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The Baltimore County union. [volume] (Towsontown, Md.) 1865-1909, March 20, 1909, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016368/1909-03-20/ed-1/seq-4/

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KEEPING THE EOT ON THE FABH.
“A farmer whose son is also a farm
er” is writing his autobiography for
the World’s Work. The editor has
asked him to tell particularly how his
son came to enjoy farm life and not
hanker after the alluremebts of the
city.
‘‘From the very first,” says this
rural philospher, ‘‘my partner and I
set out to make life enjoyable for our
children,” his ‘‘partner” being his
wife. There follow tales of porter
house steaks which ‘‘would have ap
petized the jaded palate of a dyspeptic
president,” and of huge bowls of
strawberries and cream ‘‘which Queen
Victoria might have envied.” For
playfellows the fortunate young folks
of this farm had calves, colts, horses,
pigs, pigeons, Angora rabbits, dogs,
birds, guinea pigs ‘‘and even a white
rat!”
Boys and girls do not enter this
world of their own desire. The com
mandment which bids them honor
their fathers and mothers has an un
written corollary. Parents must honor
and comfort their children. The
farmer in the magazine did this in
* setting forth the best he had in thought
and food. It is likely that many a son
has gone further astray than ‘‘off the
farm” for lack of such a keen sense
of loving responsibility at the head of
the home. Anyway, the boy is not
kept to the acres by the selling of the
best joints to the city markets while
the chuck steak is served to the
family.— N. Y. World.
HUMANE SLAUGHTERING.
In Germany, where the retail meat
dealer is usually his own butcher,
efforts are being made —as elsewhere
—to substitute humane slaughtering
for the oldtime practices that have
caused much suffering. Saxony is
taking the lead, and now has strict
laws forbidding bleeding until the an
imals have been made unconscious.
Cattle and other animals are stunned
by a blow in the centre of the fore
head, usually with something more
certain than the hammer or ax of a
few years ago. Many butchers apply
the slaughtering mask, which covers
the eyes and has a sharp bolt that is
driven into the brain by a single blow
from a wooden hammer; but less
strength and skill are required in ap
paratus using powder —one of these
being in the form of a tube like a tele
phone receiver, that projects a bolt
when the cartridge is exploded by
gentle tapping, while another fires a
sharp-pointed bullet instead of the
bolt. An improved instrument just
introduced into England is the poleax
with a wire through the wooden han
dle for pulling the trigger. In Ger
man, Italian, Swiss and other cities
abattoirs are public institutions, where
butchers go to slaughter their animals
under municipal supervision.
A PLAGUE OF LOCUSTS.
Algeria and Tunis have suffered
from an extraordinary invasion of
locusts. The locusts arrived from the
direction of the deserts in swarms so
thick as to hide the sun. They cover
the ground as with a yellow carpet,
and sometimes render the railways so
slippery that trains can hardly run.
At this stage they are not voracious,
being engaged principally in laying
their eggs. But forty days later the
young locusts, not yet winged, begin
to run about, devouring every green
thing, including not only leaves, but
even the bark and tender shoots of
trees. The hordes, advancing in a
body, sometimes cover an area of
several square miles. Barricades of
cloth, surmounted with waxed strips,
erected in the line of march, arrest
the progress of the insects, which are
unable to crawl up the smooth sur
face. Passing along the line of the
barricades they fall into ditches dug
for the purpose, where they are killed
with corrosive liquids. Another
method is to smooth descending paths,
ending in poisoned ditches. The in
sects follow the descents and they go
to their deaths.
HORBE*FACTS.
Have his harness fit.
He’ll last very much longer.
Above all, do not overtax his
strength.
Give him a little water very often.
Don’t give him a big drink directly
after a meal.
. Don’t allow him to eat too fast.
Even scatter his gram on a clean floor.
Don’t beat a stupid horse —that
only proves the driver’s stupidity.
Stay with him while he is shod —
the shoer may hit him over the head,
ruining him.
A few days’ rest, with earth to
stand on, unshod, will do him more
good than veterinary treatment in
many cases.
WEEDS AND GRASS.
The earth is seemingly able to pro
duce weeds or grass, whether fertile
or poor, and they always appear at
the same time, when the crops need
the most care. Weeds are beneficial
to a certain extent, although injuri
ous, for the gardener is often com
pelled to eradicate them when he
would not otherwise give the garden
his attention. By so doing he keeps
the soil in a fine triable condition for
the desired crop. Weeds, however,
should be removed as soon as they
appear; by so doing the work can be
more easily done, and the stirring of
the soil will then be required only to
a moderate depth.
Gyer—‘‘There goes a man the
weather seldom agrees with.” Myer
—‘‘So? Who is he?” Gyer—"He’s
a government weather forecaster.”
Corrttpondenct Baltimore County Union.
SCIENTIFIC MISCELLANY.
Birth of the Solar System—Sugar Cured
Wood—A Metal for High Speeds—Die
tance Signals In Fogs—A Crooked Par
allel-Precious Ore In a Dump—lm
proved Picture Telegraphy—Rye Sav
ing Moderation In Light—Volcano Ge
ology, Etc.
i
In the new nebular hypothesis of Prof. T. J. J.
See, it is assumed that a spiral nebula was
formed by two or more streams of cosmic dust,
which met in such away as to produce a whirl
ing motion about a central vortex. This nebula
i was much larger than the present solar system,
and as It colled up under its own gravitation,
the spirals were gradually drawn nearer to
> gether, and the nuclei formed in the colls gath
’ ered more cosmic dust, beginning the planets,
; which at first moved in elliptic paths of great ec-
I centricity. The resistance of the nebula re
| duced the orbits in size, giving their present re
I markable roundness. The limits of the Solar
System may be still unknown, for the orbit of
| Neptune is almost circular, and this indicates
I that, even at this great distance from the center,
the nebula offered much resistance to moving
bodies, and must have had sufficient density to
| form several large planets beyond those now
I known.
'
The new process announced by Consul Oli
vares, of Managua, is designed to make soft
wood proof against the ravages of the termites,
or white ants,—which in the tropics often de
stroy the finest buildings in six months,—and is
specially recommended to makers of furniture
> and woodenware intended for use in tropical
; countries. Of untreated woods only eucalyptus
and teak resist the termites. The treatment
consists in boiling the newly cut timber in a
saccharine solution, which extracts the air and
coagulates the albumen in the sap, and then
rapidly drying at fairly high temperature. The
hard, homogeneous product—which does not
shrink, warp or split—resists.the dry rot of
temperate lands as well as the tropic termites.
