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CONCHS COP THRILLER FROM REDLANDS
Saivyer Sparks
Hardfought Win
In Tilt Here
Last Night
The issue was in doubt
right down to the wire last
night but when the smoke of
battle had cleared, the Key
West High School cage ag
gregation ended up with a
hardfought 44-39 win over
the Redlands cagers on the
high school hardwood.
The Conchs gained the
win on the basys of the in
spired scoring play of center
Bob Sawyer, who almost sin
gle handedly handed the
locals the win with a one
man scoring exhibition in
the closing seconds of the
game.
After the two clubs matched
points in a nip and tuck exhibi
tion throughout the early stages of
the contest, with but seconds re
fnaining the Key Westers, sparked
by Sawyer, pulled into the slim,
game winning lead.
The contest, which was just about
as close as it could have been, in
creased the Key West lead over
the visitors to two games in their
four year series of meetings.
The game started out slowly with
the teams matching each other,
point for point and as the half be
gan to run out they were dead
locked at 16-16. Only a tight Key
West defense which never gave the
visitors a chance to get set, saved
the day when they had trouble find
ing the basket. The visitors dom
inated the play under the basket
tfs well and the Conchs were hard
put to stay in the ballgame. The
locals fast break was working to
perfection but their shooting left
something to be desired.
The halftime whistle found Red
lands in the lead Oy a 23-21 mar
gin when Engel, who led their
scoring attack for the evening, j
sank a long set shot.
The third quarter started out in
the same, fashion. Scrappy Glynn
ball at tots point and Sawyer hit
Archer and’ Stu Logun played fine
repeatedly with layups to aid the
Conchs cause.
Again, the Conchs worked the
ball in nicely but they jqst couldn’t
hit for consistent scores.
.It was'Sawjrer who put them
hack into the game when he hit
again, this time from the outside
to give the Conchs a 32-31 kicker
at the end of the third stanza.
Jimmy Solomon put the Conchs
into a 35-33 lead early in the
fin‘at period and the visitors came
back to tie it up.
Sawyer's foul shot, the first of
three successful tries late in the
game, made the score 36-35.
Stu Logun increased the Conch
lead with a layup moments later,
3S-3S as the Conch fans went into
a frenzy.
With a minute and a I.alf to play
the Redlands five pulled to within
one point of the Conchs but Sawyer
sank another from under the hoop
to give the locals the game win
ning edge.
It was Sawyer and Logun with
H and 11 points respectively that
sparked the locals to the win.
The Summary:
KEY WEST
Players G. F. TP.
Cates i 10 2
Archer „ 12 4
Sawyer - 6 5 17
Solomon 3 2 8
Logun 4 3 11
Salgado * —...... 10 2
TOTAL 16 12 44
REDLANDS
Players G. F. TP.
Engel 6 2 14
Mullin 4 0 8
Underwood Oil
Burkett *. 0 0 0
Koble 2 4 8
Bernecker 10 2
TOTAL 13 7 39
Mel Oil Ends
Ball Connection
NEW ORLEANS Uh-Mel Ott’s
baseball career is over.
The personable Ott. who never
played with a minor league team,
during a career that led to the
Hall of Fame, said yesterday he
was quitting baseball because his
MM* construction business here
needed his full attention.
*TU always maintain my love
for the game and keep my interest
hi H.” he said in an interview
“Maybe somewhere slang the line
I'll be able to give some tips to a
klflhat may help him make the
grade "
Ott managed the Oakland team
of the Pacific Cad l eague in 1951
and 1952 after 22 years as an ail-
Page 6
THE KEY WEST CITIZEN
BENCH
VIEWS
By
JACK K. BURKE
Beverly Hanson and Helen Det
tweiler met at the Tam O’Shanter
Tournament in Chicago a few
years back. Since that time Bev
has been the pupil and Helen the
teacher. Helen bas been the most
important factor in developing
Bev's game to championship sta
tus.
They work together perfectly as
a team. And there is a good rea
son for their golf success. Both
love the game and strive hard to
win. Both have put in many thou
sands of hours perfecting their
games. The teamwork idea doesn’t
stop there, however. . .
Both . . . play in the country’s
top tournaments for women.
. . .conduct golf clinics together.
