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The Key West citizen. (Key West, Fla.) 1879-current, December 09, 1941, Image 1

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A*ociated Press Day Wire
Service
For 61 Years Devoted to the
Best Interests of Key Wert
VOLUME LXII. So. 292.
WRECKING TUG
LEAVING EOR
PEARL HARBOR
Willett May Depart Te~
day; To Clear Harbor
At Hawaii Of Wreckage
Fron. Jap Attack
The wrecking tug Willett mar
Key Wml today lor Ptul
Harbor, scene of the devastating
surprise Japanese attack Sunday
afternoon.
Observers believe that tha tug
witt be ordered to clear the har
bor at Hawaii si wreckage caus
ed by the surprise air and naval
blits.
The wrecking tug, for many
years a familiar sight in Key
West waters, is being piloted by
Capt. Edward Mumford and
Chief Engineer Frank Sheppard.
Officers were busy manning
tha vessel with a volunteer crew
this morning.
WAR CALL MADE
BY RED CROSS
KEY WESTS QUOTA CALLS
FOR THREE THOUSAND
DOLLARS
Prof. Horace O'Bryant, chair
man of the Key West Chapter,
American Red Cross, is in re
ceipt of the following telegram
from Norman H Davis:
“Again the American Red
Cross is called upon to serve our
nation in war. Both nationally
and locally we face vast and def
inite responsibilities for serv
ices to our armed forces and for
relief to distressed civilians. To
provide essential funds, Red Cross
today is launching a campaign
for war funds of minimum of
Fifty Million Dollars. The Presi
dent will issue on Friday a proc
lamation supporting this appeal.
Your chapter quota is . $3,000.
Chapters may retain fifteen per
cent their collections for local
war relief expenditures. Chap
ters should at once devote full
efforts to raising their quotas in
shortest possible time. Please
report action taken. We roust j
not and shall not fail”.
MORIfSALES MADE
UNDER MURPHY ACT
The state of Florida disposed
of 33 more parcels of land in
Monroe county, Ross C. Sawyer,
county clerk, revealed today.
There was only ne competi
tive bid for the property which
was sold under the provisions
of the Murphy Act, enacted
four years ago.
The sum of $Ol7 will be for
warded to the state in return
for the sale of the paroles, which
were appraised at 25 per cent of
the 1932 assessed valuation,
plus the cost of the sale.
Negotiations were made
through Sawyer, who is also act
ing agent for the state.
SEEK NAMES OF
NEEDY CHILDREN
Key Westers who know of un
derprivileged children deserving
of sharing in Lions Christinas
Partv should report them to Mrs.
Eva Warner at City Park between
hours of 3 to 6 in the afternoon,
according to President John Cos
tar t
Lions are requesting all Key
Westers having broken or old toys
to call John Simone. 298. as many
more articles are needed to make
the affair a success.
(Extxztn
THE SOUTHERNMOST NEWSPAPER IN THE U. S. A.
One Way To Get Your Home Decorated, Let Dad Do It
I '~- v '
I. It's all so simply to fix ap
for Christmas. Decorations should be
hand-made and homey Women, tem
peramentally, are hist too prim to do
the job.
U. S. HEALTH OFFICIALS
WARN: FLU ON THE MARCH
By ALEXANDER R. GEORGE
AP Feature Service Writer
WASHINGTON. Dec. 9.—Flu is on the march again. Sb health
officials, mindful of the savage onslaughter of the mysterious malady
during the World War. are keeping a wary eye on the situation.
The number of cases being reported to the United States Public
Health Service is running almost three times as high as a year ago
when the winter wave developed!
into the most extensive epidemic
since 1929. There were 2.308 new
cases reported for the week end
ing Nov. 8 compared with 787 for
the similar period last year.
If the influenza curve should
rise at the rate it did last win
ter when a peak of 383,000 new
cases for the four weeks ended
Jan. 25 was reached, the out
break probably would be the
largest since 1920.
Earlier this year a few doctors
and bacteriologists warned of the
possibility of an epidemic similar
in scope and severity to the great
pandemic of 1918-1919. They said
last winter's epidemic which trav
eled eastward might get a foot
hold among war-weakened Euri
pean peoples and return in more
virulent form to this country-
So far. however, there is no in
dication of anything hitting us
comparable to explosive World
War outburst of the disease
when between August, 1918. and
June, 1919, there were an esti
mated 25.000.000 to 27,000.000
cases and more than 500.000
deaths from influenza and pneu
monia in this country.
