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The Key West citizen. [volume] (Key West, Fla.) 1879-current, December 17, 1953, Image 6

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Key West Kennel Club Prepares For Busy Race Meet Starting Dec. 25
Schooling Races Are Being Run
Daily At Stock Island Race Track
Indication* are that the upcoming 90-day Key West
Kennel Club rice meet will be a banner one with hun
dred* of Key Westers flocking nightly to their program
ef schooling race* now in progress.
The race* are starting this week at 4:30 p. m. daily
but starting Saturday they will be held starting at 7 p.
m. daily. The schooling race* will continue through De
cember 23 with the start of the official race meeting
scheduled for Christmas night
Sixteen of toe nation’* top Grey
bound kennel* have already ar-j
ffved is Key West including many;
of last year's favorite*. Kennels
here include: Fred Whitehead, F.
B. "Happy'* Stutz, Don Bronson,
Ftartwiag Kennels, Mi-Okra Ken
aels, Mrs. 0. Z. Ferrell, Tarhell
Kennels, M. B. Curtis, Williams!
and Fagg, C. R. Hutchings, Walter!
Owen, Joe Taylor, Jack Ortner,
James Pilgrim, Overseas Kennels,
Alvin Burke Royal C. Moore, Point
Breeze and Marianos Kennels.
Seme excellent performances
Have keen fumed in during the
schooling rocos including a mark
e# 114 seconds far the futurity
distance hy Gray Ham, Swamp
Old, Sir Omar and Dal inquant.
Wes Hardin end Range Twilight
hove both run the standard S-H
mUa caursa In 524 sac and*.
The Kennel Gub meeting, their
second since dog racing was instl
tured in Key West, will feature the
best talent in dogdom and the Ken
*el Gub management baa spared
bo effort in making the plant more
comfortable for the fans. Giief im
proven) ents are the construction of
a grandstand, the addition of three
concession booths and • tote-board
on the backstretch where it is
clearly visible from the stands.
And this year, racing fans win,
benefit from a program of grading
the dogs who run at the track.
Racing Secretary L. L. Griffin wilt
grade the dogs in fivp classes,
which information wQI appear In
the program. '~ - <
Busses are now running to the
track at 20 minute intervals from
Duval Street.
Top officials for the race meet
are now in the city to prepare for
the opening. W. R. Moore will ser
ve aa preaiding judge and director
ef racing again thia year. Moore,
one of the peers of dog racing, has
•erved in a similar capacity for
St years at Miami’s Biscayne Ken
nel Gub and has held that post at
the Revere, Mass, track for 23
ytarlC
Others here include Ed Denslow,
charg man; Jack Kruse, paddock
jud4§; Paul Sisk, starter; Ed
Lowiadale, lure operation and
George Hogsbach, mutuel director.
Leu Carbonell is the announcer
tor the meeting and Johnny Yates
is the scale clerk and paddock
judge. Max Carey is general ma
nager of the track.
A gala opening program is plan
ned for Christmas night with May
or Abe Aronovitz of Miami slated
to attend. Aronovitz was president
of the kennel club Mayor C. B.
Harvey, Rear Admiral George C.
Towner, and County Commissioner
Joe Allen have also been invited.
Mickey Vernon of the Washing
ton Senators has batted over .300
in the major leagues only twice.
Both times, however, he won the
American League batting title. In
1946 he hit .353 an] in 1953 he
batted .337.
Crossword Puzzle
l _i
AC ROM
L City in
Main*
A Mineral
spring
A Grows 1
bright
11 Scent
U-Turn to the
left
14. On top of
18. Power gained
* by using
.lever
$7. Nothing
more than
16 Adjective
suffix
It. Female sheep
30. Teaching of
a fable
H. Pertaining to
the skin
S3. Chess pieces
24. Pronoun
15. Boy
26 Witticism
27. Smallest
integer
26 Genus of tt
maple tr
30. Queen of tl
fairies
31. Declare
32. Fortune
36 Intimid. * •
34. Madam
abbr.
26 Exist
36. Chart
37. Harsh
40. Two-fooh
animal
42. River island
43. Luzon save:
44. Tart
45. Hermit
47, Animal’s
neck
coverir'-
46 Writing fl. a
49.160 aqua re
rods
50. Liquors
51. Tnng
56 In that case
* S 9 it 1 T "T i 4 r<T
* ~T 73 ' 73
1 or ?r|
?r] pr] —pj ———p- —
w — W s3 —j~r~—
® 57 | p~pr
3T1 — 2/ ~ 3* I Wy X£s \ mmmm
3* m ar —32* ———
77 -i pr-J sr-T
*lll I^FTTI
Newsmen OK j
Grid Rules
Move In Poll
By HUGH FULLS RTON JR.
