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The Baltimore County union. (Towsontown, Md.) 1865-1909, March 25, 1865, Image 1

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VOL. 1.
Jfiaitff. fantg Snimi.
(A Consolidation of the American and
Advocate,)
IS PUBLISHED WEEKLY BY
HAVERSTICK & LONGNECKERS.
(L. M. HAVERSTICK, H. C. It J. B. LONONECKFR,)
AT
$2.00 PER ANNUM, In Advance.
K paper discontinued uutil all arrear
age, are paid, unless at the option of the Pub
lishers. A failure to notify its discontinuance
will be considered a renewal of subscription.
rates of advertising :
One square, (of 6 lines, or loss,) one insertion,
50 cents; three insertions, $1; and for every
subsequent insertion, 25 cents per square.
A liberal deduction made to tho6e who
advertise by the year, or half year.
Bv consolidating the two Baltimore county
papers, the UNION has the largest Circulation of
any county paper in the State, and thus ofters
superior advantages to advertisers.
JOB WORK:
Our office, besides one of Iloe’s best Power
Presses, is furnished with a good Job Press and
all the necessary materials for executing plain
and fancy Job Printing with neatness ami dis
patch.
HANDBILLS
Of all sites and styles printed at short notice
and on good terms.
Magistrate’s and Collector’s Blanks, Deeds,
and all kinds of Public Papers always on hand
at the office.
Professional Cards.
John T. Ensor,
ATTORNEY AT LAW AND SOLICITOR IN
CHANCERY,
Towsontown, M d.
Will attend promptly and perseveringly to all i
business entrusted to his care.
Jan. 1, 1865.—tf.
DR. J. PIPER,
Office —Residence of the late Dr. E. R. Tidings.
Office hours from 7 A. M., to 9 o’clock A. M.
From 1 o’clock P. M., to 3 o’cl’k P. M\,
and 6 o’clock P. M.
Feb. 25.—tf.
DR. SAMUEL KEPLER.
Office and Residence —NEAR EPSOM CHURCH.
Towsontown, Dec. 31, 1364.—1 y
1. XEL9O.N WtSNER. R. PRICE
WISNER & PRICE,
9 ATTORNEYS AT LAW.
11 Office—No. I Smedley Row, Towsontown.
HAVING formed a partnership, will give
prompt attention to all law anil chancery
business entrusted to their care.
Sep. 17, 1864.—1 y __
Amos F. Musselman,
ATTORNEY.
Office No. 21 Lexington st., Baltimore city.
PRACTICES in the Courts of Baltimore
county..
July 9,1864.—1 y
Theodore Glocker,
ATTORNEY AT LAW
Axn
SOLICITOR IN CHANCERY,
No. 44 St. Paul street, Baltimore, Md.
PARTICULAR attention given to Chancery
and Orphans’ Court business, in the Courts
of Baltimore city and county.
All communications or business left with Mr.
JOHN R. D. BEDFORD,Conveyancer,Towson
town, will be promptly attended to.
March 12, 1864,—tf.'
O. C. Warfield,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
Towsontown.
J)REPARE3 applications for
BOUNTY,
BACK PAY and
PENSIONS.
Feb. 20.—tf .
Jos. P. Merryman.
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
71 West Fayette street, Balt.
Jan. 9,1864.—1 y
©. MERRV.tfAN. E. P. KEECH, I*. D. S j
m
MERRYMAN & KEECH,
DENTISTS,
No. 50 North Calvert street, Baltimore.
March 26, 1864.—1 y __ |
R. R. Boarman,
ATTORNEY AT LAW
AND
SOLICITOR IN CHANCERY.
Smedley Row, opposite Court House,
TOWSONTOWN.
WILL promptly attend to all business en
trusted to his care.
Jan. 18.—tf
LEWIS ■. WHEELER. WILLIAM 8. KEECH
Wheeler & Keech,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW
AND
SOLICITORS IN CHANCERY,
Offioe No. 1 and 2 Smedley Row, Towsontown-
HAVING formed a PARTNERSHIP for the
practice of Law, will give paompt atten
tion to the collection of claims and business in
general in the Orphans’Court and Circuit Court
for Baltimore county.
Aug. 27, 1859—tf
DR. G. H. DAVISON
HAVING located in TOWSONTOWN, offers
his professional services to the public.
OFFICE AND RESIDENCE—Next door to
residence of Jos. J. Stewart, Esq., Pennsylvania
Avenue.
July 23.—tf
R. W. Tbmpleman. Chas. J. Pennihgton
Wk. 11. Shipley.
Agents for sale of Maryland Lands,
Office (up stairs) No. 48 Lexington st., Baltimore.
R. W. Templeman, & Co.,
OFFER their services to the public for the
Sale of Farms, and Real Estate generally.
They have, as Surveyors, a general knowledge
of the lands of parts of the State, and unusual
facilities otherwise for the transaction of such
business. Plats and descriptions of all prop
erties they may have for sale, will be kept m
book form. Parties wishing to sell or purchase
will please oominunicate by letter as above.
Pet. 31.—1 y ,
FRANK L. MORLIN G,
FLORIST, SEEDSMAN AND
NURSERYMAN,
Store No. 2 North Eutaw, Street, Baltimore,
Nurseries on the Hookstown Road Adjoin
ing Druid Hill Park,
WOULD invite the attention of the citizens
of the county, to his Stock \
of GARDEN SEEDS,
%gISPT,OWER SEEDS, FRUlTMfflagffi
GRAPE VINES,
•4mT&ll Small Fruits.
Bvergreen and Ornamental Shade Trees,
Green House, Hot House and Hardy Plants,
Reses and Flowering Shrubs. . ..
I will be prepared to furnish early in the
season, the following Plants:—Cabbage Let
tuce, Celery, Tomato, Egg Plants, Ac., Ac.
Jan. 28.—3 m.
