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The Baltimore County union. (Towsontown, Md.) 1865-1909, June 12, 1909, Image 1

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VOL. 60. WHOLE No. 2318.
jl The * Farmer’s * Conveniences i|
] > Are not alone confined to the Rnral Free Delivery and the Telephone, bnt < )
< * there Is another convenience that all farmers should have—and many do | >
' | have—that Is a checkins account with < |
THE TOWSON NATIONAL BANK.
j > The possessor of such an account avoids the risk of having his money on J ,
< * his person or about his home where It is in danger of fire and thieves. , *
< I His bills paid by check are not only a valid receipt, but also a convenl- < J
J > ence In his home transactions, where very often the necessary change for < ,
i ' concluding a settlement Is not at hand. , |
Don’t stop to think this over, but start an account with us now. < |
ii The Towson National Bank, i;
TOWSON, ÜBLTD. j’
;! uinßCTons. \
J \ JOHN CROWTHER, President; O. H. RICE, Vice-President; * \
i [ Col. Welter S. Prenklin, Lewis M. Beeon, , ►
<1 Hon. J. Fred. C. Talbott, Wilton Creenway,
;> Hon. John S. Blddlson, Ernest C. Hatch. J >
Emanuel W. Herman, __ _ -„ ATT rrir, < ’
< ► W. 0. ORAUMER, Oasmer. <;,
► oct- n n ft n n i‘iAAJTJ\riAAAAAAAAAruVV\AJ*Ir
THE COMMERCIAL BANK OF MARYLAND
BELVEDERE AVENUE,
Near Reisterstown Road, ARLINGTON, Md.
. .—a .
CAPITAL STOCK, $25,000.
. , a "■>—
nsrow oipetst foe business.
S I B
Does a general Banking Business In all that Is consistent with safe and careful man
agement. The location of our Bank makes it the most convenient place for a large
number of residents of Baltimore county to transact their financial business.
During the short time our Bank has been open for business the; amount of deposits
has reached a success far in excess of our expectations.
We have a SAVINGS DEPARTMENT and pay interest, on money deposited there.
Call and tee us and we will explain why it will be to your advantage to open an
account with us.
Prompt attention given to all collection business entrusted to us.
s 0
CHAS. T. COCKET, Jr., JOHN K. CULVER, Ist Vice-President. CHARLES E. SMITH,
President. HOWARD E. JACKSON, 2d Vice-President. Cashier.
—:DIRECTORS:
CHARLES T. COCKEV, Jr., HOWARD E. JACKSON, ROBERT H.McMANNS,
ARTHUR F. NICHOLSON, J. B. WAILES, MAX ROBEN,
JOHN K. CULVER, GEORGE W. ALT, H. D. HAMMOND,
J. FRANK SHIPLET, H. P. EASTMAN. Deo. 2fr-ly
Second National Bank
TOWSON, IMIcL
JMk We invite the accounts of Individuals, Firms, Corporations, Societies,
Executors, Administrators, Trustees, Ac. W "
No account too large for us to handle with safety, and none too small I H
to receive our most careful consideration. || ||
I { Jl
y Collections Made. Loans Negotiated.
Banking in All Its Branches.
EVERT POSSIBLE ACCOMMODATION FOR OUR DEPOSITORS.
-lOPPIOEHS
THOMAB W. OFFUTT, ELMER J. COOK, l VIOE-PREBIDENTB. TH ° B, J. MEAM,
President. Harrison Rider, 1 cashier.
Thomas W. offutt. W. Bernard Duke, Henry C. Longneoker,
ELMER J. COOK, WM. A. LEE, ISAAC,
Harrißon Rider, Chas. H. Knox, Noah E. Offutt,
JOHN I. YELLOTT, W. GILL SMITH, JOHN V, SLADE.
Feb. 6—ly . _
INSURE YOUR PROPERTY
IIT
The 4 Home 4 Insurance 4 Company
OF NT3W YORK,
£3"*Which has for the past twelve years every loss in Baltimore County*6t
Assets—Twenty-Five Million Dollars. FIRE, LIGHTNING AND WINDSTORM.
The "Home” Writes the Largest Business In Maryland.
REPRESENTED IN BALTIMORE COUNTY BY
WHFRIiER &. COLE Towson. WBIDEMEYBR & SHIPLEY, Owldks’ Mills,
WM J BIDDISON klspXr’g, HOWARD M. GORE, Freeland.
OTSee that your Policy it in the “Home.” [June 5-8 m
gfcißjQelXaujeotiß.
