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The Baltimore County union. (Towsontown, Md.) 1865-1909, June 12, 1909, Image 2

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Tbe U^iOQ.”
TOWSON, Md.
Saturday, - - June 12,1909.
LON6NECKER BROS., Editors and Proprietors.
$1.50 per annum—in advance. Pottage pre~
paid. So subscription taken for
lest than six months.
BTC. * P. PHOHE-TOWSO* 211
A dispatch from Barre, Vt., says the largest
piece of stone ever quarried in that State—a
rock of granite containing 161,000 cubic feet—
has been blasted ont at one of the quarries
there. Figuring at the current value of $1.25
for one cubic fool, the great block is worth a
little more than $200,000.
Thk congregation of the old Presbyterian
Church known as Drawyer’e, near Odessa, Del.,
celebrated the two hundred and first anniver
sary of that historic building last Sunday. The
ancient church is opened the first Sunday in
JuDe each year for the exercises, under the
auspices of the Friends of Old Drawyer’s, an
association organized for this purpose. In the
cemetery attached to this church many Rev
olutionary heroes are buried.
For the seventh consecutive time Mr. Harry
A. Orrick was on Monday last elected presi
dent of the Baltimore Stock Exchange. Messrs.
Harry Pennington and J. C. Cooper were
elected to the governing committee to serve
until June, 1910. Messrs. Harry Fahnestock,
Arnold E. Waters and Gordon P. Paine were
elected to serve until June, 1912. Mr. Orrick,
who is a banker and broker, is a resident of
Green Spring Valley, Baltimore county.
The frequency of cyclones in Oklahoma
does not square with the theory of cyclonic
conditions growing out of forest denudation.
Foliage in Oklahoma now is greater than it
was twenty years ago, but cyclones are more
numerous. The problem is one of air currents,
and if we ever solve it we will in all probability
be able to do nothing more than issue warning
bulletins by wireless telegraphy. This, how
ever, may prove to be much if it leads to in
dicated measures of precaution and provision.
Col. Alexander McClure, one of the most
distinguished newspaper editors of the country,
died at his country borne at Wallingford, near
Philadelphia, last Sunday morning, aged 81
years. Col. McClure was born in Perry coun
ty, Pa., and was the son of a farmer in very
moderate circumstances. He ended his school
life at the age of 14 and was then apprenticed
to a tanner of the neighborhood. He took an
interest in his county paper when a boy and
became a friend of the editor. This was his
first experience in a profession that made him
a great name in later life.
The new train service which the Burlington
and Northern Pacific systems have combined
to put in force between Chicago and Seattle to
make close connection with the Pennsylvania’s
eighteen-hour flier from New York, is expec
ted to result in the transmission of mail and
passengers from New York to Seattle in four
days. The actual schedule time for this ser
vice is ninety-five hours and thirty-five min
utes from coast to coast. The Burlington and
Northern Pacific also has put on another train
leaving Chicago at night and due to reach
Seattle in seventy-two hours.
Leipsic, in Germany, has been so troubled
with malaria that the city authorities have de
termined on a campaign to stamp out mosqui
toes. Every householder will be asked to kill
all the insects in his own apartments, after
which inspectors will go around to see that
thorough work has been done. As the mos
quito breeds only in pools of stagnant water,
marsh land, rain barrels and so on, it is some
what surprising to hear of a German town
being a mosquito breeder. That we thought
was a privilege enjoyed exclusively by badly
governed American cities.
Because two men were acquitted of robbery
in a Chicago court a few days ago Judge
McEwen denounced the jurors and ordered the
accused men to "go and shake haDds with
your friends in the jury box.” Continuing he
said : "You men are discharged from further
service, and you get no pay for today. You
can go now, but I cannot believe your verdict
was an honest one." The Judge also ordered
the clerk to turn over two revolvers which
were found in the possession of the meD when
they were arrested, and added : “Give those
guns and cartridges to the defendants. They
may want to use them again.”
At Stamford, Conn., last week Dr. William
J. Long, the writer on nature subjects who
was assailed by President Roosevelt as one of
the nature fakers, gave out a long interview
dealing with the present African hunting trip
of the former President. He said that the
worst feature of tbe “whole bloody business”
was the brutalizing effect which the reports
from Africa must have on the minds of thous
ands of American boys. If the published re
ports of his exploits were true, continued Dr.
Long, they proved what he had said two years
ago, that Mr. Roosevelt “is a game butcher
pure and simple, and that his interest in ani
mals lies chiefly in the direction of blood,
butchery and brutality.”
R. L. Jones, State Superintendent of Public
Instruction in Tennessee, has been quoted as
saying that half of the teachers there are in
competent. The Knoxville Journal and Tri
bune admits that the situation is bad, though
it thinks it is improving, says that much of
the trouble is due to inadequatesalaries and to
favoritism shown by district boards of school
directors in the selection of teachers. Poor pay
for teachers necessarily involves a poor qual
ity of instructors. But give good pay and
poor school trustees and the condition is just
as bad, if not worse. There is often as much
wisdom as sting in tbe keen remark of Mark
Twain : “It is true the Lord made idiots. He
did it byway of experiment. Then he made
school boards.”
The business of one well-known firm of op
ticians in England consists largely in tbe man
ufacture of horse spectacles. The object of the
spectacles is to promote high stepping. They
are made of stiff* leather, entirely closing the
eyes of the horse and the glasses used are in
deep concave and large in size. The ground
seems, to tjie horse, to be raised, and he steps
high, thinking he is going up hill or has to
step over some obstacle. This system of spec
tacles is generally adopted while the horse is
young, and its effect on his step and knee ac
tion is said to be remarkable. It has been dis
covered that the cause of a horse’s shying is,
as a rule, short sight, and it is now suggested
that the sight of all horses should be tested like
that of children.
