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The Key West citizen. [volume] (Key West, Fla.) 1879-current, November 06, 1940, Image 4

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PAGE FOUR
FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT: The First Third-Termer In History
Threat Of War Led
To FDR’s Election
STORY BEHIND DEMOCRATS’ TRIUMPH RE
LATED BY AP’S MORGAN BEATTY
By MORGAN BEATTY, AP Feature Service Writer
WASHINGTON. Nov. 6.—Presi
dent Roosevelt guessed right in
1938 and won a third term in
1940.
The Republicans guessed wrong
in January', 1938, and lost in
1940!
That’s the conclusion of many
impartial observers. They base
it on the general theory that the
threat of war led voters generally
to support experienced President
Roosevelt despite the fact that he
ran in violation of the third-term
tradition.
The observers thumb back l
through 40,000 pages and almost j
three years of Congressional Rec- •
ord for their evidence.
The President guessed, on Jan- i
uary 3, 1938 (page 8, Volume 83, j
part one. Congressional Record,
75th Congress) that world trou- j
bles would be uppermost in the !
minds of American voters in No- j
vember, 1940, and NOT domestic
difficulties.
Wallace vs. McNary
Ten days later. Bertrand SnelL '
speaking for the Republican'
party (page 184. Volume 83, Con
gressional Record appendix. 75th
Congress), guessed exactly op- j
posite.
There were, of course, other j
strong undercurrents that helped
to spell victory for .the Demo
crats. Vice-Presidential candi
dates Henry' Wallace and Charles
McNary sort of cancelled each
other out in the critical western
farm states, prevented a Republi
can slide there.
New Deal publications may
have played a part. For instance, i
the Federal Works Agency’s j
“Millions for Defense” pictured
New Deal relief spending for de-;
fense in the depression years, |
well ahead of the national alarm
of 1939. “Technology on the
Farm.” by Henry Wallace’s de-j
partment of agriculture, outlined
a 10-year program further ac-'
centing help for the poorer farm- :
ers of the nation. And a report t
by the Securities and Exchange
Commission added up the hun- j
dreds of millions of dollars of
family holdings by the Fords,
di Ponts. Rockefellers, Mellons, ■
etc.
Then there was the relief vote, I
generally regarded as a reservoir
Qf strength for the party in
power, and votes from several
big city political machines, like
the Kelly'-Nash setup in Chicago,
and from the solid south.
But the big element still re
mains the threat of war.
Siarled in '37
The story of how the Demo
crats won begins with Christmas
week in 1937 Another economic
setback had the country by the
throat. Steel production had
dropped 70 per cent in a few
United Thank
Offering Collected
The fall ingathering of the j
United Thank Offering of St.
Paul’s church was held Monday
night after a short business meet
ing of the Woman’s Auxiliary in
the Parish Hall.
Mrs. £. J. Bayly, president.
called the meeting to order, and
opened with the auxiliary hymn J
and prayer. Reports from various
committees were read.
It was voted to have Mrs.
Thomas G. Price. Diocesan presi
dent of the Woman’s Auxiliary,
as guest speaker at the annual
Advent Social, December 10.
The date for the educational
meeting, at which Mrs. C. McA.
Wassell is scheduled to speak oni
China, will be announced later
by Mrs. Bayly, Christian Educa
tion secretary.
Mrs. Reba Sawyer, U.T.O. cus
todian, was in charge of the in- I
gathering and program. Mrs.
Wassell spoke on the U.T.O.
workers in China. Frances Mora
sang a solo and her mother, Mrs.
Josephine Mora, accompanied her
on the piano.
The offering will be presented
at a corporate communion. Sun
day, November 10. 7:00 a. m. A
social hour followed.
U.D. Of C. In
Meeting Thursday
Meeting of the United Daugh
ters of the Confederacy will bej
held tomorrow afternoon, 4:30
months. Automobile sales were
tobogganing. Business and gov
ernment were alarmed.
Suddenly two New Deal min
ions, Utility-fighting Bob Jack
son and general handy-man
name-caller Harold Ickes. launch
ed the Administration’s bitterest
attack on big business. Jackson
accused the nation’s tycoon’s of a
sitdown strike against the New
DeaL Ickes attacked the nation’s
“sixty-families.”