NEW YORK iffi—The decision of
the college football rulemakers to
switch from “platoon" football to
limited substitution received a
hearty vote of approval today from
the nation’s sports writers and
broadcasters.
But there were enough differ-;
ences of opinion reflected in the
ballots of more than 300 newsmen
participating in the Associated
i'ress postseason poll to indicate
that heated arguments likely will
continue all winter.
The NCAA Football Rules Com
mittee will meet in Sarasota, Fla.,
Jan. 11-13 to consider effects of
the rule change made a year be
fore and to decide whether it will
be retained, modified or aban
doned.
The votes of 123 football writers
and broadcasters say “keep it,”
although 10 of these proposed mod
ifications of one sort or another.
There were 59 negative ballots, 6
suggesting a compromise of some
flgt.nnd only 14 whose opinions
weren’t definite one way or the
other.
A few of the experts admitted
they liked the single-platoon game
bcause it made covering football
easier. A good many more said
the public liked it better and could
follow the game more easily with
only one group of players, instead
of two, in action.
From there on the opinions were
as emphatic as they were divided
and, to some extent the same ar
guments were used on both sides.
Many of those opposing limited
substitution said it increased the
number and severity of injuries.
Others claimed there had been np
increase. A couple, favoring the
one-platoon system, said they’d
change their minds if it could be
shown that more players were
hurt.
Minority proposals were that
rules for high school, college and
professional football should be
standardized and that free substi
tution should be permitted but
squads should be limited—usually
to 33 men—for any game.
LIKED HER WORK
EL PASO, Tex. UPt—Ellis J. Ayl
ward, a photoengraver who is fas
cinated with his work, yesterday
pleaded guilty to five counts of
counterfeiting.
But he indignantly denied he
planned to spend the sß3,,ie
had half printed when Te~sury
agents nabhed T - > for
I the heck of it, he contended.
■ptetATDiyT I E rBE
l M A TjljDi
Solution of Yesterday’s Puzzio
DOWN
!. Not hollow
6 Feminine
name
3. Bedspread
6 Native metal
bearing
compound
6 Article of
apparel
6 Side of a
book leaf
7. Reverent fear
6 Friend of
Pythias
9. Roman ror
10. Glacial
debris
11. Commerc
name to
zinc
16. Peruse
20. Came
togethc,
26 Deface
26 Lawless
crowd
26 Animal's
stomach
27. Meet over
head, as
branches
26 Southern
state
29. Funny
30. Cleaning
implerr
31. Wine ver
33 Bounder
34 Destruc:
insect
3*t Ancien:
people
37 Famoi
Qua >
preat
38. Cubic mi
39. Devourea
41. Evergreen
tree
46 English queen
46 Ventilate
46. Cereal gras.*
USS Bushnell
Sweeps USO
Sport Tourney
USS Bushnell men made a dean
sweep of the handicap pool and
table tennis tournaments at the
USO-YMCA Gub, 530 Whitehead
Street, Tuesday night.
G. M. Rebn, SA, defeated M. V.
Shea, TE3, 21-9, 16-21, 21-13, in the
finals of the table tennis tourna
ment. J. E. Crabb, SN, trounced
G. Miranda. BMSN, 50-25, in the
final game of the pool tournament.
Ail of the above are on the USS
Bushnell.
The top five in each of the handi
cap pool and table tennis “lad
ders” are:
Table tennis LL J. E. Garr.
USN, USS Olivo, 5 points; J. Neid
zielski, SA. Fleet Sonar School, 3;
Rehn, 2; Shea, 1, and J. Mowat,
AN. VX-1. o. i
Pool T. E. Branch, SOI, Na
val Station, 1.00; Crabb, 1.00; Rob
ert L. Roland, SN, Fleet Sonar
School, .99; J. Agnew, EMFN, USS
Bushnell. .96, and K. E. Saelens,
ET3, USS PC 580, .91. !