Titanium is said to be the only metal suitable
for the bearings and axles of certain modern
gasoline motors, which run at speeds as high as
8,000 revolutions per minute. The metal is ob
tained from rutile, or titanium dioxide, a min
eral of little commercial Importance hitherto.
A
The fogpboneof R. H. Marriott, of Brooklyn,
is designed to prevent collisions at sea by a com
bination of wireless telephony and the ordinary
fog bell or tbo submarine bell, and its action de
pends upon the fact that the sound of the bell
travels in air about 1,000 feet per second, or
slightly faster in water while the transmission
of the same sound by the. wireless telephone is
practically instantaneous, or at the rate of light
—about 186,000 miles a.second. As the man in
the pilot-house catches the sound of the bell in
the telephone receiver, he presses the button
that starts an instrument resembling a stop
watch. When the sound of the bell arrives by
air or water waves he stops the instrument, and
the dial—lnstead of indicating seconds like the
watch—shows the miles and feet the sound has
traveled. At the distance of two miles the air
sound would be heard about ten seconds after
that of the telephone. When the bell is next
heard, the indicator shows whether the distance
has increased or diminished, and thus the navi,
gator is notified if there is danger of collision.
***
It was decreed by the Convention of 1818 and
the Treaty of Washington of 1846 that the boun
dary between the United States and Canada
from the Lake of the Woods to the Pacific—a
distance of 1270 miles—should follow the forty
ninth parallel. The surveyors who have lately
completed the location of the boundary have
found that the astronomical parallel varies from
a direct circle around the earth, and Prof. Otto
Klotz explains the curious fact that the line, in
stead of being straight, Is at one point 800 feet
south of the direct circle and at the other place
600 feet north. It was decided that the astro
nomical parallel-or line through places where
the Pole is 41° from the zenith—should be the
acoepted boundary. This decision was followed,
but local attraction in some places deflects the
plumb line and therefore the zenith, and the
astronomical forty-ninth parallel proves to be a
quite irregular line.
A
The most valuable pile of waste known is
that lately discovered at the Wheal Trenwith
mine near St. Ives, Eng. The Cornish miners 60
years ago used only simple ores, rejecting com
plex ores as refractory, and uranium ore sent to
the smelter as black copper was returned as rub
bish. The dump heap of some 40,000 tons thus
collected now seems to be ten per cent, pitch
blende. estimated to be worth (2.50 a pound.
•**
In Dr. Korn’s system of transmitting pictures
by wire,—which has been under test for some
time at stations in Paris, Berlin and London,—
greatly improved results have been obtained,
with more rapid transmission, by the late plan
of using line drawings instead of photographs
at the sending station. A photograph drawing
published in Le Matin, the Paris daily, showed
aeronaut Zippel on his aeroplane. At the Ber
lin station the paragraph bad been prepared by
Inking its principal lines, when a half-tone was
, made from it for transmission, and the picture
printed in the Paris paper showed some of the
■hades and tints as well as the drawn lines. For
1 transmission, the half-tone was rolled in the
form of a cylinder, which was revolved with a
small contact wire resting against it to send the
impulses of current. The receiving end had the
usual apparatus, a photographic film being
wound on a cylinder rotating in agreement with
the transmitting one, and a point of light varied
In brightness by the current giving the impres
sion on the film. The picture was received in
1 ten minutes, while a photogaph from Berlin by
mail would have taken eighteen hours.
A
The daylight brightness of an ordinary room
into which the sum is not directly shining, is
found by J. E. Woodwell to be commonly not
more than 1-10 candle power and sometimes as
low as MOO candle-power per square inch. Most
artificial lights have a much greater intrinsic
brightness, and this accounts for their injurious
effects when the eyes are not shielded from their
full glare. He concludes that a diffused ligbtof
of 1-5 to 1-10 candle-power per square inch is
best. Strain and injury to the eye have been
attributed to ultra-violet light, but such light is
less in various incandescent illuminants than in
direct or even reflected sunlight.
A
The volcanoes of Hawaii have been a subject
of study since 1883 by Prof. C. H. Hitchcock,
formerly of Dartmouth College, N. H., but now
with his family making a home in Honolulu. A
better acquaintance with Mauna Loa and Kil
auea, the world’s most wonderful craters, is to
be expected from the book soon to be Usued
giving the results of this investigation.
CASTOR IA
For Infants and Children.
The Kind You Have Always Bought
Bears the /Tf x/ffv? .
Signature of AcMc/UAC
miscellaneous.
SSIiSMc.
FOR WEDDINGS AND FUNERALS,
AT REASONABLE RATES.
Special Attention Given to Ornamental
Gardening.
JOHN L. WAGNER, Florist,
W. JOPPA ROAD, TOWSON, Md.
C. & P. Phone—Towson 8-F. [Nov. 21—ly.
J. T. KAUFFMAN & SON,
Saddles, Harness,
AND STABLE SUPPLIES,
Including Brambles’ Horse Foot Remedy,
408 BNSOR STREET,
Oppo. No. 6 Engine House. BALTIMORE. Md.
C. & P. Telephone.
Jan. 2—ly
PIANOS tuned
In Any Part of the County.
Address, JOSEPH A. NEUMAYER,
Raspeburg, R. F. D., Md.
C. A P. Tel.—Hamilton 4-k. [Sept. 28—ly
TTfILIJAM M. RIBTEAU,
AUCTIONEER AND REAL EBTATE AGENT.
No. 13 Piper Building, Towson, Md.
J Residence—C. St P„ Towson Bx.
Phones o fflce-C. &P„ Towson 117 r.
July 11-tf
CASTORIA
law|s#WgL-.. 1 For Infants and Children.
AVcfie tabic Preparatloafor As-
slmilatirtgtteFoodandßeguta- ~
ting the Stomachs andßowels of JjeaFS tlie \
gjg na^ure f A i)
PromotesDigestion,Cheerful- ° / % V*
ness and Rest. Contains neither n f /r\ A I f
OpiumjMorphine nor Mineral. vl ff 1V \r
Not Narcotic. gkWlr
BatpaafOldlk-SAMUELPITUHEJI 1 H# \
1L | h Jf- i
J, Use
A perfect Remedy for Constipa- I ■
tion. Sour Stomach,Diarrhoea, I lA/ m A
Worms,Convulsions,Feverish- I If f| 11 np
ness and Loss or Sleep. | yg (JvUi
facsimile Signature of I ■
Thirty Years
CASTOMA
■■ ■„—■■■ '■■■■■■■ THE eCNTAUIV COMPANY. NEW YORK CITY.