Ralph W. Rider,
Livery, Sales and Exchange
STABLES,
WEST CHESAPEAKE AVENUE,
Near the York Road, TOWSON, Md.
First-Class Teams and Automobiles
—FOR HIRE
GOOD SERVICE and REASONABLE PRICES.
Mch. 13—3 m
SPBCIALNOTICB V
MESSRS. GEO. M. GARDNER & GO.
I*l Light Street, Baltimore, Md.,
Desire to inform those whom it may conoern that
they have on band
New 4 Old Canvas of All Weights 4 Sizes
Which they will make up for you into
Wagon Covers, Hay Covers,
THRESHING CLOTHS,
AND COVERS OF ANY KIND AND FOR
ALL PURPOSES.
At most reasonable rates. A call is respectfully
solicited. Mail orders given prompt attention.
May B—3m*
Established 1886.
“CHESAPEAKE”
STITCHED CANVAS BELTIM
Suitable and specially adapted for
Saw Mill and Threshermen's Use.
Transmits more power than any other Belt.
Thoroughly Waterproof and Fully Guaranteed.
Write for prices, etc., to
THE CHESAPEAKE BELTING COMPANY,
D. HOCKADAY, Propr.
883 McKim Street, Bet. Madison and Eager
Streets, Baltimore, Md.
Apl. 24—6 m
“ J. MAURICE WATKINS L SON;
-DEALERS IB-
Staple, Fancy & Green Groceries
Fruit* In season. Fresh and Salt Meats.
Full line of Tobaooos, Foreign and Domeatlo
Cigars, *o.
Sept. 12—ly TOWSON, Md.
'sLi*czl\unztnx&.
SPRING * STYLES
IN Alyl/ SHADES,
From $15.00 to $30.00.
HARRY W. 6ANSTER,
512 and 514 North Gay Street,
BALTIMORE, Md.
Apl. 17—ly
WALL PAPERS*-
—AND—
SHADES.
My new line is all that could be desired, showing
The Latest and Most Exclusive
PATTERNS AND NOVELTIES.
Neat and tasty work assured you at moderate
prices. .
WWon’t you favor me with an order ?
City and Country Work receive personal and
prompt attention.
FRANZ B. NORRIS,
1068 N. GAT STREET,
Cor. Chase Street, BALTIMORE. Md.
49* Telephone. Apl. 24—ly
Flowers, Plaits, R
FOR WEDDINGS AND FUNERALS,
AT REASONABLE RATES.
Special Attention Given to Ornamental
Gardening.
JOHN L. WAGNER, Florist,
W. JOPPA ROAD, TOWSON, Md.
C. A P. Phone—Towson 8-F. [Nov. 21—ly
E. SCOTT PAYNE CO.
368 and 364 N. Oay Street, Baltimore, Md.
Headquarters for Blacksmith and Horseshoera’
Supplies and Builders’ Hardware. Bar Iron, Steel
Springs. Axles, Wheels. Shafts, Spokes, Rims,
Hubs, Horse Shoes. Horse Bhoe Nail*. Horse Bboe
Pads, Rubber Tires, Rubber Tire Channels and
Appliances, Wheelwright Material and Supplies.
Headquarters for Field and Lawn Fence, Lawn
Swings, Lawn Mowers, Lawn Sprinklers. A pos
tal card will reach us. [Apl.24tJau.3o
DEUjsjcellaixeous.
MULLER & YEARLEY,
HARNESS, TRUNKS anil BARS,
343 N. Gay Street,
BALTIMOBB. Md.
Collars, Hames, Chains, Etc.
STABLE SUPPLIES.
49*Speclal prices to readers of this paper."®*
Write for Catalogue.
TRUNKS, BAIjSJID SUIT CASES.
LUMBER FOR SALE
CHEAP I
PINE
Joists, Scantling, Boards
AND ALL SIZES OF
FRAMING LUMBER.
I3NT STOCK
At Ashland Station, N. C. R. R.,
BALTIMORE COUNTY, Md.
Can haul direct to your place or ship
by rail to your station.
Apply to H. L. GRUBE,
1009 AMERICAN BUILDING, BALTIMORE.
C. & P. Phone—St. Paul 724.
or CHARLES FREELAND,
ASHLAND, BALTIMORE COUNTY, Md.
C. * P. Phone—Cockeysvllle 36 R.
Get Our Prices Before Buying Elsewhere.
May I—3m
Dr. A. O. McOURDY & CO.,
TOWSON, Md.