"CARPENTER AND BUILDER.
rpHE Undersigned, having taken up his |es
-1 In the Tenth District, on the new Turnpike
leading from Meredith’s Ford to Sweet Air,
Tespseffully asks of the public a ghareofthe
fouiipfißito Building gnd Cflrpcfi*
tw tW&m “ Bf. MATTHEW*.
Jar, 26, 1865. —tL
County Advertisements.
WARREN STORE,
In the Thriving Little Village of
WARREN.
GREAT REDUCTION OF PRICES IN ALL
KINDS OF GOODS.
riIHE proprietors of the “Warren Store" are
I offering great inducements to the citizens
of this neighborhood, that is worthy of their
attention. We offer to the public the best se
lection of goods that can be found in any store
in the country, and will guarantee to soli them
at less than city retail prices. All goods sold
here warranted as represented or the money
refunded. Our stock consists in part of
DRY GOODS,
GROCERIES,
HARDWARE,
CHINA WARE,
CROCKERY WARE,
EARTHENWARE,
STONEWARE,
GLASSWARE,
BOOTS AND SHOES,
HATS, CAPS,
! DRUGS, DYE STUFFS, OIL AND PAINTS,
MEDICINES. GLASS. PUTTY, WHITE
LEAD, LINSEED A NEATS FOOT
OIL, PAR.VPLIINE OIL, KER
OSENE OIL, MACHINE
OIL, MACKEREL,
HERRINGS, BA
CON, HAMS,
BREAST PIECES, SHOULDERS, G. A, SALT,
Fine Salt, Flour, Corn Meal, Mill Feed, Hom
ony Buck Wheat.
TIN AND WOODEN WARES,
Brooms, Ropes, Plow Lines, Shoe Findings,
Wrot Nails, Cut Nails, Spikes, Rivets, and eve
ry article that may be found in a well regulat
ed country 9tore.
COUNTRY PRODUCE
of all kinds taken in exchange for goods at
citv prices.
H. P. THOMAS,
For Warren Manufacturing Company.
Feb. 18.—ly.
GOODS! GOODS! GOODS!
I AM receiving weekly fresh
additions to ntv stock 0f,4
L>RY GOODS, GROCERIES,
QUEENS WARE, Ac., which MMMHyil'j
consists in part of— aUsaSHlS®'
Persian Cloth; Ladies’ Black Dre.s bilks;
Valencias and De Baize; assortment of Pur
ples and Mournings (English Prints); Manches
! ter and Domestic Ginghams; Ladies’Shawls in
great varieties, and Mantillas ; Nubias; French
Worked Collars ; Undersleeves; Insertions and
Edgings; Furniture Calico; Ladies’, Gentle
men and Childrens’ Hosiery in great variety ;
Black Alpacas from 25 to 75 cts; Bleached
and Unbleached Muslins ; -Shirting Linens
from 25 to 871 cts.; Table Diapers and Cloths;
Sheetings, bleached and unbleached ; Napkins
from 75 cts. to $3 per doz.; Linen, Ilabakuk,
Diaper, and Linen Crash, bleached and un
bleached.
Gentlemens’ Black Doeskin Gassimeres,
and a beautiful quality of French Cloths, Cae
sinetts, Tweeds, Kentucky Jeans, with every
variety of gentlemens’ wear.
Sugar, Molasses, Green and Browned Coffees
of the best quality always on hand ; Green and
Black Teas; Best Sugar-Cured Hams, Middling
and Shoulder Bacon, Baltimore eured—with a
general assortment of Groceries, Provisions,
Hardware, Qaeensware, Tinware, Medicines,
Boots, Shoes, Hats and Caps, Ac., Ae., in great
variety.
Also, Super, Extra, Best Extra, and Family
FLOUR.
MRS. M. A. SHEALEY,
May 2.—tf Towsontown, Md.
Auctioneer.
THE undersigned having taken out a Gov
ernment License for stli as well as the 2d
Congressional District, is prepared to attend
sales in any part of Baltimore or Harford coun
ties, or any other portion of said Districts, ex
cept Baltimore city.
JE&. Having removed from Sweet Air to
Towsontown, persons having business with me
will please address me at Towsontown, or ap
ply to Mr. Church, Advocate Office, Mr. Long
necker A Sons, American Office, or Mr. Nelson
Cooper, at his store.
SAMUEL G. WILSON,
Dec. s.—tAlo Towsontown, Md.
ioticeT
THE firm of Longnecker A Sons having been
dissolved, all persons having claims
against the above firm, of any kind, will nlease
present them to the undersigned, and all per
sons being in any way indebted either for sub
j scription to the Baltimore County American.or
for advertising, are requested to make immedi
ate payment to the above. All persons indebt
ed to John H. Longnecker for subscription to,
or advertising in the above paper, previous to
November 15th. 1863, are earnestly requested
to make payment as above. Bills will be seat
to all so indebted.
H. C. LONGNECKER,
J. B. LONGNECKER.
J. 11. LONGNECKER,
Jan. 7.—tf.
TOWSONTOWN
FEMALE SEMINARY.
Boarding and day school for young
Ladies.
Mn. MARGARET R. SCHENCK,
Principle.
(Late Principal of the Columbus Female Sem
inary, Ohio.)
The term, will commence on Wednesday,
February, B ih. Feb. lh—4t*
LODI COMP ANTS’
POUDRETTE.
WE again offer this celebrated Manure to
Farmers. After 25 years trial it is found
to be the cheapest and best fertilizer used,over
10,000 bbls. were sold last year, the demand ex
ceeding the supply.
For Tobacco, Corn, Potatoes and Vegetables,
it is unsurpassed.
The Company manufacture also, BoneTa-feu,
(a substitute for Super Phosphate,) from Bones,
Blood, Offal, Night Boil and Peruvian Guano,
ground fine. Price SSO per Ton.
Coe’s Phosphate; made by W. L. Bradly,
Boston. Having been appointed an Agent for
this celebrated Phosphate, we shall have a con
stant supply on hand.
