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The Key West citizen. [volume] (Key West, Fla.) 1879-current, March 09, 1954, Image 2

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THE KEY WEST CITIZEN Tuesday, March 9, 1954
Administration
May Fail In
Tax Cut Issue
By CHARLES F. BARRETT
WASHINGTON iff! Some key
Republicans said today the Eisen
hower administration faces prob
able defeat in trying to stave off
a wide range of excise tax cuts.
A bill to reduce many of these
‘‘nuisance” taxes comes up in the
House tomorrow, with leadership
backing and with no organized op
position in sight there or in the
Senate.
President Eisenhower evidently
conceded defeat in the House when
he conferred yesterday with GOP
congressional leaders.
Leaden said the administration
would not oppose House passage
of the bill to slash about 930 mil
lion dollars a year off taxes on
movie tickets, furs, passenger
fares, telephone bills, cosmetics,
luggage, handbags and wallets,
jewelry, cameras, sporting goods
and other items.
But they announced, after the
White House conference, that the
administration would fight to
knock out some of these reductions
when the bill hits the Senate. The
administration position is that the
government cannot afford'to lose
the revenue.
The bill would slice to 10 per
cent all excise or sales taxes now
above that level, except those on
liquor and tobacco, effective
April 1.
The proposal also would cancel
about one billion dollars in reduc
tions now scheduled for April 1
in excise taxes on liquor, cigar
ettes, automobiles, gasoline, trucks
and buses, beer and wine. Eisen
hower has urged this cancellation.
Tow members of the Senate Fi
nance Committee said in separate
interviews that when the bill
reaches there, they are inclined
to go along with the cuts despite
administration opposition.
Sen. Bennett (R-Utah) said the
bill seems to offer an “equitable
solution” to the excise tax prob
lem. He noted there are demands
to eliminate entirely many of the
taxes.
Sen. Malone (R-Nev) said he,
too, was inclined to go along with
the proposed cuts.
Sen. Martin (R-Pa), however,
said balancing the federal budget
is the “overriding issue” and he
would oppose the tax cuts unless
they are balanced with new spend
ing cuts.
t Venship Oath
( age Allowed
BALTIMORE Wl—The Japanese*
born wife of a Seventh Day Ad
ventist minister was permitted yes
terday to take her oath of citizen
ship without the customary swear
ing to bear arms for her country.
Mrs. Masu Sager of Takoma
Park. Md., told Chief Federal
Judge William C. Coleman she
would promise to do noncombatant
service but said her religion would
not allow her to swear to bear
arms.
Undsr these conditions and after
considerable questioning, Judge
tc 'man allowed her to take the
oath of allegiance with the phrase
stricken out.
Theft Solution
Puzzles Police
FITCHBURG, Mass. OfV-Police
have solved a crime involving theft
of SIOO but they don’t know where
it happened.
A fugitive from Shirley Indus
trial School—a detention home for
boys—was returned here yester
day on a charge of taking a car
without authority.
Police said he told them of
breaking into a gas station last
Tuesday and stealing SIOO from
the cash register.
But he couldn’t tell where the
gas station was other than “within
• day’s walking distance from
Fitchburg.”
No nearby police department bas
•ny record of the theft.
NAVARRO, Inc. • 601 Duval St.
New Jet Squadron
Arrives For Duty
At Air Station
Navy jet squadron, VF-82, under
the command of Cdr. V. A. Dahl
strom, has arrived at the Fleet
All Weather Training Unit, Atlan
tic, to undergo training in night
intercept and All Weather flight
operations. VF-82 is the fourth At
lantic Fleet squadron to receive
FAWTU’s new training course.
The squadron is composed of
165 men and 22 officers and they
are currently flying the F2H-2N
Banshee Jet night fighter. The
pilots of Fighting 82 will be train
ed in the Banshee aircraft and
will also receive some instruction
in FAWTU’s F3D-2 Skynight air
craft.
The course of instruction will
involve about one month of in
tensive training, at the completion
of which Fighting 82 will be desig
nated an All Weather squadron and
will fly with the Fleet in that ca
pacity.
11l Puerto Ricans
Are Subpoenaed
In New York
NBW YORK Wi—Subpoenaes
were served on 111 Puerto Ricans
here and in Chicago yesterday in
a sudden move connected with the
shooting of five congressmen in
Washington last week.
The swift drive was the largest
peacetime serving of federal wit
nesses in connection with a single
conspiracy.