Orders received for—
ALL KINDS OF SLATE.
Peach Bottom Booflng Slate,
w l! w Slabs for Walks, A J
£& aSoLET -6S
-1 Cemetery 81abs, '
Imposing Stones, Ac., Me.
49-Call on or address as above.
C. St P. Phone—Towson 192 R. [July 4—ly
J. T. KAUFFMN & SON,
Saddles, Harness,
AND STABLE SUPPLIES,
Including Brambles' Horse Foot Bemedy,
408 BNSOB STREET,
Oppo. No. 8 Engine House, BALTIMOBB, Md.
C. Sc P. Telephone.
Jan. 2—ly
P. R. BUCHWALD,
TINNER AND PLUMBER
•* LiURAVQiIiIL-^
HARFORD ROAD, opposite Grlndon Lane.
C. Sc P. Phone, Hamilton 31.
Mob. 20—ly
PIANOS tuned
In Any Part of the County.
Address, JOSEPH A. NEUMAYER,
Raspeburg, R. F. D., Md.
C. Sc P. Tel.—Hamilton 4-k. [Sept. 26-ly
i jgicjcli 2£aums.
lei iv it IS
Oakleigh Station, Md. & Pa. R. R.,
tX Milks from Towson.
Constantly on band
A LARGE STOCK OF MULES,
TO SUIT ALL PURPOSBB.
C 2 -ISS- a
Coach, Driving, : TT ft Tl (ITI fl
, Saddle and : : : \
r General Purpose iiUiiUiJU
FOR SALE OR EXCHANGE.
WHORSEsToARDED-W
C. ft P. TELEPHONE.
i DUANE H.lttOE, Prop’r,
TOWSON, Md.
OetJß4—lv
GROVE FARM
FALLS ROAD,
• North of Brooklondvllle, Md.
PRIZE WINNING—
I Guernsey Cattle,
Berkshire Hogs,
Shropshire Sheep.
T FOB SALK —
A Few Registered Heifers,
Between 4 months and 2 years old
il
e Apply to JAB. McK. MERRY MAN,
jj R. F. D. Lutherville. Md.

h C. ft P. Telephone—Towson 42.
Oct. 24—ly
TOWSON, MD., SATURDAY, JUNE 12, 1909.
*AT HOME.
When a man’s tired
In body and mind.
Home’s the only place
That he’s anxious to find.
It may be a palace,
A cottage or hut.
It makes little difference
When he's tired, but
It's home.
There are numerous clubs
And pleasure resorts
That provide entertainment.
Refreshments and sports;
There are houses of worship.
With musio and prayer.
But when a man’s tired
He seeks refuge from care
At home.
At home he is greeted
By affection's caress;
He doffs all pretensions
Of manners or of dress;
He tosses the baby
And torments the dog,
He goes to bed early,
And sleeps like a log—
At home.
The home is the heart
Of our comfort and cheer.
Made so by the presence
Of those we hold dear;
By the thought that we’re shut la
From all that annoys.
And nothing can enter
To disturb our Joys—
At home. —Christian Advocate.
HOW TOM ELLIS CHANGED HIS MIND.
BV MARY L. KIMMERLY.
“Say, Kate, don’t you want a hen
to roast for dinner?” inquired Tom
Ellis of his wife, as he stood on the
broad stone at the end of the kitchen
porch, stamping the mud from his
shoes after an early morning trip to
the barn.
“No, Tom,” replied his wife, “I’ve
some sewing I want to finish today,
and I’d rather not take time to roast
anything.”
“There’s an old speckled hen that
has been hanging around the barn
lately, and refuses to be driven away.
I positively will not have the hens
around the barn ; the next thing the
whole flock will be there.”
“All right, Tom,” soothingly re
plied his wife, “just wait until Satur
day and I’ll roast her good and
brown.”
There had been a “cloud burst”
up the valley two days before ; all the
creeks had emptied the water into the
river and it was overflowing its banks.
A deep ravine between the house and
barn was bank full, and the bridge
across it looked shaky ; but Tom had
crossed safely to feed his horses. As
he threw two pieces of brick at the
speckled hen, he said: “Only two
days more then your career of will
fulness will be cut short.” But the
hen dodged the brickbat and flew
into an open window at the back of
the barn.
A rain which began in the morn
ing increased to almost a deluge. The
bridge across the ravine was swept
away, and the water crept gradually
over the land toward the house. As
Tom and his wife ate their dinner,
they jested about the flood and the
near approach of the water.