* COUNTY * OFFICIALS^
Circuit Court.
Judges— Chief Judge, Hon. N. Charles Burke;
Associate Judges. Hon. Frank I. Duncan and
Hon. George L. Van Bibber.
State's Attorney— Robert H. Bussey.
Auditor—William Grason.
Commissioners to take Testimony and Examiners
in Equity—A.. A. Piper, W. George Marley, Caleb
V. Cherbonnier.
Crier —George W. Selpp.
Interpreter and Bailiff— Julius Rudiger.
Bailiff— Tobias C. Ltnzey, Jacob B. Wilhelm.
Stenographer—3. Maurice Watkins Jr
Terms of Conrt.
Law and Criminal— Ist Monday In March, 3d
Monday in May, 3d Monday In September, Ist
Monday in December.
Equity— lst Monday In January, Ist Monday in
March, Ist Monday in May. Ist Monday in July,
Ist Monday In September, Ist Monday in Novem
ber.
Clerk’s Office.
Clerk of the Court— William P. Cole.
Chief Deputy Clerk and Cashier— M. J, O’Hara.
Court Clerks- Michael F. Connor.
Equity Clerk— Charles E. Fendall.
Index Clerk— William R. Hoff.
Examiner—Thomas R. Jenifer.
Assistant Examiner— W illiam Frank ton.
Assistant Clerk— William 8. Cowley.
Messenqer— Rczin H. Denny.
Record Clerks— Bernard Hogarty. Samuel M.
Lucas, Henry Dickmeyer, George F. Wheeler.
Jr., Charles H. Mays, Charles B. Chapman. Wm.
8. Cockey. Fred. D. Dollenberg, 8r„ Bernard P.
Bruns, Arthur W. Shanklin, John T. Cockey,
Charles H. Mays, C. T. Shaffer, Sterett Grason,
James L. Burgoyne.
County Commissioners’ Office.
County Commissioners—Henry P. Mann, presi
dent; William Byerly.br., Dr. Charles L. Matt
feldt. „ ,
Chief Clerk and Auditor— E. Stanton Bosley.
Transfer Clerk —Hugh J. Gallagher.
Counsel to Board— John F. Gontrum and James
J. Lindsay.
Stenographer— John R. Haut.
Keeper of Court House.— Marion Shearman.
Bailiff to the Board.- John H. Sparks.
Watchman at Court House—John B. Miller.
Orphans’ Conrt.
Judqes— Melohor Hoshall, Chief Judge; H. Sey
mour Piersol, E. Clinton Tracey.
Register of Wills— William J. Peach.
Deputy Register— Hugh P. Price.
Copy Clerks— John Green, Eugene Gosnell.
Bailiff to Orphans' Court— Wm. Bowen of 8.
Special Appraisers— J. Maurice Watkins, Sr.,
George Fauth.
Treasurer’s Office.
Treasurer and Collector— N. Bosley Merry man.
Chief Clerk— John P. Mays.
Assistant Clerk— Frank P. Bossom.
Counsel.— Elmer R. Haile.
Police Force.
Marshal of Police— W. Herbert Gorsueh.
Sergeants— James E. Mann, John F. Walker,
Laurence B. Meise. _
Canton Harry Hutchins. J. Wesley Creamer,
Charles Spann, Cornelius Cotter, James Birch,
Henry Pfisterer, Joseph Hess, Thomas J.Moy
lan. August Schirmer, Michael Moore, Theodore
Kreamer.
Oardenville—L. N. Bradfleld.
Oovanstown— Joseph M. Dewees, W. 8. Bell.
Towson—A. 3. German. _
6’aton>itf—William Stevens, August Peters.
Arlington—Martin McGuire. Noah Kirk.
Mt. Washington— Patrick W. Scott. Denis F.
Starr. _ _ ,
Ml. Winans— Frank Bartcher. Barney Beale
feldt, William Mo.ler, William H. Rhuland.
Roland Park- Jehu Rutledge. L. F. Bortner.
Pikesville— James E. Kleeman.
St. Denis— Andrew J. Brass.
LauraviUe— Royal L. Phelps.
Sheriff’s Office
Sherlff-Ahram T. Streett.
Clerk and Deputy—W. George Marley.
Deputy— Caleb P. Burton.
County Jail.
Warden— Elisha M. Price.
Deputy Warden— Clinton O. Bosley.
Watchman— Wm. Thomas Fulton.
Physician— Dr. William L. Smith.
Alms Home.
Superintendent— John P. Cbilcoat.
Physician.— Dr. WilmerC. Ensor
Chaplains—Revs. A. T. Pindell and R. C. Camp
bell.
Engineer—John T. Shea.
Agents to Discover New tt Missed Property.
Ist District— Thomas J. Flannigan.
2d District— Caleb 8. Hobbs.
3d District— Philip Watts.
4 th District— Samuel Owings.
6th District— David M. Thompson.
tth District— Thomas L. Gemmill.
7th District— Samuel S. Cooper.
6th District— John P. D. Parks.
9th District— William Coney.
10<A District— Harry Patterson.
IKA District— Vacant.
12 th District—Henry M. Miller.
13 th District— Henry J. Emmerich.
14<A District— George C. Wolfe.
15<A District— James Btevenson, Jr.
Pnbllc Roads.
Roads Engineer— Henry G. Shirley
ROAD SUPERVISORS.
l*f Edward N. Thomey.
2d District— J. Isaac Holbrook.
3d District—J oseph A. Kennedy.
ith District— Jacob L. Morrel.
6th District— Joseph M. Armacost.
6 th District— Frank Shuchart.
7th District-H. Milton Slade.
6th District— Harry D. Dawes.
9th District— Elisha W. Parks.
10<A District—3. Conrad Burk.
lltA District— Frank J. Kearney.
12 th District— John Schaefer.
13 th District— Henry Gable.
Hth District— Thomas Comes.
\6th District— William G. Earl.
School Commissioners’ Office.