Pamphlets with full particulars, with price,
may be obtained by addressing the Company’s
Agents, BOWEN A MERCER,
No. 3 Exchange Place, Baltimore.
February 25.—2 m.
plougbTcastin gs !
PLOUGH CASTINGS l!
I
rpilE attention of Farmers and Merchants is
I invited to my full aud complete stock, em
bracing all the various sizes of the Wiley,
i Woodcock, Smith, Atwood, Minor A Horton,
i Wisconsin, and other kinds, all of which will
be sold low by the single piece or ton.
Albo, a good assortment of Ploughs, at less
than regular price#, at No. 142 N. Gay street,
Baltimore. HENRY WILCOX.
Feb. 6.—tf
TO REAL ESTATE OWNERS.
| rpHE undersigned are now dealing extensive-
I A ly in the vale of FARMS and LANDS in
i all parts of Maryland, especially in Baltimore
county. Those desiring to sell at good prices,
will send us a full description.
No Sale no Charge.
a9**AU Legal Claims of soldiers prosecuted.
EATON A CO.,
Baltimore.
Office—No. 26 St. Paul Street between Lex
ington and Fayette. Feb. 4,1865.—tf.
TAKE NOTICE.
FALL STYLES OF HATS, 1864.
WE are now prepared to fur
nish our friends and thcsSsSSlS
public with the FALL STYLES RRtfg%&-
OF HATS, for Gentlemen’s wear, RMBRIR
i which will compare favorably with any sold
in the efty of Baltimore.
, ALSO, SOFT FELT HATS,
Latest pattern, for Gentleman, Youthe and
CtlUrJU™. T.rj
Oct. 16.—tf No. 106 fray etreet.
TOWSONTOWN, MD., SATURDAY. MARCH 25, 1865.
Railroad Directory.
Northern Central Railway.
TRA INS NO R TIT WA RD.
Mail leaves Calvert Station at 9.20 A. M.
Pittsburg and Erie Express 8.00 P. M.
Pittsburg and Elmira Express 10.00 P. M.
' Harrisburg Accommodation leaves at 2.50 I*. M.
Parkton Accommodation No. 1 “ 7.20 A. M.
Parkton Accommodation No. 3 “ 5.00 T. M.
TR A INS SO VTil WA RD.
Mail train arrives at Calvert Station 5.30 P. M.
Pittsburg, Elmira and Eric Express..?.oo A. M.
Harrisburg Accommodation arrives 12.2(1 A. M.
Parkton Accommodation, No. 2 8.30 A. M.
Parkton Accommodation, No. 4 7.25 P. M.
Pittsburg Express through without change of
cars.
’ Express Train leaves at 10.00 daily.
Express Train a t 8.00 daily, except Saturdays,
for Harrisburg. Pittsburg and Erie.
Express at 10.00 P. M., Sundays, for Harris
burg, Pittsburg and the West only, arrives dai
ly except Mondays.
Express at 8.00 P. M., leaves daily except
Saturdays.
Mail daily, except Sundays. Harrisburg Ac
commodation leaves daily except Sundays.—
Mail and Express will not stop between Balti
more and Parkton.
Baltimore A Ohio Railroad.
Mail Train for the Ohio river will leave Bal
timore daily (except Sunday) at 9.00 A. M.
Express Train will leave Baltimore daily at
9.40 P. M.
Both trains connect at the Ohio river for all
points West, Southwest and Northwest.
Frederick Train leaves Baltimore daily at 4.
00 P. M.; and Frederick at 7.00 A. M., Sundays
excepted.
The Ellicott’s Mills Train leaves Baltimore
at 6.20 and 10.00 A. M., and 2.00 F. M.; and El
licott’s Mills at 7.00 and 11.30 and 3.30 I*. M.
FOR WASHINGTON.
Leave Baltimore at 4.30, 7.00, 8.50, 9.40 a. m.
and 3.30, and 6.00 P. M. On Sundays at
4.30 8.50 A. M., and 3.30 and 6.00 P. M. Leave
Washington at 6.16, 8.15 and 11.15 A. M., and
3.00, 4.30, and 6.45 P. M. On Sundays at
8.15, 11.15 and 3.00 A. M., and 3.00 P. M. The
O. a. in. and 3.30 p. in. trains ouly from Balti
more, and the 8.15 a. m. and 3.00 p. m. from
Washington stop at way points. The 7.00, 8.50
a. m. and the 3.30 and 6.00 p. m. from Balti
more, and the 6.15 and 8.15 a. ni. and 3.ooand
4.30 p. m. trains from Washington connectwith
trains on the Annapolis road.
Philadelphia Railroad.
Way Mail Train for Philadelphia and way
stations, at 8.25 a. m.
Express Train for Philadelphia and New
York at 9.20 a. m.
Express Train for Philadelphia and New
York at 1.10 p. m.
Way Mail Train for Philadelphia and way
stations at 4.25 p. m.
Express Train for Philadelphia and N. York
at 6.35 p. m.
Above trains leave daily except. Sundays.—
On Sundays for Philadelphia and New York
at 9.25 p. ni.
For Salisbury and intermediate points on
Delaware Railroad take 9.25 p. m., train, and
for Dover, Deleware, take the 1.00 p. in;, train.
Western Maryland Railroad.
Leave Union Bridge at 4.35 A. M. and 8.47
A. M. Leave Baltimore at 9.20 A. M. and 3.
P. M.
Stages connect daily with Manchester and
Hampstead, at Glen Morris Station, on arrival
of 9.20 A. M. train from Baltimore, and for
Uniontown, Taneytown and Emmittsburg. on
arrival of same train at Linwood Station.
BALTIMORE & TOWSONTOWN
RAILWAY.
ON an after Monday, October 10th, 1864, cars
will
LEAVE BALTIMORE EVERY HOUR,
In the Charles Street Cars, corner of Baltimore
and North streets,
FROM 7 A. M. TO 6 P. M., except 12 M.
