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The Key West citizen. [volume] (Key West, Fla.) 1879-current, February 19, 1946, Image 3

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TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 1946
jr
T Baseball • Diamondball
Football * Basketball • Swimming tS&B V.
Tennis • Golf • -Track
Key West High Seeded Fourth
In C Class District Cage Tourney
Key West High School has been
seeded 4th in the Class “C” Dis
trict Basketball Tournament.
The tournament wifi be held in
the Redland High Gym next week
on Thursday, Friday and Satur
day.
The coaches of all “C” Class
schools were to have met in the
Miami Beach High School Sat
urday morning to arrange details
of the tourament. Out of the 19
teams in the district, only ten
will appear in the tournament.
The six strongest teams, accord
ing to the assembled coaches,
were seeded. This is done so
that the best teams will not meet
each other until the end of the
tournament, thus insuring better
final games.
Pompano was seeded first,
Homestead second, Delray Beach
third. Then comes Key West,
followed by Redland and Ter-.h
High.
Key West plays its first game
Friday morning at 10 o’clock
Greenwood Lake, N. J., Made
Over For Contender Billy Conn
By FRANK ECK
AP Newsfeatures Sports Writer
GREENWOOD LAKE, N. J.,
Feb. 19.—Billy Conn is going to
like his camp in this little village.
The place is being made to order
for the Pittsburgh Kid who has
plans for lifting the world’.s
heavyweight boxing champion
ship resting on the brow of Jcc
Louis since 1937.
When the Irishman arrives
April 1 to begin strenuous train
ing for his June 19 date in Yan
kee Stadium everything will be
shipshape, even to the 40-foot cab
in cruiser which undoubtedly will
have the run of the lake.
Teddy Gleason, the man who
got Conn interested in this sec
tion, is responsible for what is
tantamount to an entirely new
fight camp. The site is more fa
miliarly known as Brown’s Hotel
Since the name has been carried
down through generations.
$25,000 Refurbishing Project
Gleason has shelled out $15,090
and will spend another ten grand
before Billy begins belting spar
ring partners.
Teddy’s first job was to spruce
up the hotel interior. He had the
exterminators in twice during the
first six months, painted and re
modeled all 20 rooms in the ho
tel, brightened the restaurant with
palm trees and indoor awnings
and had numerous portraits of
fighters painted in the barroom.
Even President Truman has befeh
'‘dope in oil”.
Gleason is building 20 steam
heated cabins with a shower in
each. Six of these cabins will b?
used by Conn’s sparring mates.
Dance Hall Is Indoor Gym
The indoor gym, used occasion
ally for Saturday night dances,
has a full-size ring and will hold
more than 1,000 spectators. At
present the makeshift dressing
room is a coat check but that sit
uation will be remedied.
Indoor drills will be held dur
ing rain and cold. An outdoor
arena seating 1,200 persons will
be built between the hotel and
the southern tip of the lake.
When the summer season hits in
full stride Gleason plans to pro
mote boxing.
Conn's living quarters will be a
smart looking chestnut log cabin
less than a half-mile up the road
and back from the concrete high
way. The cabin cost Gleason $3,-
500 but recently he turned down
an SB,OOO offer to sell the place
when Billy fell in love with it.
The structure, complete with all
modem conveniences, took Glea
son six years to build in his spare
tune.
Plenty Of Room For Roadwork
The setting is ideal for road
work, too. There are numerous
paths and, if Conn feels the urge,
ht can run around Greenwood
Lake. It’s only nine and a half
nules long but a good 20-mile hike
around it by foot.
Gleason, a checker’s delegate
for the International Longshore
men’s Association, says Conn be
came sold on the place onlv a few
months ago while putting awav
two steaks and listening to what
could be done.
One of Conn’s pals has been on
the scene for several months. Ko
is Joe Lucignano. promising 22-
By FRED MILLER. JR.
against sixth seeded Tech. Ac
cording to the seedings, Key West
is favored to win.
Stuai’t and Boynton play Thurs
day at 8:30 a.m. The winner of
this game meets Homestead at 4
p.m. Friday. Homestead is fav
ored to win. Whoever does win
will play the Key West-Tech win
ner at 8:30 p.m. Friday. This ir
the semi-final round and the win
ner engages the remaining team
of the first division at 8 p.m. Sat
urday in the District champion
ship game.