“Ah-ha,” said the experts, “the
President’s getting ready for an
! other attack on business. Ickes
| and Jackson paved the way. The
boss will follow up with the main
* onslaught in his speech to £on
i gress on the state of the nation.”
But the President surprised
j everybody, perhaps even Ickes
and Jackson. He made no attack
on big business on January 3. In
stead, he opened up with a care
fully-worded attack on aggressor
nations. He supported the other
democracies. He advocated “ade
‘quately strong self defense.” And
finally he appealed to business,
labor, and agriculture “to demon
strate national unity in a world
of high tension and disorder.”
He Saw War Clouds First
The Republicans waited 10
days, then sent Snell to the radio
for the official reply. Through
3,500 words, almost up to the
last paragraph of his speech,
Snell concentrated on the domes
tic scene—the “depression.” the
“11,000,000 unemployed,” the
$17,000,000,000 worth of Roose
velt public debt, the “hamstring
ing” reform laws.
Snell dismissed the cfouds of
war with one oddly-wortled sen
tence:
“Above all. we oppose the con
tinual preaching of war against
and hate among our own people.”
From then on out, the New
Deal marked time on domestic
issues, offered fewer and fewer
reforms, more and more big de
fense plans. Republicans multi
plied their attacks on spending,
extravagance, and in a final
splurge, took a business man to
head their party ticket in 1940
the one big business man who
had throughout the New Deal
championed business against “big
government.”
As war spread, the Republicans
supported defense and conscrip
tion, but charged the President
with a slow administration of de
fense, and insisted he was lead
ing the country toward war. Will
kie also talked up to the dicta
tors as the campaign swung into
its climax.
But all this came late.
The margin of Roosevelt vic
tory was established in 1938 be
cause he saw the war clouds
first.
St. Paal’s Sponsors
Bingo Party
Card and Bingo party will be
held in the Parish Hall tomorrow
evening at 8:00 o'clock for the
benefit of St. Paul’s Church.
Prizes will be awarded and re
freshments served.
Council P.-T. A.
Meets Tomorrow
Mrs. M. L. Russell, president,
announced today that a meeting
of the Monroe County Council, j
Parent-Teachers Association, will
be held tomorrow afternoon.
Thursday, at 3:00 o’clock in the
Division Street School audi
torium.
MUSICIANS SEEK
CHARTER QUOTA
Musicians of this city are urged
to join the newly organized Musi
cians Protective Association. Lo
cal No. 202. American Federation
of Musicians. • before November
23 as that is the date set for the
closing of the charter.
After that date the initiation
fee will be considerably higher,
according to an announcement by
the Executive Committee. Musi
cians are requested to contact
either John Pritchard or Ygnacio
Carbonell.
o’clock, at the home of Mrs. Ross
C. Sawyer. 523 Eaton street
All visiting daughters are cord
ially invited to attend.
Choice Of American People
f§§PtfilißiF z < v’s-Sl -
I . P <Hf I
FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT
Chronology Of Roosevelt Administration
*
(AMHociatrd Prrs** Feature Srrilrr)
Congress has passed some 5,300'
bills in seven and a half years of
"the Roosevelt Revolution"—a
turbulent, precedent - smashing
era of legislative and administra
tive activity.
1933
Roosevelt inaugurated; vows
war on depression. . .Banks clos
ed by Presidential edict. . .Con
gress grants FDR dictatorial pow
ers over money. . Congress legal
izes 3.2 beer. . .CCC organized to
enroll jobless youth. . .AAA set
up to control crop production. . .
TVA power project established
. . .FERA starts distributing fed
eral relief funds. . .Uncle Sam
starts making loans to home own
ers. . .Government insures bank
deposits. NR A gives government
control over industry-. . .PWA
launched to stimulate business
. . .U.S. recognizes Russia. . .
Prohibition repealed.
1934
Air mail contract cancellation
stirs tempest. . .Gold value of
i dollar reduced. . .SEC created
to regulate stock exchanges. . .
Recriprocal trade treaty program
inaugurated. . .FHA set up to
bolster home buying. . .Congress
tabs $500,000,000 to aid drought
sufferers. . .Railway mediation
board created. .-.Federal com
; munications commission created
. . .Senate rejects St. Lawrence
; waterway treaty.