It looks like William JeDnings Bryan
was putting himself in trim for the national
campaign of 1912. He is not pleased with the
status of a number of Democratic Congress
men on the tariff question and in the latest
issue of his newspaper he said : “Democratic
voters, you cannot begin too soon to select
candidates for Congress. In about a year the
campaign will be on, and upon that campaign
Will largely depend the hope of the party in
1912. Let those Democrats who believe in
pure and undefiled Democracy get together in
each district and pick out a Democrat who can
not be bought or frightened. The trusts have
stealthily secured control of some of the Con
gressmen who were elected as Democrats, and
they will have tbe confidence of the trusts in
securing a renomination. No time is to be
lost; now is the time to organize the real Dem
ocrats ; to secure Congressmen whose Demo
cracy is real.” From Col. Bryan’s viewpoint
wonder what a “real Democrat” looks like.
Special to The Union.
LETTER FROM ABROAD.
Correspondent Takes a Trip to “Purgato
ry”—Priest Claims to Have Collection
of Objects of Supernatural Origin
—Artists Examine Strange Pic
ture—What Young Novice
Saw at Night, etc., etc.
Rome, Italy, June 6tb, 1908.
Messrt. Editors:— While seated one morning In
tbe reading room of Cook’s tourist office, in the
Piazza di Spague, with my elbow propped on a
table littered with pamphlets advertising vari
ous attractive excursions that could be made in
the neighborhood of Rome, such as a “Trip to
Tivoli with Signore Tani,” “Along the Appian
Way in Automobile,” “A Da; Among the Alban
Hills,” etc., my eyes were suddenly arrested by
a red bound brochure entitled,
“A Little Journey to Purgatory.”
Personally Conducted by
Father Victor Joubt.
I thought It must be a joke- book, may be a cari
caturist's concentrated edition of Elbert Hub
bard’s “Little Journeys to tbe Home* of Great
Men;” but no, it was a sincere, albeit friendly in
vitation to go to hell, and I went. Instead of
crossing the Styx In Charon’s boat. I crossed the
Tiber in a tram-car, and instead of passing
through a gloomy cavern-like portal, guarded by
Cerberus, I entered the infernal regions via a
modern church in the vicinity of the new city
court house. Doubtless lam not the first who
has chosen a similar route to perdition.
Father Jouet is a priest who has devoted his
life to tbe collection of objects bearing marks
and finger prints of alleged supernatural origin,
tending to show that purgatory is a definite
geographical spot in tbe universe, and that the
unhappy souls, who have been plunged therein
to expiate their sins, live literally in a lake of
fire. These relics he has preserved in a museum
at No. 12 Lungo Tevere Prati. next door to tbe
church above mentioned. Visitors are shown
tbe church first as a sort of preparation for tbe
extraordinary sights which are to follow. It is
decorated with frescoes and paintings repre
senting the torments of the lower regions, and
above the altar is a realistic panorama illumined
by red lights showing a sea of flames In which
men and women are struggling.
Twelve years ago, beside the altar, an event
occurred which Fatner Jouet and many other
Romans regard as a miraculous endorsement of
the priest’s project to prove to the world the
material existence of purgatory. One night, at
an hour when no one was in the church.a candle
fell from the altar setting afire some velvet cur
tains. The blaze crept along a wooden railing
and finally spent itself against a plaster wall
where the woodwork ended without doing
further damage.
Next morning when Father Jouet and his con
freres discovered tbe accident they set about at
once to clear away the ashes and have the place
repaired. “This section of the wall will have to
be replastered. See how curiously it has been
discolored by the fire and smoke,” remarked one
of the priests, and then suddenly raised his
hands in amazement toward the stain.
The flames had traced a picture on the wall!
Not a grotesque.pbantasmagoric.shadowy smoke
effect, requiring an effort of tbe taagination to
discern, but a human face and figure outlined as
clearly as if depicted by the painter’s brush- an
old man clothed in a red robe, wearing on bis
head a bishop’s mitre and standing waist deep in
flames.
“A soul In purgatory!” cried Father Jouet.
“And a bishop!” whispered the others.
That same morning Father Jouet visited the
Vatican and communicated his strange discov
ery to the Pope. Now, as all the world knows,
Leo XIII was strong on natural sciences and not
much of a believer in latter-day miracles, so he
turned the matter over to a committee of emi
nent painters for a cold, technical examination.
The artists readily admitted that it was a real
picture and lost no time in arriving at quite a
simple explanation of the phenomenon. It was
an old fresco, they said, representing a bishop or
cardinal of the early church being burned at the
stake as a martyr. It had been effaced by time,
or by a thin coat of plaster or whitewash, and
the sudden heat comiDgin contact with tbe wall
had brought out these old outlines and colors.
It was a most extraordinary work of art, they
said, and were beginning to analyze its style for
the purpose of assigning it to a particular date
and school when Father Jouet calmly set their
wisdom at naught by proving that the wall was
only two years old, that be himself had superin
tended its construction, and that it had been
plastered with ordinary lime and mortar by a
common workman who still lived in a neighbor
ing street and who recollected having been paid
40 a day for the job.
“Astonishing 1” exclaimed the learned artists*
and gave it up.
