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The Key West citizen. [volume] (Key West, Fla.) 1879-current, January 19, 1953, Image 2

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THE KEY WEST CITIZEN
3Cry West Cittern
Published daily (except Sunday) by L. P. Artman, owner and pub
lisher, from The Citizen Building, comer of Greene and Ann Streets
Only Daily Newspaper in Key West and Monroe County
L. P. ARTMAN Publisher
NORMAN D. ARTMAN BusineM Manager
Entered at Key West, Florida, as Second Class Matter
TELEPHONES 2-5661 and 2-5662
Member of The Associated Press—The Associated Press is exclusively
entitled to use for reproduction of all news dispatches credited to it
w not otherwise credited in this paper, alert local news
published here.
Member Florida Press Association and Associate Dailies of Florida
Subscription (by carrier) 25c per week, year sl2; By Mail $15.60
ADVERTISED RATES MADE KNOWN ON APPLICATION
The Citizen is an open forum and invites discussion of public issue
and subjects of local or general interest, but it will not publish
anonymous communications.
IMPROVEMENTS FOR |KEY WEST ADVOCATED
BY THE CITIZEN
1* More Hotels and Apartments
2. Beach and Bathing Pavilion.
3. Airports—-Land and Sea.
4. Consolidation of County and City Governments.
5. Community Auditorium.
A RECORD 1952 CHRISTMAS
The National Safety Council recently announced that
the four-day Christmas weekend exacted a highway death
toll of 556. This is an all-time record, surpassing the pre
vious record of 655 fatalities in the Christmas holiday of
1936.
When considering the 656 deaths, due to highway
accidents during the recent Christmas weekend, one must
also take into account the thousands temporarily or per
manently injured in these and other accidents. It occurs to
us that the offering of some 500 lives each Christmas is a
sacriiice which is almost as unappreciated as it is unnec
essary.
At least one state has attempted to remind motorists
of the death threat which always hovers above the high
way by erecting crosses along the highway where deaths
have occurred. It is a sobering sight to see three or four
crosses in a spot on the side of the road as one speeds
along to his destination. The sight, and resulting medita
tion, has caused more than one driver to slow down.
This method has been tried by the State of Florida,
and it is worth the consideration of all states who have not
tried it.
ECONOMISTS PREDICT iMILD SETBACK
The F. W. Dodge Corporation recently polled 137
leading economists on expected business conditions in 1953
and found that a majority think there is a good possibility
of a mild setback in the last part of 1953. However, the
prevailing opinion is that general stability and good busi
ness conditions will prevail during most of the year and
that the setback—if there is one—will be of minor impor
tance.
Many of those polled thought the business outlook
was fine and that the total output of goods for next year
would exceed the output for 1952. Many expected prices
to decline moderately as 1952 wears on.
The 137 economists polled were officials of either
business or financial companies, university teachers, pri
vate consultants or government men. These economists ad
vise all business men to develop initiative, push advertising,
make necessary price adjustments and use modern promo
tional and sales efforts. In addition, they think some busi
nesses should be run more cautiously in 1953. They believe
there is no reason for businesses to suffer if this advice is
followed.
There are still some Americans left who believe that
we can sell our goods abroad without buying anything
from anybody else.
Every man has a right to develop his business into as
large an affair as he can with due regard to honesty and
fair treatment extended to his competitors and customers.
AU&H-^AUW
Monday, January It 1953
AND HE SHARPENED THE WEAPON!
HAL
BOYLE
SAYS
NEW YORK W) The young
Army officer was looking for some
thing.
Something he had lost. Some
thing he felt missing in America.
He told me about it as we sat
chatting about Korea. He had been
back from there a short time, and
now was getting ready to leave
again—on his fourth term of duty
overseas. But he wore on his chest
none of the ribbons he had won.
Only the silver bars on his shoul
ders to show his rank.
And he looked so young you’d
have guessed he’d just been com
missioned; unless you looked in his
eyes.
“I dropped by because you were
the only one in town I knew at all,”
he apologized. “And I was lone
some for someone to talk to.
‘‘You know things are different
in Korea now from what they were
in the old days. They got it pretty
well made there now. Things are
pretty good—all considered.”
He mentioned a few names and
asked if I remembered them. I
didn’t.
“Well, you know how It is la
Korea,” he said. “They come and
go. I guess they came after you
left. Now they’re back here too.
Most of them. So am I.”
He fingered his garrison cap
restlessly.
“What’s wrong with me any
way?” he broke out “I used to
dream at night in Korea of getting
back home. But l wasn’t back
home a week until I felt homesick.'*
“What do you mean?”
“Oh, I don’t know. I just looked
forward so much to getting back to
the States. And when I did...
something was missing.”
“You mean you felt let down be
cause people didn’t want to talk
much about Korea?” 1 asked. "You
can’t blame them for that really.
They’ve got their own problems
here, and naturally it’s hard for
them to understand what’s going
on over there.”
“No, it isn’t that," he said. I
got shot four times in the last war.
I didn’t expect to be treated like a
hero. I know that the hero business
don’t last.”