. , .are on the staff of the Mac-
Gregor Golf Cos.
. . .have the same birthday - De
cember sth.
. . .own Mr. Chips, a miniature
French Poodle, who accompanies
them around the country.
. . .like to wear the same type
clothes.
. . .like all kinds of food.
In addition, both won their first
tournament as professionals!
Helen won the Western Open
immediately after turning pro.
Beverly captured the Eastern Open
in 1951 in her first start as a pro
fessional.
The Hanson-Dettweiler combina
tion of pupil-teacher is the first
ever to reach the top in big-time
golf.
Schooling Races
Are Set Next Week
Work has progressed on the
Koy West Kennel to tho point
that there is o strong possibili
ty that schooling racos will
start on Tuosday night.
Track general manager Bill
Stoughton said today that fur
ther announcements will bo
forthcoming as to o definite
date.
The public is invited to at
tend tho schooling racos at no
admission charge.
Tho Kennel Club has boon
fortunate in securing tho ser
vices of J.J. Kelly os manager
of their pari-mutuel depart
ment. Mr. Kelly is a pioneer
pari-mutuel wagering special
ist being identified with tho
larger midwostorn horse tracks
for tho past thirty years.
It is at Mr. Kally's instiga
tion that the Australian totali
zer will be used at tho track.
This device is used in ovary
foreign country in tho world to
koop tho fan posted and up to
tho minuto concerning tho lat
est odds on tho contestants.
Very few of tho nation's dog
tracks are equipped with this
device.
It assures an honest and ef
ficient operation.
Kelly is in tho city now with
his wife at tho LaConcho hotel.
Aeheson Is Happy
NEW YORK UP)—Former Secre
tary of State Dean Aeheson says
he enjoys his return to private life
“much more than 1 ever thought
possible.”
Aeheson made the statement last
night in a chat with a newsman at
a private dinner of Yale Univers
ity's Scroll and Key Society. He
was guest of honor.
Jack Kist, baseball and football
roach at East Stroudsberg (Pa.)
High, has been named a scout for
the St. Louis Browns.
Bob Arrix, Notre Dame’s place
kicking specialist, set a modern
Irish record when he booted three
field goals in 1952.
I n -
| time great player and a manager
with the New York Giants,
j He reported to manager John
' McGraw as a 16-year-old young
ster from Louisiana in 1926. After
| two years, at 18, he was a regular
! and on his way to becoming one of
the Giant immortals.
He was named to 11 all-star
teams and vet mure National
League record* than any other
player
ott wav voted mto the Hall of
Fame in 1951.
Saturday, January 24, 1953
’ v dam §
'7 MKm
In five years, Beverly Hanson
came from almost a disinterest in
golf to complete love of the game
and a sincere, mature desire to
have a part of extending the bene
fits of the game to more people
throughout the country.
“It’s the finest game there is, for
the largest number of people,” she
says sincerely.' “You’re never too
young or too old, too rich or too
poor, to have the pleasure and the
physical benefits of golf.
“I realize I’m young and rela
tively new at the game, but al
ready I know that you meet the
finest people playing golf. Fine
people, fun, sport, and healthful
exercise what more could any
one ask of a recreation?”
Bev believes that she can best
do her part in promoting golf as a
member of the MacGregor Golf
staff. She has no immediate plans
to be a golf instructor. Instead, she
will continue to play in all the ma
jor tournaments find give exhibi
tions and clinics as time permits.
As for her views on improving
an individual’s golf game, she
says, simply, “Work at the game,
especially the mechanics of the
swing, get good and continuing pro
fessional instruction, use good
equipment, . . . and keep at it!”
Regarding her own career in
golf, Bev says “Naturally I want
to win every tournament. But I
also want to do everything I can
to promote and develop a game
that is so all-around perfect for so
many people.”
NAS Cops Win
In Navy Wives
Bowling Loop
By Trudy Cochran
Honors this week go to the scrap
py little NAS team. Betty Ward of
their team finally “found the spot”
and rolled on to take the two high
singles for the week and also the
high triple. Her set was 517 con
sisting of 185, 188 and 144. That
cost the USS Cero three points. Ju
lia Warren of NavSta CPO had the
third high single of 165. Congrats,
all the way! The high scratch team
set went to USO-YMCA which was
725 and their team game was also
high. The score was 1974.
insert insert score insert score
TEAM STANDINGS
Clubs W. L. Pts.