No widespread outbreak has as
yet developed in Europe. The
cases in the United States this fall
have been mild and the wave
quite localized. Mpre than 1.300
of the 2.308 new cases reported for
the week ending Nov. 8 were in
Texas which for several months
has been accounting for some 40
per cent of the cases. * . ]
Since the vear 1500. world
wide influenza of great virulence
has occurred about four times in j
each century. The 1918-1919
sweep was the first of this cen
-1 tury so another may be about
j due. The concentration of mass
' es of men in training camps and
the heavy travel of civilians and
soldiers tend to complicate flu
control
Army medical officers, how
ever. see several favorable
factors now as compared with
1918. Trainee housing facilities
are better; a much lower death
rate from illness indicates a
healthier Army and the Med
ical Corps is prepared for
quick hospitalization and se
gregation of flu sufferers. Tha
Army has now become season
ed to camp life while recruits
ere not being inducted in
large groups as they were in
1911.
Even if there should be a
sweeping outbreak of severe
cases, medical men believe the
I various sulfonamide remedies for
iPPLaCB
! William Gargan—Edmund Lowe
FLYING CADETS
ALSO. COMEDY and SERIAL
PRIZE NITE TONIGHT
fl W m
■ ■'' 68®*;- M •: I
a*. ~ Jf r , #£*££& > Wtiiilsim
2. “The Christmas Wreath. Get a rape of eoa
wll table evergreen. Then . . . where’s that red
ribbon? Leave things alone. Son! Yes, the
white bells are pretty with that shiny stuff
But look few that ribbon.
pneumonia and strepticoccjc in
fections would curb the death
toll
Oldtirners still shudder when
they recall the speed and ferocity
of the 1918 assault Thousands
died within 48 hours after being
stricken. There was a critical
shortage of coffins in many cit
ies and headlines in New York
newspapers told of “the unburied
dead in Queens cemeteries".
Throughout the country schools,
churches and movies were closed;
football games called off.
The wearing of flu masks was
compulsory in some communities
and the mayor of St Louis clos
ed all non-essential business for
a week. In Chicago health au
thorities ordered the arrest of
persons not using handkerchiefs
when sneezing.
In 1918-1919 epidemic swept
into every continent, bowling
over Eskimos in northern
Greenland as well as natives
in tropical Tahiti. Surveys in
dicated half the population of
San Antonio, Tex. was at
tacked by the disease.
There were two odd angles to
(the 1918 outbreak in this coun
l tO*- Hie epidemic peak which
usually comes in midwinter or
later was reached in October.
It attacked a larger proportion
of young people than the mid
i dle-aged or the old, the heaviest
mortabty rate being among per
sons in the 25 to 29 age bracket
BIG SHOTS ARE THE
BEST DINER-OUTERS
II By tMoriitrl Pmnl
ALLENTOWN, Pa Dec. 9
William Klassen would rather
plan a meal for a United States
President than try to please the
average fussy diner—and he's
done both.
It s the lesser lights trying to
look important who make things
tough for a head waiter. Klas
sen concludes after 43 years in
which he's arranged dinners for
at least a million people.
He planned banquets for Theo
dore Roosevelt. William Howard
Taft. Woodrow Wilsoh. Warren
G. Harding and Calvin Coobdge.
Presidents and governors aren't
hard-boiled customers, says Klas
sen. You can place soup-to-nuts
before dyed-in-the-wool notables
and then relax.
NOTICE
BROADWAY MARKET
will be closed ell day
Thursday preparing for
GRAND OPENING on
FRIDAY MORNING in
NEW STORE.
KEY WEST, FLORID A, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 9. 1941
Electric Welding School
May Be Closed Unless
Enrollment Is Increased
The Kev West electric welding
school which offers free training
to defense workers is in grave
danger of being closed unless
there is an immediate and sub
stantial increase in enrollment
The local office of vocational
training for defense workers was
informed today that there is a
great demand for the machinery
in other cities.
Robert D. Dollev, state director,
disclosed today in a communica
tion received by Kev West Direc
tor E. J. Kerr tfrht the response to
the free vocational training class
es in other sections of the state has
been great and enthusiastic.