Months passed and the fame of the miraculous
picture was noised abroad. Other artists came
to marvel and persons of devout faith to pray;
one day an eminent church historian from tbe
Piedmont came to Rome and dropped in casually
to see the picture; Scarcely had his eyes rested
upon the features when he turned pale as death
and gasped in Father Jouet’s ear:
“My God, man, don’t you know ? That face !
Its Cardinal!” And he mentioned tbe name of a
great prelate who had been dead for more than
a quarter of a century.
I saw the mysterious picture with my own
eyes. It is an awe-inspiring visage, a nightmare
of a face, which haunts the imagination for
hours afterward. It is no accident or freak of
nature. It was executed by a master's haDd,
whether of man or spirit. It shows design.
From the church Father Jouet conducted me
to the museum. Tbe objects it contains are
difficult to describe. Imagine a piece of linen,
a book or a wooden table upon which a red hot
human band, a band of flesh and blood, glowing
with heat and yet not withered or consumed,
has lain for a fraction of a second, just long
enough to leave the scorched, blackened im
print of the fingers and palm, but not long
enough to set the object ablaze. Tbe museum
contains twenty or thirty articles bearing such
imprints, collected from all parts of Europe,
each with a separate terrible history of its own.
Persons without faith in tbe supernatural are
of course disinclined, even after having seen
these things, to credit the theory that they have
actually been touched by souls returning from
purgatory to eartb, but no one who has seen tbe
collection and the documents accompanying it,
and who has afterward talked with Father Jouet,
can harbor the suspicion that the fiery finger
prints have been fraudulently fabricated with
the deliberate intention to deceive. That they
have been “faked,” to use an American slang
expression. Whatever is the real origin of these
imprints Father Jouet believes them to be ex
actly what he represents them to be.
Tbe Reverend Mother Angela, a nun at the
Ursuline Convent at Sommieres, of which the
Abbot Leonard was the chaplain, died about two
decades ago, at the age of 35 years. She was
venerated as a saint by tbe whole community,
and no one thought it necessary to say masses
for her soul or pray for her deliverance from
"purgatory, because it was taken for granted
that she went straight to heaven.
Shortly after Mother Angela's death a young
girl from Clermont presented herself as a novice
at the door of the convent. She was called Sister
Maria, was pious, intelligent and full of zeal.
One day she said to the Abbot Leonard, her con
fessor:
“Father, I am afraid to stay in my room alone
at night!”
“Why, what’s the matter, my child ?” asked
tbe aged priest.
“For several nights I have not been able to
sleep; each night, just as the clock is striking
12, a strange light enters my room and hovers
above the stool on which I am accustomed to
kneel before my little altar. It is like a candle
flame suriounded by mist or fog. I am sick
from fear.”
Tbe old chaplain patted the child on the head,
laughed good-naturedly at her story and told
her she must have been dreaming. But Sister
Maria, who continued to be visited by the mys
terious light, not getting any satisfaction from
the chaplain, finally demanded and obtained per
mission to speak to the Mother Superior. The
latter also treated the matter lightly, but as she
had some writing to do that night and was anx
ious to calm the girl's fears she consented to sit
up and watch with her. Neither saw anything
that night, and the Mother Superior took ad van.
tage of the negative experience to ridicule the
simplicity of Sister Maria and declare that she
was the victim of her own imagination, but the
child, certain as to what she bad seen, insisted
that the Mother Superior return the next night,
and midnight found the two again seated
together in the cell, one trembling with expec
tation.the other sceptical. Suddenly the young
er rose, panting and perspiring with tenor, and
stretched out her arms toward something which
she wished to show her companion. The latter
saw nothing until Sister Maria cried out“ Mother,
it is a nun!”
Then the figure became visible to both, lumi
nously visible, yet dim of outline, like the white
nuns who flit across the cloister court-) ard in
the shadows on a moonlight night. The appari
tion began to speak;
“I have returned from purgatory to ask that
three masses be said for my soul, and that for
nine days all the sisters of the convent pray
earnestly for my deliverance.” This said the
spectre disappeared. For nine days the regular
life of the community was interrupted, special
masses were said and perpetual prayers offered
for the repose of the unhappy nun.
But who could It be? The Abbott Leonard
was inclined to think probably a certain sister,
Agostina, who had died a month or two previous
and who bad possibly been sent to purgatory to
temper her disposition, which had not been
most gentle during her earth-life. During these
nine days the apparition did not return and
sister Maria slept soundly, but on the tenth
night she was awakened by a mysterious light
and found the spectre standing by her bed.
“Fear nothing!” it said, “It is only I.”
“But who are you ?”
“I am Mother Angela! Thank the commu
nity in my name for their prayers. My condi
tion has been greatly ameliorated, though the
oraisons of some of tbe sisters have been use
less because they were offered with incredulity.
Tell tbe Abbot Leonard not to reproach him
self. It is not bis fault that I have suffered so.
I am condemned to nine more days of torment,
after which I will be admitted to heaven. But
listen; would you like to save your own soul and
at tbe same time ease my pain by suffering in
my stead ?”
Sister Maria accepted the penance and for
nine days remained fastiDg in her cell, daily in
flicting upon herself severe bodily pains. When
midnight of tbe last day came the devoted girl
lay prostrate on the floor of her cell half uncon
scious, so weakened by her fasting and self
inflicted tortures that she was unable to drag
herself to bed. Suddenly the little chamber
was filled with a lurid, unearthly glare, and she
felt a burniDg hand laid an her shoulder, and
beard a voice which said:
“Tonight is my last hour in purgatory. Thanks
to your willingness to share my suffering. I
can already see afar the opening gates of Para
dise.”