“Don’t you wish the house was a
two-story one, Kate?” asked Tom;
“then we could move up-stairs when
the water comes in below.”
“If the water comes into the house
we can move up stairs in the barn,”
replied the wife, but not for one mo
ment did she think it at all probable
that the water would reach the house.
After dinner, Kate resumed her
sewing, paying little attention to the
rain, while Tom read the newspaper,
and the little boys played about the
house.
At two o’clock Tom came in from
the kitchen, saying: “Kate, I believe
we’d better set things up off the floor
and take up the carpets, for the water
is rising fast; it is up to the floor of
the kitchen porch now.”
Kate dropped her sewing quickly,
took a look around, then went to
work. The drawers were taken out
and piled on top of the dresser ; the
clothing was put in the clothes-basket
and that set on top of the commode;
provisions taken from low shelves in
th^pantry and placed on higher ones;
carpets folded the quickest way and
placed on the table, and the bedding
on top of the carpets; but before all
the goods were in positions that seem
ed out of reach of the water the floors
were being covered by streams com
ing in under the doors.
The little boys laughed as they ran
back and forth through the fast
flowing streams that soon spread over
the floors; but Tom quickly started
for his horses to take his family to
the barn for safety. With difficulty
Tom swam the ravine, reached the
stable and returned with two horses.
He placed his wife and the elder boy
on one of the horses, telling her to
hold fast to the horse, and the boy to
hold fast to bis mamma, and they
would cross all right.
Kate was alarmed when she saw a
lake around the house, and the ravine
which they must cross a rushing
stream capable of taking anything
down that might come in its way.
Trembling inwardly, she grasped a
strap fastened around the body of the
horse with one hand, while the other
hand held the child with a vice-like
grip. Tom tied the halter rope of
Kate’s horse to the saddle of the horse
he rode, took little Glen in bis arms,
and they started for the barn.
At the edge of the swift-flowing
water the horses snorted, almost re
fusing to plunge into the seething
torrent. Bidding his wife “hold fast,”
Tom shouted to his horses to go, and
they obeyed. Kate was nearly swept
from the horse’s back as the animal
lost its footing and battled bravely
with the flow of water in trying to
reach the opposite bank.
Down, down the stream they were
carried in spite of all Tom’s urging to
his horses, as he constantly assured
his wife, if she held fast, they would
make it all right.
They were brushed by trees as they
were swept past them along the bank,
as the horses tried to get a foot-hold,
and, failing, were carried farther down
the stream, until they were a quarter
of a mile below the barn; then, as
Tom’s horse seemed to strike some
kind of a footing, he shouted : “Cour
age, Kate, holdfast.”
As Tom’s horse gained a footing,
Kate’s horse lost his on the slippery
bank and nearly fell to his knees,
throwing Kate forward into the water.
She kept her grip on the child and
the strap, and the strong arm of her
hust>and assisted her in getting upon
the horse’s back before they were out
of the deep water. When the horses
found a place on which they could
stand, they were allowed to stop a
while to breathe before starting up
the bottom land to the barn.
Nothing but the tops of the fence
posts could be seen above the water
over the ronte they must take to the
barn, but a gate opening into a lane
was unfastened and they passed
through. Both children had been
screaming in terror for some time,
and both parents’ faces were white,
but with firm-set muscles, and what
strength of will they possessed, they
urged their horses onward through
the soft mud. When the barn was
reached, they found a foot of water
on the floor. Tom helped his wife
and children to the ladder leading to
the hay lott, and when he saw them
safe he cared for his horses as well as
he could, i
It was now four o’clock ; the rain
was still coming down as fast as ever.
The water rose steadily in the barn,
the horses splashed it impatiently, a
little colt neighed from fright, and the
situation became serious. Tom climb
ed to the hay loft with bis horse
blankets, wrapped them around his
wife and children, who were shiver
ing in their wet clothes, and said
“Well, Kate, I don’t know what
this is coming to, but I think I have
done all I can until daylight.”
They looked across the water to
their cottage home; the water was
up to the windows, and it was grow
ing quite dark. They fixed some hay
for the little boys’ bed, and, covering
them with the blankets, bade them go
to sleep. The children had been too
much excited to think of supper, and,
with no farther fear, they were soon
asleep ; but the parents kept an anx
ious watch all night. An extra splash
ing among the horses below caused
Tom to go down again, to find the
little colt floundering in its efforts to
keep its nose out of the water. Kate
stood on the ladder and held the lan
tern, while Tom put the colt up in
the manger, and thus saved its life.