The letter further informed
Kerr, that unless Kev West takes
full advantage of the machinery
m use at the local school, he will
be compelled to remove it to a
city where there is a demand for
it. :
TEMPERATURES
Highest last Lowest
24 hours last night
Abilene ~ 57 30
Albany 40 30
Apalachicola 63 47
Atlanta 55 35
Boston 40 34
Buffalo 37 33
Charleston 58 40
Chicago 36 21
Cincinnati 46 33
Cleveland 35 30
Corpus Cbristi 56 43
Denver 56 25
Des Moines 38 24
Detroit 37 31
El Paso 58 36
Fort Myers 59
Galveston 59 52
Hatteras 62 46
Huron 33 20
Jacksonville 6i 43
Kansas City 45 26
KEY WEST >3 S3
Little Rock 57 27
Los Angeles 70 55
Louisville 46 28
Memphis 55 27
Miami 80 64
Mpls.-St Paul _ 25 16
Mobile 62 40
Nashville 53 29
New Orleans _ 61 51
New York 43 37
Oklahoma City 53 36
Philadelphia 48 36
Pittsburgh 40 30
Richmond 55 30
St Louis . . 44 28
Salt Lake City 42 22
San Antonio 56 35
San Diego 69 56
San Francisco 58 44
Sit Ste. Marie 32 25
Savannah 60 40
Seattle . 49 44
Tampa 68 55
Washington _l 55 37
Wiiliston 31 17
STEELS FALSE TEETH
CHICAGO—A burglar in the
home of R. C. Collins of this city
stole the false teeth belonging to
Mrs. Collins. 1
f-V ~ | 3 *B -
tf ,>"•
3. “Hare's tha place for tha wreath.
Bovoboy! Now, bow the h— did that
happen? The wife had butter on her
fingers when she handled that ham
mer. But everybody makes mistakes.
Director Kerr, today issued an
urgent invitation to all men of
Key West to avail themselves of
welding classes which are
j free to all
He pointed out that there is a
great demand for electric welders
jho are needed desperately in de
fense- industries. Instruction is
given by expert teachers, he
added.
The school is located at GrinneH
and Catherine streets, but applica
tions and information may pe. ob
' tamed at the office of Vocational
Training for Defense Workers on
the second floor of the county
court house.
Free classes are also offered in
typing, shorthand, business. Eng
lish and spelling. Sessions are
held every Monday and Wednes
day night from 7 to 10 at the High
School comer White and United
i streets.
SARASOTA UDC
| PLANS PROGRAM—
WILL PAY TRIBUTE TO JU
DAH P. BENJAMIN ON
JANUARY 22
!
SARASOTA. Dec. 9 (FNS).—
The Sarasota Chapter of the
J United Daughters of the Con
federacy will pay tribute to the
j memory of Judah P. Benjamin.
: Jan. 22. 1942
One of the least known epi
sodes in southern history is the
: flight of the Confederate cab
inet after tie fall of Richmond.
Yet throughout our state of
Florida there still live imme
diate descendants and close rela
tives of "crackers"’ who helped
to safety three Confederate cab
inet officers who chose to flee
through our state,
i One of these was Judah P
Benjamin, holder at various times
of three Confederate cabinet po-
I sitions.
With Governor Spessard L.
| Holland expected to attend and
all schools and business establish
ments closed for the day. the
Sarasota Chapter of the UJXC..
under the able leadership of Mrs.
Mary P. Brownell, will honor
the distinguished Confederate
.who so faithfully served the
-lost cause” when a suitable
’monument will be unveiled near
; the point where he set sail for
foreign shores after narrow ly
escaping from pursuing Union
troops.
Benjamin will be the first
cabinet officer so honored and it
is interesting to note that he is
• a Jew. The celebration comes
;at an opportune time and will
serve as Florida’s answer to
; those Hitter agents and would-be
American fascists who would
| split this country into groups
by hate-arousing lies and pro pa
‘ ganda. _ _ j
Hostile .Aircraft Reported
Sited Around New York
CLARIFY STORY
ON CVRRY HOUSE
Aa item which appeared
in the column. "Key West in
Days Gone By", provided
friends of T. Jenkins Curry
with ammunition for a bar
rage of good-natured "kid
ding".
The story culled from The
Cifizer files of 10 years ago
reported that one of the
tenement houses owned hp
Mr. Curry bad been acci
dentally set on fire while he
was attempting to rid it of
licks.
The copied. condensed
story which appeared in the
column, neglected to explain
that it was one of many
houses owned by Mr. Curry.
His friends pounced on this
omission r<i made consid
erable jest about hi having
ticks in his home.