And will leave
CORNER EAST AND ENSOR STS., Old Town,
EVERY HOUR,
FROM 7.15 A. M. TO 6.15 P. M.,
Except at 12.15 noon.
The cars connect at North Boundary Avenue.
LEAVE TOWSONTOWN EVERY HOUR,
FROM 7 A. M. TO 7 P. M., except at 12 M.
A car will leave the corner of EAST AND
ENSOR STREETS at 11 P. M.
Oct. 15.—tf A. D. SANIvS, Agent.
CHANGE OF HOUEsT
Baltimore, Gatonsville & Ellicott’s Hills
RAILWAY.
FALL AND WINTER ARRANGEMENT.
ON and after Monday, October 3d, 1864, cars
will run HOURLY,
FROM 7 A. M. TO 12 M.,
AMI)
FROM 2 TO 7 P. M., DAILY,
Sundays included.
PASSENGERS TO AND FROM ELLICOTT’S
MILLS will leave daily, Sundays included, at
8 and 11 A. M., and 2 and 5 P. M.
Depot west end of Baltimore street.
Oct. B.—tf
Substitute Brokers.
Special Notice.
Headquarters for Drafted and En
rolled Men for the City and
Counties.
WANTED this day, FIFTY good Alien or
Contraband SUBSTITUE3, for which
we will pay the highest price. We invite all
of our friends (who are subject to draft) not to
fail in procuring a Substitute for three years,
Jirevious to draft, which may take place in a
ew days ; (and as our motto was from thefirst,
so it is now, to deal fairly with all men.) As
time is money, you can call and leave your
orders and no further personal time would be
required and your full discharge papers for
three years would be brought to your place of
business for settlement.
'iHft-As we do not ask for money in advance,
call early at the "OLD ESTABLISHED OF
FICE,” Lairf Buildings, St Paul street, Room
No. 6, up stairs.
WM. H. BAYZAND ft CO.,
Feb. 4.—2 m. Authorized Agents.
The Old Established and Reliable
Substitute Agency,
GEO. COLTON & CO.,
28 Second Street, Nearly Opposite the Dost Office,
HAVING been for a long time in the busi
iness of furnishing Districts and individ
uals with Substitutes, and enlisting Volunteers
for the Armv and Navy, and being thoroughly
familiar with every department of our occupa
tion, We can offer great facilities to those who
may need our services. Those who wanttoen
ter the service, either as Substitutes or Volun
teers, as well as those who want Substitutes for
themselves or friends, would do well to give us
a call.
ffi&r Contracts taken for filling quotas, as
heretofore.
Exemption papers of all kinds carefully
E repared ana advice furnished. Claims of all
inds collected with dispatch.
RFMEMBER THE PLACE!
28 Second Street, Baltimore, Md*
Feb. 25.—-2 m.
COME OUT OF THE DRAFT 1
Enroled and Drafted Hen of the Oity and
Counties,
NOW is your time to putin good alien SUB
STITUTES, at the shortest possible notice,
and Cheaper thax the Cheapest, thereby ob
taining a release for 3 years, with a guarantee
from us besides, SUBS ARE SCARCE and the
PRICES GOING UP EVERY DAY. Therefore,
all Enroled Men who intend to furnish a> SUB.
Erevious to the taking place of the Draft, can
e supplied by making early application at our
I offiee, 76 West Fayette street, Bible House, up
stairs, and at oUr office, EllieotPs Mills, 4th doOT
from the Provost Marshal’s office.
I We do not ask for any money until we present
vour ftill dieharge for three years.
' Vm. B. BABSCIR ft CO.,
Jan. Authorised Agents.
Official Record for 1865.
Public Officers of the United States.
President —Abraham Lincoln, of Illinois.
Vice President —Hanuibal Hamlin, of Maine;
after March 4th, Andrew Johnson, of Tenn.
Secretary of State —William H. Seward, of
New York.
Secretary of the Treasury —William Pitt Fes
senden, of Maine.
Secretary of War —Edwin M. Stanton, of
Pennsylvania.
Secretary of the Navy —Gideon Welles, of Con
necticut.
Secretary of the Interior —John P. Usher, of
Indiana.
Postmaster General —Win. Dennison, of Ohio.
t torney General —James J. Speed, of Ken
tucky.
Judge Advocate General —Jos. Holt, of Ken
tucky.
Provost-Marshal General —James B. Fry.
Commissioner of Internal Revenue— Joseph J.
Lewis, of Pennßy vania.
Commissioner of Agriculture —lsaac Newton,
of Pennsylvania.
Chief-Justice of the Supreme Court —Salmon
I’. Chase, of Ohio.
Public Officers of Maryland.
Governor —Augustus W. Bradford, Baltimore
county.
Lieut. Governor —Christopher C. Cox, Talbot
county.
Secretary of State —William B. Hill, Baltimore
city.
Attorney General— Alexander Randall, Anne
Arundel county.
Adjutant General— John S. Berry, Baltimore
countv.
Comptroller —Robert J. Jump, Caroline co.
Treasurer —Robert Fowler, Baltimore countv.
Commissioner of Land Office —William L. W.
Seabrook, Frederick county.
Judges Courtof Appeals —B. J. Goldsberough,
Ist district; James L. Bartol, 2d district; 8.
Morris Cochran, 3rd district; Daniel Weisel,
4th district; Richard I. Bowie, sth district.
Superintendent of Public Instruction-*— L. Van
Bokkelen, Baltimore county.
United States Senators —Reverdy Johnson,
Baltimore city ; J. A. J. Creswell, Ceeil co.
Representatives in Congress —J. A. J. Creswell,
Ist district; Edwin H.‘Webster, 2J district;
Henry Winter Davie, 3rd district; Francis
Thomas, 4th district; Benjaman G. Harris, sth
district.
Public Officers of Baltimore County.
Judge— Richard Grason.