In the morning the conditions were
no better. The water was up to the
horses’ sides. The little boys awoke
and were hungry, but no provisions
had been brought. The water was
now clear to the eaves of the cottage.
There was no neighbor nearer than
half a mile, and nothing but water
and trees to be seen in any direction.
Pigs and old hogs were seen swim
ming, trying to find some place to
rest, and three had found a footing
on the roof of a shed. Many chick
ens were carried by on the flood;
cows and horses could be seen stand
ing deep in water along fences of pas
tures ; trees, boxes, barrels, chicken
§>ops, and all manner of loose arti
es were being swept to the river.
Little Glen wailed: “Mamma, I’m
just awful hungry.”
“Mamma is very sorry, little man,
but she has nothing to give you.
Maybe some one will come by and by
and bring us something to eat. God
won’t let us starve.”
Little Glen became hopeful, but
Emmet, the older boy, asked : “Are
you sure, mamma, God will give us
food ? ”
“Yes, my son, if we are only pa
tient; and you must remember we
are not the only ones God has to think
about.”
Glen was still crying for food,
when a slight noise was heard in the
farther corner of the hay, and mamma,
thinking to amuse the little ones,
told them to go and see what it was.
After some search, Emmet shouted :
“Oh, mamma! it’s a speckled hen,
and here are three eggs 1”
The father and mother exchanged
glances. Tom blushed scarlet, but
Kate told the boys to bring two of
the eggs to her; she broke the ends
of the shells and told the little boys
to drink each an egg, as this was the
way God saw fit to feed them.”
"But, mamma, why don’t He give
you and papa some, too?” questioned
Emmet.
“Ob, He will by and by ; but He
knows we can wait better than little
boys.” The little boys wanted the
third egg, but mamma said no, one
was plenty for them then.
The hen walked up on the hay,
but when she saw Tom she skipped
back, ducking her head as though
she must dodge some kind of a mis
sile whenever she saw him.
The water remained about station
ary all day, although there were fre
quent heavy showers. The children
were very restless, but the parents
took turns sleeping, preparatory to a
second night’s watch. The second
morning there was no improvement
in conditions, except that the rain
had ceased falling and the sky was
bright. Another egg was found in
the speckled hen’s nest, so each of the
little boys had one. The parents
anxiously watched every floating ob
ject in hope some one might come to
their assistance.
Toward night of the second day an
object was seen far off, which proved
to be their neighbor in a watering
trough, paddling toward them. Tom
shouted, the neighbor waved his hat,
and after what seemed a long wait,
he drew near the barn with his un
wieldy craft. He had brought a basket
of provisions, which was soon hauled
up to the hay-loft by the hungry
couple.
The neighbor told them that all the
houses along the bottom land had
water in them, and that all the fami
lies had been obliged to move up
stairs; that small buildings, pigs and
chickens were all gone, and that hun
dreds of bushels of grain had been
destroyed. Then telling Tom he
would come back in the morning and
take them over to his house, he start
ed for home, and was watched by
Tom and Kate until the trees hid him
from their view.
The next morning the neighbor
came with a roughly-made flat-boat
and took the family to bis home;
, then the two men returned for the
l horses and colt. The colt was tied
and put in the boat, and Tom held
the halter ropes of his horses as they
walked or swam behind the boat to a
place of refuge.
Ten days later, when the waters
had gone down, and Tom and Kate
were trying to arrange some things
so they could stay in their own home,
and the first fire was built in the cook
stove, little Glen said : “Now, papa,
you can kill that old speckled hen
and let mamma roast her.”
“I’ve changed my mind about
roasting that speckled hen,” answered
Tom, “even if I have to give her en
tire possession of the barn ; for I
think she has earned it.” — Country
Gentleman.
A LESSON IN COOKING.
That anybody can cook is a popular
masculine view of one of the most dif
ficult and interesting of the arts.
The following is a dialogue which
took place in a city flat when the wife
was sick and the husband a voluntary
chef. It was the breakfast hour.
The voice from the kitchen asked:
“Do you begin to count the three
minutes from the time you pnt the
eggs in or from the time the water be
gins to boil?”
The voice from the bedroom re
plied: “Do you wha —Why, you
don’t put the eggs in till the water
begins to boil, dear.”
“You don’t? Well, I did.”
“Is the water nearly boiling?”
“Nearly boiling ! Why, I just put
it on 1”
“And isn’t it very hot?”
