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The Key West citizen. [volume] (Key West, Fla.) 1879-current, June 15, 1945, Image 2

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PAGE TWO
Ibr litg Hirst Citurn
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Ww<m Tk* • *ian Building
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ttMTt*tta hytf.m
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MdiUt tatlri: .
SH MiM anttirra. .ar.U ••* banka. raanlutlon*
„ , n.dl'.a, piwma, etc., Will lx
.. . 4 (■ • t ik r rata *f I# ccMte a lino.
* ~ , . i,., •.•••rtalamcMi hy chnrchea from
. rrvcMwa 1 > Im and ti• <1 are & cent* a line,
ft , . iua* la ■■ I*, n forum and Invite* din
fm llr>■ r # ag- ft ■ trnrf- and Duhjrrta of local or
~ , ~„i it will not publlah anonymoua
aggy-Aggafei
Oil
""""TSSini n rm cmxo
1 ****
1 MkMlal Ol—iy sad CHy Oov-
IWfANTHY DAY IS JUNE 15
On# ymmr ago. on June 15, 1944, the
t - ftr. and vf ritiseuM cooperated in the
<* . i.tatMitt of the first Infantry Dav. To
< mark* Ininntry Day 11.
Dunn* those 12 month* the war has
i!. fa deeiehre turn. Germany as a mili
t y p* s *r ha*, for the time being:, been
,1. (rafrtj Some day the full story of that
•Hue* cm**nt a ill be told. When it is told,
ima*-at. though not necessarily the
m* /iamonxM chapter in it will deal with
*. * v *r\. heroic, anonymous, unshaven,
tUpfimg. determined foot soldier, the in-
Mn itmu of Kill Mauldin's cartoons.
It * the infantrvrnan who takes the hill
,4 fcukh the hiU and dies holding it. It’s
th niantrvman who mops up and occu
i)iw It * the Infantryman who, when all
• ,r* are added up. wins the war.
And now he turns from one hemi
*t-a* rto another. On a hundred Pacific
m **. ath bayonet and grenade, he per
u*m the heartbreaking task, foot by foot,
.n, t in. h. that must be gone through
wt<- e thie country is made safe from the
iniffni people of Japan.
ii a an **• properlv thank him? He
tm (ton. he is in the millions; we cannot
knew *.i| his names. But we can remem
hp that he is the thin black line on the
map hat inches forward day by day—so
o t blood to the inch. We can remember
• ha? without him. the ordinary foot soldier,
• r -a on. We can remember that his
- . his death cannot be too solemnly
bjtH9ffd
CURRENCY
Among other casualties of the war are
• nrt,ry s\ at cm a of countries invaded
f t n, Naaua. These unfortunate nations
** . <kl of much of their currency.
atiMni- wn< overed in Germany contained
tndho* m the wealth of nations overrun by
bnrbnrtc Germans. A plan just an
oi * and -v the finance minister of France
. t *<i. <1 t clean up a financial mess,
dh th. ...me time write off the value of
held illegally outside the country,
t French currency of denominations
*♦*••• •• francs must be exchanged for
entirely nets ivstie. This ex
. hutnye i* te be universal. Elaborate ar
. •m* Ht* have been made to expedite
*i f with more than !00,(MIO employes
tinanca ministry handling the de-
To get new money for old, proper
Is oftftcstum must be made through iden
b * >•' ratu.n cards. This is expected to
■* f s* • into circulation or wipe out for
*>.* m*ie bv profiteers and those who
ppwfer*‘d through collaboration with the
other ftmutrMMi will lie forced to take
h torn. Millions of invasion money
- , redeemed, and much of the bogus
igfMMMj hmsed hy Japan, for example, will
h . ’• be w ritten off entirely. The Amer
**' dollar and the British pound sterling
tb only stable features in a world
jdh sha< up by a long war.
•niarpriai includes the right of
itwt iduals to go into business regardless
. -sd- Ngreementa. price controls and di
• isom f territory.
| ABUSE IS NOT AN ARGUMENT
Abuse is not an argument. That fs a
timeworn statement, and its truth has been
established by time, yet many of us for
get that circumstance and assume the atti
tude that the more we malign a person the
more forceful is our argument.