State's Attorney —John T. Ensor.
Clerk —John H. Longnecker.
Sheriff —Tames Thompson.
Register —John Philpot.
Treasurer —Christian Gore.
Judges of the Orphans’ Court —Stephen W.
Falla, James A. Standi ford, Joseph Merryman.
County Commissioners —Joshua F. Cockoy,
James Button, Daniel J. McCauley.
State Senator —Edward P. Philpot.
House of Delegates —W. H. Hoffman, George
Slothower, D. K. Luaby, David King, Z. Poteet,
N. H. Parker.
Collectors of Internal Revenue —Jan. L. Ridge
ly, 2d district ; George W. Sanda, sth district.
Assessors of Internal Revenue —John W. Web
ster, 2d district; Win. Welling, sth district.
Boat'd of Enrolment, Id District —Robt. Catb
cart, Provost Marshal; Jona.J. Chapman, Com
missioner; J. Robert Ward, Surgeon.
Board of Enrolment, s tk District —John C.
Holland, Provost Marshal; Benjamin Whit
wright, Commissioner; Dr. Dorsey, Surgeon.
Miscellaneous.
WE have on hand and are constantly re
ceiving, all the different varieties of
COAL, fur family use, steam, blacksmith and
limeburners’ purposes, which we offer for sale
in quantities to suit, at the lowest market pri
ces. Our country friends, sending their teams
for Coal, will find our yard the most convenient
one in the city to load at.
Coal delivered promptly at any of the sta
tions on the Nortnern Central, or Philadelphia,
Wilmington and Baltimore railroad.
W. F. H. ONION,
Corner Lombard street and Central Avenue.
Feb. 20.—1 y.
JOS. E. QUINLAN,
W HOLES ALK AN D RETAIL DEALER IN
FLOUR, FEED, GROUND BONE.
GUANOS, LIME, HAIR, CEMENT,
CALCINED PLASTER,
Seeds of all Kinds,
Constantly on hand at
No- 149 North Gay st, near Exeter, Baltimore
I AM at all times buving WOOL, for which I
am paying the HIGHEST CASH PRICES.
JOS. E. QUINLAN.
April 28, 1804.—1 y
JOHN D. HAMMOND,
SADDLE, HARNESS, TRUNK,
AND COLLAR MANUFACTURER,
WHOLESALE A RETAIL,
No- 848 Baltimore st., APSfiUEb
|E||||j|p ©g 8 doors below Eutaw
r\-- ti-rJrfi N° use ' Baltimore, gJRMfI
MANUFACTURES and keeps constantly on
hand every description of SADDLES.
HARNEBB, TRUNKS, VALISES, CARPET
BAGS, COLLARS, and every other article in
his line. All orders executed with neatnees
and dispatch. July 9, 1864.—1 y
JACOB HOFFMAN,
SADDLE, HARNESS AND COLLAR MAN
UFACTURER.
No. 176 North Gay Street, Baltimore.
MANUFACTERES and keeps constantly on
hand all kinds of light and heavy Har
ness, Collars, Saddles, Bridles, Whips, Ao. Old
Harness taken in exchango. Country work of
all kinds punctually attended to. Repairing
promptly executed.
Feb. 4.—3 m.
SCHUCHMANN A HEIM,
jb
MANUFACTURERS OF
Traveling Trunks,
Valise# and Ladies Bonnet Boxes,
No. 6 W. Baltimore Street,
BALTIMORE.
TRUNKS MADE TO ORDER
Jan. 14, 1865.—1 y.
JOSEPH REILLY’S
SALOON & RESTAURANT,
No. 11 South street, Baltimore.
OYSTERS, CAME, Ae, served
at short notice.
English, Irish and Beotoh ALES,
and BROWN STOUTS of most approved brands.
Superior six-years-old ENGLISH ALB, from
the celebrated brewery t>f Burton on Trent, to
be had on draught. An infallible remedy for
Dyspepsia. Sep 12.—6 m
' #
HATTER’S
Pure Flaxseed I>T*ops,
FOR COUGHS, COLDS, AND ALL AFFEC
TIONS OF THE THROAT,
No. 133 North Gay strut, Baltimore.
ALL kinds of CAKES AND CONFECTION
ERY, of the best quality, on reasonable
erms. NbV. 16. —tf
GEORGE O. MoCOULL,
UNDERTAKER,
No. 131 Saratoga street, 1 dor west of Howard
TS prepared to furnish COFFIRB at 26 jHK
1 oent.lek* than the usual price, and of ine
finish, for cash. Jan. 26, 1806.— 1 y.
Select f octt^.
OUR HEROES.
(Thk poem given below lias been recited by Mr. Mur
dock before large audiences in Philadelphia and Balti
more, whore it was received with shouts, and applaud
ad verse by verse : ]
Cherks ! cheers, for our heroes'
Not those who wear stars;
Not those who wear eagles,
And leaflets and bars ;
We know they are gallant,
And honor them too,
For bravely maintaining
The Bed, White, and Blue!
But cheers for our soldiers.
Rough, wrinkled, and brown;
The men who make heroes,
And ask no renown:
Unselfish, untiring,
Intrepid and true.
The bulwark surrounding
The Red, White, and Blue !
Our patriot soldiers!
When treason arose,
And Freedom's own children
Assailed her as foes ;
When Anarchy threatened
And Order withdrew,
They rallied to rescue
The Red, White, and Blue!
Upholding our banner
On many a field,
Tho doom of the traitor
They valiantly sealed;
And, worn with the conflict,
Found rigor anew,
When victory greeted
The Red, White, and Blue!
Yet loved ones have fallen—
And still, where thej> sleep,
A sorrowing Nation
Hh&ll silently weep;
And Spring’s fairest flowers,
In gratitude, strew
O'er those who hare cherished
The Red, White, and Blue !
But glory immortal
Is waiting them now ;
And chaplets unfading
•Shall bind every brow.