Here Father Jouet closed bis story, while I
bent to examine with breathless interest Sister
Maria's scorched sleeve. There, indeed, in
blackened outlines, was tbe unmistakable im
print of a woman’s band.
“And the drops of blood ?’’ I asked.
“A scourge with leaden pellets,” replied the
priest. Seabrook.
Correspondence Baltimore County Union.
AN ECLIPSE OF THE SDN COMING.
. Woodlawn, Md., June 9tb, 1909.
An eclipse of the sun Is an event which never
fails to arouse general interest. Such a phe
nomenon is always looked forward to by persons
in all walks of life. As an eclipse, partially visi
ble here, will occur in a few days, a sketch of it
may prove of Interest to the general reader.
On Thursday, June 17th, about 15 or 20 minutes
before sunset, a small notch may be detected in
the setting sun. This will gradually increase in
size until lost to view by the sun sinking below
the western horizon. This is about all that can
be seen here, but from another point of view it
is an extremely interesting eclipse, being total
in some portions of the earth and the path of
totality exhibiting some unusual phases.
It is very well known that an eclipse of the
sun is caused by tbe moon coming between tbe
sun and eartb and thereby cutting off his light.
It is probably not so well known that these
eclipses repeat themselves at regular intervals,
or return again after a period of 18 years and 10
days. This period was discovered by the Chal
deans and by means of it eclipses were pre
dicted, although such methods will not do for
the modern astronomer. It is probably still less
known that these eclipses come in, run their
course and pass off in about a thousand years
not to return again for more than a hundred
centuries. The present eclipse is the first of a
long series of total eclipses which will occur at
regular intervals of 18 years, 10 or 11 days, until
it shall have passed off into space, not to return
again for more than ten thousand years.
This series began as a small partial eclipse
around the north pole and increased in magni
tude at each return until in 1891 the central line
touched the earth in high northern latitudes
and passed over portions of Siberia and the
Arctic ocean. This time it was annular and of
very short duration. On June 17th the moon’s
shadow cone will touch the earth in 12 seconds
after tbe line of centres, consequently the
eclipse will then change from annulai to total.
This will occur in northern Chinese Empire.
The shadow path will then pass north by east,
crossing Silterta, the Arctic ocean and quite near
the north pole; thence southeast and ending in
southern Greenland.
About 45 seconds before the central line leaves
the earth the shadow cone will pass off and the
eclipse will again change from total to annular.
Quite near the pole the eclipse will occur at
noon and the sun will be totally eclipsed for 22
seconds, but on account of it being somewhat
difficult to make a journey to those regions, it
will probably not be very generally observed;
at least no government so far as I have learned
has sent out an expedition to observe it.
With us only a very small portion will be visi
ble, beginning a few minutes after 7 o’clock, and
tbe sun will set partially eclipsed. The eclipse
will end entirely in southern Missouri at sunset.
This eclipse will return in 1927- June 29th.
This time the path of totality being further
south and will pass through England, Norway,
Sweden, Arctic ocean, Siberia, and ending in
Behring sea. The people of Northern England
will have an opportunity of seeinga total eclipse,
but the time of totality will be very short. With
us it will be entirely invisible, but on the return
in 1945 the path of totality will cross parts of the
United States and Canada. J. B. H.
The United States Supreme Court has ren
dered its decision in favor of Mrs. Elizabeth
Peck, tbe lowa temperance advocate, who sued
the Chicago Tribune for libel on account of its
having published a picture of the plaintiff in
connection with an advertisement of a certain
brand of whisky. The picture was printed
over tbe name of another woman described as
a nurse, quoted as indorsing the whisky.
The publisher was held responsible, even
though the publication may have been by
mistake.
The Illinois Legislature amended the
game law in away to prevent any man from
killing more than ten wild geese in a day.
This is a law which will be very generally ob
served. The man who can kill more than that
number of that elusive bird in a day is always
the man who does it either at the club or
around tbe bar-room stove.
A man who is said to be the oldest veteran
on the United States pension rolls is Micajah
Wise, of Beaver Brook, Sullivan county, N.
Y„ who has just applied for an increase of bis
pension. He is 108 years old and still hale and
hearty. Mr. Wise was a member of Gen. Phil
Sheridan’s cavalry that routed Early’s army
in Shenandoah Valley.
Pr op erty Transfers in Baltimore County.
—Deeds, etc., received for record in the office of
tbe Clerk of tbe Circuit Court for Baltimore
County:
DEEDS.
D. F. Thompson and wife to Timothy J. Hooper.
Ella R. Gawthrop to John H. Borleis and wire.
F. J. Wieslnger and wife to W. R. Funk and wife.
W. C. Vogts, trustee, to F. B. Carroll and wife.
James Young and wife to Samuel F. A. Kiel.
Gertrude H. Bosley et al. to H. G. Woodruff.
C. W. Littleton and wife to 8. W. Sparks and wf.
James E. Ingram et al. to Conway Robinson.
Frederick C. Rapp to Leo J. Garvey and wife.
Mary Ann Lacey to Katherine Lacey.
Paolo Mortillo and wife to Domenico Serio.
Belleview Land Co. to Paolo Mortillo.
W. N. Braun and wife et al. to Eliza M. Callerman.
Helen A. Hartman to Annie Elberth.
P. C. Mueller and wife to Annie Elbertb.
Canton Congregational Church to the Second
Congregational Church.
E. C. Powley and wife to Louisa H. Middleton.
Mary H. Price to Charles A. Emerine and wife.
Lyons Land Co. to Lloyd M. Ticer and wife.