School Commissioners— Thomas B. Todd, Presi
dent. North Point; G. Herbert Rice, Catonsville;
John Arthur, Fork; Samuel M. Shoemaker,
Stevenson; Keister Russdll, Relsterstown;
Frank G. Bcott. Shawan.
Secretary, Treasurer and Superintendent— Albert
8. Cook. _
Assistant Superintendent—John T. Hershner.
Stenographer— Miss Janette Brown.
Counsel to the Board— Z. Howard Isaac.
Supervisors of Election.
Charles H. Wise. Democrat; George A. Davis,
Democrat: Jarrett N. Zimmerman. Republican.
Clerk— Thomas J. Hunter.
Counsel to the Board—Arthur P. Shanklin.
Station Home Magistrates.
Arlington— Richard A. Bevan.
Canton—D. A. Thompson.
Mt. Winans— August W. Miller.
Miscellaneous.
County Surveyor— Fred. D. Dollenberg, Jr.
Inspector Weights and Measures— Thomas W.
Wheeler.
Keeper of Bear Creek Draw- Bridge— Geo. Grace.
Keeper of Back River Draw Bridge— William B.
Mitchell. l
TREES,SMBS'
Ornamental Plants.
VEGETABLE PLANTS
IN SEASON.
Rutoi Floral ami Nursery Co. ■
RIDER P. 0.. Md.
June 20—ly
Fire Department.
Superintendent of Fire Alarm Telegraph— George
Hartman.
Fire Marshal— Charles Herrman.
No. 1, Towson— Alex. B. Miles, captain; Harry
E. Numbers, driver.
No. 2, Mt. Washington— Bdw. Scharf, captain;
Edward Kearnes, driver.
No. 3, Arlington— Charles Hoffman, captain
Horace W. Gould, driver.
No. 5. Catonsville— Thomas Armacost, captain;
Edward Poehlman,driver.
No. 6, Mt. mnans— Zachariah Dunn, captain;
Philip Grace, driver.
No. 7, Canton—Adam Hartman, captain; Wm.
H. Waters and John Linderman, drivers; James
E. Flynn, engineer; James Mullaney, assistant
engineer: Joseph Hoefiin, houseman.
No. 8, Highlandlown— John Heickle, captain;
Robert L. Funk, James White, drivers; Edward
Gensler, engineer; Joseph Kuhn, assistant engi
neer ; Conrad C. Freldel, houseman.
No. 9, Oardenville— Henry B. Nuth, captain;
Harrison J. Rigdon, driver.
No. 10, Oovanstown— Frank Romemberg, cap
tain ; George J. Mulligan, driver; Stand ish Uh
ler, substitute.
No. 11, Roland Park— Perry A. Knight, captain;
John D. Meekins and Leonard H. Horuick, driv
ers: J. F. Hofstetter. engineer.
Special Officers.
Middle River— James W. Wood.
Texas— Thomas F. Keough.
Oella— Thomas L. West.
DickeyviUe— Jacob C. Pace.
Ruxton— John H. Bowen.
EUicott City—Denis Cavey.
Lutherville— Michael Welsh.J
Patapsco Neck— Edward A. Parker.
Special Officer for Entire County— Noah Walker
Keepers of Police Stations,
Canton— Lewis T. Btreett and August Kiefer.
Mt. Winans— Philip March, Jr.
Removers of Garbage.
Oovanstown— Molyneux J. Fisher, Jr.
Highlandlown— Jacob Hahn and John Schwarz.
Canton— Geo.A. Telljohann and John Foertsch
berk.
Catonsville— Peter Toole, Harman Faye.
Towson—3. William Phipps.
Tuxedo, Evergreen and Plat 1, Roland Park-
William Foster.
Plat 2 and 3 Roland Park—Vl. 8. Hull.
Sanitary Officers,
Ist District— Dr. A. H. Mann.
2d District— Dr. Harry F. Shipley.
3d District —Dr. Henry A. Naylor.
ith District— Dr. Harry M. Slade.;
s th District- Dr. B. F. Price.
6 th District- Dr. J. B. Norris.
7th District—Dr. E. W. Hyde.
6th District—Dr. T. Ross Payne.
9th District— Dr. R. C. Massenburg
10 th District— Dr. Thomas H. Emory
\lth District— Dr. James F. H. Gorsueh.
12 th District —Dr. W. E. McClanahan.
13<A District— Dr. Frank H. Ruhl.
14<A District— Dr. William D. Corse.
16<A District— Dr. John W. Harrison.
Lamp Lighters.
DickeyviUe—3 ohn P. Murphy.
Mt. Winans—Simon Seigle.
Constables.
lsf District— Frederick C. Itaab. August J. Pe
ters. Denis Cavey.
2d District— Caleb S. Hobbs, C. E. Crusey.
3d District— Thomas W. Edes.
ith District— Charles J. Beckley.
6th District— William H. Benson.
6th District— William F. Hare.
7th District—S. Elmer Rosier, Geo. W. Canoles.
6th District— Edward W. Cole, John W. Hoff
man.
9th District— Jas. P. Wilkinson, George G. Ger
man. George D. Myerly, Clarence T. Murray.
10<A District— Oscar Johnson, Robert A. Nelson.
Wth District—
12fA District— Christian Hess.
16th Districts- Joseph J.Glllen,Joseph Bollinger,
14(A District- John A. Quick, William Sindall,
15<A District— James W. Wood.
Justices of the Peace,
Ist District—Henry B, Whiteley, Catonsville ;
William E. Nagle, Catonsville; John M. Bone,
EUicott City; August C. Luers, DickeyviUe;
Frederick C. Pakendorf, Catonsville.
2d District— William C. Euler, Woodlawn • Wm.
E. Fite, Roslyn; John T. Isaac. Granite; Lloyd
N. Randall, North Branch.
3d District— Richard A. Bevan, Arlington; Wm.
F. Coughlan, Pikesville; H. Holliday Emich,
Arlington: Andrew Ensor, Mount Washington.
ith District—3no.H. Beckley, Reisterstown; J.
J. Smith Orrick, Glyndon; Samuel H. Brown,
Woodensburg; David L. Slade, Owings’ Mils.
6<A District— Abraham 8. Cooper, Cpperco;
John T. Thompson, Mt. Carmel; Noah F. Jack
son. Mt. Carmel.
6th District—J ohn H. Copenhaver, Freeland;
Samuel 8. Miller, Freeland; Wm.l. McCullough,
Rayville; E. Louis Palmer, Freeland.