Mrs. Rosa Collazo, wife of a
would-be assassin of former Presi
dent Harry S. Truman, was among
the 91 persons subpoenaed here.
Her husband is now serving a life
sentence.
All four persons arrested in the
Washington shootings admitted
membership in the fanatic Nation
alist party of Puerto Rico.
The witnesses here will be ques
tioned by three grand juries in
vestigating the local activities of
the party.
The Chicago witnesses wiU be
questioned in connection with laws
governing conspiracy to overthrow
the government by force.
Truman Makes >
Candid Comments
On McCarthy
NEW YORK Former Presi
dent Harry S. Truman had two
comments—one light, one serious—
when told today about a mysterious
threat against Sen. Joseph R. Mc-
Carthy.
On his customary pre-breakfast
stroll newsmen told Truman of an
anonymous telephone call received
early today at the Waldorf-Astoria
Hotel warning that “something
terrible’’ would happen to Mc-
Carthy.
The ex-President smiled and
jokingly said:
“Oh, pshaw! I don’t see why
anyone .would want to kill him.
We’d have no entertainment at all
if they killed him.”
Then, the smile vanished and
Truman added soberly:
I “I don’t believe in government
by assassination.”
The former President added that
“the best assassination a politician
can get is vote assassination.”
Inheritance Is
Puzzle To Sailor
LOS ANGELES I*l Bo’sun’s
Mate I.C. William Cabeca, 26,
stands to inherit sloo,ooo—if he
quits the United States Navy.
He’s been in the service for 10
years and likes it. So it’s not easy
for him to make up his mind.
A great uncle, Antone Cabeca,
died and left him one eighth in
terest in an SBOO,OOO Miami, Fla.,
hotel provided he quits the Navy.
“Maybe I’ll take the dough,”
said Cabeca yesterday. “Then
maybe again I won’t.”
Scientists can turn mercury into
gold, but it costs more than gold
from mines.
y‘dm
NEW YORK Iff!—Getting on top
of the American corporate heap is
more likely to make you a nice
target for competitors than to give
you a permanent deed to the place.
Two-thirds of those on the list
of the 100 largest industrial corpo
rations 45 years ago are missing
from today’s top 100.
Hie swift pace of business com
petition has winded them. And it
goes on taking its toll year by
year, as the top 100 shift regularly.
Some of these 1909 industrial
giants have gone out of business.
Others have been swaUowed up in
mergers. But most have just faUen
behind because other corporations
were growing faster, the New York
Stock Exchange points out in the
March issue of its magazine, The
Stock Exchange.
New inventions, new methods,
new tastes of the consumer has
cut them out of the business herd.
And around the corner is the
atomic age, waiting to beget new
industries.
The biggest surprise perhaps is
not in the names of the 36 corpo
rations that are still among the
leaders after 45 years but in the
names of latter day giants who
weren’t numbered with the great
in 1909. In them you’ll find a
short history, in part at least, of
what has been happening to the
American scene.
General Motors, now atop the
industrial corporate heap, was only
a year old in 1909. Ford, only a
few years older, wasn’t among the
elite either. Only one rubber com
pany and three oil companies place
on both the early and current lists.
The age of motors, gasoline and
tires has changed the industrial
scene.
Chemical companies have come
to the fore in recent years in like
manner. Du Pont is the only pres
ent day leader to make the top 100
in 1909. And much of its eminence
now is due to products unheard of,
or even undreamed of, in the earli
er period.
Aluminum was no great shakes
in the century. The items into
which the metal found its way
then are only a fraction now of
the end-products like airplanes and
appliances and building materials.
Leadership mortality among the
industrial giants over the years,
says the Brookings Institution, is
due mainly to “pressure toward
PILOTLESS BOMBERS g
TAKE OFF TODAY 41
MELBOURNE (ff-The first pi
lotless bomber squadron to go over
seas departed from the Air Force
guided missile base near here to
day for Germany.
The unit, the Ist, left for Charles
ton, S. C., where it .will board a
ship for Europe to bolster NATO
defenses.
Another squadron, the 69th, is to
follow later in the year.
Thief Is Polite
NEW ORLEANS W)—A man who
said “Please” but earned a gun
robbed the Barder Finance Cos. of
$1,757.
Miss Shirley Achor, 23, company
clerk who was on duty alone, said
the man locked her in a back
room yesterday after asking,
“Please walk to the rear of the
office.”