A few days ago. The Citizen received
a reprint of an editorial that attacked
Governor Caldwell because of his insis
tence in fattening still more the state’s
surplus bankroll at the expense of the tax
payers.
There was sufficient room in the
charge for the writer to prove his case
calmly by adding fact upon fact, but he
begins his article by declaring;
“The greatest tax hog that has gov
erned the State of Florida since this writer
came here 33 years ago is Governor Millard
F. Caldwell.”
Denouncing him as a “tax hog” im
plies that he intends to nuzzle into gov
ernmental pap, which everybody who
knows Governor Caldwell is aware is not
true. He will not profit by an increase sur
plus, and he has stated he has in mind post
war projects that the state intends to un
dertake.
The Citizen believes that there wa.4 no
necessity, in almost all cases, to increase
the tax burden in Florida, because the pub
lic’s pocketbook undoubtedly will become
leaner and leaner as the wartime boom
decreases, resulting in the tax burden be
coming more acute when there is no longer
“easy money”. But because that is the
Citizen’s attitude,, it would not resort to
abuse in striving to maintain it.
Besides, as we re4d the article, the
more we read the more confident we felt
that it was propaganda against a certain
matter that the governor has favored.
Briefly, the writer mentions some of the in
creased taxes, then devotes the remainder
of the article to opposing something that
the governor view's with favor.
It w r as said of Lincoln, particularly
during his debates with Douglas, that he
admitted the truths of so many things his
opponent said there appeared little oppor
tunity for his driving home what he wished
to say and, thereby, gain his point. But he
always did, and, while he was leading up
ta his climax, he spoke of his opponent in
a kindly vein, because Lincoln was one of
the many thousands who have said, “Abuse
is not argument.”
In a pompous statement by the pre
mier of Japan, he states that when his na
tion emerges victorious over the United
States, it will not demand unconditional
surrender, but will treat the fallen foe w’ith
consideration, dignity and justice.
SPRINGBOARD TO JAPAN
It was with the battle for Okinaw'a in
mind that Tokyo spokesmen told the Jap
anese people a day or two ago that the out
come of imminent developments “will de
cide the rise or fall of our country for cen
turies to come.” This is a statement ap
proximating truth.
It is also one w'hich deepens the sig
nificance of this campaign and which
causes hope to rise as bitter opposition is
overcome and conquest of the island be
comes an accomplished fact.
With the capture of Okinawa’s superb
Naha airfield and Chinen Peninsula and
the of remaining Japanese
forces into a limited area on the southem
end of the island, this campaign, after two
and one-half months of hard fighting, en
ters its final phase. As the military situa
tion exists at present, with American troops
holding all advantages, there seem to be
no serious obstacles to swift completion of
the task. It is easy to explain why the cam
paign has been one of extraordinary diffi
culty, why the losses have been heavy, why
the toe has fought desperately to the end. i
The explanation is found in General
MacArthur’s statement of his conviction
that Japan w'ill not learn from the lesson
of Germany, that it will not, sensing the
inevitability of defeat, surrender while it
is still possible to salvage something from
the wreckage. Japan, in the opinion of
General MacArthur, will quit only when
the main islands have been invaded, cities
have been destroyed and her economy and
military government have been brought
down in ruins.
Okinawa is an important stepping
stone on a long, hard road. And when the
final objective is in sight the road will be
come more difficult and the price of prog
ress higher. The rough terrain of Kyushu,
Shikoku and Honshu, defended by Japan’s
unused reserve of 4,000,000 soldiers, will
present to American arms the mast exact
ing test they have ever encountered on any
field of battle.
THE KEY WESTS CITIZEN
HI
YESTERDAY: Cynthia’s at
tempt* to pt acate the children
end get them to like Carey is
pathetic. Edris was the most dif
ficult of all to handle while Vera
simply stayed away from the
house as much as possible. The
office did not take much of her
time now and Cynthia did not
know what to do with herself.
• Chapter 12 i
|T WAS disconcerting not to be
* needed. Maud ran the house
beautifully and the children were
entirely independent with their
own concerns, their own plans.