7<A District— W. E. Anderson, White Hall; Ed
win C. Hawkins, Parkton: John W. Hicks, Here
ford ; Alfred A. Sparks. Parkton.
6th District— John D. C. Duncan, Cookeysvllle;
F. A. Gemmill, Shawan; Samuel C. Dali, Luther
ville ; Wm. T. Curtis, Shawan.
9th District— Joseph B. Herbert, Towson; Chas.
T. Bowen. BrooklandviUe; John J. Timanus,
Towson; Thos. J. Hunter, Towson; George J.
Holland, Loch Raven ; James H. K. P. Wilkin
son, Govans; Thomas I. Sbanley, Roland Park
J. Howard Fox, Towson.
10<A District— George Treut, Jacksonville. '
11<A District— Patrick Bradley,Loreley; Charles
J. Francis, White Marsh; John T. Ambrose,
Jenkins; Harry Schutz, Upper Falls; W. O. B.
Wright, Baldwin.
12<A District—David A. Thompson, Highland
town ; Townley R. Wolfe, Highlandtown; Henry
J. Mueller, Canton.
13<A District— Robert C. Clark, St. Denis; Au
gust W. Miller, Mt. Wiuans; Frank A. Bond,
Haletborpe.
14 th District—Joe. A. Neumayer, Oardenville;
J. Harman Schone, Oardenville ; Geo. A. Klein,
Fullerton.
15<A District—Joseph Blair, Sparrow’s Point;
James F. Gibson. Chase; John Gettman, Ross
ville; James Mitchell. Rossville; James Gil
more, Rosaville; Wm. H. Haut, Rossville.
Notaries Pnbllc.
Towson— James Kelley, Mrs. C. Marley Hipsley,
Ernest C. Hatch.
VatonsviUe— Ml ss Laura M. Platt, Arthur W.
Robson, George A. Betzold.
Roland Park— Miss Elizabeth A. Parker, O,
Parker Baker, F. Spence Creney, C. Walter Car
nan.
Reisterstown— William L. Bhrlver.
Owings' Mills— George Ward.
UockeysviUe— Peter Mulcahy.
Oovanstown— Jacob 8. Parr. Madison E. Lloyd,
Lennox B. Clemens, Wm. H. Herzog, J. Leroy
Hopkins.
Orangeville— Titus L. Mason.
Raspeburg— Joseph Plumer. John F. Oyeman.
Highlandlown— Edw. A. Pflster, John H. Filler.
Corbett —Frank E. Sparks.
Sparrow's Point— Wm. V. Hummel.
Woodlawn—' Theodore E. Macken.
Pikesville— Jacob H. Kraft, Carlyle Barton.
Arlington— Frank M. Barrett.
Long Green —C. Robert Wilson.
Duiany't Valley—J. Marsh Matthews.
Hamilton— Martin Kennedy, Frank C. Purdum.
, Brehm's Lane— Michael Luber.
JOHN TYRIE,
—STEAM—
MARBLE & GRANITE TORES,
COCKETSVILLE, Md.
-ALL KINDS OF
MARBLE & GRANITE MONUMENTS
A SPECIALTY. I
No oharge made for showing designs either at
the works or elsewhere. i
JAMBS B. DUNPHY, Agkht, Towbos, Md.
Sept, 28—ly
gftßsixiawß and gentists.
A. C. McCURDY,
SURGEON DENTIST.
TOWSON, Md.
Ex-President State Board Dental Examiners.
CROWNS, BRIDGES AND PORCELAIN
FILLINGS.
Orriox Hours \ ® M
Offico Call—C. A P. ’Phone, Towson 192 R.
Dec. s—lv
QR. H. 8. JARRETT,
Office with his father (Dr. J. H. Jarrett), Wash
ington Avenue, near Allegany Avenue,
TOWSON, Md,
Special attention to catarrh of nose and throat.
Office Hours—B to 10 a. m.; 6toß p. m.
C. A P. Phone—Towson 217. rOct.lOtJuneO
IJR. J. ROYSTON GREEN,
NORTH BALTIMORE AVENGE.
Near Trinity Church. TOWSON. Md
Office Hours—B to 10 A. M.. and 8 to 8 P. M.
C. A P. TeleDhone. July 18—ly
JEUscellaneous.
the ESTABLISHED
COUNTRY 1831
GENTLEMAN
The ONLY Agricultural NEWSpaper
AND ADMITTEDLY THE
LEADING AGRICD LTURAL JOURNAL OF
THE WORLD.
Every department written by specialists, the
highest authorities in their respective lines.
No other paper pretends to compare with it in
qualifications of editorial staff.
Gives the agricultural NEWS with a degree of
completeness not even attempted by others.
SINGLE SUBSCRIPTION, $1.50.
BUT SPECIAL INDUCEMENTS
are offered to club organizers.
We want an Agent in your town,
and will be glad to send you our
AGENTS’ PROPOSITION if you
could find time to do a little can
vassing for us.
SPECIMEN COPIES
will be mailed free on request. It will pay any
body interested in any way in country life to
send for them. Address the publishers:
LUTHER TUCKER A SON,
Oct. 31-tfl Albany, N. Y.
WILLIAM A. LEE,
TOWSON,
?££ GROCERIES
Teas and Ooffees,
Canned Goods,
y Cigars and Tobacco,
TV Boots and Shoes,
FLOUR, FEED, HAT & STRAW,
PHOSPHATE, LIME AND CEMENT,
ALL REPAIRS FOR OLIVER AND BISSELL
CHILLED PLOWS,
GARDEN TOOLS, GRASS AND GARDEN
SEEDS.
All Goods Found in a First-Class Store.
Jan. 2—3 m
A PENNSYLVANIA R. U.
On and after Sunday, Oct. 11, 1908, trains on
the Maryland & Pennsylvania Railroad will leave
and arrive at North Ave. Station, Baltimore as
follows:
DAILY (EXCEPT SUNDAY.
LEAVE. ARRIVE.
7.35 A. M. for York. 8.25 A. M. from Belair.
9.30 A. M. “ Belair. 9.20 A.M. “ Delta.
3.25 P. M. “ York. 11.55 A.M. ” York.
5.05 P. M. “ Belair. 2.05 P. M. “ Belair.
6.00 P.M. “ Delta. 5.50P.M. “ York.
11.30 P. M. “ Belair. 7.40 P.M. “ Belair.
SATURDAY ONLY.