Tournaments are conducted at
the USO-YMCA Gub each Tuesday
night with drawings at g o’clock
sharp. Prizes are awarded the win-|
ners of first and second places in
each event. Handicaps affect mat-;
ches between players who have
played in previous matches of this
series. The pool listing includes 24
contestants and the table tennis
“ladder” has 30 men from top to
bottom. <
CONVICTS ARE SMART
COLLEGE PARK, Md. (ffi-John
Portz teaches English classes at
the University of Maryland. Last!
summer he also started an English
class at the Maryland penitentiary
as part of a rehabilitation pro- 1
gram there.
Portz reported yesterday to the
university regents:
“Right now I can tell you flatly
that the penitentiary group is far
superior to any group I am cur
rently teaching. We may antici
pate an extraordinary high set of
grades.”
LEGAL NOTICES
„ TO CONTRACTORS
OFFICE OF THE STATE ROAD DE
PARTMENT
Tallahassee, Florida
December 7. 1663
COTSTRCCTION PROGRAM
Scaled bids will be received at
Tallahassee, Florida, from Qualified
Contractors until 10:30 A. M. (E.S.-
TANARUS.) on the 22nd day of December,
1953, for t hf construction of the
following projects:
***** Project. Job No. M3M-IS2,
'State Road No. 6-905, Monroe Coun
ty. On Key Largo. South Bay Har
bor Drive from SR 5 dnd North Bay
Harbor Drive to SR 5. South of
Rock Harbor. Work consists of light
excavation (Borrow. Local Rock):
Shaping and Compacting Base <(
Inches deep); Type 3 Surf. Treat.:
and incidental Items. The net length
of the Job Is 0.688 mile. A proposal
Guaranty In the amount of *500.00
will be required.
The terms (1) "light excavation."
(3) "medium excavation,” and (3)
“heavy excavation" as used herein
above Indicate, resnectlvelv, (1) less
than 8000 Cu. Yd*. per mile, (2)
8000 to 15,000 Cu. Yds. per mile, and
(3) more than 15,000 Cu. Yds. per
mile.
A proposal Guaranty consisting of
either a certified check, cashier's
check, trust company treasurer's
j check or bank draft of any national
I or state bank, in the amount stated
above, made pr rable to the Chair
man of the State Road Department,
oust accompany each bid. All checks
or drafts shall have been issued
within 60 days of the date for re
ceiving bids. Certified checks shall
have the necessary Ftate of Flor
ida's Documentary Stamps attached.
The name of the bidder and the
applicable Project Number should
be shown on the check or draft.
All work Is to he done In accord
ance with Plans, Specifications, and
Special Provisions of the State Road
Deoartment. Special attention Is
called to “Notice to Qualified Con
tractors" and any Special Provisions
contained In the Proposal Form.
Plans and/or Proposal Forms will
he furnished to Qualified Contrac
tors upon application to thia office
for the sum of 125.00 per set. Extra
sets of Plans may he purchased for
*IO.OO per set. The Standard Specifi
cations may be purchased for *I.OO
per copy. Plans, with or without
Special Provisions, may he pur
chased bv fabricators for *lO 00 per
set. NO REFI N'D WILL BE MADE
FOR ANY OF THE ABOVE CHARG
ES FOR PLANS AND PROPOSAL
FORMS.
Proposal Forms will not be Issued
unless request ts received at least
II hours prior to opening bids.
The right Is reserved to reject
anv or ell bids.
STATE ROAD DEPARTMENT OF
FLORIDA
RICHARD H. SIMPSON.
Chairman
SAM P. TTTRNPNTLL,
State Highway Engineer
dec. 10-17. 1953
IN THE COFNTT JI'DGE'S COURT.
IN AND FOR MONROE COI'NTY.
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE.
In re Estate of
HARRIET BABCOCK BRINTON,
sometimes known as HARRIET
B. BRINTON, also sometimes
known as H. B. Brtnton,
Deceased.
NOTICE or APPLICATION FOB
FINAL DISCHARGE
Notice Is hereby given to all whom
It may concern that Aquiline Lone*.
Jr as Executor of the Willi
and Testament and Codicil thereto
of Harriet Babcock Brlnton, some
times known as Harriet B Brlnton
also sometimes known as H. P
Rrinton. deceased, has filed with
the Honorable Raymond R. Lord
County Judge In and for Monroe
County, Florida, hts Final Accounts
and h*a made application for his
discharge aa such executor.
Dated thia 2nd dav of December.