She had been the charming visi
tor who came to dinner every
night but she did not know them
intimately. Cynthia told herself
this with a wry smile but it was
the truth and left her at loose
ends when she stayed at home.
So why should she?
There were other things she
could do. For one, she bought a
flock of gay prints and organzas
though it was so late in the sea
son and in spite of the huge bills
of the former month. She had
spent so much ’ time in street
clothes that now she lost her head
completely with the help of a
saleswoman anxious to thin her
6tock.
“Madame is so very slender.
She can wear the very young
frocks. Even a fourteen is a little
—we will try a twelve —”
“Heaven s, no!” Cynthia gasped.
"Fourteen is young enough. Thei
seams can be taken up.”
“But it is not the age, only the
size that is fourteen,” blundered
the woman, tactless, and Cynthia
murmured, “Oh,” deflated.
She had never cared about
looking young until now. She
hadn’t given youth a thought as
it slipped away from her and if it
had lingered longer than with
other women she knew, she had
not been unduly elated about it.
But now she wanted pretty things
and got them, too. The fitting
room mirrors were flattering ana
somebody called her “Miss.”
Vera was at home when the
boxes came. “Trousseau?” There
was a bite m her voice that didn’t
belone there-
KEY WEST IN
DAYS GONE BY
FROM FILES OF THE CITIZEN
OF JUNE 15, 1935
Rev. Shuler Peele, pastor of
the Fleming Street Methodist
Church, who has been ill with
flu in a hospital in Orlando, is
now improving, according to in
formation received 1 here today, j
Mr. and Mrs. Morris Holtsberg,.
who went to Gainesville to be |
present at the graduation exer-1
cises in the University of Florida, j
returned home yesterday, accom- 1
panied by their son, Herman, a j
member of the graduating class. I
Anthony Bragassa, who had
been enjoying a vacation at
Clopton Key, returned home yes-,
terday. j
Children of kindergarten
will be taken care of daily at the
Coral Isle casino by Mrs. Louisa
Knowles, of the FERA, it was an-[
nounced today.
Billy Pierce, son of Mr. and 1
Mrs. L. M, Pierce, of South
street, who recently graduated
from the School of Commercial
Art in William and Mary College
in Williamsburg, has. been
admitted into membership of the
National Society of American i
Artists, according to information j
his parents received today.
Flag Day Exercises were ob
served last night by local Knights
of Pythias in their hall on Unit
ed street. Addresses were made
by W. P. Archer, Frank 0..
Roberts and-A. D. Northrup. j
Mrs. Jack Maloney and son ar
rived yesterday from Miami to
visit relatives.
Edwin Trevor, manager of
Columbia Laundry, left yesterday
to visit in Islamorada and Miami, j
Today The Citizen said in an !
editorial paragraph:
"Perhaps there is nothing in a
name, but A. G. Luck, of Bridge- j
well, England, probably believes
there is. He insured his married i
daughter against the birth of 1
more than one child, and she had
twins.”
TODAY’S HOROSCOPE - j
A comparatively quiet position
in life is the lot or today’s native
unless supported by other good
•aspects; but there are ready
sympathies and perhaps some un
satisfied yearnings. There will ■
be a multitude of friends, at
tracted by the jovial, social na
ture. All together, it is a strong,
desirable life.
Cynthia said. "One would have
thought you were buying your
own last month."
Slow color came into Vera’s
lovely ivory skin that no sea or
sun could spoil and Cynthia was
instantly remorseful. They had
never quarreled or had mother
daughter enmity between them.
“I shouldn’t have said that I
hope you’ll show me your pretty
things after you’ve looked at
mine."
\/ERA was moody over the boxes
V spilling riots of color. She
didn’t oner to help with the
hangers but sat in a slipper chair
hugging her knees.
“That was a lousy thing for you
to do, mother."
Cynthia was so startled by the
odd, hoarse voice that she dropped
the dress she was holding up to
admire. “Vera!”
“Yes, it was.” Vera shrugged.
“You heard, but I’ll say it again.
A messy trick, then. It made us
all feel silly before people. One’s
own mother running off, getting
married to somebody we didn’t
know.”