Leave at 1.30 P. M. for Belair. Arrive at 4.00
P. M. from Belair.
SUNDAY ONLY.
LEAVE. ARRIVE.
9.05 A.M. for Delta. 9.00 A.M. from Delta.
4.05 P.M. ” Delta. 5.55 P.M. “ Delta.
11.00 P.M. “ Delta. 9.30 P.M. ’* Delta.
LEAVE TOWSON FOR BALTIMORE.
Daily, except Sunday, at 8.05,9.03,11.37 A. M., 1.44,
5,80.7,23 P. M,
Saturday only, 3.39 P. M.
Sunday only, 8.37 A. M., 5.35, 9.08 P. M.
ARRIVE AT TOWSON FROM BALTIMORE.
Daily, except Sunday, at 7.59, 9.50 A. M„ 3.45,
5.25, 8.22,11.46 P. M.
Saturday only, 1.50 P. M.
Sunday only. 9.29 A. M„ 4.25,11.20 P. M.
J. S. NORRIS, General Manager.
C. A. FIFER. Gen’l Pass. Agent.
QHESAPEAKE STEAMSHIP COMPANY.
"CHESAPEAKE LINE.”
ELEGANT PASSENGER STEAMERS “CO
LUMBIA” AND “AUGUSTA.”
For OLD POINT COMFORT and NORFOLK.Va.
Steamers leave Baltimore daily (except Sun
day) at 6.30 P. M., and arrive Old Point Comfort
at 6 A. M. and Norfolk at 7.00 A. M„ where con
nection la made with the Rail Lines for all points
South and Southwest.
"YORK RIVER LINE.”
ELEGANT PABSENGER STEAMER “ATLAN
TA” for WEBT POINT and RICHMOND, Va.
Steamer leaves Baltimore Tuesday, Thursday
and Saturday at 5 P. M., and arrive West Point
at 7.45 A. M„ and Richmond at 9.20 A. M.
Steamers call at Gloucester Point, Clement’s,
Clay Bank and Allmond’s (weather and ice per
mitting.)
STEAMERS LEAVE BALTIMORE FROM
PIERBIB &19 LIGHT STREET WHARF.
Through Tickets to all points may be secured,
baggage checked and staterooms reserved from
the City Ticket Offices, 119 E. Baltimore street,
ARTHUR W. ROBSON, Agent, 127 E. Baltimore
street, or the General Offices, Light and Lee
streets, Baltimore, Md.
E. B. FOSTER. E.J. CHISM,
General Manager. General Passenger Agent.
T. H. McDANNEL, Asst. Gen’l Passenger Agt.
Nov.23—tf
BUSICK’S CAFE
FORMERLY URBAN’S,
York Road and Pennsylvania Ave.
Oppo. Lee Building, TOWSON, MD.
HABRY D. BUBICK, Proprietor.
—Always on hand the finest brands of—
LIQUORS, BRANDIES,
Ni CHAMPAGNE, CLARET, .NX
>3V BROWN STOUT, 7y
5 BASS’ ALE, PORTER, Ac.
THE BEST BEER on draught and In bottles foi
family use. A large stock of CIGARS
of best brands alwavs on hand.
Ample Btabling and Shedding and polite hostler
always in attendance.
July 4—ly
YOU WANT SOME PRINTING
DONE QUICK AND WELL?
LET US DO IT FOR YOU.
A COMPLETE ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT
INSURES PROMPT DELIVERY OF WORK.
“THE UNION” OFFICE,
Dec. 13—tfl Towson, Md.
&tuctirmee*s.
JOHN V. SLADE,
CORBETT, BALTO. COUNTY. Md.
WILLIAM M. RISTEAU,
13 PIPER BUILDING, TOWSON, Md.
XTriLLIAM N. MAYS,
Vy RUHL’S P. O- BALTO. COUNTY. Md.
CHARLEB H. ISENNOCK,
R. F. D. No. 1, PHCENIX, Md.
CALEB S. HOBBS,
RANDALLSTOWN. BALTO. COUNTY.
JAMES L. NOBWOOD,
TOWSON AND UPPER FALLS
rpHOMAS C. BIDDISON,
J, GARDENVILLB. BALTO. COUNTY
ED. J. HERRMANN,
BOSSVILLE, BALTO. COUNTY, Md.
PE. BOTH, Md. Phone.
, PERRY HALL, BALTO. COUNTY
George a. Walter,
PERRY HALL, BALTO. COUNTY
Gh. battee,
CHARLES J. BECKLEY,
STANSBURY BRIAN,
WHITE MARSH, Md
Harry councilman,
PARKVILLE, Md.
4LEXANDER HUGHES,
BBNGIES, Md.
Thomas j. wells,
UPPER FALLS. BALTO. COUNTY. Mo.
to loan in sums of SI,OOO
I .UUU AND UPWARD.
Apply to B. W. HERMAN.
June*.—tf. Attorney at Law, Towson. Md.
J > C. &P. Phone— Mt. Vernon 760. Md. Phone—Courtland 1527. < [
E. Watered Co. HH
Shingles Sash
)| Laths 922 PARK AVENUE, Doors
j; Pickets BALTIMORE, Blinds J;
Flooring Frames
;! Ceiling I II BJ| R F Mouldings <;
I > LUMpcK ± i
< | Being located near the freight depots of all railroads and the nearest yard to ' >
' > the suburbs, we have always made , ►
A Specialty of the Country Trade.
J ► Mcb. 13—7 m < J
The New-Way
AIRCOOLED
IS THE BEST T
The World is Progressive and*the lljgßWai lirafei
New-Way is Years in Advance
WELL PROTECTED BY PATENTS AND IN A ||
CLASS BY ITSELF.
Start, Handle and Care for this
Of)M PAR IRON ■ It weighs only one-quarter as much as the old type of engines.
, v — *-■ Uses one-quarter as much fuel. No pipes or pumps. No needle
valve. No packing. No foundation required ; will run anywhere. Is held in place by four lag
screws. Speed from 200 to 600, which increases; 12-inch pulley to 36 inch. No counter shaft is
needed to get the different speeds. One oil cup oils automatically. We do not turn gasoline off or
on to start or stop. Power rated with steam; not compared with other gasoline engines and has
less than one-quarter as many parts and is made where quality counts. Not a drop of water is used.