Menlo Park Land Co. to Henry N. Eckstine.
Susanna Schuebelen, administratrix, to John
Schaefer and wife.
Anna Rinehart et al. to C. J. Riehl and wf.
Wm. F. Williams and wf. to Richard S. Sutton.
T. C. Worthington and wf. et. al. to the Eagle
Lumber Co., limited.
The Atlantic Transport Co. of West Virginia to
the Northern Central Railway Co.
Ellen M. Schaeffer to Williamson Veneer Co.
Jessamine Townsend and bus. et al. to Ellen M.
Schaeffer.
Dora E. C. Brandau to Jonathan K. Taylor.
J. P. Brandau and wf. to Maryland Realty Co.
J. P. Brandau an* wf. to Dora E. C. Brandau.
Jas. E. Ingram atd wf. et al. to D. E. Thomas.
J. Linton Black to Margaret Hartman.
Jacob 11. Baugher to Eugene D. Emich and wf.
Amelia A. List and bus. to J.H.Cronhardtand wf.
J. M. Donaldson and wf. to Edgar D. Keeble.
Timothy J. Hooper to John T. Donohue.
Wm. Conev and wf. to O. 8. Rowe and wf.
Harry W. Neepier to Mary C. Kirby.
F. Link and hug. to Louisa F. Gable and Ella A.
Gable.
Frederick Wright et al. to Wm. M. Seitz.
Louis P. Kraus and wf. to A. J. Leutz.
Wm. H. WtJirht et al. to Louis P. Kraus.
Lyons Land Co. to A. B. Schuchts and wf.
S. R. Allnutt to Etbel H. Crosby and Phoebe S.
Crosby.
Ethel H. Crosby to Severn R. Allnutt.
Henry Herman and wf. to S. Sundheimer.
The Manhattan Land Corporation of Baltimore
county to D. Rider and wf.
T. J. Flannery and wf. to B. F. Marr, Jr. and wf.
W. H. Mattbai and wf. to G. H. La re et al.
Balto. uud Liberty Turnpike Co. to Frank H.
Callaway.
J. B. Keplinger etal. trustees, to G. A. Schlstedt
and wife.
Frank W. Uildea and wf. to C. E. Falconer.
G. D. Hammerbucber to F. D. Gildea and wf.
W. H. Parker and wf. to P. A. Knigbtand wf.
Matilda A. Gontrum et al. to J. Sippel and wf.
Same to Casper H. Sippel and wf.
Mary E. Smith to Florence G. Hipsley.
Rufus J. Taylor to Louis Schmidt.
W. H. McLean and wf. to Margaret Stetzer.
T. J. Hooper to E. Walters and wf.
Mary M. Raspe et al. to 8. D. Markley and wf.
W. T. Childs and W. E. Miller, trading as Childs
\- Miller, to M. J. Wiest, trading as M. J. Wiest
Sewerage Disposal Plant.
Tbe Cheswolde Land Co. to J. E. Maher.
J. H. Baugher to A. B. Stearns and wf.
A. J. Kohly to G. W. Spence.
Balto. Highlands Realty Co. to J. S. Schell and
wife.
Margaret Stetzer to J. G. Edel and wf.
special Hxrtijc es.
JOSHUA G. BOSLEY,
—CANDIDATB fob
county SURVEYOR,
Subject to the Democratic Primaries.
To the Democratic Yotereof Baltimore County ;
I was appointed by the County Commissioners
of Baltimore county to fill out the unexpired
term as Surveyor of. the late Col. Charles B.
McClean, and at that time I took as an equal
partner in the Surveying business Mr. Fred. D.
Dollenberg, Jr., which partnership still con
tinues under the firm name of Bosley & Dollen
berg.
Two years ago I was booked to succeed myself
as County Surveyor, but just a short time before
tbe meeting of the Convention I was asked by
the leaders of the party to give way to Mr. Dol
lenberg on account of the political situation of
the Bth district, of which I was then and am now
a resident.
Mr. Dollenberg would not then have been
thought of for that position had it not been that
he was my partner, and that the partnership was
to continue for at least two years.
Mr. Dollenberg is now a candidate in his own
name and right for re-election, although when I
stepped aside for him to benefit the Democratic
ticket two years ago, be told me without any
solicitation on my part that he would not in fu
ture run in opposition to me for tbe same office.
He knew very well that it was understood he
was to hold that office in my stead for the one
term. If Mr. Dollenberg continues a candidate
there will be an end of our partnership on or be
fore January next.
t I am a candidate for County Surveyor and .feel
constrained to publish this statement to show
why and how Mr. Dollenberg occupies the posi
tion of County Surveyor, and I ask you, each
and every Democratic voter of the county, to
consider well the respective claims of Mr. Dol
lenbergand myself before casting bis vote in the
coming Democratic Primaries.
June 5-4tl JOSHUA G. BOSLEY.
DEMOCRATIC PRIMARY ELECTION
“TO- -j „I1
Nominate Candidates by Direct Yet* tor
County Offices and Bix Members of ; A
the House of Delegates from
Baltimore County.
And also to Elect Three Persons from Each
Election District to Serve on the Dem
ocratic Executive Committee.