USO - NCCS .. 30 19 41
USO - YMCA 29 22 36
USS Cero 25 26 36
OpDevSta CPO 24 24 36
NAS 24 27 29
NavSta CPO 19 32 23
Grid League
Prexy Asks
Squad Cuts
By RALPH BERNSTEIN
PHILADELPHIA (*—Apparently
National Football League owners
believe their $30,000 a year com
missioner has been crying in his
beer—probably the brew that spon
sors the league’s television and
radio programs.
NFL boss Bert Bell has been
bemoaning the financial status of
the majority of his 12 team league
But last night, the owners had
their say. In effect, they told Bell
that there is nothing wrong with
the financial structure of their
league. They did it by rejecting a
Bell proposal to rut squads to a
limit of 30 players thereby saving
some 20 or 25 thousand dollars per
team a year.
Asa result, each club wiU be
allowed 33 men on the active ros
ter with an indefinite number of
“injured” players available if they
have been on the required reserve
list for 20 days. Actually, this
means a club will be able to carry
up to 40 players. Players can be
switched from the injured to the
active lists as needs dictate
The action was a slap in the face
for the cum mission-?r and he acted
that way in making the announce
ment of the decision to the pr‘
Bell has been trying that unless
the club* economize there wouldn't
•be any pro football eventually.
61 Golfers To
Play In Golf
Tourney Sun.
Sixty-one golfers in the Key West
area have signed up for the March
of Dimes Tournament to be held
Sunday at the local course. Gene
Sarazen was invited to participate
in the affair, but due to other
commitments could not play.
All players are requested to re
port to the starter 20 minutes be
fore their scheduled starting time.
The pairing are as follows and
the number in parentheses are the
handicap.
1000 A. M. G. L. Young (330),
Adolfo Novo (27), L. J. Crosby
(27, and C. L. Kulberg (27).
1010 A. M. J. E. Brown (25),
Paul Cahill (23), Sandy Luppens
(20) and Moondy Biero (22).
1020 A. M. G. C. Snow (22), Paul
Yobski (?), David Fiedly (18) and
L. O. Ebey (18).
1030 A. M. BUI Weidman (9),
Bob Smith (8) and Charles Yates
(8).
1040 A. M. A. Pages (23), BUI
Cates (20), Fito Lastres (20) and
Jack Burke (22).
1050 A. M. Bob Cochran (18),
James McCardle (18) and Nivens
(17).
1100 A. M. BUI Saunders (15),
Lou McLain (16), Joe Foley (16)
and Wilsc.i Walker (16).
1110 A. M. Ray Fernandez (16),
Capt. Boaz (16.), V. Vinson (16)
and Delio Cobo (16).
1120 A. M. M. G. Cochran (14),
Fred Albert (14), Art Myers (12)
and Bill Solis (11).
1130 A. M. Bob Spottswood (12),
Clem Pearson (10), Jack Carbo
nell (10) and D. E. Marith (9).
1140 A. M. Leo Lopez (10), R.
R. Bernicke (9), Roy Duke (10)
and Ward Tyson (9).
1150 A. M. Bill Plowman (9),
Clem Price (8), Lloyd Watts (7)
and Paul Roberts (9).
1200 Don Dustin (7), Frank
Wayne (6), Joe Lopez Jr. (6) and
Jack Rupley (8).
1210 P. M. Gene Witzel, (3),
Blake McCann (5) and James Mi
ra (3).
1220 P. M. Humbert Mira (2),
Harry Knight (3), Norton Harris
(3). I
1230 P. M. Louie Pierce (18),
J. J. Kirschenbaurft (19), Ed Har
ris (18) and A. H. Robeson (18).
All other golfers and visitors that
would like to take part in this
worthwhile cause can stUl submit
their names and receive a start
ing time Sunday. Contact Joe
Lopez at the Key West Golf Club,
phone 2-9202.
ROXING
ROUNDUP
THURSDAY'S FIGHTS
By The Associated Press
NEW YORK (Sunnyside Gar
dens): Joey Klein. 148Vfc, New
York, stopped Frankie Bela anger,
151 Vi, Quebec, 3.
AUGUSTA, Me.; Jackie Jamie
son, 141, Portland, Me., knocked
out Babe McCarron, 142, Bangor,
Me., 10.