Teams seeded 1,3 and 5 play
in the first division and teams
seeded 2, 4 and 6 play in the sec
ond division.
The winner in each division is
determined in the semi-finals and
the two winners meet in the
championship game.
Besides the six seeded team;,
those teams appearing 'in the
tournament wil linclude: Clewis
ton, Belle Glade, Boynton and
Stuart.
CITY SPORTS
Every Type of Play
BASKETBALL
at High School Gymnasium
(Night Games)
TUESDAY—
-7:oo—Miami Daily News vs. Mi
ami Herald.
B:oo—High School “B” vs. High
School.
9:00 Divers vs. WKWF.
WEDNESDAY—
-7:oo—Lindsley Lumber Cos. vs.
Coca-Cola.
8:00—St. Mary’s vs. Convent
Cubs.
9:oo—lndependents vs. Dental
Corps.
THURSDAY—
-7:oo—Key West Transit vs.
Sweeting’s Auto Service.
B:oo—Convent vs. Lions Girls.
9:oo—Red Raiders vs. Earth
quakes.
BASEBALL
at Municipal Stadium
(Afternoon Games)
jSUNDAY—
Games to be announced.
RECREATION
Bayview Park—Tennis, basket
ball and handball courts. Dia
mondball. Comfort stations.
South Beach and Rest Beach—
Swimming.
Gulf Dock and Rest Beach—
Dcepsea fishing, small boats.
Today's Anniversaries
(Know America)
1732—Thomas Young, fiery'
Boston pre-Revolutionary pa
triot, Philadelphia physician
born in Ulster Cos., N. Y. Died
June 24, 1777.
1766—William Dunlap, famed
versatile New York painter, play
wright and historian, ardent
American, who served the art?
when America paid them poorly
born at Perth Amboy, N. J. Died
Sept. 28, 1839.
1799—Charles S. Olden, busi
nessman, gentleman farmer, New
Jersey’s noted Civil War gover
nor ,born near Princeton. Died
April 7, 1876.
1828—Carl Wimar, St. Louis
painter of the Indians and of the
frontier of his day, born in Ger
many. Died Nov. 28, 1862.
1847—Sara Y. Stevenson, noted
Philadelphia archaeologist, liter
ary editor and civic worker, born
in Paris. Died Nov. 14, 1921.
Subscribe to The Citizen—2st
weekly.
year-old Hoboken, N. J., welter
weight who is managed by Glea
son and handled by Tony Te
macci, who has helped condition
16 world’s champions.
A thriving resort town in sum
mer, Greenwood Lake is 50 miles
from New York City. Fistic fol
lowers who wish to view Conn
and Youis in action before a big
bout should’t have much trou
ble. Louis will train at Pompton
Lakes, 13 miles from here.
Nactu Rally Trounces NAS Marines
jHIiKB JLgi'
IN THE OPENING JUMP AT CENTER that started the action Jan
uary 23, J. R. Brown, Sic, of Newton, Kan., the Nactu center (left),
barely gets the tip from Pfc. Randall Storms, of Fort Thomas, Ky..
the Marine pivot man, as they leaped for the ball. At the right, a
group of both quintets vault skyward in an anxious effort to grab
a rebound off the Marine backboard. With the score tied at 24-24
in the last three minutes, Nactu clinched the contest with a scoring
splurge, to win, 31-25.
THE SNAPPER
Takes In the Whole School
Published by Key West Senior High School Students
EDITORIAL and BUSINESS STAFF
Editor, Betty Cottrell
Asst. Editor, Carolynne Morgan
Fashion Editor, Joan Porter
Asst. Fashion Ed., Ann Doherty
Features Editor, Gerry Albury
Who's Who of the Week
This issue we’ve chosen as our
week’s celebrity, Joyce Mulberg.
She first saw the light of day
January 21, 1929, in Key West.
Joyce came to Key West Hi in
the 9th grade and we put her to
work right away. 7 She was then
elected Treasurer of the Student
Council while still a “Studious
Sophomore” and earned herself
the title of “Honest Joyce”. Sho
then was appointed chairman of
the Recreation Committee. This
was really a big job as the Annex
had just started to function. Joyce
took over and before we knew
it, it was a big success. One of
the best things about it was that
we had a juke box all paid for.