And also to Elect Five Delegates from Each
Election District to Meet in County Con
vention to Elect Seven Delegates to
the Democratic State Conven
tion, as Set Forth Below :
In accordance and compliance with Article 33
of the Code of Public General Laws of 1904, title
“Elections,” sub-title “Primary Elections,” as
amended by Chapter 737 of the laws of the State
of Maryland of 1908, and in compliance with tbe
request aud recommendations of the Democratic
State Central Committee, tbe undersigned, Dem
> ocratio State Central Committee for Baltimore
County, by virtue of the power and authority
vested in us, do hereby give notice to the Demo
i cratic voters of Baltimore county, that a Prima
ry Election will be held in tbe several Election
Districts aud Precincts of said Baltimore county,
On Saturday, dune SSth, 1909,
From 12 o’clock M. until 6 o’clock P. M..
| AT THE FOLLOWING PLACES, Vl?:,i
1 First District—
First Precinct—At Library Hall, Catons
ville.
Precinct—At Henry Lauman's,
1 Tsrd y Precinct—At Odd Fellows’Hal 1,
Dickeyville.
i Fourth Precinct —At Conrad Becker’s,
Frederick turnpike.
Fifth Precinct At E, Frank Ritter's, cor.
i Rolling Road and Johnnycake Road.
I Second District—
i First Precinct—At Harrisonville Hall,
Harrisonville.
Second Precinct—At W. F. Plel’s Store.
i
J Third District—
First Precinct—At Engine House, Mount
1 Washington.
i Second Precinct—At Engine House, Ar
lington.
Third Precinct—At William F. Cogblan’s,
1 Plkesville.
i Fourth Precinct—At Odd Fellows’ Hall,
, Plkesville.
Fourth District—
■ First Precinct—At J. D. Fisher’s Resi
dence, Reisterstown.
. Second Precinct—At Glyndon Volunteer
Fire Company’s House, Glyndon.
Fifth District
1 At Joshua T. Hale’s, near White House.
i
Sixth District—
; Adjoining Owings’ Store, Middletown.
’ Seventh District—
'• First Precinct—At James M. Sampson’s.
Second Precinct—At John R. G •ilfin’s,
Wlseburg.
I Eighth District—
First Precinct—At Odd Fello ws’ Hall;
Cockeysville.
Second Precinct—At Mrs. Laura Cockey’S,
Timonium.
1 Third Precinct—At Wm. T. Curtis’, Prloe
, " ville.
Ninth District—
First Precinct—At Eogine House, Go
, vanstown.
Second Precinct—At 416 Roland Avenue,
at Terminus of Roland Park Cars.
ThirdPrecinct—At James Phipps’ Store,
, East Side York Hoad, Towson.
i Fourth Precinct—At Grange Hall, Towson.
Fifth Precinct—At J. A. Matthews', Falls
1 Road and Lake Avenue,
i Sixth Precinct—At Frederick Crowder’s,
Harford road, near Alisa avenue.
Tenth District—
First Precinct—At T. M. Pearce’s, Manor.
Second Precinct—At Wesley’s Hall. Sunn
y brook.
1 Eleventh District—
i First Preoinct—At the residence of John
T. Ambrose, near Ady’s Hotel.
Second Precinct—At Hiltz’s Store Butld-
I ing. Baltimore and Jerusalem Turnpike.
( Third Precinct—At the Casino. Upper Falls.
Twelfth District—
First Preoinct—At Mr. Krage’s, Second
avenue and First street.
Second Precinct—At William Smith’s, N.
W. corner Elliott and Second streets.
Third Precinct—At corner Clinton street
, and Schueh’s alley.
Fourth Precinct—At Zorn’s Hall, Third
street near Gough street.
Fifth Precinct—At Hombergville.
Sixth Preoinct—At Frederick Heckman’s,
212 O’Donnell street.
Seventh Precinct—At S. W. Cor. Lombard
and Fifth streets, Highlandtown.
i
Thirteenth District—
First Precinct—At Ludwig Nagle’s, Mount
Wlnans.
Second Precinct—At Columbian Hall, St,
Denis.
Third Precinct—Opposite Andrew Knell’s
Barber Shop. Washington road.
Fourteenth District—
-1 First Precinct—At John Brautigam’s, Gar
den ville.
Second Precinct—At Alert Engine House.
Third Precinct—At Geo. McCormick’s Res
idence. Philadelphia Road, Orangeville.
Fourth Precinet—At Beck's Store, Putty
Hill.
Fifteenth District—
First Precinct—At Scottish Hall, Spar
i row’s Point.
Second Precinct—Near Toll-Gate House,
Eastern Avenue.
Third Precinct—At Wilson’s, corner Eben
ezer Road and Eastern Avenue.
Fourth Precinct—At Marine Building,*
Sparrow’s Point.
Fifth Precinct—At Butschky's Store, cor
ner Weis Avenue and North Point Road.
To nominate candidates by direct vote for
County Offices and Six Members of the Housed
Delegates for Baltimore county to be placed ou
the Democratic ticket at tbe next General Elec
tion. as follows: r
ONE PERSON FOR CLERK OF THE CIR
CUIT COURT FOR BALTIMORE COUNTY. 1
ONE PERSON FOR SHERIFF OF BAUTIt
MORE COUNTY.
ONE PERBON FOR TREASURER OF BAL
TIMORE COUNTY.
THREE PERSONS FOR COUNTY COMMIS
SIONERS FOR BALTIMORE COUNTY.
ONE PERSON FOR SURVEYOR OF BAL
TIMORE COUNTY.
SIX PERSONS FOR MEMBERS OF THE
HOUSE OF DELEGATES TO REPRESENT
BALTIMORE COUNTY AT THE NEXT REG
ULAR SESSION OF THE MARYLAND LEG
ISLATURE.
And also for the purpose of electing three per
sons from each Distriot to serve two years upon
the Democratic Executive Committee for Balti
more County, who shall meet for organization at
tbe call of tbe Chairman of the retiring Com
mittee.
