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The Key West citizen. [volume] (Key West, Fla.) 1879-current, September 17, 1940, Image 1

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Associated Press Day Wire
Service
For 60 Years Devoted to the
Best Interests of Key West
VOLUME LXI. No. 222.
1.1. Board Acts
To Allow Lower
Subdivision Bids
Clerk Sawyer Permitted
To Speed Up Sales Of
Key Properties; In
quiry Invited
The Internal Improvement
Board of Tallahassee, trustees of
all Murphy Lands not redeemed
under the terms of the original
act nor bought in at auction since
announced today that steps will
now be taken to speed up sales
of sub-division lands in Monroe
County.
The steps to be taken, accord
ing to the Board’s agent, county
clerk Ross C. Sawyer, include
permission given to Mr. Sawyer
to reduce the bidding price be
low the original rule applied to
the bids, which was one-quarter
of assessed valuation based on the
1932 assessment
Instructions sent Mr. Sawyer,
and now on file, allow him to go
over the subdivision lands on the
keys, and if he thinks it wise, to
lower the bas e bids to any rea
sonable rate, or to lump the
whole subdivision into one price
for bidding purposes at a lower
unit rate.
Mr. Sawyer stated this morning
that the new rule would affect
approximately twenty subdi
visions yet unsold, totalling ap
proximately 5,000 lots.
His suggestions as to lower
base bids would be sent to the
trustee for approval. Mr. Sawyer
stated. Inquiry on such lands in
Monroe County has been invited.
SCHOOLS IN COUNTY
HAVE 2136 PUPILS
COMPLETE ENROLLMENT
FIGURES REPORTED BY
SUPT. RUSSELL
Superintendent of Public In
struction Melvin E. Russell re
ported today that enrollment fig
ures at Monroe County’s schools
had reached over the 2100 mark,
setting a record for this county
over past years’ figures.
Complete enrollments as of to
day were as follows:
Key West Junior-Senior High
School, 731: Division Street
School, 520: Harris School. 406;
Douglass High School. 178; Doug
lass Grade School. 206.
Schools on the keys reported a
total attendance of 95. divided as
follow’s: 42 at Matecumbe. 31 at
the combined Tavernier and
Rock Harbor school and 14 at the
Marathon school. A colored
school at Marathon has eight
enrollees.
San Carlos School's registra
tion totalled 36. it w’as reported.
crimeTorecaster
USES THE ALMANAC
( By A Pre)
ASHEVILLE. N. C., Sept. 17—
The population of Asheville's
jail, like the tides, is largely con
trolled bv the moon, or so Jailer
V. G. Andrews figures.
“Maybe it’s the clear nights that
bring them out”, he says, “but I
can consult an almanac and tell
months in advance when the jail
will be crowded”.
A CAN OF CISCO PEP AT 15c MAY SAVE YOU A $15.00 VALVE GRINDING JOB. LOU SMITH AUTO SERVICE, PHONE 9153 OR 5. DUVAL AND DIVI9U|
She 2Cetj Meat Crtizeit
HOME GUARD WILL
•• • •
Companies To Be Formed
ASSEMBLE TONIGHT
Third meeting for the new’ly
formed Kev West Guard will get
under way tonight at American
Legion Hall promptly at 8:00
o'clock, officials of the organiza
tion announced this morning.
As stated last week, main con
sideration at the meeting tonight
will be formation of the hundred
odd members into companies.
Following completion of that
procedure, the companies may
hold first drill practice, it w r as
thought today.
Officials further stated this
morning that a city-w’ide spon
soring committee for the Key
West Guard is being formed to
be made up of representative
citizens in all lines of endeavor.
The list of membership of that
group will be released shortly.
County commissioner Wm.
Monsalvatge and city" council
man John Carbonell, together
with executive officer Julius
Stone of the Guard, were sched
uled to have a meeting soon to
discuss a WPA sponsorship pro
gram to obtain uniforms for the
Guard members.