“Of course, it isn’t!” came the in
dignant reply from the kitchen.
“Well, then, just take the eggsout
till it starts boiling.’’
Silence for a few moments.
“What shall I take ’em out with ?”
“There’s a big iron spoon hanging
over the sink.”
“Oh ! Where shall I put them ?”
“Why, on the Icitchen table, dear.”
“But they keep rolling off if I don’t
hold ’em.”
“Then put them on a saucer.”
“Which one shall I take?”
“Don’t take —Oh, never mind;
take any of them.”
Silence for ten minutes.
Then : “Charles, is the water boil
ing?”
“It isn’t even lukewarm yet.”
“Not lukewarm! Why, you didn’t
fill it with cold water ?”
“Of course. Why not?”
“Charles, dear, I’m sprty to make
you so much trouble,” came from the
bedroom, “but it will never boil that
way. Just pour it out and put in
only a little from the hot-water fau
cet.”
“All right,” came the reply from
the kitchen. “Now I’ve done it.
Shall I put the eggs in ?”
“No ; wait till it boils.”
Silence.
“There, it’s boiling now. Shall I
put ’em in 1”
“Yes.”
Silence for some time.
Then, from the bedroom, “Aren’t
the three minutes up yet?”
‘‘Gracious ! I forgot to look at my
watch when I put ’em in. I guess
it must be time, though. What do
you take ’em out with?”
“The big spoon,” said the voice
from the bedroom, patiently.
Silence.
“Say,” came the voice from the
kitchen, “how —what made ’em all
come out of the shell? There isn't
anything in the shells at all, and the
water--why, the water’s all poached.”
“Oh, dear,” said the voice from
the bedroom, “you must have cracked
them when you dropped them in?”
“Whydidn’tyousayso? Icouldn’t
put my hands clear down into the
boiling water with ’em, could I?”
‘.‘Of course not. Never mind.”
Silence.
‘.Well, what do I do now?”
“Oh, just turn out the gas and let
it go at that.”
“But what are you going to eat?
Don’t j’ou want me to boil you some
more?”
The voice from the bedroom an
swered eagerly: “No, no! Please
don’t! I’ll just have some crackers
and milk, please. That will do.
Bring me the bottle of milk out of the
lower part of the refrigerator, and a
bowl and a spoon, and a cracker jar
from the sideboard. No, I’ll open
the milk bottle. Thank you. Now
go back to your newspaper, dear.
Sister May will clear up when she
comes.”
“How long does the doctor say
you’ll have to stay in bed?” came
the voice from behind the newspaper.
“He doesn’t say.”
“I hope it won’t be long.”
“I hope so, too.” — Chicago News.
WOBTH SEEING.
In a Florida town a visitor from
the north hailed a native.
“What’s the matter with the peo
ple here?” he asked. “What are
you all running so hard for ?’ ’
“Can’t stop to talk, stranger,” the
man answered over his shoulder as
he rushed on.
Men dashed out of their stores,
slammed the doors and sprinted up
the street, some in aprons, some in
shirt sleeves. An epidemic of mad
ness seemed to have struck the place.
The town policeman sauntered
[ along at last. Policemen never hurry.
“What’s wrong?” the stranger
asked.
> ‘‘Ain’t nothin’ wrong,” said the
policeman. “The railroad agent just
got a telegram that the down express
i is cornin’ through in a few minutes
1 with snow on the roof, and the boys
have gone to fetch their families down
i to the depot to see the sight.”
i “WELL,” said the cheerful wife,
■ who thought she had a soprano voice,
’ “if the worst comes to the worst I
i could keep the wolf from the door by
singing.” “I don’t doubt that would
r do it, ” replied her pessimistic husband,
t “but suppose the wolf should happen
; to be deaf?”
ft ■ •' ™
1 He alone has energy who cannot
1 be thus deprived of it.
WEARING OF GLASBEB.
“A greater number of persons than
ever are now wearing eyeglasses or
spectacles,” said Dr. Eugene G. Win
ter, of Boston, to a reporter the other
day. “Up to a short time ago the
demand for lenses was so great that
the manufacurers were almost swamp
ed with orders, and it was feared in
this country there would be a serious
dearth of lenses. All of the glass
that is used in the optical business is
imported. The greater part of it
comes from Germany; the rest is
made in England. It seems that
American glass manufacturers have
thus far been unable to produce glass
of the reqnisit quality for the eye
glasses.