L D. 1953
<*d> AQT7ILINO LOPEZ. Jr..
As Executor of the Las* Wilt
and Testament end Codicil
thereto of Harriet Babcock
Brlnton, sometimes known as
Harriet B. BYlnton. also some
times known as H. B. Brtnton,
deceased.
W. CURRY HARRIS.
*o3*4 Duval Street,
Key West. Florida
Attorney for Executor
dec. 3-19-17-31, 1953
Weiss Says Trade With A’s Will Start Flurry
By MURRAY ROSE
NEW YORK “Thia will open
the floodgates. The other clubs will
have to scramble now.”
A big grin on bis usually ex
pressionless face, George Weiss,
general manager of the New York
Yanks, made the comment after,
the world champions bad acquired
slugging Ist baseman Eddie Rob
inson and workhorse pitcher Harry *
Byrd in an 11-player trade with
the Philadelphia A s which inciud-[
ed some promising rookies from
the Yanks’ Kansas City farm.
In return for Robinson and Byrd,
who figure to strengthen the
Yanks immeasurably, the New
Yorkers gave three players they
can easily spare—Negro dutfiekier
infielder Vic Powers, outfielder Bill
Renna and first baseman Don Boll
weg.
, Powers, leading hitter in the
American Assn, with Kansas City
last year with r .349 average, was
the “key man” in the deal for the
’ A’s, the Yankees said. Renna and
; Bollweg were just utility players
with the Yanks.
! Even with the addition of Rob
inson and Byrd, the Yanks indi-1
cated they have no intention of
: t standing pat with a four-aces hand
|in their drive for a sixth straight
pennant and world championship.
| “We’re in the market for a pitch
er, said Weiss. He still had the
cat-ate-the-canary look on his face
: today after announcing the big
trade Wednesday.
I No cash was involved, the Yanks
i said, except for the return of $25,-
000 to the A’t for their purchase
of third baseman Loren Babe last
April. Babe was sent to Kansas
City as part of the sweeping trans
action.
| The other players the A’s got
in the deal were:
I Fro.n Kansas City: catcher Ai
{Robertson, 25, who hit .278 at
'Kansas City and .264 at Syracuse
last year; right-handed pitcher
John Gray, 26, with a 9-7 record
and 4.15 earned run average; third
baseman Jim Finnegan, 25, .303
at Binghamton of the Eastern
League last year.
The A’s sent the following to
the Yanks’ Kansas City farm:
Babe, 25, 430; first baseman
Tom Hamilton, 27, .196; and out
fielder barmen Mauro, 27, .255
with Washington and Philadelphia.
Robinson, a long-ball hitter who
was 33 Tuesday, will vie with Joe
Collins for the first base job and
help fill the gap letf by the retire
ment of pinch hitter Johnny Mize.
The veteran from Baltimore hit
only 447 last year but clouted 22
, homers and drove in 102 runs. A
left-handed swinger, he’ll have an
inviting target in the Yanks’ 297-
foot right field wall.
Byrd, 29, Rookie of the Year in
the American League in ’52 when
he bad a 15-15 record with a 3.32
earned run average, tailed off last
year. He wound up with an 11-20
record and a 5.51 ERA mark.
Bollweg, 31, hit .297 in 155 times
at bat, while Renna, 27, had an
.314 average in 121 trips to the
. plate.
“We strengthened ourselves in
’ the departments we needed help
. in most,” said Weiss, “but the
| A’s got a lot of good, young ball
players which they need for fu
: ture rebuilding.”
i “It is a good start toward the
• beginning of a faster, younger bet
. ter defensive team that will bring
the club into the first division,”
LEGAL NOTICES
IN THE circuit court of the
SIXTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR MO'VROE COUNTY.
IN CUANCF.RY.
CM# >• 13-867
DWIGHT L. DRAKE,
Plaintiff.
▼a- DIVORCE
ANGELA DRAKE,
Defendant
NOTICE BY PCBLICATION
TO: ANGELA DRAKE
36 Franklin Street
Somerville, Massachusetts
YJU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that suit for divorce has been filed
against you herein and you are re
quired to serve a copy of your!
answer on Enrique Esquinaldo, Jr .I
608 Whitehead Street, Key West
Florida, Attorney for Plaintiff and
file the original thereof with thei
Clerk of this Court on or before the
4th day of January, A. D- 1954, oth
erwise a Decree Pro Confess© will
be entered against you.