Will not freeze up in winter or burn up in summer. No dampness to sweat through the cylinder
and rust it when not in use. If your cylinder rusts inside it is ruined and you don’t know why. It
will start the same in winter as in summer. Its speed range and oil device aDd absence of largeand
heavy wheels make it longer lived than any other typo of engine by many years. It cannot wear
runs in oil.
The New-Way is the Only Air-Cooled Engine in the World that is Made in All Sizes and
Guaranteed to Develop its Full Rated H. P. for Any Length of Time
in Any Climate and Not Over-Heat.
It is a well known fact that there is no way to cool water but by air. All engines are cooled by air,
directly or indirectly. Water will stay hot for a long time when put in a rubber bag, so air cannot
come in contact with it. The aggressiveness of the water cool agents will convince you that he
yelps from fear. Mention it to him when he calls and watch the sore spot develop.
Take no Chances and Investigate the Merits of the New-Way.
We have no signed orders for engines; they are sold on their merits. You take them on free
trial and pay for them if you like them better than the money they cost. Is it fair 1 See it before
you buy.
X_ IMLA-Isrisrs <sc CO.,
Aug. 1-tf] FORREST STREET, COR. HILLEN, BALTIMORE, Md.
S. L. LAMBERD CO.,
111, 113,115 Light Street, Baltimore, Md.
Agricultural Implements, Seeds, Fertilizers, Carriages,
Wagons, Lawn Mowers,
McVicker Gasoline Engines,
WIND MILLS, TANKS, TOWERS, PUMPS.
We Install Bath Rooms, Toilets, Sinks, etc., in Country Homes.
May 16—ly] Let Us Make You Estimate.
GASOLINE PUMPING ENGINES
LEADS THE WORLD!
We will Offer for a Short Time a Limited Number of
OMEGA CREAM SEPARATORS
FOR BPOT CASH AS FOI.LOW8:
No. 1 CAPACITY 325 LBS 550 00
Headquarters for Root’s Bee Keepers’ Supplies, Star Feed
Mills, Hocking Valley Cutters aud Corn Shelters, Best
Ever Sulky and Gang Plows, Black Hawk
Corn Planters, Sprayers, Etc.
RAWLINGS IMPLEMENT COMPANY,
9 and I I W. PRATTSTREET, BALTIMORE, Md.
C. & P. —Mount Vernon 2751. Md.—Courtland 2145.
—BARGAIN PRICES FOR —
TINNERS, PLUMBERS, STOVES AND HARDWARE DEALERS.
ESTABLISHED 1865.
WILLIAM A. CONWAY,
626-628 FORREST STREET, Near Belair Market, BALTIMORE, Md.
MANUFACTURER AND JOBBER OF
Tin Plate in Rolls and Boxes, Eave Trough and Conductor Pipe, Elbows,
Shoes, Galvanized Iron, Black Iron, Sheet Zinc, Corrugated
Galvanized Roofing, V Crippled Roofing, Solder
and Tinners’ Supplies in general.
Tin in Rolls, plain and painted, 28 sheets to roll, a specialty. Strap Iron,
Railroad Milk Cans. Iron-clad Baltimore Milk Cans, &c.
Stoves, Ranges, Furnaces and Fireplace Heaters.
STOVE REPAIRS OF EVERY DESCRIPTION.
Solicited. Special Low Prices for this Fall’s Trade. [Oct.l7tMay9.
Illliiii gSplagfek Keep the Hens
j ■ |pi is recommended by some of tho
an( l clapboards cost more and do
W. • not keep the buildings as dry and
jjgL-e. YOU CAN APPLY IT YOURSELF
with roofing kit in each roll. It docs not require painting when first
applied, and lies flak Send to-day for free samples and our booklet, Jt
A "Building Economy." Jjn
H. E. BARTLESON,
COCKEYSVILLE, Md. J
fr O July 4—ly
SOUTHCOMB'SH ATQ
Wise Heads Wear Them.
109 E. Baltimore St.,
BETWEEN CALVEKT AND LIGHT STS.. BALTIMORE, Md.
Nov. 14—lv
Monet to loan on
FIRST-CLASS REAL ESTATE,
IN SUMS TO BUIT.AT 5X PER CENT.
Apply to ORA SON A BACON,
Dec. 18—tf Towson, Md.
TO LOAN.
IN BUMB OF 1500 AND UPWARDS, ON
FIRST MORTGAGE.
Apply to WILLIAM S. KEECH.
Feb. lf-tt Towson, Md. I
&Uoxnz%B atgaro.
WGILL SMITH. _
. ATTORNEY AT LAW,
Second National Bank Building, Towon, Md.
Elmfr j. cook,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
Second National Bank Building, Towson, Md.
JOHN S. FNSOK,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
„ .Offutt Building, Towson, Md.
WILLIAM S. KEECH, Jr.,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
Second National Bank Building, Towson, Md.
JHUWAUD FOX,
. ATTORNEY AT LAW,
Second National Bank Building, Towson, Md.
Laban sparks,
ATTOREY AT LAW,
No. 228 ST. PAUL STREET. BALTIMORE, Md.
JFRED. C. TALBOTT,
. ATTORNEY AT LAW.
17 Lexington street, baitimore, and Towson.Md
Elmfr r. haile,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
Piper Building, Towson, Md.
T WILBUR MEADS,
. ATTORNEY AT LAW.
Office—Piper Building, Towson, Md.
Arthur p. shanklin,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
26 Bank of Baltimore Bldg., and Towson, Md.
T SCOTT OFFUTT,
• ATTORNEY AT LAW,
Piper Building, Towson, Md.
IRVIN G. HERMAN,
* ATTORNEY AT LAW,
6 East Lexington street, Baltimore, Md.
CBQHN SLINGLUFF,
• ATTORNEY AT LAW,
Towson, Md.
\IT GEORGE MARLFY,
YV • ATTORNEY AT LEW.
Second National Bank Building, Towson, Md.
JOHN J. TIMANUS,
ATTORNEY & COUNSELOR AT LAW,
Piper Building, Towson, Md.
FRANCIS L. KLEHH,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
225 Bt. Paul street, Baltimore, Maryland.
Herbert w. stone,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
C. ft P. Phone. Sparrow’s Point, Md.
Robert h. bussfy,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
Office—Piper Building, Towson. Md.