When called by the trumpet,
At Time’s great review,
They stand, who defended
The Red, White, and Blue !
A JUG OF RUM.
Here, only by a cork controlled,
And slender walls of earthen mould.
In all the pomp of death, repose
The seeds of many a bloody nose :
The chattering tongue, the horrid oath ;
The fist for lighting, nothing loth ;
The passion which no word can tame,
That burst like sulphur into flame;
The nose carbunkled, glowing, red ;
The bloated eye, the broken head;
The tree that bears the deadly fruit,
Of murder, maiming, and dispute.
Assault that Innocence assails,
The images of gloomy jails;
The giddy thought on mischief bent;
The midnight hour in riot spent;
All these within this jng appear,
And Jack the hangman in the rear.
ipsMianflroji
RULING BY LOVE.
Experience of a School-Teacher.
‘What is the secret of your discipline ?’
inquired a young teacher of Mrs. L , a
veteran of the school-room. ‘You are not
half so severe as I ain obliged to be, and
yet you have more perfect order in every
thing.’
‘Oh, you know,’ was tho reply, ‘that I
have had years of experience. I should be
but a poor scholar if I had not learnod in
my own schools many things.’
‘Yes, certainly,’ said the other ; ‘but were
you always as successful ? What faculty of
head or heart carries you so easily through
all sorts of difficult places ! Won’t you have
the kindness to tell me what you do, or
don’t do to get on so well with childreu,
and parents, too ?’
‘lf I can suggest anything to be of ser
vice to you,’ said Mrs. L , ‘I should be
happy to do so. In the first plac, I have
but few definite rules, and govern as little
as possible. Then I -observe my pupils
closely, marking their individual peculiari
ties, and treat tfiein according to their de
velopment oftalent and character. Some
I lead by their strong points : in others I
stimulate the weaker faculties; in all I
play upon the better nature, and avoid all
1 cau the sharp resistive qualities so active
in vicious boys and ill-governed children
generally.
‘I do not punish as much as I once did ;
I throw my pupils upon their own sense of
honor and right, making them feel that I
trust them, and it often works like a charm.
But above all, I make them feel that I love
them, and am seeking their good in every
thing. The majority of nupils in every
school will respond to kindness and behave
better and learn more for such friendliness
than for any other sort of discipline. A
teacher, to be sure, must command respect,
and not allow herself to be trifled with ;
and in cases of willful or malicious disobe
dience her authority must be fully main
tained ; bat through these years I have
found, as a general thing, love to be the
strongest of all authority in the school
room.’
‘I love my pupils,’ said the young teach
er ; ‘I would be glad to do all I could - for
their welfare; and they love me, I do not
doubt; but oh, Mrs. L ! many of them
are so repulsive, I never could get any noarer
them than kindness and duty obliged mo.’
‘I appreciate all that,’ said Mrs. L ;
‘one has to love sometimes against every
thing—to love, not for the worthiness of
the object, but for its need of being loved.
Of coarse, this involves some self-denial,
and a little self-discipline, bat the true
teacher will accept it, for her work is of a
missionary character.’
‘Can you do that, Mrs. L , for such
boys as your Jack and Jim ? Have you the
genius for loving so perfectly ?’
‘lfyou will allow me,’ said Mrs. L ,
‘I will tell you a story of my experience.—
Some years ago I was principal of a depart
ment in a large public school in P . The
department had been badly managed for a
long time, and I found it at first a very dif
ficult position. I knew there was much ex
pectea of me, and I was very sensitive
about success or failure. Oh, what a task
it was to get those 120 undisciplined chil
dren into order—and with feeble health,
too ! I think I could not havo done it had
I not been sustained by prayer, and a daily
reliance upon God, my Father.
“There were many foreigners among my
somber, Germans mostly, and some Irish.
I had been particularly warned of one boy,
who bad been for years considered the worst
in school. It took but a few days to find
him out—a rough, ill-condi
tioned lad as you oversaw in a school-room.
His father was a passionate man, and Wal
ter had been beaten and scolded until the
good that was in him had apparently al
most died out. He was an inveterate whis
perer, would not study, and played truant
some part of nearly every day ; he would
•lip out when my back was turned at the
black-board while his class was reciting.—
I tried every way I could to stimulate his
ambition; I gave him rewards and pres
ents, but they lasted only a few days, add
then he tore them up or gave them awaiy
in my presence, and grew worse than before.
‘One day I went borne from school fairly
worried out with his halefulness, and sfct
down alone to think what was next to be
done. I pitied the poor child that there
was nobody to care -for and save him ; tye
was bo unlovely that he suffered a sort ot
abuse from every band that touched him.
Then I thought bow infinitely patient and
loving Ohriit bad been with iny own Way
wardness, and I resolved to make one more
effort for this sinning, frisndless child.—
So I knelt down and asked God for strength
1 and for love, and when I went out of my
room I saw all clear.
! “Tho next day the boy’s father came
i dragging him into the school-room, with an
angry, discouraged look. ‘Here’s Walt.,’
; said he—‘l don’t know what ails the boy,
! but I can’t do anything with him. If ho
! runs away again he Bhan’t come to school
i another day—l’ll put him iuto a shop to
work.’
i “I think we shall have no more trouble,
i Mr. J ,’ said I; ‘Walter will be good
uow.’
The man looked astonished and went
| away, but I felt as if victory was uear at
' hand. After tho cxcitenieut of such a
i scene had subsided, I called Walter to rny
desk and spoko in the kindest manuer I
i could : ‘Walter, what makes yon such a
! bad boy ?’
‘He answered sullenly, ‘I don’t know ; I
1 cau’t help it.’
, ‘ ‘Wouldn’t yon rather bo good so people
i will lovo you—so your teacher will love
1 you, and be glad to seo your faco coming
; into the school ?’
‘‘l can’t be good—l never was good,’
j said the boy.