Key West, Monroe County, Flor
ida, December 3, 1953.
EARL R. ADAMS. Clerk
of the Circuit Court
(Seal) By: Kathleen N'ottage.
Deputy Clerk
dee. 3-10-17-24, 1953
Wheel Alignment
$5.50
Complete Electrical
TUNE-UP
$5.50 for 6 Cyl.
$6.50 for 8 Cyl.
(PLUS PARTS I
SATISFACTION
GUARANTEED
CARBURETOR GENERATOR
BATTERIES STARTER
GENERAL TUNE-UP
Murray Anlo
Electric
liS Slmanten St. Dial 2-1851
Page 6
THE KEY WEST CITIZEN
Charles Eyes Title After Win
Over Wallace In San Francisco
By RUSS NEWLAND
SAN FRANCISCO uP Lean,
mean Ezzard Charles, the former
heavyweight champion, was bang
ing at the title door again today
follow ing his imoressive victory
over Coley Wallace last night. j
Charles, fighting in the same
powerful fashion as when he wore
the crown from 1949 to 1951,1
stopped Wallace -just 17 seconds'
before the scheduled end of the
nationally televised 10-rounder.
Although he won in masterful
fashion and led from atari to fin
ish, Charles’ win provided the set
ting for a hassel over whether he
should be credited with a knockout
or a TKO.
The No. 3 heavyweight contend
| er dropped his younger rival twice
in the 10th round. The first one
was for a nine count. Wallace hit
: the canvas from a right to the jaw.
He sttggered to his feet and went
down again from a right and left
to the chin. The time was 2:43.
Referee Frankie Brown did not
count over the fallen Wallace. Ac
cording to California State Athlet
ic Commission rules, it should
have been called a technical
knockout. Brown, in his report to
the commission, said it was a
knockout.
Two judges, Eddie James nd
Toby Irwin, like Brown old-time
ringmen, said it was a TKO in
their first report but later changed
it to conform with Brown’s de
cision.
Willie Ritchie, former world
lightweight champion now chief
commission inspector for northern
California, said it was a TKO but
Commissioner Joe Phillips said he
would abide by the referee’s rul
ing.
Charles, 32, was in champion
ship form. He proved that exper
ience and top condition can over
come such physical advantages as
Wallace enjoyed because of his
youth and size. Wallace is 25 years
old and stands 6 feet 2. He weighed
201 pounds to 190 for Charles. Ez
indicated he is gunning for a title
match with champion Rocky Mar
ciano.
Charles dominated the fight from
start to finish. Wallace's best
round was the second, which
seemed fairly even because he
said A’s Vice Presidfent Earle
Mark in Philadelphia.
Power, 24, and another Negro,
outfielder Elston Howard, both
were called up from Kansas Gty
by the Yanks. They were the first
Negroes signed directly to the
New York club. Weiss said Howard
definitely will report to the Yanks’
spring training camp at St. Peters
burg.
r^i
| ■
I
■ Start 4:30 P.M.
\ parking
Dunes Every W
Admission Beautiful .
Fr ee New Grandstand I
A NIGHTLY RACING STARTS
DECEMBER 25th
Thursday, December 17, 1953
managed to crack Charles with
three stiff lefts to the jaw.
Charles had Wallace in a bad
way in the final frame. Coley was
standing up strictly on his nerve
and he took a real beating.
Wallace said, “Charles is the
best man I've ever been ia the
ring with. He has everything.”
Wallace's manager, Blinky Pa
lermo, went even further:
i “The way Charles fought tonight
he can lick any heavyweight liv
ing. Wallace is still young and we
know he ia a comer.”
Okla. A & M
Bids For NatT
Cage Honors
By BEN PHLEGAR
NEW YORK (85—The Oklahoma
A&M cowboys, perennial contend
ers for national basketball honors,
appeared today to have come up
with their best big man since the
days when Bob Kurland, seven
foot redhead, roamed the Midwest
prairies.
The Aggies have been beaten
once—by a single point at Minne
sota— in. eight starts this season,
and in almost every victory big
Bob Mattick, a 6-foot-U giant, has
been singled out for praise.
It was Mattick in the starring
role again last night as A&M
turned back their deadly rivals at
the University of Oklahoma 65-46.
He scored 25 points, tops on both
teams, but it was his great re
bounding that made the big dif
ference.