1 thought perhaps he might be
having family troubles. But, no, he
said his wife and little amt were
getting along fine.
“It isn’t the way people feel
about me here,” he said. “I guess
maybe the trouble is the way I
feel about them. I don’t know. I
feel out of place. I don’t feel like
I really belong. What am I looking
for?”
And then I knew. Re missed the
desperate loyalty to an outfit that
knits together men in danger and
discomfort He misted the close
kinship of war that welds a group
of diverse men into a single unit
willing to face death or life in
mutual faith and trust
“I guess you’re right” he said
when I told Mm that. “But I don’t
seem able to find that here. I don’t
POOH OLD CRAIG
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STATION
Promts at Truman
DIAL 3-9191
YOUR PURE OIL DEALER
rim . . Tube# . . Batteries
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THIS ROCK OF OURS
“Dear Gibb,
“Since you only write concerning
‘Our Rock’, I would like you to try
and save part of the Rock which
I help take care of. Someone is
trying to destroy the golf course
greens by pouring transmission
grease on them.
“Louis Carbonell, president of
baseball, and Curry Harris, presi
dent of the Quarterback Club, will
verify the fact that Fve worked
hard to try to beautify the Island.
Since I have no known enemies,
I cannot understand why anyone
should try to hurt the grounds on
which 1 work very hard.
“You and I once worked together
at Overseas Transportation as
Dispatchers so you will know who
I am.
“Sincerely yours,
(signed) “HUMBERT MIRA”
When I used to work with Hum
bert, he wee a mighty efficient
man. Moreover, he is the kind of
guy who would transfer such effi
ciency to any Job he happened to
be working upon. If thore is van
dalism on the golf course greens,
it would hurt him deeply and he
would take it as o personal af
front. (You can see that by read
ing between the lines of his letter.)
I’m not • golfer so I’m publish
ing this item in the hope that you
readers who enjoy the game might
help solve the situation. Om idea
that occurred to me was that some
of the mowing equipment might ha
dropping tha transmission grease.
However, if this were true, Hum
bert would have realised it he
knows machinery.
If the case is straight out-and
out vandalism, Glynn Archer, Joe
Lopes, Gene Wheel, end dozen of
other golf enthusiasts should pitch
in and bring pressure to bear in
order to discover who is guilty. It
shouldn’t be too hard to contact
local service stations and find out
what person or persons are get
ting used grease and oil and for
what purpose.
Dedication Of County JaH
The dedication of the county jail
last Thursday seemed out of place.
It wasn’t because the ceremony
wes in any way different from sim
ilar ones conducted throughout the
nation. Nor could the officials’
speeches be criticized. (Sheriff
Spottawood made an exceptionally
fine talk when he frankly stated
his probisms to the audience.) My
fit in. Maybe I’ll find h again in
ray next poet I’m shipping to the
Caribbean next week.”
“Why the Caribbean?”
“Well, I don't think they’d let
me take the wife and kid back to
Korea," he said. “And I think I
could use a mild winter for a
change.”
As he left, I wondered a*, out the
million American men who have
filtered through Korea or are still
Tax Consultation... Accounting
ROBERT ). GROVER
Fenner Internal Revenue Agent In Charge
•f the Key Wen Office
Amimui Me eeverence frem seme, end the egening e# a fecal
serve toe peepfe ef Ihie area en Tex Cenevttatfe*
227 Duval SL (Caroline St entrance)
OPPICf RHONE 1-4432 RESIDING* RHONE 2-3441
Bp BILL GIBB
trouble was that I just could not
bring myaelf to believe that a cele
bration was in order because of a
new building which, at bast, will
house sorrow, misery, and grief.
Thera was a recurring thought
that if the man-hours that were
put into planning the dedication, if
the man-hour* of the visitors who
attended the “open house” if all
of this time ware to ha put into a
constructive program of helping
wrong-thinking people (so-called
criminals), perhaps there would
be a few less inmates for the jail.
Excluding the “white-collar”
class of criminal who is usually a
respected member of the commun
ity and depends upon others to
perform his violence when neces
sary. tha average man vho lands
in jail is often a pretty good sort of
a “Joe.” Ignorance, bitterness,
misunderstanding, ate., is tha prin.
cipla cause dl his going outside the
boundary of conventional morality.
Whereas months or years spent
in jail will do littlo good and often
aggravates such conditions, a kind
word, a helping hand, a little pray
er may atraighten out a man’s
mind before he commits some
criminal act. Try smiling at, and
inwardly loving, the people you
meet on the street. You’d be sur
prised but such action might touch
some poor guy's heart when he
feels that he has reached rope’s
end and doesn’t care anymore
about living a decent life.
Of course, the above isn't meant
to be taken too literally. There it
a certain clast of person who is,
what you might say, drunk with
the insanity of evil. Such an Indi
vidual is beyond the aid of ordi
nary laymen like you and me. In
deed, contacting him would only
lead to a probable contamination
within ourselves. Generally speak
ing however, if we leave our
hearts and minds open to Truth,
we will know which people are
worthy of help. And, instead of
celebrating the opening of anew
jail, we will feel sorrow for the
necessity of such a building and
look forward to the day when man
kind will discard artificial morality
and accept Spirituality in its steed.