“The greatest defect in American
eyesight is the inability to see at
great distances. The majority of per
sons who wear eyeglasses or specta
cles are nearsighted. Even those
born with perfect eyes have been
forced before they are very old to re
sort to glasses that they may see
everything going on. This myopia
is due almost entirely to the artificial
conditions that surround a human be
ing in this present age almost from
his very babyhood.
“As cities increase in size and as
the conveniences that are offered in
any one city increase, so does the
value of real estate increase. And
with the rise in realty values the
height of buildings increases and
partitions become more numerous.
Skyscrapers are effective obstructions
to long ranges of vision. The more
or less vivid and tiresome colorings
of their walls have usurped in man’s
visions the place of the restful and
unfathomable blue of the sky. The
apartments in these new buildings are
of smaller dimensions than those in
the old fashioned buildings, for the
air space allotted to each and every
person in the community must be cur
tailed to make the investment on the
building in any way profitable. In
consequence, modern persons become
accustomed tonone but short distances.
It makes no difference whether one
be employed all day in a small office,
poring over a set of books, or whether
he is hurrying about the city streets,
he cannot see very far about him.
And even in his home the walls of
his room have grouped more closely
about him.
“The fish that were found in the
stream of the Mammoth Cave were
discovered to be totally blind, although
they at one time did possess sight.
The same law that was operative in
depriving these fish of their sight is
operative today in the great congested
centres of modern civilization, and it
is only a question of time when the
eyes of those who are compelled to
work in artificial light all day long
will become so unaccustomed to day
light that blinders will have to be re
sorted to.”
PRESIDENT’S AIDE LOOKS THE FART.
Captain Archibald Willingham de
Graffenreid Butt. That’s his name.
It should be written Captain Archi
bald Willingham de Graffenreid Butt,
U. S. A., military aide to his excel
lency, the President. It’s a good
deal of a name and something of a
title to carry around, but Captain
Butt does it handsomely. He looks
the part, every inch of him, whether
in uniform or in civilian togs ; but he
is specially fetching in his uniform.
Captain Butt, it is worth while to
mention, is an Englishman by birth.
There are a number of young military
men in the army who came from the
English service in the South African
war, and then, getting the idea that
the chance of promotion was better in
the United States, entered the service
here. Some others came for the war
with Spain, but these, as a rule, have
dropped out since, and very few of
the number who tendered their ser
vices at that time were accepted.
The American army has many attrac
tions for clever young English officers,
who, in any future war this country
might have, would volunteer i n
greater numbers than they ever did
before, purely from love of adventure.
But about Butt. He is one of the
finest fellows in the army, and has so
many friends that it is utterly impos
sible that any jealousies should ever
develop because of the handsome
berth he has attained, with its assur
ance of better things in the future.
The President and the whole Taft
family are very fond of him, and it is
calculated that he will have a marvel
ous promotion of some sort, one of
these days, just as Commander Wil
lard S. Sims, naval aide to Roosevelt,
was given a battleship of the best type
over the heads of men who outranked
him. These positions in the personal
entourage of the President are always
stepping stones to the best things in
the service. The men who occupy
them necessarily acquire an influence
that makes them useful to others in
the service ; and if, like Commander
Sims, they are strenuous persons, full
of programs and theories and uplifting
! ideas, they are certain to have ample
opportunity to make good with their
schemes. If they do this —as Sims
’ did—there is likely to be nothing too
1 good for them in the future. — New
‘ Century.
I Tell me not in mournful numbers
that we meet again today—all the
- scraps we had on Sunday fixed up in
the same old way. Mutton chops and
. turkey giblets, lamb and chickens,
t steak and stew in a motley mass of
jumble served again to me —and you 1
j Ah, I recognize the giblets. There
5 is one I could not crack ! “Oh, good
, evening, Mr. Grizzle”—and that neck
is coming back ! Friends of other
meals, I greet you ; greet you in the
good old way. Yes, doggone you, I
’ will eat you, or you’ll come again some
: day 1
The Kansas City Journal gives this
l from the typewriter of a Kansas editor
i on the death of a prominent citizen :
i “He had been married forty years and
was prepared to die.”
t Don’t be fearful that you are do
ing the wrong thing all the time.
ESTABLISHED 1850.
QEHEBAL GBAHT’S EARLY BAYS.
Mrs. Emma Dent Casey, writing
in the February Citde magazine of
her memories of General Grant, re
futes some popular legends, which
have been current.
There is the famous story of Cap
tain Grant living in such poverty that
he had to haul his poor little fagots
of wood through the city with an ox
team and blow on his ungloved fin
gers to keep them from freezing.