How she accomplished this, we’ll
never know. Like Alexander
Hamilton, she just had the gift of
being a great financier. She
proved to the rest of us that she
was capable of holding the fort
and doing it well.
We couldn’t let her go by then,
so we just elected her president
of the Student Council. It can
safely be sa:d that she has been
one of the biggest little presidents
we have ever had.
. Like all other people, she, toi),
hak ‘romantic interests. We he
lieve Frank Papy, heart throb of
all lovers of music in Key West,
is in first place, but we could be
wrong.
To a job well done, let’s give a
big hand to Joyce . Mulberg.
Eagle Scout Bozo
The outstanding event of the
recent Boy Scout Week was the
awarding of the Eagle* Scout
award, the highest Scout award,
to Arthur Bozo:
We congratulate Arthur and
hope that he will be an example
to other Scouts to aspire to be
Eagle Scouts.
PARIS VD PROBLEMS
PUZZLE FOR OFFICIALS
AP N^'vsfeatnres
PARIS, Feb! 19. —It’s more
than au.uuO amateur ladies of the
evening, not the legendary ‘Ma
demoiselle from Armentieres,
who have Army authorities in
Paris keeping a sharp eye on the
broad boulevards and tiny side
streets.
French police records show
that the city had between. 1,200
and 1,500 prostitutes living in
registered houses, before these
were ordered closed recently and
another 5,000 “inscribed” prosti
tutes who ply their trade from
cheap rooming houses and shab
by hotels.
“But they are not our greatest
source of difficulty,” said Capt.
Franklin R. Fitch’of 2539 Birch
Street, Denver, Col., head of
Seine section’s Preventive Dis
ease division. “That source is the
clandestine prostitute—the unre
gistered or uninscribed girl who
makes all or most of her living
that way and on whom there is
no way of checking unless she
happens to be picked up in a
raid.”
Registered houses of prostitu
tion were off-limits to military
personnel, even before they were
ordered closed with the regula
tions enforced “most strictly by
the madam es themselves who
knew they would be penalized if
they permited American soldiers
to enter their places,”
Sports Editor, Fred Miller, Jr.
Asst. Sports Ed., Betty Burchell
Art Editor, Elsie Curry
Business Mgr., Andre Mumford
Asst. Bus. Mgr., Billy Stewart
' Gossip
By SMELLY and MELLY
Well, here we are again, to give
you the latest dope on the love
affairs and break-ups.
Flash!! Have you noticed the
new “sparkler” Raymond M. has
given Betty McGuire Keep up
the good work, Betty.
It looks like real romance be
tween Kitty S. and Clayton P.
What happened to Gloria, Papy?
Have you noticed the way
Nancy Sterling looks at Ed Bar
nett in jith hour study hall?
The new girl, Dottie Lou L., has
been given a lot of attention by
both Joe McCuilen and Bo Mead
ow.
We wish Caroline Morgan
would make up her mind between
Earl K. and Ed Gardner.
#
Well, here is good news. Pr. J ,
Goehring and Forest Arthur have
found each other at last.
Have you seen that diamond
ring Nancy Norman is flashing
arojund? Arthur has good taste!!
What has • happened between
Gladys and “Oakie”? Ask Billy
Robinson.
It seems that Cleora R. has fal
len hard for a boy named John
F. Is this true, Cleora?
Ben S. must have it bad over
Ernestine because she is wearing
his ring.
It looks like Mildred Tift has
the old love bug again for Ever
ett R. Hubba! Hubba!
Gerry A. is quite the stuff these
days, especially with Meanada.
Keep it up, Gerry.
Gosh! but have you seen Joan
Porter these days? It seems like
Baby is always on a road trip.
Poor Joan.
My kid, Bessie, hasn’t been lo
school in that big model A any
more. I guess the car isn’t what
it used to be.
By CYNTHIA LOWRY
Weekly examinations of regis
tered prostitutes helped control
disease, but it is, he said, prac
tically impossible to control the
situation involving casual pros
titution in hotels and rooming
houses. MPs and French police
make raids frequently on suspec
ted premises, and between 150
and 200 girls are picked up week
ly.”