FALL RIVER. Mass.: Mario Mo
reno, 150. New York, outpointed
Pete Adams, 150, Newark, N. J.,
10.
VANCOUVER, B. C.: Jackie
Blair, 132. Hollywood, Calif., out
pointed Bobby Woods, 130, Eureka,
Calif., 10.
By JACK HAND
NEW YORK un - Luis Angel
Firpo, the “Bull of the Pampas”
in the golden ’2os, was watching
the current crop of boxers do their
stuff at Stillman’s Gym.
“Very few good heavyweights,”
he said through an interpreter.
“In Argentina we have good ban
tam, welter and middle. Cesar
Brion is our only good heavy
weight. He good fighter but too
bad he no punch.”
Firpo. reportedly a millionaire,
said he has “three or four”
ranches near Buenos Aires, cover
ing some 12.000 acre* He has 7,000
head of cattle—some bulls but no
fighting bulls. Just eating bulls.
He came up for the boxing writ
ers dinner last week and will re
main another week, renewing old
acquaintances.
Around the gym they say Brion
■ will be matched with Archie Moore
'in a non-title scrap at St. Louis,
Feb 25. It’s not official yet. Brion
has a Feb. 16 date at Brooklyn's
'Eastern Parkway with Bob Baker
and Moore goes in Toledo next
j Tuesday in an over-the-weight
| match.
Billv Graham and trainer Whites*
Bimstein left fur the coast and a
Early Nevr York line on the
Feb 11 Kdl CavDan-Cbuck Davey
fish? make* ttw Cuban Kid all
favorite to roan-'o man wagering
Although Garden was not rr
i impressive hi* Washington bout
BASKETBALL
RESULTS
By Tho Associated Pros*
JacksonviUe Lee 66 West Palm
Beach 52
Jacksonville Beach Fletcher 60
Jacksonville DuPont 34
Coral Gables 48 Miami Tech 43
Ft. Pierce 53 Belle Glade 45
Pompano Beach 57 Miami Gesu 50
Vero Beach 50 Clevviston 44
Key West 44 Redland 39
Lake Worth 47 Stuart 34
St. Petersburg 53 Jacksonville Lan
don 46
Miami Jackson 54 Miami Edison 47
Daytona Beach Mainland 57 Bishop
Kenny JacksonvUle 20
Branford 37 High Springs 27
Williston 45 Lake Butler 35
Cross City 62 Mayo 38 ,
Brewster 61 Largo 38
St. Leo 40 Sebring 29
Lake Wales 48 Kissimmee 38
Reddick 55 Trenton 54
Tampa Hillsborough 64 Tampa
Plant 4i
Ocala 72 Bolles 50
Wimauma 52 St. Petersburg St.
Pauls 47
Brandon 52 Dade City 40
Jesuit 91 Plant City 30
Winter Haven 52 Tarpon Springs 40
Mulberry 53 Aubumdale 33
Lake Placid 67 Ft. Meade 37
Melbourne 47 Winter Garden Lake
view 43
Mt. Dora 62 Clermont 22
Tampa Jefferson 69 Orlando Edge
water 38
Orlando St. James 38 Edgewater
Jayvee 35
St. Augustine 64 New Smyrna
* Beach 44
Tavares 37 Apopka 35
DeLand 45 Crescent City 28
Daytona Seabreer' . 69
GainesvUle 41
Oviedo 45 St. cloud 39
Leesburg 49 Cocoa 44
Winter Park 65 Eustis 30
Umatilla 48 Titusville 38
Ft. Lauderdale 68 Miami Beach 38
Homestead 60 South Broward 42
Jacksonville Jackson 51 Lakeland
43
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
EAST
Coast Guard Academy 63 Kings
Point* 57
North Carolina College 66 Blue
field (WVa) 62
MIDWEST
DePaul 58 Oklahoma A&M 47
Chicago Loyola 75 Dayton 69
Cincinnati 72 Duquesne 69
North Dakota 77 South Dakota
State 66 •
Michigan Tech 72 Northland (Wis)
53
St. Cloud 86 Moorhead (Minn) 50
Detroit Tech 111 Cleary 62
Wisconsin Tech 59 Aurora (111) 47
Kansas Wesleyan 72 Bethany (Kas)
64
SOJTH
Clemson 79 The Citadel 50
American Univ 70 Scranton 63
Western Carolina 109 College of
Charleston 72
Sewanee 84 Howard (Ala) 64
Delta (Miss) 65 Austin Peay 62