My confidence and hopes are
high that Sheriff Spottswood will
carry out his promise of rehabili
tation and proper care for his pri
soners. The new, clean jail was a
necessity and should aid the Sheriff
by providing a more normal,
healthier atmosphere.
in that filter. How many have come
home feeling exactly like that
young officer?
RUGS CLEANED
AS Partite! Garment* chair eatty
pwceaicd. AH work guaranteed
POINCIANA
DRY CLEANERS
213 Staontee St Dial t-T33f
PEOPLE’S FORUM
PRINTED PROPAGANDA
Editor, The Citizen:
Walk into an average American
sundry shop for a taste of fashion
able American literature. Spark
ling, paper-covered handbooks at
25c up, in full-length or condensed
editions, have an irresistible ap
peal in these inflated times. In
Key West, many thousands pocket
books are on sale today.
It goes without saying that at
the national ratio, the enormous
circulation of these books must
have a decided effect on the minds
of the young. Among the pocket
books are some truly greats. But
the predominant themes in sex,
horror, and crime strike anew
low, with cover designs outdoing
themselves in sloth and slime. The
press, through the medium of the
handbooks, prepares youth for the
slaughter by disturbing their prin
ciples and narcotizing their minds.
We could do otherwise in temper
ing society for solid citizenry. If
at least 50 per cent of profligate
hip-pocket literature were replaced
with simplified, illustrated hand
books on law, medicine, mechanics,
music, languages, etc. imagine the
upswing in the trend of social
thinking! Words embalm the liv
ing; or when dedicated to enlighten
ment, they raise the dead to an
awareness of latent talent and
buried initiative.
Our daily newspapers even more
strongly glamorize violence and
vice. In quiet, routine articles, we
learn of new serums that save and
heal. Yet murder is headlined.
The press makes or breaks men
and situations. A verbal frown,
and today’s champion may be to
morrow’s outcast. And sometimes
the blackballed are guilty of
thoughts too sound to be fashion
able. Truth is rationed at so many
ounces per century. •
Having bowed out of mortal ex
istence in 1809, Thomas Paine
slowly rises in wordly esteem. His
social and religious observations
are an oasis to the minority who
think. His magnificent contribu
tions to the press are alive today,
forever challenging living .men. For
Paine’s unquestionable logic has
not been annihilated by storms of
protest, shock and ttgoti'y.
Man-made theologies would blue
print infinity and presume copy
rights on truth; and man’s God
given prerogative of forming his
own conclusions is thereby de
famed. Modern hieroglyphic* sell
ancient fallacies, spreading tradi
tional dry-rot. Words may be guilty
of murder in the first degree, but
there is no corpus delicti. ’
EXPERT
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BY FACTORY MAN
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SAN CARLOS THSATRI
A distorted press persuades men
away frota reason; or forces the
reasonable man into solitary places
There is a calculus in print that
multiplies wrong and divides
truth. It, adds zest to unsavory
things mid subtracts from the
sweeter .virtues. Smiling words
may single out inferior persons,*
veneer their mediocrity, applaud
their shallow minds, and bring
them swiftly to fame. Thus pro
paganda reserves for these a
place in the hall of infamy.
David overcame Goliath because
the rightness of his position stead
ied his arm. And when truth proof
reads the copy, the press aims
directly in the cause of freedom.
It has been sublimely cpqken
(Isaac Watts, 1674-1748);
“Seize upon truth, wherever it
KEY WEST
SALVAGE CO.
STOCK ISLAND
Wa Want Junk of All Kinds
Old Cars and Trucks
DIAL 2-5196
STRAND
MON.-TUES.
ABOVE and
BEYOND
r X ’ . with
Robert Taylor,
Eleanor Parker,
James Whitmore
and Larry Keating
Love and War
MONROE
Last Times Today
THE BELLE
•I REV YOHK
with
Fred Astaire and
Vera Ellen
-, v Mimical
; l In Technicolor
is found, amongst your
amongst your foes, on ChristiaS
or heathen ground; the flower*!
divine where’er it grows.”
The free press is not extinct Is
America, though tottering in placat.
But the tiniest light shall not bn
extinguished by universal dark*
ness.
Erma F. Wagner
Stock Island
emu's isss.
Factory Method* Used
All Work Guaranteed
FOR PROMPT AND RILIABLf
SERVICE SKI . . .
DAVID CIFELLI
920 Truman An. (Reax)
Dial 2-7637
SLOPPY JOE'S
SvTSI
V E ATURING
1 S E • O'* Qan; *:
Mark Stanley's Trio
AIR CONDITIONED
Met. 2 A 4:04 Night 4:12 S 1:13
Wed, Thurs, FrL Sat
Million Dollar
Mermaid
with
Esther Williams,
Victor Mature,
Walter Pidgeon,
David Brian
In Technicolor
Musics!
AIR COOLED
Mat. 3:31 Night 4:31 S 1:31
TUES. - WED.
THE LADY
POSSESSED
with
James Mason
and June Havoc
Serial t
• SON OF GERONIMO

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