Just before he fled, the bandit
knocked on the back room door
and said, “Miss, you can start
yelling now.”
Miss Achor did.

Belated Reply
DENVER Iff)—Back in 1923, Miss
Annie May Straub, a Denver
schoolteacher, planned to take
some college courses. She wrote
to North Attleboro, Mass., for her
grades as a student at the turn
of the century.
The high school finally got the
letter last week, the Denver Post
learned yesterday.
Meanwhile, Miss Straub, retired
from teaching in 1944, had died
in Los Angeles Jan. 6.
Heavy Hitting Attack
Swamps Marine Outfit
GAINESVILLE UP)—Wayne Clark
knocked out a triple, double and
single in four trips yesterday lead
ing a 13-hit attack on four Parris
Island Marines pitchers that pro
duced a 17-12 exhibition baseball
victory for the University of Flor
ida.
Cifelli's Italian Restaurant
SERVING THE FINEST IN ITALIAN FOOD
Non-Fattening Spaghetti
ALSO ADDED LENTEN SPECIALS
Open 4 to 9 P.M. Daily, Except Monday
920 TRUMAN AVENUE
Today's
Business
Mirror
By Sam Dawson
’innovation in product and market
development.”
When a few firms dominate an
industry for a time, they may
find that smaUer companies or
outsiders have brought out substi
tutes.
“The readiness to move into
more promising areas of product
or methods,” says the institution,
“helps to explain why some lead
ers have been able to maintain
positions while .others have been
displaced.”
Here are the 36 durable leaders
among the nation’s 100 largest:
AUied Chemical, AUis-Chalmers,
American Can, American Car &
Foundry, American Smelting & Re
fining, American Tobacco, Ana
conda Copper, Armour,
Bethlehem Steel, Borden, du
Pont, Eastman Kodak, General
Electric, International Harvester,
International Nickel, International
Paper,
Jones & Laughlin, National Bis
cuit, National Distillers, National
Lead, Phelps Dodge, Pittsburgh
Consolidation Coal, Pittsburgh
Plate Glass, Pullman,
Republic Steel, Singer Manufac
turing, Sears Roebuck, Standard
iOil (New Jersey); Swift, Texas
Cos., Tide Water Associated Oil,
United Fruit, U. S. Rubber, U. S.
Steel, Western Electric, Westing
house Electric.
COUNTY OFFICIALS *
(Continued from Page One)
county and NAL get together and
settle their dispute informally.
NAL next invited the county
commissioners to come to Miami
to discuss the matter.
Gerald Saunders, chairman of
the board of county commission
ers, replied by totter, declining to
go to Miami for the meeting and
offering to meet here with NAL
representatives any time NAL
wanted.
Since Jan. 1, the commissioners
have been trying to get new air
service here.
Meanwhile, NAL requested Navy
permission to fly in and out of
Boca Chica Field on the Naval Air
Station. NAL contends Meacham
field is inadequate for the type of
equipment NAL would like to fly
here.
At present, NAL flies one 14-
passenger pline a day here?
The Navy matter is still pend
ing. The decision has to come from
the Chief of Naval Operations in
Washington.
- *>'**s&
REP. PAPY THANKS
(Continued from Page One)
and . Weinberg, Miami certified
public accountants.
Mr. Papy told The Citizen today
that “I am sure the the audit will
clarify aU of the personal and
vicious attacks, insidious innuendo
and references of incompetency
and dishonesty which have been
leveUed at the Road and Bridge
Commission.’*
Commission Lauded
“All of these men are of high
standing in the community and
their honesty and integrity bas al
ways been beyond reproach. I feel
that each and every one of them
joins mo in thanking the Governor
for having this audit made,” Mr.
Papy added.
And today, Anthony Demerritt,
chairman of the seven man Com
mission appointed by the late- Gov
ernor Dan McCarty told The Cit
izen that his group “stands ready
to olfer any assistance to the
auditors that they may require.”
Gov. Johns has ordered that re
cords in Tallahassee and at Pigeon
Key, be opened to the auditors.
Demerritt has maintained all
along that his group has nothing
to hide.
The commission held a two hour
press conference Saturday at their
Pigeon Key Headquarters.
The Little Theatre
>22 TRUMAN AVENUE
SHOWING TUESDAY
YOUNG DYNAMITE
Also By Popular Demand
SON OF THE SHEIK
Rudolph Valentino
* SHOWING WEDNESDAY ..