Stetson 83 Georgia Tchrs 82
Milligan 79 David Lipscomb 72
Memphis Navy 94 Bethel (Tenn
-80
Fisk 63 Morris Brown 50
Belmont (Tenn) 79 Athens (Ala)
65
Quantico Marines 87 Cherry Point
Marines 76
SOUTHWEST
Texas Wesleyan 69 Texas Lutheran
68
Southern State 97 Arkansas State
Tchrs 69
Arkansas State 76 Union (Tenn) 61
Arizona State (Tempe) 83 Arizona
State (Flagstaff) 71
FAR WEST
Washington 75 Washington State 41
Idaho 65 Oregon State 49
Utah 71 Colorado A&M 64
Brigham Young 71 Wyoming 42
Utah State 63 San Jose State 59
San Francisco 61 Oregon 57
Idaho State 75 Colorado State 52
Western Wash 72 St Martins 45
Humboldt State 74 Chico State 63
Oregon Education 81 Oregon Tech
65
Honolulu Ply mouths 75 Stanford 73
with Vic Cardell, he obviously was
rehearsing the moves he plans to
make against a southpaw.
Making the moves against right
handed Cardell, he was tagged too
often by Vic’s not ♦> potent right
IDavey would do well to disregard
: the Keed's numerous bolo punches
That overhand right and the left
• book are the real weapons.
FRIDAY NIGHT'S FIGHTS
By Tho Associated Press
NEW YORK-SL Nicholas Arena
i—Willie Troy. 15T*. Washington,
outpointed Bobby Jones, 152. Oak
land. Calif. (IS).
WALLA WALLA, Wash - Ted
j "Tiger** Lowry, ’W, *to**. r<fafm
jkr " S - sty* ■s£&£' J"
? reka. Calif (•). *
CAEN. France—Charles Humez
Paris, knocked out Widmer Milan
,dri Italy, (2). Middle*eights, but
exact weights nut available
MELBOURNE Austral,*-Frank
John.****. EfiiUwt. stopped
Frank Flannery, IS4 : *, Australia,
tie. for British Empire lightweight
Utit.
UNDERDOGS COP NET
WINS IN TOURNAMENT
First round upsets marked the
Key West Junior Boys Tennis tour
nament.
Fifteen year old Henry Cleare
clearly indicated that he has prac
ticed for the big ones by sweeping
through his first matches to enter
the semi-finals in the competition
at Bayview Park. Henry’s deter
mination flashed a warning sign to
the high school tennis team that
their positions might not be so se
cure for the upcoming stiff state
high school schedule.
The fifth seeded team, Stu
Yates and Johnny Sellers further
confused the dopesters by elimi
nating the third seeded team,
Leeburg Knowles and George
Tribe Hurlers Want More Money
CLEVELAND \ Hank Green
berg had a pitchers’ battle on his
hands today. His famous Big Three
is yelling for more money.
In the past few days, the In
dians’ general manager has re
ceived a series of “no’s” from
Early Wynn, Bob Lemon am ?.Iks
Garcia when he plunked contracts
in front of them
Together, they won the an
total of 67 games ftr the In ' -
last season.
But while they cry “We v, :* c
raise,” Greenberg probably h s ■
pay cut ready for a fourth Indian
pitcher—Bob Feller.
Feller hasn’t received his con
tract yet—he’s due back in Cleve
land today—but persons close to
the club said it is almost a cer
tainty that he’ll get reduced.
He had a poor showing of nine
victories and 13 losses last season
and was believed earning $50,000
on the strength of a great preced
ing, season (22-8) and big drawing
power.
Whatever Feller is cut, it seemed
likely that it won’t make up for
all the money his fellow pitchers
are asking. The requested salar
ies, with raises in parentheses, are
believed to be roughly as follows:
Wynn 535,000 ($5,000); Lemon
—545,000 ($5,000); Garcia—s3o,ooo
($9,000).