Fitch said soldiers picked up
in such raids were given preven
tive disease treatment and inter
viewed to obtain possible sourc
es of disease. The women are
taken to hospitals, examined and
then, if found free of disease and
inscribed as prostitutes, are re
leased. Unregistered girls who
are not diseased are turned loose
with a warning and a strong
sugestion they register as pros
titutes. If they are picked up
three times they are forced to
register. Diseased women are
held for treatment. ,
Although the VD rate for
American soldiers in Paris is
“slightly lower” than the rate,
for instance of soldiers in Ger
many, a great many, of the cases
don’t show up until the men who
were in Paris on leave get back
to their units and Paris is believ
ed to be the greatest single
source of VD infection on the
continent Fitch says.
THE KEY WEST CITIZEN
HELP WANTED

TELEPHONE
OPERATORS
WAGE INCREASE
" Learners now earn a mini
mum of $31.20 per week
for 48 hours work
Wage rates for experienced
operators are proportion
ately higher
Frequent increases, addi
tional payment for evening
Sunday and holiday work
MANY OTHER
ADVANTAGES
i ' *■ .
L6t our Chief Operator,
Mrs. McDermott,
tell you the whole story
Apply 9 to 5 at the
TELEPHONE OFFICE
t
febl-tf
Waitresses. Club Tropics, under
new management. Contact own
er, Gurdon Wolf son, 700 Duval
street. febl6-3tx
Wanted Messenger, daytime
work. Apply Western Union.
febl9-tf
Male or female grocery clerk. Ap
ply Castro’s Market, 901 Duval
st. febl9-6tx
Maid, general housework. Cas
tro’s Market, 901 Duval st.
febl9-otx
Experienced waitress. Short
hours. North Beach Inn. Phone
261-J. febl9-4t
HELP WANTED—MALE
We have an attractive offer for
a local young man who already
has a Ist or 2nd class Radiotele
phone Operator’s license. We
are particularly interested in an
ex-service man between 20 and
26 years of age who has had'
communication experience. A
chance to live at home, to earn
a good living, and perhaps to
achieve lifetime security. See
Mr. Overlin at Southern Bell
Tel. & Tel. Cos. feblß-3t
Beef boner or meat cutter, white
or colored. Apply 1028 Divl
sion st. febl9-3t
Meat cutter, experience preferred.
Castro’s Market, 901 Duval st.
febl9-6tx
MISCELLANEOUS
Refrigeration sales and service.
Repairs on all makes. All work
guaranteed. Mumford & Ross,
220 Duval st., phone 333.
feblß-tf
Used furniture bought and sold.
Key West Bedding Cos., phone
669, 515 Front st. febl-tf
Lawn mowers, knives, scis
sors sharpened. Sewing ma
chines, small motors, suit cases,
trunks, locks ,etc., repaired.
Keys duplicated. B. F. Camp-'
bell, 928 Division street, phone
-189. febi-tf
Will repair or buy cameras.
Evans Photo Studio, 506 South
ard street. jan 19-1 mo
Picture framing, pictures matted
and framed. Paul G. DiNegro,
614 Francis st., phone 1197-M.
febfi-lmo
THIS is to notify all real estate
brokers in regard to my prop
erty, 303 Duval Street, that the
price has been changed for new"
price. Write me. Mrs. C.
Black, Meridian, Georgia.
febl3-12tx
Bring your laundry to 1008 Olivia
st. Phone 224. febl9-2tx
WANTED TO BUT
Wanted—Old rags. Call at The
Citizen Office. janl7-tf
Lot, small house. Reasonable
price. Box X-7, c/o Citizen Of
fice. febl4-6tx
Wanted—One or two 30 x
tires. Otto Jesiek, Mastic
Camp, febl9-3tx
Navy Photos
CLASSIFIED ADS
RATES
Regular Type
Advertisements under this
head will be inserted in The
Citizen at the rate of 2c a word
for each insertion, but the
minimum charge for the first
15 words or less is 30c.
Black Face Type
The rate for blackface type
Information for the Advertisers
is 3c a word and the minimum
charge for the first 15 words
or less is 45c.
PAYMENT
Payment for classified ad
vertisements is invariably in
advance, but regular advertis
ers with ledger accounts may
have their advertisements
> charged.