Cynthia trembled. Suddenly she
was “having it out” with Vera
who more than the others had
seemed to take the debacle with
composure. Vera was now taking
her to task.
“It was a selfish thing to do.
But you’ve always been selfish.”
Cynthia waited a moment be
fore she said, “Why selfish? It’s
my life. It hasn’t interfered with
yours in any way. Or with the
others.” She ignored the “always.”
It was too ridiculous.
Faint derision touched Vera’s
lips.
“Don’t you think so? You’re our
mother. What you do affects us
more or less.”
“And how did my marriage
affect you?” Cynthia kept herself
under control This was only Vera,
her child, but she had to know
how she felt. Vera, the closed, the
guarded. There might be some
thing undone that she could meet
and conquer.
“Well—we had always looked
up to you, you know, as if you
were mother—and father, too, in
one person. Wise, you know, in
everv wav. We thought vou knew
STARTED IN 1809
- ■ -
I CHICAGO. Caspar Lehmann
j started the art of glass engraving
in Bohemia in 1609, and used cut
ting jewels and crystals.
LEGALS
IX THE ClHClkl' COIIIT OF TIUC
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL. CIRCUIT
OF THE STATE OF FI.OHIDA,
IN ASH FOR MOVROF COUNTY.
IX CHANCERY.
Cane Ao. 10-301
WALDRMAR M. HACZ,
Platnttff, *
j „ , vs. DIVORCE
I ELIZABETH ALICE WALL B.AI'Z,
Defendant
ORDER OF,PUBLICATION
TO: Elizabeth Alice AVall Hauz,
i • I2M Lennox Road,
Huntington, Long Island,
New York.
You- are hereby required to ap
! Pear to the Rill of Complaint for di-
I vorce in the above styled cause on
j °* before the lXth day of July. A.
jIX 1H45. otherwise the allegations
I therein will be taken as confessed.
1 This order is to be published once
a week for four consecutive weeks
in the Key West Citizen, a newspa
per published in Key West. Florida.
hone and Ordered this 14th dav of i
June. A. IX 1915.
1 (SEAL) v Ross C Sawyer )
Clerk Circuit Court,
Monroe County. Florida.
By (sd) Florence E. Sawyer, ;
1 Deputy Clerk. |
(Sd) ALLAN B. CLEARE, Jr. j
Solicitor for Plaintiff.
junls-22-29;j1y(5,1!Hr,
, IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE .
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA. IN
AMI FOR MONROE COUNTY. IN
CHANCERY. !
('■Me No. IW-2SO
PATRICK J. EGAN,
Plaintiff,
' , T> .. VS ' divorce!
MARY EGAN,
Defendant.
ORDER OF PUBLICATION 1
TO: MARY EGAN. 1
311 St. Marks Place,
St. George, Staten island,
j New York, N. Y.
I It is hereby ordered that you are s
I required to appear on the 2nd day i
iof July, 1945, before the Above en-'
; titled court to the Bill of Complaint l
filed against you in the above en- ]
titled cause and the Key West Citi- ,
zen is hereby designated as the ,
newspaper in which this order shall j
be published once a week for four)
consecutive weeks.
| Witness the Honorable Joseph !
! Otto as One of the Judges of thisj
; I’ourt and the Seal of this Court in I
1 the City of Key West, Monroe Coun-
Florida, this 2Sth day of May, (
i (SEAL) Ross C Sawyer j
Clerk Circuit Court, j
Monroe County, Florida, j
By (sd) Kathleen Nottage,
Deputy Clerk I
jun 1-8-15-22,1945
| IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN 1
I AND FOR MONROE COUNTY. IN
CHANCERY.
Case No. 10-257
JACK V. ABBOTT,
Plaintiff,
v - DIVORCE.
BERNICE GKFFERS ABBOTT.
Defendant. '
ORDER OF PUBLICATION
TO: BERNICE GEFFERS ABBOTT, .
(iSOfi Bradley Avenue,
Parma, Ohio.