Feller’s cut, at most, would
amount to 25 per cent, or $12,500,
assuming the $50,000 is accurate.
The final “no” of the Big Three
was expressed by Garcia down at
the stadium yesterday, even
though the conversation was jovial
and in a kidding vein. This was
the exchange:
Sports Mirror
By Tho Associated Press
TODAY A YEAR AGO - The
United States Military Academy
announced Earl Blaik would re
main as athletic director and head
football coach.
FIVE YEARS AGO - GU Dodds
broke all Boston records with a
4:08.4 clocking as he won his 19th
straight mile.
TEN YEARS AGO Clark
Shaughnessy resigned as Mary
land coach to accept the job of
head coach at Pittsburgh.
TWENTY YEARS AGO The
Sporting News poll omitted Babf
Ruth from the major league All-
Star team outfield.
Jim Martin was a star end or
the Notre Dame football tear
but on the Detroit Lions he l
the regular guard on offense.
ITS OUT OF THIS WORLD
But You Can Get It at the
SIGSBEE SNACKERY
Home Made Chili Real Delicious
Served With Fresh Saliines —35 c
Uont Forget Jumbo the Royal Banana Splits
wads of ice cream
COBS OF WHIP CREAM
Topped triih A (Merry and Crunchy Pecan a
MADS, Wl*H S£*Ll*T tvf LkSAM
SIGSBEE SNACKERY
Befide Food Dept. f*tor#*
SICSBEE I*\Rk
Haskins in one of tho hottest
matches seen this season.
Yates tremendous net play
coupled with Seller's effortless
ground strokes clinched the ver
dict for the underdogs in the
three set match.
Peter Knight, known for his im
mobility on the gridiron completely
reversed his field in a decisive vic
tory over A1 Yates. If Knight main
tains his present speedy court cov
erage he should have a splendid
chance at the covered Jerry Tre
vor cup.
Leo Carey and Frank Roberts
seeded first and second subdued
their opponents with their usual
display of fne form.
Semi finals go on court in both
singles and doubles this afternoon
Hank: “Get your contract?”
Mse: “Yes.”
Hank: “Are you happy?”
Mike: “No.” .
Hank (laughing)* “You know
; something? You’re a better pitcher
I when you're unhappy.”
| Garcia (after a pause); “Well,
try nak'ng me happy for a change.
Y: i never know. I might win 30
that way.”
rk, after first admitting Lem
VISUALINER SPECIALIST
•Wi ML
j
r
Above it pictured Richard Stimpe, who alter 3V
factory training with the I. Bean Visualiner equipment is
now in charge of the Visualiner department at Navarro,
Inc. This process is your guarantee of perfect front end
alignment, wheel balance, etc.
Front End Correction , ee JR am
Front Wheel Balance , (j( U K
Including Weight• / RT
NAVARRO, INC.
101 DUVAL ST. DIAL 1-7041
at 3:00 p.m. Finals will be held
tomorrow afternoon at the same
time.
Scores to date are as follows*
Singles competition -Leo Carey and.
Lawrence Bailey 6-1, 6-3: Peter
Knight and. A1 Yates 6-1. 6-1; Leo
Carey and. Leeburg Knowles 6-1. 6-0;
Frank Roberts and. George Haskins
6-4, 6-1; Henry Cleared. C* Yates
6-2, 6-3; Charles Yates and. Tony
Dopp 0-6, 6-4, 6-4; Leeburg Knowles
and. Ronnie Parks 5-0, 6-0.
Doubles competition Johnny
Sellers and Stewart Yates and. Lee
burg Knowles and George Haskins
2-6, 6-4, 7-5: Henry Cleare and Earl
Weech and. Sam Curry and George
Reese 6-2, 6-2: Leo Curry Carey
and Frank Roberts and. A1 Yates
and C. Yates 6-0, 6-1.
on and Wynn had turned him down:
“Mike, you’d be wise to beat them
to the gun. There won’t be much
left after they sign.”
Mike: “You've got something
there.”
Garcia, Wynn and Lemon will
stay in Cleveland at least until
Monday night, when the Cleveland
baseball writers will honor them
'at a ribs and roast dinner as
Cleveland’s “Men of the Year.”
Feller won the award last year.
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