1935
Holding company “death sen
tence” enacted. . .Supreme Court
kills NRA. . .National Youth
Administration established. . .
National Labor Board created. . .
Social Security measure enacted
. .Banking system remodeled,
shifting credit from bankers to
| Uncle Sam. . .Guffey coal bill
fixes wages and prices. Neutral
i ity act bans arms shipments to
belligerents. . .WPA work relief
created. . .Senate rejects adher
ence to world court.
1936
Supreme Court kills AAA. . .
Congress overrides 52,000.000,000
soldier bonus veto. . .Soil con
servation-domestic allotment re
places AAA. . .Roosevelt de
nounces “economic royalists” in
accepting renomination. . .Con
gress passes Rural Electrification
act . .Roosevelt-Gamer miss only
Maine and Vermont in record
smashing election triumph.
1937
1 Giant Bonneville dam power
THE KEY WEST CITIZEN
'project authorized. . .Congress
makes farm tenant loans. . .U.S.
Housing Authority created to
make loans for low cost homes
. . .Supreme Court upholds Na
; *.ional Labor Relations act and
Social Security act. . .Senate kills
President’s proposal to enlarge
Supreme Court.
1938
Crop “insurance act” passed.
. . .Wage-hour law goes into ef
fect. . .U.S. naval tonnage increas
.cd after Munich conference. . . 1
Civil Aeronautics Authority set
up. . .Congress approves soil con
servation and parity price pro
gram. . .Roosevelt “purge” of an
ti-New Deal Democrats fails. . .
Republicans win congressional
elections, see hope of 1940 vic
tory.
1939
House kills $3,000,000,000 spend
lend bill. . .Hatch act forbids
political activity by government
: employes.. .Neutrality act amend
itd to repeal arms embargo and
,provide cash and carry- plan. .
Army air corps expanded. . .
Congress passes government re
organization measure.
1940
! Roosevelt on cruise inspects
Panama canal defenses. . .Silent
on third term. . .Europe’s “all-
I out” war brings Roosevelt request
! for huge defense program. . .Big
Business Men Knudsen and Stet
tinius on defense commission. . .
Republicans Knox and Stimson
made cabinet members. . .Con
gress warns U.S. will fight to up
hold Monroe Doctrine. . .New
defense appropriations near $lO,-
000.000,000 mark. . .Plan two
ocean navy, 25,000 new warplanes
in two years. . .Congress passes
$918,000,000 farm bill.
Roosevelt, with overwhelming
convention delegate support, ac
cepts third-term nomination be
cause of “overriding public dan
ger”. . .FDR picks one-time Re
publican Henry A. Wallace, sec
retary of agriculture, as his 1940
running mate. . .Famed political
maestro James A. Farley quits
as chairman of the Democratic
national committee. . Edward J.
Flynn of New York selected by
committee as national chairman
. . .Wallace resigns as secretary
of agriculture to campaign for
tvice-presidency. . .The campaign
begins.
1936 NATIONAL VOTE
~
(By Associated Press)
WASHINGTON, Nov. 6.
American citizens divided their
1 5.647,117 votes in the presiden
tial election in 1936 as follows:
Roosevelt (Democrat) 27,476.673
Landon (Republican) 16.679,583
Lemke (Union) 882,479
Thomas (Socialist) 187,720
Browder (Communist) 80,159
Others 340,503
Electoral votes (531) were di
jvided as follows:
Roosevelt, 523.
; Landon. 8.
Liberty BaU.
Shines Tonight
t *
It’s rumored that Key West’s
400 are to be chosen from the
guests at the Liberty Ball, which
,is being sponsored by the Catho
lic Daughters of America in the
Rainbow Room of La Concha
hotel tonight, starting at 9:30
o’clock. So say the managing
committee of the Ball, and it re
mains for those ■who are plan
ning to attend this highspot so
cial function to discover just
1 what the expression means.
Mrs. William R. Warren and
Mrs. B. Curry Moreno have been
selected to welcome the guests.
Special arrangements have
been made to insure prompt serv
ing of refreshments and Gerry
Collins’ Orchestra, together with
the “surprise” master-of-cere
monies, will insure a merry night
of fun and entertainment.