You are hereby required to ap
pear to the Bill of Complaint for'
divorce in the above styled cause I
on or before the 2nd day of July, {
IA. lx 1945, otherwise the allega-,
lions therein will be taken as con
fessed.
This order is to he published *
once a week for four consecutive j
weeks in the Key West Citizen, a i
newspaper published in Key West, i
Florida. .
Done and Ordered this 31st day of I
May, A. D. 1945.
(SEAL) Ross C Sawyer i
- Clerk Circuit Court, i
Monroe County, Florida, i
By: (sd) Kathleen Nottage,
Deputy Clerk. I
(Sd) ALLAN B. CLEARE, JR.,
Solicitor for Plaintiff.
junl-8-IS-22,1943 |
all the answer* and that we could
always count on you. And then
you do this—come home with a
handkerchief tied over your head,
bringing in this man we’d never
even heard of—this young man—"
Cynthia was scarlet She held
up her hand. “Leave Carey out of
it” she said.
“Carey can’t be left out He’s
the root of it But Fm not blam
ing him. Lots of men would have
done the same thing. Pretty soft
for Carey.”
“You are vulgar," Cynthia said
coldly. It was horrible and hateful
beyond words. She didn’t have to
listen but she did. And a hateful
little piping voice within her kept
saying over and over that it wasn’t
vulgar at aIL It was only cold
facts told in a cold fashion and
what other people, strangers who
didn't know, would say. “All right,
go on,” she said. "But first I want
to admit that I was wrong, not in
marrying Carey but because I
didn’t teil you in time for you to
get used to the idea To use your
common sense. It was only because
it seemed so very much our own
affair.”
Vera nodded in calm agree
ment. “Marriage is one’s own
affair—or should be. But usually
it isn’t. When it interferes so
frightfully with other people’s
plans—“
Cynthia laughed and this re
lieved the tensity. The absurdity
of the grave girl using psychology
like that!
“Oh, did you have plans?” She
picked up tne fallen frock.
Vera did not reply. Her silence ,
was ominous. She moved to the
dressing table and began to brush
her silky hair. She was ivory pale
again and the situation was not
completed as Cynthia had hoped.
“Hasn’t everyone even the
children. But now everything is
knocked into a cocked hat”
“I’m sorry,” Cynthia said, cool
again. She had had enough. She
tried to speak lightly, dismissing
the whole thing. “Can’t you make
some new plans? Something to fit
in with my own?”
“I’ll have to, it seems,” Vera
said, and went out of the room
taking the brush with her.
To be continued
LEGALS
IN THE fTRCUrr COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR MONROE COUNTY.
IN CHANCERY'.
Caw No. 10-302
BEATRICE H. BECK,
Plaintiff,
vs. DIVORCE
JOHN JULIUS BECK,
Defendant. •
OHDER OF PUBLICATION
TO: John Julius Beck,
IS South .Munn Avenue,
East- ortwiKo. New Jersey.
You are hereby required to ap
pear to the Bill of Complaint for dl
; vorce in the above styled cause on
Jor before the 18th day of July,
A. D. 1945, otherwise the allega
tions therein will be taken as con
fessed.
This Order is to be published once
a week for four consecutive weeks
in the Key West Citizen, a newspa
per published in Key West. Florida.
Done and Ordered this 14th day of
June, A. D. 1945.
(SEAL) Ross C Sawyer
Clerk Circuit Court.
Monroe County, Florida.
By (sd) Florence E. Sawyer,
Deputy Clerk.
(Sd) ALLAN B. CLEARE. JR.,
Solicitor for Plaintiff,
i junls-22*29;j1v6,1945
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(1933 Probate Act, Secs. 119, 120)
IN THE COURT OF THE COUNTY
Jl D(iE. MONROE COUNTY', FLA.
IN PRORATE.
In re: Estate of •
BERMAN WEINTRAUB, also
sometimes known as B. Wein
traub, Deceased.