Hank Iba's teams always play
possession-style ball and with a
man who can get the ball off the
boards for them regularly they are
tough to beat.
Kansas, last season’s Western
NCAA titlist, won its first game ,f
the campaign 72-61 over Tulsa aft
er two setbacks on a Southern trip.
Center B. H. Born, playing with a
sprained ankle, scored 22 points.
In the East, Togo Palazzi paced
Holy Cross to a 101-64 triumph
over Colgate with 29 points. It was
the Crusaders’ 42nd consecutive
home victory.
Ninth-ranking Fordham, classed
as one of the powers in the East,
got a real scare against City Col
lege of New York, finally pulling
out a 53-51 decision on a driving
on-hander by Alan Larkin with
10 seconds to play.
Niagara showed its best form so
far in overpowering Syracuse 90-
62 as it brought its record up to
5-1. Charlie Hoxie scored 21 points.
Quick Acquittal
OKLAHOMA CITY uP-Six syra
pathetic jurors took only five min
utes yesterday to acquit a man
of stealing a 10-cent pie.
Garence Wilson, 45. was charged
with the theft of the fried pie from
a South Side grocery store Sept. 26.
Nine potential jurors refused to
sit in the Common Pleas Court
case before the six finally chosen
were empaneled.
Wilson contended it was all a
mistake on the part of the clerk
who accused him. “Why would I
steal it?” he told the coun, “1
had S2OO in ray pocket.”
EFFECTIVE BIMP
DENVER (8* - Mrs. Robert
Brewster put in a rush call for
police help after her 16-month-old
son Paul swallowed a souvenir
gold coin about the sise of a half
dollar. Speeding to a hospital with
■the boy, the police patrol car hit
i a sharp dip in the pavement and
bounced—and up popped the coin
from Paul's throat.
Cornell opened its Ivy League
competition by beating Harvard
64-53 for its fourth straight vic
tory.
Using All America Tom Gola as
a decoy to break up a defense in
the first half, La Salle of Failadel
phia whipped Lafayette 70.
Navy won its fourth in a row,
beating Columbia 78-52.
In Southern Conference games,
George Washington trounced Vir
ginia Tech 93-55 and Virginia Mili
tary rallied to overcome David
son 69-59.
j Xavier of Cincinnati beat Villa
Swarthmore 84-54 in a Philadel
phia double-header,
In the Southwest, Texas Tech
edged Texas A&M 58-55 and New
Mexico defeated New Mexico A&M
58-38.
The Citizen: A Family Newspaper
rm bavs rm
For QUALITY USED CARS
and General Auto Re pair $
TWINS GARAGE
1139 DUVAL ST. DIAL 2-2491
1 $ t $ SAVE Sill
YOU
SAVE MONEY
WHEN YOU BUY
A DEPENDABLE
HESTER
BATTERY
With Its Self-Charging
# Feature
WE BROUGHT
BATTERY PRICES
DOWN
You Help By Buying
A HESTER BATTERY
LOU SMITH
1116 White Street
ANNUAL
CHRISTMAS
USED UR
SALE
Clearing Out
All
Used Cars
SPECIAL
OFFER
TO THE FIRST
5 CUSTOMERS
Buying A Used Car
Between • • 10 AM.
We Will Give A
SIOO.OO
Discount
On Any Car Selected
8800.00 OR MORE
Just A Few of the
Many Fine Buys
in This Sale of Sales
1949 FORD
S DOOR
SM7.N
1949 PLYMOUTH
S DOOR
SSJ7.N
1950 FORD
2 DOOR
JIM7.M
1950 CHEVROLET
S DOOR
$997.00
1950 STUDEBAKEJ
4 DOOR
smm
1950 STUDEBAKEI
4 DOOR
1747*
1951 OLDSMOBm
4 . DOOR M
31797.90
1952 PLYMOUTH
4 DOOR
3i3S7.ee
1950 PONTIAC
. 4 DOOR
liM7.ni
1948 PLYMOUTH
4 DOOR
5997.N
1951 FORD
4 DOOR
$1197.01
1951 FORD
4 DOOR
$1197*
1951 DODGE
4 DOOR
$1297.90
FREE TUREET
A seren-to-nine-pouad
TURKEY will he gietn
away FREE to er#i
purchaser of a Fite
Used Car during this
sale!
NAVARRC
INCORPORATED
434 Semfcerd Street I
TELEPHONE 5 2342
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