Further enlistments in the or
ganization w’ill be taken tonight,
it was stated.
LACKS PATRONAGE
INDEPENDENCE. Kan. Be
cause it has not had a pupil for
14 years and there is only one
child of school age in the district,
the Buffalo Township school has
been sold at auction.
The Budget Problem
(EDITOR'S NOTE: While Jack Stinnett. AP Washing
ton Feature Service Writer, is on vacation, the space usually
devoted to his column is made available to the two major
parties for a pro-and-con presentation of an agreed list of
political subjects. Neither side has seen the other's articles
and there will be no rebuttal.)
The Republican View
By DANIEL A. REED
Member, Committee On Ways and Means, House of
Representatives
WASHINGTON. Sept 17—
Mor e red ink has been used in
the national bookkeeping under
the fewer than eight years of the
Roosevelt New’ Deal administra
tion than in all previous years in
the history of the Republic.
Should we be inflicted with
four years more of like spending,
extravagance and waste —with-
out including the extraordinary
expenditures now required for
national defense—the red ink
supply w’ould doubtless be com
pletely exhausted.
How we are now to meet the
demands for the necessary ex
penditures for increased military,
naval and air defenses is a prob
lem imposed by law on the House
of Representatives, to which is
given the taxing power. It is one
that appears well nigh insoluble.
The New Deal financial policy.
Naval Station Softball Team
Benefit Dance
Friday. Sept. 20, 10 till ?
Pena’s Garden Of Roses
PRIZES
Admission 50c couple
THE SOUTHERNMOST NEWSPAPER IN THE U. S. A.
LEAGUE NOTES
RISE IN STATE
TAX STRUCTURE
PER CAPITA COST OF GOV
ERNMENT RISES FIVE
TIMES HIGHER THAN POP
ULATION INCREASE
<Spwl*l to Tfce Cltisea)
JACKSONVILLE. Fla., Sept.
17 ~Per capita cost of state gov
ernment has increased five times
as fast as the State’s population
during the past five years, ac
cording to a statement released
here today by the Florida Tax
Revision League.
According to the League’s
I statement the per capita cost of
state government has increased
84 in the past five years,
whereas, the State’s population
has increased only 17% in the
same period.
The League’s figures are based
on state government cost of $16,-
475,552, for 1934, figured against
the 1935 State Census which gave
the State’s population as 1,606,-
842; and the 1939 state govern
ment cost of $35,470,500 figured
against the recent Federal Cen
sus which gives the 1940 popula
tion as 1.877,791.
“It should be borne in mind”,
says the League, “that this $35,-
470.500 is the cost of state gov
ernment only. Complete figures
on the cost of county, city, and
other local units of government
are not available. The total cost
of state and local government
has been estimated to be $123,-
000.000—approximately $65.00 per
capita.”
The League says: “There is a
generally accepted principle in
business that as the volume in
creases. the cost per item de
creases in direct proportion. This
principle apparently does not
apply to the cost of government
in Florida. In 1934, state gov
ernment cost $10.25 for each man.
woman, and child—white and
black. In 1939 this cost had in
creased to $18.89 per person—an
increase of 84%, while popula
tion was increasing 17#.
“One of the major problems
confronting the legislature when
it convenes next April will be a
general revenue fund deficit of
several million dollars. A care
ful study of the excessive in
crease in the cost of government
in recent years, with a view of
injecting economy and efficiency,
w r ould aid materially in solving
this problem.” .
if such a policy exists at all. is
mainly confined to spending and
borrowing with never a thought
of the morrow.
Even taxation to meet the in
terest on the national debt be
comes an almost insupportable
burden upon the American peo
ple.
• • •
The result of continuous an
nual deficits, totalling more than
twenty-one billions of dollars for
the seven New Deal years from
March 1, 1933, to March 1, 1940.
w ith an increase in the national
debt of an even greater sum, is
to leave our financial structure in
a deplorable state of weakness at
a time of crisis and when the na
tional economy should be on a
sound basis and a source of
strength, rather than weakness.