Guests have been urged to
phone 318 before 6:00 o’clock to
night to make reservations for
tables at the Liberty Ball. This
| will insure against having to
stand and will enable a “com
fortable look” at the excellent
floor show all set to be present
ed.
SPEEDY BALLOON
LA JUNTA. Colo.—A toy bal
loon, inflated with natural gas,
was sent up by the chemistry
class of the La Junta High
School, just to see how far it
would float. It was found the
next day by Howard Mantzey, of
Dawn, Mo., a distance of 575
miles away, making the trip in
15 hour*.
HAROLD THOMPSON
RITES FOR FRIDAY
DIED MONDAY MORNING IN
5 • *
NEW ORLEANS; WAS 38
YEARS OLD
Funeral services for Harold
Thompson. 38, who died in New
Orleans last Monday morning,
will be held Friday afternoon,
at 4:00 o’clock from the residence
of his brother, Clarence Thomp
son. 1414 Newton street, to
Fleming Street M. E. Church.
Rev. W. R. Howell will offi
ciate at the services. Lope?
Funeral Home is in charge of ar
rangements.
Surviving Mr. Thompson, be
sides Clarence, are two other
brothers. Claude, of Key West,
and Philip, of Fall River, Mass.,
and three sisters, Mrs. John Car
bonell, Jr., Mrs. Frank Jolly and
Mrs. John Pittman, of this city.
Pallbearers at the service will
be Benjamin Saunders, James
Singleton, Robert Knowles. N. B.
Shannahan, Richard Knowles
and John Spencer.
NEW RESTAURANT
OPENS TOMORROW
Key West’s newest eating es
tablishment, The Beachcombers
Restaurant, opens* tomorrow at
109 Duval street, under the man
agement of ftfe-s. E. E. Poor and
Mrs. Emma Corrigan.
Both of these ladies are well
known to Key Westers. Mrs.
Corrigan will be remembered by
the old timers as she and her hus
*band operated four restaurants in
Key West during the World War
and all were popular for their
good food. She will be in charge
of the kitchen and all food served
at the Beachcomber.
Mrs. Poor was here with the
Sutton Line tw'o years ago and
operated the house boat at Dry
Tortugas. She liked Key West
well enough to return this year
and start in her own business.
Everything at the Beachcomber
will be homecooked, including
the pastries.
NAVARRO SELLS
G.E. APPUANCES
Of special interest to ladies of
• the city is the announcement in
today’s paper that Navarro. Inc.,
corner Southard and Duval
street, is now carrying a com
plete line of General Electric
appliances.
Navarro is now the exclusive
General Electric dealer in Mon
roe County and has a splendid
display in the showrooms on the
Duval street side of the building,
The new dealer will feature a
complete line of electric re
frigerators and the famous Hot
Point Electric Stoves.
WILLKIE SENDS
CONGRATULATIONS
(Continued from Page One)
states north of the Mason-Dixon
line last night were wiped out in
surprising tactics that found
usually Republican rural districts
recording practally even totals
for both candidate, to allow the
cities to settle the issue.
Surprise of the election waJ
the gain, now apparent in the
House of Representatives for the
Democrats. On the face of late
returns, that party will gain ten
new seats in the lower house.
The Senate is still controlled by
the Democrats by a large ma
jority.
Roosevelt carried the industrial
east states, including New York
and Pennsylvania, the solid
south, as usual, jumped to the
far western states and was run
ning close in bordering states.
Willkie’s strength was mainly in
the mid-west farming areas.
,
HIGH-WIRE EXPERT
RECOVERS
BALTIMORE. Md—Joe Cher
bock. the high-wire walker who
fell while performing at the
Shrine circus here last November
and was critically injured, has
recovered sufficiently to rejoin
his former outfit In the fall h£
dislocated both arms, fractured
a leg. suffered numerous cuts and
bruises to his head and face,
and other assorted injuries. He
was in a local hospital for almost
nine month*.
ITCH.;?
U the FIRST bottle at Imperial Lottos
fail* to satisfy in the rel(tf of itrhias
agony of Eczema. Radi. Tetter. ShUihs,
Ringworm. Toe Itch, money returned.