! “Couldn’t you be good if I would love
you, Walter?’ *
j * ‘You couldn’t love me—nobody ever
; loved me,’ said Walter, looking down very
restlessly.
‘ ‘Yes, Walter,’ said I, ‘if you would try
to be good I could lore you, and I would
love You, and be the best friend in the
world.’
‘The boy looked up as if a strange, new
thought bad struck him.
‘I repeated my words, and the tears start
! ed a little, too, for I was tired and nervous
with my cares. A moment I waited for an
I answer, and then he spoke, choking down
his emotion : ‘You can't love me !’
I “Again 1 assured him in the gentlest
; manner, and then he said, ‘lf I should try
j and should fail once or twice, could you
, lovo me then a little ?’ I told him yes.
‘He stood another moment trembling and
| swelling, and then he broke down entirely,
and cried as if bis heart was bursting. I
let him cry, and did not shut back my own
tears, while the whole school looked on.—
Finally, when he had done sobbing so as to
speak, he said in a voice that didn’t seem
like Walter’s‘Ob, ifyou’U love me, I’ll be
a good boy ’
‘I talked awhile to 300 the and encourage
him, and then dismissed him to his seat.—
Before he went he took my hand in his dir
ty brown fingers, aud with the tears raining
over it, kissed it again and again. I did
oot require many lessons that day; he laid
his head on his desk and cried most of the
time. Twice he came to my desk, as if
afraid to believe, to ask the same question
—*Can you love me, Mrs. L ? Oh, I’ll
do anything ifyon’ll love, me !’ Once I put
my arm rouud the great, uncombed, unwash
ed German boy, and kissed his forehead.
‘Walter was conquered. The next
day he came to school in tidy clothing,
k washed, combed, and in his right mind. I
; had no more trouble, but I had, while he
remained in my room, all the obedience
• and kindness saeh a boy can give. By
taking some extra pains wihfc his lessons—
and that I was very willing to do—he was
1 in a few months promoted with credit to &
higher department. In return, lie delight
ed in doing errands for me; and through
1 the whole season he searched the country
f for miles around to get flowers for my vase.
The incident was a trying one to me, but
! besides the good to poor Walter, it was
worth a dozen whippings to the school.’
i ‘Why,’ said the young teacher, ‘it is in
deed liko missionary work to kiss dirty
■ boys, but you have the genius for it.’
1 ‘We are all aware,’ answered Mr. L ,
1 ‘that to teach successfully, one needs the
! devotedness of a missionary. We know,
* also, that no great moral good is ever done
• but by giving out of one’s heart and life to
■ the needy and the unworthy. To use one’s
1 faculties of friendship and kindness without
[ stint or grudging, is all that genius means,
as yon apply the term. And it has for the
l giver as well as the receiver its own abun
-1 dant and blessed reward.' —Phrenological
1 Journal.
; OirWealth.
f There is no doubt much speculation in
the manufacture and sale of shares of Oil
Companies, and much of the capital that
! finds its way into them will no donbt prove
' an entire loss to the inventors, but this fact
1 should not be allowed to mitigate against
* the full development of the great oil basin
* on the western borders of our State. That
L there is oil there in great abundance, aud
• that this oil is of immense value, are facts
* daily proved by the market reports of pro
' ductiou and prices. The following is the
’ quantity of coal oil (gallons) exported from
5 five ports, January Ito September 3:
! 1863. 1864.
' From New York, 14,004,493 13,821,423
Boston, 1,005,574 1,344,707
Philadelphia, 5,141,347 4,282,646
r; Baltimore, 605,889 729,792
; Portland, 2,271 288,567
i •
J Total exp. fr. U. S., 20,965,324 20,467,135
Same time in 1862, 5,889,936
* These figures show that there is no fall
' ing ofl'in thesupplyof oil, as had been previ
ously feared and predicted by those who
• could not rationally and satisfactorily, ac
’ count for the wonderful existence of oil so
* far below the surface of the earth. There
1 has been a small increase in the supply the
present year over that of last, and there is
1 reason to believe that bad as much atten
-5 tion been given to the sinking of wells as
there has been to that shorter cut to a for
, tune by the manufacture of company shares,
- the increased yield of oil would have been
- as great in 1864 over 1863 as it was in 1863
s over that of 1862. But it does not follow
1 that the loss to inventors in unproductive
shares will result in no good. The specula
• tion now so active in oil stocks is attract
-1 ing a great amount of capital and labor to
: the region, which will sooner or later tell
■ favorably in the greatly increased produc
> tion of oil. No new and valuable source
I of wealth can be promptly developed with
’ out more or less of speculation. The sil
ver mines of Mexico, the gold mines of
r California, and the anthracite and bitumin
. ous coal mines of Pennsylvania, would not
b&ve reached their present development of
; wealth, had they been wholly separated
I from speculation in one shape or another,
in twice or thrice the time since tbeir dis
. covery, but for the stimulus afforded in the
• hope of speedy and large profits from com
paratively small ventures.
“Broke or his Rest.”—About the droll
; est man alive is a chap now in Chicago,
well known in northern Vermont by the
name of “Tim Wait.” Say what you might
to Tim, be was always ready with a repar
tee, and a good ono. On one occasion he
came into a hotel in Burlington, looking
rather jaded and down in the mouth.
“What’s the matter, Tim r said one of
the company. “You look rather the worse
for wear.”
“Why, you see,” said Tim, “I haven’t
slept a wink for three nights—last night,
to-night and to-morrow night.”
; Mr innocent young sportsman, in or
der to shoot a Squirrel on the top of a tall
tree, climbed another one close by, and on
being asked the reason for so foolish a freak,
said that he “didn't want to strain his gun
by a long shot P*
Sabbath Physiology.
The Almighty rested one seventh of the
time of creation, commanding man to ob
serve an equal repose. The neglect of this
injunction will always, sooner or later, bring
mental, moral, and physical death.
Rest is an invariable law of animal life.