And also to elect 5 delegates from each Elec
tion District of Baltimore county, to meet in
County Convention of the Democratic Party at
Towson,
Tuesday, 99th day of June, A. D. 1909,
At tbe hour of 12 o’elock M.,
to elect 7 deleaates to the Democratic State Con
vention, which will meet in Baltimore City
On Wednesday, August 11th, 1909,
to nominate a candidate
FOR COMPTROLLER OF THE TREASURY.
Sbc. 160 c. All candidates shall file with the
State Central Committee or other governing
body of the respective parties for toe several
counties at least fifteen days prior to the day
fixed by tbe State Central Committee, or other
governing body for holding tbe said primary
election, a certificate stating his name, resi
dence and age. and the office or convention for
which he seeks to be nominated, and five days
thereafter he shall pay to the State Central
Committee or other governing body for such
county tbe sum estimated by such committee or
governing body as bis fair proportionate part
necessary to defray the expenses, provided that
in tbe case of candidates for office said propor
tionate parts shall be estimated according to tbe
number of candidates and the salaries of the
various offices sought.
All applications to have names placed upon
the official ballot must be filed on or before June
10,1909, and each candidate must pay his his pro
portion of tbe estimated expenses of said pri
mary within five days thereafter, otherwise his
name will not appear on the official ballot.
J. FRED. C. TALBOTT.
CHARLEB H. DICKEY,
WALTER B. TOWNSEND,
State Central Committee for Baltimore County.
WALTER R. TOWNSEND. Treasurer.
GEORGE HARTMAN,
Secretary,
Smedley Row, Towson, Md.
Special Notices.
What ia Prohibited Under Section 3, Chap
ter 737, of the Acta of 1908, Embra
cing Sections 160 A to 160 W,
Both Inclusive.
Sec 160 W. Shall not bring, take, order or send
into any plaoe of primary election any distilled
or spirituous liquors, wine, ale or beer, or shall
at any such time and place, drink or partake of
such liquor, shall be guilty of a misdemeanor
and subject to a fine from $lO to SIOO. Hotels,
taverns and saloons are required to be closed on
the day of primary elections; making beta or
wagers upon the result of any primary election
is prohibited, fine from S9O to saoo.
Sec. 180 V. Provides that no person shall elec
tioneer, conduct a voter except when physical
disability requires assistance, or attempt to in
fluence the vote of any voter within one hun
dred feet of any polling place of any primary
election in any county, or who shall place a dis
tinguishing mark upon any ballot or evelope.
It also provides that the voter shall not show
the face of a marked ballot to*any judge, clerk,
officer or other person inside of or within one
hundred feet of the polls; fine SSO to S3OO or im
prisonment in jail for not less than fifteen days
nor more than six months, or both.
COKBUPT PRACTICE ACT.
Chapter 123, Act of 1908, which applies to the
primary and general elections.
Secs. 164 and 166 requires all money to be paid
to a treasurer or political agent, and all money
must be disbursed by them. They are required
to report, under oath, after the primary elec
tion, as to the manner the money was expended, j
Every person expending money in violation
of these sections, 184,165 and 166 on conviction,
shall be fined not less than S3OO, nor more than
SI,OOO. or imprisonment for not more than two
years, or both fine and imprisonment.
Sec. 165. Provides that no person other than a
treasurer or political agent shall pay any of the
expenses of any election or primary election ex
oept that a candidate may pay his own expenses
for postage, telegrams, telephones, stationery,
printing, expressage and traveling and board.
The expenses before nomination or election, or i
both, may make or incur directly or indirectly, |
shall not exceed in the whole twenty-five dol
lars for each one thousand up to fifty thousand,
and ten dollars for each one thousand in excess
of fifty thousand of the registered voters quali
fied to vote for the office in question at the next
preceding election therefor. All to be paid, han
dled and disbursed by a treasurer or political
agent and not otherwise. The Chairman of the
State Central Committee of the State or any
County State Central Committee may solicit
contributions for campaign purposes to be ex
pended as provided by tnis Act. Penalty, fine
’ not less than S3OO, nor more than SI,OOO, or im
prisonment not more than two years, or both
fine and imprisonment.
Sec. 167. Requires the treasurer or political
agunt to file under oath, a full and detailed ac
count and statement of the amount received,
giving the names of the persons from whom the
money was received and names of persons to
whom money was paid. Penalty. S3OO to SI,OOO.
Sec. 168. Every candidate for public office
shall wit bln 30 days after the election or primary
election, make out and file with the officer em
powered by the law to issue the certificate of el
ection to such officer, a true and itemized state
ment under oath, of all money contributed and
expended by him. No person shall be deemed
elected until be shall file this statement. Pen
alty, S3OO to $2,000. or imprisonment not more
than two years, or both fine and Imprisonment.
Sec. 171. The following persons shall be guilty
of corrupt practice, and shall be punished in ac
cordance with the provisions of this Act. Every
person who shall directly by himself or by
another, give or offer, or promise to any person,
any money, gift, advantage, preferment, enter
tainment, aid, emolument or any valuable thing
whatever, for the purpose of inducing or pro
curing any person to vote.or refrain from voting,
for or against any person, or for or against any
measure, or proposition at any election or pri
mary election. Every person who shall directly
or indirectly receive, accept, request or solicit
from any person, candidate, committee, asso
ciation, organization, or corporation, any money,
gift, advantage, preferment, aid. emolument, or
any valuable thing whatsoever, for the purpose
of inducing or procuring any person to vote, or
refrain from voting, for or against any person,
or for or against any measure or proposition at
any election or primary election or political
convention; fine, from S3OO to SI,OOO, or imprison
ment not more than one year, or both fine and
imprisonment and shall be Ineligible to any pub
lic office for four years.