The truth is that he and his negroes
cut the wood and he often sent one of
them to the city with a load to sell
to the families of a Mr. Blow and
Mr. Bernard. Mr. Bernard was the
brother of my brother John’s wife.
During the Christmas holidays one
winter the negro who generally drove
the team for Captain Grant was ill
and there was no one to send in his
place.
The Captain’s St, Louis friends
sent him word that they were out of
wood, and, accordingly, he hitched
up his team of white horses to his big
wagon, loaded on the wood, and
hauled it to the city himself. He
probably hauled several loads in this
way. I do not know how many.
Any other man with the same temper
of spirit and the same lack of false
pride would have done the same.
On one of these trips, as the Cap.
tain was driving along seated on his
load of wood, he suddenly came face
to face with General Harney and his
staff. The General, resplendent in a
new uniform and gold trimmings,
eyed the figure of the farmer on the
wagon with astonishment. Then he
drew in his horse. Grant stopped his
team, and the pair smiled into each
other’s eyes.
“Why, Grant, what in blazes are
you doing?’’ exclaimed Harney.
The Captain, sitting comfortably
atop his load of wood with his ax and
whipstock at his side, shifted one
muddy boot across the other and
drawled:
“Well, General, I am hauling
wood.”
The thing was so obvious and Grant
so naive that General Harney and his
staff roared with laughter. They
shook his hand and joked with him
and finally carried him off to dine
with them at the Planters’ Hotel.
That is the true story of Captain Run
down at-the heels Grant peddling
wood for a pittance in the streets.
AT THE WHITE HOUSE.
Mrs. Taft has the reputation of be
ing an excellent housekeeper, but lit
tle of this kind of work will fall to
her lot as mistress of the White House.
A steward is provided at SI,BOO a
year to look after such matters.
It is hisduty to hire all the servants,
to give orders to the housekeeper and
to do all the marketing. He is pro
vided with a government dayton wag
on in which to do bis shopping.
He is a sworn government official,
who under the terms of a bond of
$20,000 given before he enters upon
his duties, is personally responsible
for all government property used in
the White House. This includes ta
ble linen, plate, glass, furniture, car
pets and ornaments.
Whenever the first lady of the land
wishes any repairs or changes made
she has simply to call upon the en
gineer officer of the Army who is de
tailed in the dual capacity of superin
tendent o f public buildings and
grounds and master of ceremonies at
the White House. He is allowed
$35,000 a year for the care and re
furnishing of the mansion and an
equal .amount for repairs, $6,000 for
fuel, $9,000 for greenhouses and #4,-
000 for care of the White House
grounds.
All food bills, including those for
the four state dinners given each
year or for the entertainment of dis
tinguished foreigners in Washington,
must be paid out of the President’s
own private funds. The four state
banquets usually cost aboun SI,OOO
each, says the Technical World. The
floral decorations for the W aite House
however, come from the government
greenhouses. The music, too, is
free, being furnished by the famous
Marine Band at Washington.
In the basement of the White
House the new mistress will find two
modern kitchens, a large laundry
room and a wonderful pantry con
taining au electric dish heater with a
capacity of 3,000 dishes and plates.
At the state dinners, over which she
presides, the viands, prepared in her
two kitchens by one of the best cater
ers in the country, will be served on
a $30,000 service of Wedgwood china,
besides the new glassware bought
under the Roosevelt regime and the
historic silver plate collected by White
House matrons since Adams’ time.
THE CLEBK BCOBED.
There is a proprietor of a shop who
is for ever scolding his employees for
their indifference in the matter of
possible sales. One day, hearing an
assistant say to a customer : “No, we
have not had any tor a long time,”
the proprietor, unable to countenance
such an admission, began to work
himself into the usual rage. Fixing
a glassy eye on his clerk, he said to
the customer:
“We have plenty in reserve’ ma’am
—plenty downstairs 1”
Whereupon the customer looked
dazed; and then, to the amazement
of the proprietor, burst into hysteri
cal laughter and quitted the shop.
“What did she say to you?” de
manded the proprietor of the clerk.
“We haven’t had any rain lately.”
A teacher, after patiently defin
ing words in a spelling lesson, gave
the word “grewsome” from among
them, to be put into a sentence, with
this result from the brightest little
girl in the class : “I cannot wear
my last Summer’s dresses, because I
grew some.”
Some things go without saying,
but a woman isn’t one of them.
He who takes things on faith gets
many a jolt.

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