Although President Roosevelt
has demanded enormous new
taxes and has called upon the na
tion to make every sacrifice in
support of urgent national de
fense needs, not a dollar of
economy has been enforced upon
the sprawling peace-time bu
reaucracy built up by the New
Dealers since 1933. Every Federal
boon-doggling project continues
(Continued on Page Four)
KEY WEST, FLORIDA, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1940
NORTHROP WANTS TO KNOW WHY
*•* * • • m * m
Would Be Willing To Contribute To Such A Move
WE CANT HAVE A CITY MANAGER
“Have you ever suggested to
the voters of Key West the advis
ability of looking around for a
City Manager for their city?”
Charles W. Northrop, new-citi
zen of this city, asks this question
in a letter to the publisher of
The Citizen, sent from Coral
Gables where he and his wife are
staying for a short vacation.
The question awakened mem
ories of the New City Charter
drive instituted by the Lions
Club and later turned over to a
Citizens’ Committee. In answer
to Mr. Northrup. the suggestion
of a City Manager was thorough
ly covered by that committee at
the time changes in city govern
ment here were being discussed
and acted upon and has long
been advocated by The Citizen.
Many members of the Citizen’s
Committee recalled today how
the tide changed from that rad
ical move to one of more con
servative nature in the effort to
CRIMINAL COURT
TO HEAR MOTION
HILTON'S ATTORNEY WILL
PRESENT PLEA FOR NEW
TRIAL TOMORROW
Clerk C. Sam B. Curry, of
Criminal Court, stated that the
recessed session of that court will
be held tomorrow morning as per
schedule, with attorney W. Curry
Harris, representing Alton Hil
ton, presenting a motion for a
new’ trial to Judge W T m. V. Al
bury.
Court w'ill assemble at 9:00
o’clock.
Hilton was found guilty of a
statutory' offense by a jury’ Fri
day of last week. He is a sergeant
in the local Marine Corps.
Also on the docket is sen
tencing of Frank Sosin, found
guilty last week of an assault
charge.
POUCE OFFICIALS
RETURN TO POSTS
After a very enjoyable vaca
tion. Police Chief Ivan Elwood
and Sergeant Joe Kemp returned
to the city yesterday’.
While away they visited brief
ly in Columbus, Ga.. Anderson
and Dothan. Alabama and Hot
Springs. Arkansas.
NEITHER RAIN, NOR STORMS, NOR NIGHT
* • • ••• • *
Army Officers Train Birds To Return Home In Darkness
••• ••• •••
CAN STOP OUR PIGEONS IN THEIR RIGHT
(AmuH'iatfd Prfmt Prilarr NrnTrr)
OCEANPORT. N. J.. Sept. 16.
—Climaxing months of effort,
army officers at Fort Monmouth
have developed a unique strain
of night-flying carrier pigeons.
Experiments with night fliers
were started shortly after World
War I. But only during the last
10 years has there been emphasis
on their training.
When the first experiments
were started at Fort Monmouth,
the trainers were working against
the accepted theory that homing
pigeons will roost upon the ap
proach of darkness and will not
fly if released after dark.
One of the white lofts was set
aside for the night fliers. At
dusk every' day, the birds were
released and allowed to return
home. Gradualy. the distance
they flew* was increased.
Then the birds were taken
short distances from the left in
complete darkness. Some shot
straight for home. Others were
bewildered.
The weak were weeded from
the strong and the latter bred
more night birds.
By 1930, successes were more
modernize the legislative form of
government here which has held
for many'years.
Mr. Northrup goes on to say:
“Advertise for a Manager and
get the best. Key West has so
much to be given tourists and
’Old Codgers*, like myself, that it
is a crime to not bring out the
good Key West has.
“Could we not get a vote from
the people and have someone
take the lead and pump the of
ficials and all other employes
full of ‘good common sense* for
the betterment of ’One Grand
City—Key West'?