The busy heart beats, beats ever, from in
fancy to ago and yet for a large part of the
time is in a state of repose.
Win. Pitt died of apoplexy at the early
age of forty seven. When the destinies of
nations hung in a large measure on his do
ings, ho felt compelled j.o give au unremit
ting attention to affairs of state. Sabbath
brought no rest to him, and soon the uu
willing brain give signs of exhaustion. —
But his presence in Parliament was con
ceived to be indispensable for explanation
and defense of the public policy. Under
such circumstances, it was his custom to
eat heartily substantial food, most highly
seasoned, just before going to his place, in
order to afford the body that strength and
to excite the mind to that activity deemed
necessary to the momentous occasion.—
But under the high tension both brain and
body perished prematurely.
Not long ago, one of the most active bus
iness men of England found his affairs so
extended, that he deliberately determined
to devote his Sabbaths to his accounts.—
He had a mind of a wide grasp. His views
were so comprehensive, so far-seeing, that
wealth came in upon him like a flood. He
purchased a cou n try seat at the cost of £400,-
000, determining that lie would now have
rest and quiet. But it was too late. As he
stopped ou his threshold after a survey of
his late purchase, lie become apoplectic.
Although life was not destroyed, he only
lives to be the wreck of a man.
It used to bo said that a brick kiln “must
be kept burning over the Sabbath it is
now known to be a fallacy. There can be
no “must’’ agaiust the divine command.—
Even uow it is a received opinion that iron
blast furnaces will bring ruin if not kept in
continual operation. Eighteen years ago,
an Englishman determined to keep the Sab
bath holy as to them, with the result, as his
books testified, that he made more iron in
six days than he did beiore in seven ; that
lie made more iron in a given time, in pro
portion to the hands and number and size
of the furnaces, than any establishment in
England which was kept in operation du
ring the Sabbath. ,
In onr own New York, the mind of a man
who made half a million a year weDt out in
the night of madness and an early grave
within two years, from the very strain put
upon it by a variety of enterprises, every
one of which succeeded.
“It will take about five years to clear
them off,” said an observant master of an
Ohio canal boat, alluding to the wearing
out influences on the boatmen, who work
ed on Sabbaths as well as on other days.
As the boatmen and firemen of the steam
ers on the Western rivers, which never lay
by on the Sabbath, seven years is the aver
age of life. The observance, therefore, of
the seventh portion of our time for the pur
poses of rest is demonstrably a physiologi
cal necssity— a law of our nature.— Hall’s
Journal of Health.
How can Farming bo made more At
tractive ?
The following are some of the scraps
and shreds, drawn at varions time 3 from the
discussions of the Wapping (Mass.) Far
mer's Club :
1. By less hard work. Farmers often
undertake more than they can do well, and
consequently work too early and too late.
2. By more system. Tho farmers should
have a time to begin and stop labor. They
should put more mind and machinery into
their work. They shonid theorize as well
as practice, and let both go together.—
Farming is healthy, moral and respectable;
in the long run profitable. The farmers
should keep good stock and be out of debt.
The farm is the best place to begin and end
life, and hence so many in the cities and
professional line covet a rural home.
3. By taking care of health. Farmers x
have a healthy variety of exercise, but too
often neglect cleanliness, omit bathing, eat
irregularly and hurriedly, sleep in ill-venti
lated apartments, and expose themselves
to cold. Nine-tenths of the human diseas
es arise from cold or intemperance. Fre
quent bathiug is profitable, so is fresh air,
deliberation at the dinner table and rest
after a meal.
4. By adorning' the home. Nothing is
lost by a pleasant home. Books, papers,
music and reading should all be brought to
bear upon the indoor family entertainment;
and neatness, order, comfort, shrubbery,
flowers and fruit should harmonize all with
out. Home should be a sanctuary so hap
py and holy that children will love it, wo
men delight in it, manhood crave it and old
age enjoy it. There would be less deser
tions of old homesteads if pains were ta
ken to make them agreeable. Ease, order,
health and beauty are compatible with farm
life and were ordained to go with it.
An Australian Election.
In the Australian colonies women are
permitted to vote in municipal elections. —
Lately in Victoria they voted for members
of the Provincial Parliament. The Lon
don Times, in referring to the matter, says :
The women seem to have availed them
selves in considerable numbers of the priv
ilege obtained. * * * It is recorded
that the women voted as wisely as the
meu ; that they generally voted for. the
best educated candidate, that they showed
contempt for the secrecy of the ballot;
and that, espousing the cause which they
took up with a heartness and devotion inci
dental to the female character, they gener
ally gave plumpers for the candidate of
their choice. In a franchise so low as that
enjoyed by the Australian colonies, we ea
sily believe that this new element especial
ly as the female votes were given in respect
of property, would be a marked improve
ment. It will be very curious to see wheth
er this innovation, thus accidentally intro
duced, is allowed to continue, or whether
the colonists will persevere in the course
upon which they stumbled. In the latter
case it would seem hardly to be possible to
leave matters as they are, or to prevent the
infusion of a much larger female elemeut
into the constituency.’
An Original Idea. — One of our good
friends, in writing to us concerning the con
dition of our men when they return from
Southern prisons, suggests that when ex
changes are made, they should be by the
ponnd. We fat our prisoners; the rebels
starve theirs; and our friend thinks that
by exchanging pound for pound, w© should
get, on an average about five of our men for
two rebels. — Vox Populi.
(7*The Peach, originally, was a poison
ous almond. Its fleshy parts were then used
to poison arrows, and it was for this pur
pose introduced into Persia. The trans
plantation and cultivation, however, not
only removed its poisonous qualities, but
produced the delicious fruit we now enjoy.
The Force of Education. —Nothing was
so much dreaded in our school-boy days aa
to be punished by getting between two girls.
Ah, the force of education 1 In after years
we learn to submit to such things without
shedding a tear.
water is unwholesome—SOj
too, is a standing debt,
NO. 12.

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