A FINGERPRINTS §
w DON'T LIE w
Richard Travis - Sheila Ryan
NAGUIB IS BACK IN
(Continued from Page One)
Naguib was made to end all quar
rels before resumption of negotia
tions for withdrawal of British
troops from the Suez Canal zone.
Salem said the regime still held
to its March 5 decision to estab
lish a constituent assembly—an in.
terim parliament—by July 27, and
to abolish the two-year-old rule of
martial law and local press cen
sorship. It was Salem who had
announced Naguib’s resignation
and accused the popular, pipe
smoking army man of seeking ab
solute powers.
Naguib has become a near idol
to millions of Egyptians hoping
for an end to the feudal rule which
has gripped this strife-torn Middle
East country'. But Nasser is re
garded as the strong man of the
revolution and has been the chief
negotiator with the British on the
deadlocked Suez issue.
One of those who attended the
heavily guarded, four-hour joint
meeting last night said it was Nas
ser who suggested Naguib be given
back his old posts, provided he
give up his earlier demands for
powers to veto the council’s de
cisions and to hire and fire Cab
inet ministers.
“The council and Naguib wel
comed the suggestion,” the in.
formant said.
The council also canceled out
another decree signed only yes
terday naming Nasser as Egypt’s
military governor. The post went
back to Naguib.
The surprise developments of
last night were another chapter
in. a long conflict inside the Rev
olutionary Council. Nasser was the
behind-the-scenes engineer of the
bloodless coup which ended the
monarchy, exiled King Faroul 20
months ago and set Naguib up as
revolutionary hero. He was known
to favor keeping the council as
supreme power even after the con
stituent assembly was elected. Na
guib, on the other hand, was said
to have wanted the council to step
into the background when the in
terim parliament took over.
The informant at last night’s
crucial meeting said the discus
sion bore heavily on the need for
patching up quarrels—for present
ing a front of unity and stability
before resuming negotiations with
the British over the disputed Suez.
JAMES FACES VOTE
(Continued from Page One)
opinion, “would not support Jimmy
Roosevelt.”
Roosevelt recently was sued for
separate maintenance by Romelle
Roosevelt who named three women
as corespondents and filed a letter
signed by Roosevelt in which in
fidelities with nine other women
were admitted.
HOUSEWIFE FACES
(Continued from Page One)
could save them. They are in
heaven safe forever from evil.”
The Fisher family physician said
Mrs. Fisher had been subject to
periods of depression and had con
sulted a psychiatrist about them.
Cancer causes about 224,000 deaths
a year in the United States.
NOTICE
The Candlelight
Dining Room
1209 Virginia Street **
TELEPHONE 2-2897
IS RE-OPENING
Wednesday,
March 10
Taking this opportunity to
thank our many friends for
thoir thoughtfulness.
MRS. B. DRUMMOND.
LAST TIMES TODAY
el §
wm IJiiHjfc m I
mwlm f
\ mmrn tj OTTO EKUHOCR Pnfetffe FUNK MQfMU
OncM* JOHN BUMS wj
WEDNESDAY ONLY
ah
Spanish **
Fox ISetvs Cartoon
Box Office Open: 1:45 - 9:00 P.M. Daily
3:45 . 9:00 P.M., Wednesdays
CONTINUOUS PERFORMANCE
TELEPHONE 2-3419 FOR TIME SCHEDULE
San Carlos Theatre
Air - Conditioned
TODAY’S
STOCK MARKET
NEW YORK, MV-Gains and loss
es were about evenly divided in
early dealings in the stock market
today.
Most price changes were in small
fractions. Exceptions were Boeing
Aircraft, which climbed IV4 to
63 3 4 on announcement that a stock
split is planned, and Amerada
Petroleum, which lost 2V* at 190.
| Aircrafts generally were higher.
! Motors, electrical equipments, rail
roads and coppers were mixed.
Utilities and steels lost small frac
tions.
There were reports of an upturn
in business for some chemical
manufacturers, but chemical stocks
failed to respond.
MURDER TRIAL
(Continued from Page One)
they had been sentenced to 25
years on coniction of robbing a
branch bank of $83,000 on April!
10, 1953.
The officer radioed for help and
10 county patrolmen closed in on
the bar. Hombeck and Goldman
tried to shoot their way out, using
a bartender and sailor as hostages.
Hornbeck fled in another stolen
car but was captured after a 50-
mile chase.