JMAULSBY SMITH.
• ATTORNEY AT LAW,
12 E. Lexington Street, Baltimore.
La. rettaliata,
• ATTORNEY AT LAW,
847-849 Equitable Building, Baltimore, Md.
Noah e. offutt,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
Money to Loan. Offutt Building, Towson.
JAMES P. OFFUTT,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
ffutt Building, Towson, Md.
J EDWARD STIRLING,
• ATTORNEY A COUNSELLOR AT LAW,
1609 N. Calvert Street, Baltimore.
HARLES PIKLFRT,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
228 St. Paul street, Baltimore, Md.
Robert r. boarman,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
TOWSON. Md.
JOHN I*. O’FKRRALL,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
Henry c. weaver,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
505 Fidelity Building, Baltimore, Md.
Am. denhakd,
• ATTORNEY AT LAW,
Fidelity Building, Baltimore, Md.
CHARLES ft ARTHUR HERZOG,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW,
112 E. Lexington Street, Baltimore, Md.
WHITKLOCK ft FOWLER,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW,
1407 Continental Trust Building, Baltimore, Md.
OAMUISI, REGESTER,
O ATTORNEY AT LAW,
801 Bt. Paul Street, Baitimore, Md.
Ernest c. hatch,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
Office—Piper Building, Towson, Md.
T L. G. LEE,
tl • ATTORNEY AT LAW,
City Office—l 2E. Lexington St., Baitimore, Md.
Every Saturday at Belair. Md.
John mays little,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
Office—Pipor Building, Towson, Md.
Residence— Parkton, Md,
Do. mcintosh, jr„
. ATTORNEY AT LAW,
Offices—Towson, Md., and 213 St. Paul street,
Baltimore, Md.
WATSON E. SHERWOOD,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
Offices—Postoffice, owings’ Mills, and 1400Conti-
nental Building, Baltimore.
JAMES KELLEY,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
AND NOTARY PUBLIC.
Offutt Building, Towson, Md.
JOHN S. BIDDISON,
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
Offices—Piper Building, Towson, ana Law Build
ing, Courtiand St., Baltimore. Md,
\TVILLIAM H. LAWRENCE,
Vt ATTORNEY AT LAW,
213 St. Paul Street. Baitimore. and Smedley Row,
Towson, Md.
Dg. Mclntosh,
• ATTORNEY AT LAW,
Offices—Towson, Md., and 213 St. Paul street,
Baltimore, Md.
Q R. FRANKENBERRY,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
Office—Masonic Temple, Towson, Maryland.
J. EDWIN DAVIS. CHARLES E. SIBOMUND.
Davis ft sieumund,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW,
702 Fidelity Building, Baltimore, Md.
ERNEST HOEN, JR. HARRT E. PARKHURST.
HOEN ft PARKHURST,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW,
948 Equitable Building. Baltimore, Md.
JEFFERSON D. NORRIS,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
Room 12, No. 222 St. Paul street, Baltimore
Glyndon and Reisterstown, Saturdays.
Harry e. mann,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
Latrobe Building, 100 E. Lexington street, Bal-
tlmore, Md.
MARSH MATTHEWS,
• ATTORN bY AT LAW,
510-512 Fidelity Building, Baltimore, Md.
Special attention to county practice.
AA. PIPER, ATTORNEY AT LAW,
• TOWSON, Md.
Office—ln Piper Building, opposite main en
trance to Court House.
JOSHUA G. BOSLEY,
TOWSON AND PHILOPQLIB,
ATTORNEY AT LAW AND SURVEYOR.
Pays special attention to real estate, both as
surveyor and as attorney.
WILLIAM ORASON. LEWIS M. BACON
G BASON ft BACON,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW,
Room 3 Masonic Building, Towson, Md.
Adam anstine,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
Office—Room 706 Fidelity Building, N. W, Cor.
Charles and Lexington Streets.’Baltimore, Md.
Prompt attention to county business.
R. W. APPLBOARTH. O. T. REIFSNIDER, JR.
APPLEGAKTH ft REIFBNIDEB,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW,
10 E. Lexington Street, Baltimore, Md.
W. RIBTEAU ORASON. CARLTON ODB ORASON.
GRASON ft ORASON,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW.
Booms 11 and 12. Piper Building, Towson, Md.
Alfred j. carr,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
727-732 Law Building, 221-227 Courtland Street
Baltimore, Md.
Residence—C. & P., Pikesville 61-Y.
El. painter,
• ATTORNEY AT LAW,
301 St. Paul Street, Baltimore. Also, Owlnrf
Mills till 8.30 A. M. dally.
City and county practice. Both Phones.
JOHN H. RICHARDSON,
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
622-623-624-625 Law Building, Courtland Street,
near Lexington, Baltimore, and Towson.
Residence—42 Eastern Ave., Hlghlandtown.
C. ft P. Phone.
OEOROE WHITELOCK, JOHN B. DEMINO,
DAVID FOWLER, W. THOMAS KEMP.
WHITELOCK ft FOWLER,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW,
1407 Continental Building, Baltimore, Md.
JOHN F. GONTRUM,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
Law Building. Courtland Street, Baltimore, Md.
Office hours from 10 A. M. to 3 P. M.
Special attention to practice in Baltimore oity
and Baltimore county.
FRED’K J. BCHLOBSTEIN. HORACE T. SMITH.
SCHLOSSTF.IN ft SMITH, '
ATTORNEYS AT LAW,
1013 American Building, Baltimore, Md.
C. & P. Phone—St. Paul 172.
Emanuel w. Herman,
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELLOR
AT LAW.
Baltimore City Offices—Builders' Exchange
Building, Charles and Lexington Streets.
Baltimore County Offices —Piper Building,
Towson, Md. ETC. ft P. Tel.-Bt. Paul 2865.
JAMES J. LINDSAY,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
Baltimore City Office—4l2 Equitable Building.
Towson Office—Smedley Row.
I C. ft P.-Bt. Paul 3143.
Phones City Office Mary iand-Courtland 1575.
Residence Phone—C. ft P., Towson 170 K.
EDWARD A. O'MARA. M. 0. ANOKLMUR.
O’ MARA ft ANGELMIER,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW,
I 227 St. Paul St., (Rooms I,2and 30 Baltimore, Md.
Phones J Maryland 1831 W.
I Phones -j c. ft p. Mt. Vernon 1490.

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