“I will subscribe ten dollars a
month for six months to get this
thing started. We should find a
Manager who has done the thing
up brown for other cities, pro
viding he can be induced to take
over the management of our city
and further providing the people
agree on that move.
“I don’t know how' to proceed
in the matter, but I would be one
of the first to follow the leader in
the matter of better government”
Mr. Northrop and many others
who have witnessed the workings
of city governments under a City
Manager arc apparently in accord
on this subject. They recall that
hundreds of cities throughout the
nation have changed over to that
form and have reaped, as a gen
eral rule, immense benefits.
On the other hand, there are
those in Kev West that ask how
in the world any one man could
possibly “pull Key West back up
to financial solvency” from the
depths in w’hich it is now foun
dering. The City Council at pres
ent is struggling hard with many
problems, they point out. and
have arrived at a practical stale
mate. Whether or not a City
Manager could have done better
is a Question that neither they
nor anyone else, as far as The
Citizen could learn, can possibly
guarantee.
U.Si. LAWRENCE
COMES INTO PORT
Destroyer U.S.S. Lawrence, es
corting ship for the submarine
Sea Raven, now’ on experimental
operations in Kcv West waters,
came into Kev West harbor this
morning. U.S.S. Humphreys is
still out with the Sea Raven.
Other shins of the Key West
Patrol in port today w r ere the
U.S.S. King. U.S.S. Bainbridge,
destroyers, and U.S.S. Golds
borough, converted seaplane ten
der. according to Cant. A. S. Car
pender. commander of the pa
trol.
frequent than failures. The birds
were actually homing from 20-to
-60 miles away.
Today night fliers released in
complete darkness will shoot un
erringly for their home loft. Il
luminated at first by the soft
glow of red lights, the lofts now
are in total darkness.
Instinct alone guides the birds.
Captain I. L. Kaufmann, signal
officer, says.
Here is a typical night's train
ing:
Late in the afternoon. 10 or 15
birds will be taken in a mobile
loft to some point on the Jersey
coast.
After dark, the birds are turn
ed loose.
The trainer carefully notes the
time the birds are released to the
minute so that by checking on
their arrival time at the home
home loft he is able to determine
the speed of the pigeons’ flight
Some have been known to fly
60 miles an hour. In fact, signal
officers say, night fliers, sup
posedly because of their fear of
darkness, are faster than day
messengers.
YOUNG MEN
MAY BECOME
AIR CADETS
JAYCEES AND LEGIONNAIRES
SPONSOR CAMPAIGNS TO
ACQUAINT ALL INTEREST
ED MEN WITH FACTS
Applications for appointments
as Flying Cadets are now avail
able to young men of this com
munity between the ages of 20
and 27 years of age.
Blanks can be obtained from
Joe Allen, president of the Key
West Junior Chamber of Com
merce at The Citizen office or
from Harold Russell. Post Com
mander or W. H. Reardon, ad
jutant, of Arthur Sawyer Post
Nio. 28. American Legion.
Candidates who are accepted
for flying training in the Army
Air Corps are enlisted as “fly
ing cadets.” Flying cadets wear
distinctive uniforms which dif
fer from those worn by officers
or enlisted men of the Army, and
they are quartered in separate
barracks provided for them.
The pay of the flying cadet is
$75 per month. In addition there
is a ration allowance of SI.OO
per day while undergoing train
ing. Necessary uniforms and fly
ing equipment are furnished
them without cost. Transporta
tion is furnished to flying cadets
from the place of enlistment to
the civil flying school at govern
ment expense.
Candidates for appointment as
fying cadets must be unmarried
male citizens of the United
States who at tHe time of applica
tion have reached their twentieth
but have not reached their twen
ty-seventh birthday.
In addition to application
blanks the above named persons
are distributing to candidates full
particulars contained in a book
let prepared under the direction
of the Adjutant General of the
Army.