Thirty of 89 prospective jurors
were eliminated yesterday, most
of them because they said they
could not send Hornbeck to the
chair unless the state proves he
fired the fatal shot.
Every now and then, Hornbeck
would turn in his chair and smile
at his sister and mother-in-law who
were seated in the courtroom. His
court-appointed attorneys, John A.
Santora Jr. and John Nelson, iden
tified the sister as Mrs. Jeanette
Thompson and the mother-in-law
as Mrs. Del Woozle, both of Louis
viHe, Ky.
Hornbeck’s 18-year-old wife,
Patsy Ruth, is held at Miami in
lieu of $25,000 bond on charges of
smuggling a pistol to him in the
Savannah jail. Held on the same
charge is Goldman’s widow, Nor
ma Jean, 20.
Besides the killing here and bank
robbery and escape it Savannah,
Hornbeck is accused of robbing
banks at Birmingham, Ala., and
Fort Lauderdale and has been im
plicated in robberies at Omaha,
Neb., Indianapolis and Louisville.
Subscribe To The Citizen
FURNITURE SPECIALS
Aluminum Deck Chairs $10.95
Metal Porch Chairs
(Assorted Colors) .. $ 6.50
Metal Yacht Chairs $ 6.50
EISNER FURNITURE CO.
Poinciana Center Tel. 2-6951
BILL'S LICENSED
PAWN SHOPj
703 Duval Street *
Your Grocer SELLS That Good
STAR * BRAND
S5£K COFFEE
TRY A POUND TODAY
STRONG ARM BRAND COFFEE
Triumph
* Mill 6 VSOr
ALL GROCERS
U.S. GRANTS COUNTY
(Continued from Page One)
will have schools here “running
over in two years.” O’Bryant said*
School officials have been work
ing hard to devise a plan of ef
fecting savings in their operating
budget so that some of the money
could be channeled into a building
program.
Present Plans
But currently, the only building
contemplated are additions to the
Coral Shores School at Tavenier
and the Sue Moore School at Mara
thon. Bids for the addition of four
classrooms and toilet facilities at
the Coral Shores will be opened!
by the School Board on March 29
and bids for the construction of
four classrooms, an office, teach
er’s lounge, library, kitchen and
storeroom at Sue Moore School
will be considered on March 16.
The Coral Shores addition will
cost an estimated 50 thousand dol
lars while the Marathon construc
tion is expected to cost about 85
thousand dollass.
There are 251 students at Coral
Shores and 310 at Sue Moore
School.
MARINE SENTRY UP
(Continued from Page One)
have to be cleared before publi
cation.
i Finch and Sneigr said-they rea
lized that.
The Navy says no pictures
should have been made in the
area of the crash since the area
lis restricted.
Citizen Want Ads Pay Off
Something New
Has Been Added
Key West Radio
and TV Service
1001 Simonton Street
TV House Calls
Answered Promptly
TEL. 2-8511
Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday
f 1 Jjß Show Times: 1
SECOND CHANCE
7:00 and 10:13
PJf SEA TIGER 1
11 rf ecJortr TECNfiftCOtOg 1 f ; O2 ONLY % *
I Friday and Saturday
CTPAMB Mat. 1:55 A 4:05 Night 4:15 A I:2s
9 I KAIIII AIR CONDITIONED
: | Tuesday and Wednesday
'i
MIMIBAE Mat. 3:30 Night 1:30 A 8:SI
mVIIKVK , AIR COOLED J|
I Tues. and Wed, Thurs. • FrL • Sat
I*B“‘wMbsssH
Virginia nan •< Uniwmi tntewfoml
Picture* And Stories Of New*
Event* Of Interest To Everyone
Can Be Found In Tho Citisoit’i
BLACK HILIT™"™ 1
PASSION PLAY !
Lake Wales Amphitheatre
JAX. 31 APRIL 18
Fvery San.. Toes, Thorn.. 8 pji.
Spe. Saturday Per.. March 18
For Ken. A laf. write Bax T 1
Phone 2-os 11—Lake Wales. Fla.
POOR OLD CRAIG]
® SERVICE ■
STATION I
Francis at Trumutl
' DIAL 2-9191
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Tires . • Tubes • • Batteries]
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920 Truman Ava. (R.ar) 4 1
TELEPHONE 2-7637*
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HEARING
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hearing friend or loved ON.
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423 Simon ton St. Phono 2*752]

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