over London Lessened
GRISWOLD’S STORY
ACCEPTED BY ‘P.M.’
Oliver Griswold, publicity
agent for Government movies
at Washington, D. C.. a
native of Key West, informed
> friends here yesterday that
his story on the Island City
had been accepted by *'.P.
M.". the new New York
newspaper, for publication
in the near future.
The story will be illus
trated profusely with pic
tures of the city and sur
rounding territory.
Mr. Griswold spent about
a month in the city this sum
mer. on vacation.
W. L. BAGBY DIED -
I LATE LAST NIGHT
CONSTRUCTION HEAD PASS
ED AWAY SUDDENLY AT
PACKER STREET HOME
William L. Bagby, head of the
construction company bearing his
name, died last night at 11:00
'o’clock at his residence, 1015
Packer street. He was 47 years
! old.
The body is resting at Pritch
ard’s Funeral Home awaiting
word from relatives in Georgia
as to funeral services.
Mr. Bagby came to this city a
! little over a year ago and formed
the construction company and en
gaged in a general contracting
business. Recently he had been
successful in pushing to near
completion. six homes for local
residents on Avenue E.
HARD LUCK
1
LAUREL. Neb—A foul hall,
hit bv Pitcher Earl Miner, curved
over the bleachers, out of the
baseball park and through an
automobile windshield. It was ■
Miner's car.
presence of phosgene, he experi
ences a sharp metallic taste in his
mouth.
In an area as big as a room 10
feet square, a lethal dose of phos
gene is one-third of an ounce, if
the victim is exposed thirty
minutes. In higher concentra
tions, of course, it is quickly fatal.
Drops of watery material form in
lung tissues, stop oxygen, and
the victim suffocates.
It is well suited to use against
civilian populations also because
! victims would be likely to run or
exert themselves. The slightest
’exertion produces death almost
'immediately.
Phosgene is known to all mili
tary forces. The common gas
mask is one hundred percent ef
fective against it.
Military experts point to re
cent statements of the German
high command accusing the Brit
ish of dropping poisonous mate
rial in grain fields. They suggest
the Germans arc preparing to
use gas and are “justifying”
wholesale raids on London in ad
vance by accusing the British of
barbarous bombing of civilian
populations.
VPS3 PERSONNEL
MOVES INTO NEW
i BASE QUARTERS
FIRST MEALS TO BE SEBTED
TOMORROW; LT. SUTHEF
LING ANNOUNCES SPECIAL
MENU
Banacks and ©ffic*‘fV quarter,
at the Trumbo airfield oprnn
for occupation today and per
sonnel ->f air squadron YPS3 cz
busily engaged, thua? not ut ur
regular flight duty, m moving jt
effect.s from the naval statMn
proper to the new quarter*
| Approximately 15d mm sill
have moved into the new bniia
ings by evening today
Lt. E W. Sutheriing. cumaus
sary officer, announced that Tf*—
cial meals will be served tom*•-
row to the airforce to a sort of
“eelebi atnn event" on the occa
sion of opening of living quar
ters.
The menus for the three mr 11 ,
to be prepared and served a the
mess halls are printed herewith
Breakfast—Fresh fruit fried
eggs, fried ham. German-fried
' potatoes, hot rolls, bread, butter
coffee.
Lunch Hot soup, fried chicken
giblet gravy, creamed mashed
potatoes, vegetable dressing, but
tered peas, buttered cauliflower
tomatoes, lettuce and celery, ap
ole pie and ice cream hot corn
bread, bread. butter and terd tra
Supper Fried meat hntty
Spanish macaroni kidney bewr
fri*d potatoes, tomato*-*, celery
and lettuce, fruit jam. bread. *>d
tea.
The Budget Prob'.im
(EDITOR'S ROTE White w* A? Wudmmm
torn FMlure Sin in Wnm. m mm mfea. mm mmmßr
devoted to his co'uai *■ merhi —tm mm sow wm-zr
parties for a pro and-cor | iiirr ia and mm apa< mm at
and there will be no nhdxL
The DtMcnbc tn
By ROBERT L DOUGHTOW
Chairman. Committee On Way* Rad Nne tern at
Bapraianrati mi
WASHINGTON. Sept 1C
Since 1933 our public dett ba_
increased from S22(IOQ.CW>.tA to
543.000.11W1.0000 The S2I.*MRjM.-
000 increase represents an an
nual average deficit of about $3 -
000.000.000 for each of these ar*. -
en years
During the early part of th
penod the unparaUelied depres
sion with which we found oar
selves afflicted had so reduced
U.S.S. NOA LEFT
FOR NEW STATION
Destroyer USS Sou has left
Key Weft base far anew staging
according to wr.rd released by
Captain A. S. Carpmoer. com
mander of the Key West Patron
this moroing.
Ships m port this afternoon
are the USS King, just return
ed from neutrality patrol, aad
the destroyers Bainbndgr mud
Golds borough, the latter two be
ing on base operation duty this
morning.
USS Sands left this mornme
on neutrality patrol duty.
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