The Citizen regrets that it
was the instrument in mak
ing Mr. Curry the butt of so
much raillery by those who
consider themselves his
friends.
CALL MADE FOR
' WOMEN TO AID
i DEFENSE WORK
trained office girls urg
ed TO REPORT TO HEAD
QUARTERS IN COUNTY
COURTHOUSE
| An urgent call few office worn
| en workers was issued today by
j Albert Mills, secretary of the
Key West home defense force.
All women and girls who have
ever had anv office training are
urged to report at the Home
Defense office on the second
floor of the county fourth oues
tomorrow. The department will
he open from 9 a. m. to 9 p. m.
j Stenographic experience is not
necessary The home defense
force is in desperate need of typ
ists. filing clerks, and those who
have had secretarial experi
ence.
An important meeting of the
Defense Council has been called
for 9 o'clock tonight at City i
Hall. The session will be held i
immediately following the meet
ing at w hich instruction wiA he j
given on methods to combat
chemical warfare
DEFENSE MEETING
CALLED TONIGHT
Albert Mills, commander of Ar
thur Sawyer Post No, 28. Amer
ican Legion, has requested all
members of the organization to at
tend the meeting to be held this
evening in City Hall, starting at
8:00 o'clock.
Meeting this evening will be of
interest to every member in the
part which the Legion is designed
, to play in the home defense pro
gram.
MORE THAN ONE WAY
OSWEGO. N Y.—The shot that
hunter Earl E Man waring fired
at the bunny missed —but the rab
bit dropped dead. The fleeing
quarry ran heaktnng into a tree
and broke its neck
FTCJDEFENSE
BUY
LWITEO
SJm STATES
IWtomci
HUNDREDS OF INTERCEPTOR PLANES naaram
TO TAKE TO AIR SHORTLY AFTER MSB
HOUR; REPORT THAT FUMES OF PEtSSB
NEL AT MITCHELL FELD HAVE KEB EVACU
ATED
from Tiroes Square, hal been mmoteritert.
big isfualaq buae at Mitchell Fuk
grounded. LaGaudu airport, lurguut a tear caroky tea
discontinued civilian service.
Air raid wardens oa I Tag Uteuaai an* ahaeq Me eeeaaaa
seaboard from Marne to Key Weet baas baea aMteeed m
their listening poets.
Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt and Mayas Fanßa 1 - -f
were ordered to disembark at Palm *jg mmm .
tinue their trip by autumn hill
ATTACK MADE ON PHIUPPBCS
MANILA. Dk — .
ftrees today.
Nicholsi Field, near Nbmtha was Caarnay eamAaask.
I EjMM| |Mf.i

These reports, be waver, could act be artnert
and the Philippine*.
lO.OOu-ton battleship Priilim■> Hamma h aha amtet
that 200 Allied vessels have been remsdsd ap tey me Apy
anete Navy.
ALL-CLEAR SIGNAL
SOUNDED AT 1:25
4 Hi
The ail-ctektr signal was
sounded m New York City at
IJ$ p. m.
No details wer given of the
I alarm called followmg reports
I that hostile planes were descend
| inf on the city
AIR RAID ALARM
AT LONG ISLAND
ids a —i•■a Prmwii
An air raid alarm has famen
sounded in Mim-oi* central city
of Long Island.
At 1 p. m. umdenufKd planes
believed to be thoae at m hos
tile power were repartee sighted
ISO miles from New York Har
bor
The 75.000 acridaen its! ami it
in the New York ansa ■*""*■ it
steel helmets, gas masks fit
shouldered rifles as a precau
tion
FORECASTS AEF
FORCE M ORIENT
An American Expeditionary
Jmn iB the Orient was foewsesi
'today by Senator Reynolds
chairman of the army aao nasal |
affairs committee
ATTENTION! 8
Members Arthur Suwyarl
Post, Mo. ZB, Anaarimn |
Legtee
You are requested to attend fj
die meeting at County Court jj
House tonight. 8:00 o’clock.
at am t a
Key Wart. Placid*, mm rta
mart aqaabie oiaaaSc a the
country; with sc aaceaui
rxrjrc of only 14* Fmhrwhe*
pei ce mi crvrs
NEW YORE SCHOOLS
York C*v near tin ~ * t reek
All Uu tin gfiiiiMpi as Wmmrnm
and fjmna— mat n
JAPANESE PLANES
FLY OYER PAR AHA
JLt]

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