FOR RENT
V
Detective stories, romances, biog
raphies ,all the best new books,
some for 5c per day, many for
only 10c for a whole week. Paul
Smith, Bookseller, cor. Simon
ton and Eaton streets, febl-tf
ROOMS FOR RENT
Light housekeeping rooms. Rea
sonable. 411 William st
febi-lmox
Rooms for men only. Gaiti Dorm
itory, 109 Duval street. Good,
clean beds, hot and cold show
ers, $5.00 per week. febl3-6tx
WANTED TO RENT
Naval officer and wife desire
apartment or house, furnished
or unfurnished. No children
and no pets. Write Box 8.L.,
q/d Citizen. * febl9-6tx
ROOM WANTED
Room, with or without board, on
first floor for 5 or 6 weeks.
Phone Central Hotel, Room 51.
febl9-2tx
FOR HIRE
For Hire—Truck, general moving.
J. C. Ramsey, 709 Whitmarsh
Lane. Phone 1161-W.
febl-lmox
s FOR SALE
“Lustretile” is guaranteed to re
move caked rust and rust stains
from any surface. Try it—you
will be amazed. Pepper’s
Plumbing Supplies, 512 Flem
ing. jan3l-tf
—:
Vita Var House Paint, guaranteed
100% pure. $3.25 gallon. There
is none finer at any price.
Pierce Bros. febl-lmo
Library copies of current best
sellers—at prices that get lower
with each rental. To fill your
bookshelves comparatively
painlessly, get acquainted with
our unique rental library sales
system. Paul Smith, bookseller
cor. SimontOn and Eaton sts.
febl-tf
Vita Var Full Body Floor Varnish;
j $5.00, value, $3.95 gallon, none
better. Pierce Bj-os. febl-lmo
'We carry a full line of all plumb
ing supplies and fixtures. Pipe
cut and threaded at Pepper’s
Plumbing Supply, 512 Fleming.
jan3l-tf
Vita Var Super Chromium Finish
Alumlhum Paint, covers 30%
more surface than most of the
aluminum paints.. $5.40 per gal
lon, Pierce Bros. febl-lmo
2- and 3- bedroom bungalows,
furnished and unfurnished;
small down payment, balance
payable monthly. Johnson &
Johnson, Phone 372. febl-tf
Fresh tomatoes. 1310 Johnson
street. febl9-l2tx
Living room set and desk. 833
Olivia, upstairs. febl4-stx
Grape vines. 1217 Petronia st.
>■ feblß-6tx
Cabin cruiser, 40 ft., SBOO. 1418
Newton st. febl9-2tx
Engine for 1935 Ford. Reasonable.
108-D Poinciana Ext. feblß-2tx
3 Vi-horse Evenrude 1942, $55.00.
Outboard motor, one 2-horse,
$45.00. Outboard, one gas heat
er. Apply rear 1119 Watson,
Cottage Number 3. feblß-2tx
Two-story house, corner of Eliza
beth and Fleming. Apply 61b
Dey st. febl9-6tx
Sea King, BVi h.p. outboard mo
tor. 818 Dey st. febl9-2tx
Oldsmobile, 1938, Sedan; Chevro
let, 1940, Sedan. Red Brick
Garage, Simonton and Greene
sts. febl9-3tx
26-ft. pleasure or commercial boat,
Chrysler marine motor. See
Berlin, A. & B. Fish Com
pany. febl9-3t.<
Lot on Eliza st Reasonable. Ap
ply Sterling’s Poultry Market
or phone 243. febl9-4t\
Palms, ferns, crotons, coleus, sui
tanas, aralias, cactus, flame
vines, fruit trees, many other'.
1004 Southard st, phone 1049-J.
febl9-2tx
DEADLINE
To insure publication, copy
must be in the office before 11
o’clock on the day of publica
tion.
OFFICE
Business office in The Citi
zen Building, corner Greene
and Ann streets. Door jto the
right on entering building.
FOR SALE
For Sale—Prewar single bed,
high-class coil springs, inner
spring mattress. Used" little.
$30.00. 916 Windsor Lane.
febl9-Ux
LOST
Lady’s black handbag on high
way, between Ramrod Key and
Boca Chica, containing cash,
ration books, other articles. Can
identify contents. Notify Post
master, Ramrod Key. Reward.
febl6-6tx
Lost—Camera in brown leathfr
case in or near La Concha Hotel,
Thursday evening, Feb. 7th.
Finder please return to Citizen
Office and receive reward.
feblß-?tx
Man’s blue bicycle with basket.
Will finder please call 88-M.
febl9-3tx
Who Knows?
1. Does the Bible say that Gab
riel will blow his horn to an
nounce the day of judgment?