‘Daddy’ Fagg Enters
131st Year Of Caring
For Florida Orphans
JACKSONVILLE. Sept 17
On Sunday, September 15. Mar
cus C. “Daddy” Fagg. state
superintendent of the Children’s
Home Society of Florida, started
his thirty-first year of caring for
the homeless, orphaned and “less
chanced” Children of Florida.
During the past thirty years
under “Daddy” Fagg's direction,
the Home Society has extended
its aid and care to over 40 thou
sand abused, mistreated, desert -
ed, afflicted, unwanted, home
less, helpless and needy chil
dren from every county, city and
town in the entire state, these
children being from just a few
hours old to 16 years of age, and
of every creed and belief.
Almost three million dollars
has been voluntarily contributed
to the Society by thousands of
men. women and children—in
dividually and through churches,
schools, lodges, civic and wo
men’s clubs, young people's or
ganizations. 'business firms and
other groups in every section of
the state.
| The number of children cared
for has increased from 90 in 1910
;to an average of practically 2000
| children annually.
The income has increased from
[ less than S4OOO 00 in 1910 to an
average of $150.000 00 annually.
The number of givers has in
creased from 157 in 1910 to prac
tically 50 thousand annually.
In 1910 the Home Society own
ed no property, and was crowd
ing its children into one rent
free cottage in Jacksonville. In
1940 the Society owns free of any
indebtedness four delightful Re
ceiving Home properties in Jack
sonville, Pensacola. Miami and
Lakeland, with a daily capacity
of 250 children, and which serve
nearly 2000 children each year.
Three workers, an elderly
matron, a colored cook and
“Daddy" Fagg composed the en
Storms Halt
Invasion; Air
Raids Fiercer
SLOW DOWN-THAT
School Children On Romdr
KID MAY BE YOURS
TAMPA. Sept 13 YFNS* —Dur
ing the next eight months mart
than 500.000 children, or mutt
than one-fourth of our popuia
tion, will be traveling Vo and
from school in every r immiaMT
and crossroads in Florida. Asher
Frank. director of the Fiona*
Safety Council, -aid today
’ Many of these children ail
be tmv tots entering a near asMi
a strange world Heretofore tto-v
have had their mothers guarding,
them from danger, but now they
are on their own resources and
their minds are confused by a
multitude of new experiences
Dtivits should be extra earrfu
during these days because chil
dren will be careless and 0
Man Accident will not respect
their tender years
“In the past five y ears no: a
school child has been killed dat
ing school hours, and and fwn
driver will hear the thnughT m
mind that one of these children
might be his. this splendid record
can be keot unbroken during <*>
school year".
< Special <• The fit
tire staff of workers m 1910. Now
the Society has a staff cf 45
trained and experienced workers
that cover the entire state
In 1910. two or three nrw>-
papers made occasional refer
ence to the work of the Society
Now practically every newspaper
in Florida is a booster for the
Society and its important work.
Only 52 out of the more than
40 thousand children aided have
passed away during the past 39
years, giving the Florida Society
the lowest mortality rate m the
entire nation.
This wonderful record has been
made possible through the serv
ices of nearly 109 of Florida’s
most outstanding physicians
dentists and the fine co-opera
tion of hospitals in all parts of
the state, all these services being
given without compensation
One of the Society s greatest
contributions has been the draft
ing and securing the passage of
welfare legislation during the
past three decades, such as the
juvenile court law, child labor
law, compulsory education law,
wife desertion bill, appropriation
for the State Industrial Schools
for girls and boys at Ocala and
Marianna, the Florida Cnppied
Children s commission the State
Welfare Board act. in all af which
the Home Society has had an ac
tive part.
The Society's greatest and oust
far-reaching service however,
has been in securing thousands af
the finest adoptive and foster
family homes lor thousands of
utterly n cane less, helpless and or
phan children and the urmgmg
of lasting joy to thousands of
childless couples all over the
state. Many of these lirwr
wards are now filling pat io af
honor and distinction b this and
other states
This whole job has bees done
(Continued on Page Four,
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