TO ALL CREDITORS AND PER
SONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DE
MANDS AGAINST SAID ESTATE:
i You and each of you are hereby
I notified and required to present any
I claims and demands which you,
or either of you. may have against
I tile, estate of Berman WYintraub, also
sometimes known as B. Weintraub,
deceased, late of said County, to
the County Judge of Monroe Coun
ty, Florida, at his office In the court
! house of said County at Key West,
| Florida, within eight calendar
■months from the time of the first
! publication of this notice. Each
[ claim or demand shall be in writing,
i and shall state the place of resi
. denee and post office address of the
claimant, and shall be sworn to by
i the claimant, his agent or his at-
I torney, and any such claim or de
, mand not so filed shall be void.
ROSE WEINTRAUB.
As Executrix of the Last Will
and Testament of Berman
Weintraub, also sometimes
known as B. Weintraub,
deceased.
WW. ROGER WATKINS,
I 1 Attorney for Executrix.
junl-8-15-22,1945
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE’S COURT.
IN AN FOR MONROE COUNTY,
! FLORIDA. IN PRORATE.
I In re: Estate of
; SAMUEL B. TUELL, Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
TO ALL CREDITORS, LEGATEES,
, DISTRIBUTEES AND ALL PER
SONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DE
MANDS AGAINST THE ESTATE
OF SAMUEL B. TUELL, Deceased.
You and each of you are hereby
l notified and required to present any t
claims or demands, which, you, or |
[either of you, may have against the i
Estate of Samuel B. TuelL deceased,
late of New York County, New York,
to the Honorable Raymond R. Lord, i
County Judge, in and for Monroe!
: County, Florida, at his office in the !
! County Court House of Monroe
County. Florida, within eight caien-•
dar months from the date of the 1
first publication hereof. Said claims
or demands shall be in writing and
contain the place of residence and
post office address of the claimant
and shall be sworn to by the claim
ant, his agent or attorney.
All such claims or demands not
filed within the time and in the
manner prescribed herein shall be
I void.
Dated the 21st day of May, A. D.
1945.
(sd) PAULINE W. TUELL, J
(sd) ALLEN 11. HASTINGS,
As Executors of the Last Will
and Testament of Samuel B.
Tuell, deceased.
JULIUS F. STONE, JR.,
Attorney for Executors.
junl-8-1 5 -22,19 45
TODAY IN HISTORY
~i
1752 Historic Benjmin
Franklin demonstration— by use
of a boy’s kite—of the Identity
of electricity and lightning.
1775 Continental Congress
choses George Washington com
mander-in-chief of the Army of
the Revolution.
1836 Arkansas admitted to
Statehood.
1844—Charlei Goodyear issued
historic patent for vulcanising
rubber.
1846—The Oregon Treaty set
tles much- disputed boundary
.with Canada.
1889 John Philip Sousa’s
“Washington Post March” first
played in Washington.
1904 The “General Slocum”
disaster in New York Harbor—
PLACE TOW
refrigeration
B| REAL* ICE
BASIS 4 rm wfll *•<
jj | erttion Siimlm.
REAL ICE
is MORE ECONOMICAL... It’s BMNhjr
and Safe... It’s PURE
THOMPSON ENTERPRISES,
(ICE DIVISION)
Phone No. 8 Key Wool, fie.
WHEN ITS JOB
PRINTING
REMEMBER
- IWe is aa JOB
Ta* Lari*
aad
No SERVICE To# Small
THE ARTNAN PRESS
The Citizen Building
PHONE 51
; A BURNT-OUT UGHT BULB
V USES NO ELECTRICITY. _
NEITHER DOES IT GIVE LIGHT.
WHEN YOU ARE IN OUR OFFICE
REMEMBER TO PURCHASE BUIJiS.
10-WATT 13c *
15-WATT ]|c
25-WATT lie
60-WATT | Sc
1 OS-WATT j Sc
200-WATT 27*
Plus Tax
KEEP BUYING WAR BONDS
KEEP THOSE YOU BUY.
CITYELECTRIC SYSTEM
FRIDAY, JCNS •* *•
.mm,!, i munw
CHICAGO —The
at the end* ol Ur
the robber W^eep
sharp ctows ***> *****•
some 1000 women and children
of Sunday School picnie ***■
| liSi—Mail distribution of ***•
tea* iNsrdWl
ships in attack on Brrtiali convuy
in Mediterranean
1944 abend inindj *****

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