2. Can the Constitution be
amended to abolish the Senate?
3. When were envelopes first
used for mailing letters?
4. What is the mortality rate
for small business enterprises?
5. Where will the United Na
tions Oragnization have its capi
tal?
6. How much were taxes reduc
ed by cutting income taxes and
repealing the excess-profits taxes?
7. What is sometimes referred to
as the United States experiment
in socialism?
8. How many men are being in
ducted into the armed forces un
der Selective Service?
9. What is the FEPC?
10. Why are the Great Powers
interested in bases in the Arctic?
The Answers
1. No.
2. Yes, but some authorities
think it would require the unani
mous vote of the states.
3. Probably around 1840.
4. One out of six usually close
before the end of the first year.
5. In the U. S., but place is not
yet determined.
6. An estimated $5,900,000,000.
7. Our attempt to rehabilitate
the economy of Puerto Rica.
8. About 35,000 a month.
9. The Fair Employment Prac
tice Committee.
10. Because it is considered the
strategic crossroads of the air.
ORIGIN OF NAME
BALTIMORE. The drachma
of Greece derives its name from
the iron bars used as currency by
the Greeks before 600 B. C.
LEGALS
notice: to Crboitoks
(IMS Probate Act, Sera. lie. ISO)
IN THE COURT OF THE COUNTY
JUDGE. MONROE COUNTV. FLA.
IN PROBATE.
In re: Estate 4>f
ELLEN L. DARSEY,
Deceased.
To All Creditors and Persons Hav
ing Claims or Demands Against
Said Estate:
You and each of you are hereby
notified and required to present any
claims and demands which you, or
either of you, may have against the
estate of Ellen L. Darsey, deceased
late of said County, to the County.
Judge of Monroe County, Florida,
at his office in the court house of
said County at Key West, Florida,
within eight calendar months from
the time of the first publication of
this notice. Each claim or demand
shall be in writing, and shall state
the place of residence and post
office address of the claimant, and
shall be sworn to by the claimant,
his agent, or his attorney, and any
such claim or demand not so filed
shall be void.
<sd)' CLARENCE E. SHINE.
As administrator of the Estate
of Ellen L. r/arsey, deceased.
febl2-l-26;mar5,1946
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR MONROE COUNTY. IN
CHANCERY.
No. I*-575
RALPH NEWTON SUTTON,
Plaintiff,
vs. DIVORCE
JEAN REID SUTTON,
Defendant.
ORDER OF PUBLICATION
TO: JEAN REID BUTTON
371 .East 23rd Street
Paterson. New Jersey
You are hereby required to ap
pear to the Bill of Complaint for di
vorce filed against you In the above
entitled cause on the Ist day of
March, A. D. 1946, otherwise the
allegations of said Bill will be tak
en as confessed.
This the 28th day of January, A.
D. IM.
(Circuit Court ,
Seal) Ross C Sawyer
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: (sd) Kathleen Nottage, D.C.*
JULIUS F. STONE. JR..
Solicitor for Plaintiff.
Jan2l>;febs-12-18,1946
PAGE THREE
Two Defendants
Will Go Before
Criminal Court
Hearings were given yesterday
before Peace Justice Esquinaldo
in two cases concerning fights i.t
Sugaloa, and Patrolman Frank
Caraballo, defendant in one of
them, was held for criminal court
on a charge of aggravated assault.
He was released in his own recog
nizance.
Justice- Esquinaldo said that
the testimony in the case was
conflicting. Witnesses said the
defendant had used a blackjack,
but he denied their statements,
and added that he never wields
a blackjack.
Charge of aggravated assault
against Robert Taylor, manager
of Sugaloa, was reduced to as
sault and battery, and he was
held in $250 bail for criminal
court.
There are not less than 30,000
different kinds of butterflies in
existence.
wmmmmmrnmmmmmmmmmmmm
%t- tfie ItyitncMcut flfi*
OONRICOj
Without Question...hi|h
i quality Ronrico makes
the smoothest cocktails,
tha bast highballs.
IT'S POLLOCK'S for
irnDDING
’ J/
I if pric ” Include
ft mLSnB. Federal Tex
POLLOCK’S
Quality Jewelers
524 Southard Street
Opposite the Bus Station
PHONE 465
if See Our Windows ★
l We Give Sponge Festival Vote
: Certificates With Purchase*

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