Simply repeat Imperial Lottos aa seed
ed while nature helps heat
SERVICERS PLAN
i FOR NEW SEASON
MOVE TO ENTERTAIN VXSI
TORS; WILL ENTER ARII
- PARADE
,
With the season about to opes
the members of the Stone Church
Service Club made extensive
plans for the entertainment of
visitors, who, each year, attend
the meetings and take active
part in the program of the or
ganization.
I The program committee ar.
j nounced the first of a series of
programs to be presented next
Tuesday evening in the farm at
a patriotic program with a geak
1 er and musical numbers to r unu
1 out the program. Heads o. tnc 1
various branches of the en-jsted
service will attend as s|. -cu*.
guests of the club.
1 The club voted to enter a .oat
in the American Lcgtou A rus-
Itice Day parade nt. .wood y.
George M. Gray, annual win
ter visitor and member at tne
club, was appointed by the .nan
to contact the Art Center i an
effort to secure a welcome
! to be placed in the Chamb r at
Commerce room inviting visi
tors to the activities of the club
CLASSIFe COLUMN
Advertisement* malar this land
will be inserted in me Citiaen ms
the rate of one-cent (lc) a were
for each insertion. out the mini
mum for the first inaartinr in
every instance is twenty five
cents (25c).
Advertiser* snould give thaw
slraat address as well as thaaz
telephone number if they desire
results.
Payment tor classified adver
tisements is invariably in ad
vance, but regular advert sen
with ledger accounts may have
their advertisements charged
WANTED
; WANTED —A chance to bid cm
your next printing order. The
Artman Press. maylf-tf
PICTURE FRAMING
PICTURE FRAMING. Diplomas;
antique frames refinished. Sign
painting. Paul DiNegro. 614
Francis street octl2-lroo
FOP SALE
SIGNS—“For Rent". “Rooms Far
Rent”, "Apartment For Rent",
“Private Property. No Tres
| passing”. THE ARTMAN
PRESS. nov2s-tf
OLD PAPERS FOE SALE—
Three bundles for 5c Tue Citi
zen Office. nov2s-t t
I __
$175 CREDIT MEMORANDUM
on any Chrysler product, far
quick sale. $75 cash, ar will
I trade, what have you? 11N
Grinnell street novd-lark
ALL OR HALF INTEREST m
Beautifully Furnished Rooming
House, located four blocks from
downtown. Write Box X. co
The Citizen. novS-3t
ALL OR HALF INTEREST m
Beautifully Furnished Rooming
House, located four block? from
i downtown Easiest terms pas
sible. Write Box X. co TV-
Citizen. novS-h
.
PERSONAL CARDS. UTS par
100. THE ARTMAN PRES*
TYPEWRITING PAPER Mt
Sheets, 75c. The Artman Preaa
■arlltf
HOTELS
BRING YOUR VISITING frwodß
m need of a good night's real
to THE OVERSEAS HOTEL
Clean rooms, enjoy the homey
atmosphere. Satisfactory rates
sy Weming St aprH-tf
DR. A. IL MORGAN
CHIROPRACTOR
Offices Now Located Xu Tha
Page Building
MONROE THEATER
Wm. Boyd—M Rambeau m .
SANTA FE MARSHALL
CROSS COUNTRY jOtfAMCT J
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER L IMB
HAD LONG WAIT
RUT PUT ON MG
the da m at a adaaa-wadAag
with a large cam H* apuaae
BiNCO CARD PAITT
PARISH HALL
Jackjr It ran—Mama James m
TOMBOY
aka
COMEDY ad
TRY IT TODAY—
CUBAN COFFEE
am SALE AT ALL GROCERS
JOB HUNTING :
•I AM Urndt
do All j
■ff RBd4r. mam
flovoicalij. and witk
the beat of wurkmmm
sfaip. Call SI far mm
RAPID SERVICE
REASONABLE PRICES
FREE ESTIMATES
THE AKTMAN PBESS
PHONE Si
TWO— j |
Opt your eyes
TO BEAUTY!
TV.~i.fr r •
la soast * ro as immmmai
tarn la aaahr a tear mmm.
ymmyuw cam

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