Sec. 172. Prohibits corporations from contrib
uting to election.
J. FRED. C. TALBOTT,
CHAS. H. DICKEY, ,
WALTER R. TOWNSEND,
State Central Committee for Baltimore County.
GEORGE HARTMAN,
Secretary,
June s—tdl Smedley Row, Towson, Md.
Hcwr Ji&wjevtisemjettts.
•yrr anted.
Immediately, a FIRST-CLASS TEAMSTER.
Apply to D. BTEWART JESSOP.
June 12—2t*J Ashland, Md.
JJIOR SALE.
HORBE LAWN-MOWER, in perfect condi
tion. used only one season. Cost $65: will sell
for S4O. Apply to S. C. DAIL,
June 12—tf] Lutherville, Md.
WANTED.
A YOUNG BINGLE MAN AS A HELPER IN
A BLACKSMITH SHOP.
Apply to OEOROE H. SCHMIDT,
June 12—St*] Long Green, Md.
piAKHERS, HOW ABOUT THIS ! I I
20.000 lbs. STANDARD BINDER
TWINE, at 5 X cts. per pound.
Apply at 109 NORTH GAY STREET,
June 12—It] Baltimore, Md.
ANTED.
A Woman or Husband and Wife, woman for
GENERAL HOUSEWORK and man to HELP
ON FARM. Apply to SMITH BROS.,
Windsor Farm, Dulany’s Valley.
Address—Glenarm, R. F. D. No. 1, Md.
June 12—8t*
jQK. H. 8. JAKRETT,
Office with his father (Dr. J. H. Jarrett), Wash
ington Avenue, near Allegany Avenue,
TOWSON, Md.
Special attention to catarrh of nose and throat.
Office Hours—B to 10 a. m.; 6toß p. m.
C. & P. Phone—Towson 217. f June 12—ly
TXT ANTED—FARMS.
I HAVE A NUMBER OF APPLICA
TIONS FORFARMSIN BALTIMORE
AND HARFORD COUNTIES.
Owners wishing to sell please send me details
and prices. No charge unless sale is made.
ROSS N. BOWERS.
233 Courtland Street, Baltimore, Md.
June 12—3t*
Report of county treasurer
—FOR THE —
MONTH OF MAY, 1909.
Cash on hand May Ist, 1909 $ 37,284.69
Taxes received during the month 458,641.27
Receipts from all other sources 5,999.45
Total receipts $501,926.41
Disbursements during
May, 1909 $ 38,384.99
Balance June 1, 1909 463,540.42
N. BOSLEY MERRYMAN,
June 12—ltl Treasurer and Collector.
J^OTICE.
165 Hidden Road, Badtimore County, (.
June Bth, 1909. 1
Having leased the “IVY MILL” QUARRIES,
on the Hillen road, formerly operated by the
late Mr. WALTER H. THORNE, I am now pre
pared to furnish STONE OF ALL KINDS FOR
ALL PURPOSEB. at short notice.
C. & P. Telephones—
-2179 Madison, at Quarries.
5 R Towson, at Residence, Lutherville.
3143 St. Paul, at Offices, 412 and 414 Equitable
Building, Baltimore, Md.
JAMES W. SHEA,
Under the name and style of
THE THORNE & SHEA STONE CO.
k j June 12—2 t
jr. Albert Slade, Attorney, 10% Law Building,
Baltimore, Md.
TO CREDITORS.
THIB IS TO GIVE NOTICE, That the sub
scriber has obtained from the Orphans’ Court
of Baltimore county, letters of administration
on the estate of
MARY ANN OWINGS,
late of said county deceased. All persons having
claims against the said estate are hereby warned
i< to exhibit the same, with the vouchers thereof,
to the subscriber.
On or before the 16th day of December, 1909;
They may otherwise by law be excluded from all
benefit of said estate. Those indebted to
- said estate are requested to make Immediate pay
ment. Given under my hand this 9th day of
June, 1909. A. ELIZABETH OWINGB.
June 12—4t*l Administratrix.
H B. Hinternesch, Attorney, 210 ISaet Lex
ington Street, Baltimore, Md.
Herman d. hinternesch, as
signee. VS. JAMES W. JAMES, AL
BERTA A. JAMES, HIS WIFE, in the Circuit
Court for Baltimore County, in Equity.
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for Balti
more county, this 7th day of June, 1909, that
the sale made and reported by Herman D. Hin
ternesch. Assignee, tor the sale of the property
described in the proceedings in the above en
titled cause, be ratified and confirmed, unless
cause to the contrary thereof be shown.
On or before the 6th day of July, 1909,
Provided a copy of this order be inserted in Borne
newspaper printed and published in Baltimore
county, once in each of three successive weeks,
before the said sth day of July, 1909.
The report states the amount of sales to be
$560.00 WILLIAM P. COLE, Clerk.
True Copy—Test:
June 12—4tJ WILLIAM P. COLE, Clerk.
J. Edwin Davie, Attorney, 216 St. Paul
Street, Baltimore, Md.
IN THE ORPHANS’ COURT OF BALTI
MORE COUNTY. , _
ORDERED, by the Orphans’ Court for Balti
more county, this Bth day of June. 1909, that the
sale of the leasehold estate of James R. Warner,
deceased, made by Anna Warner, the Ad
ministratrix of the said deceased, and this day
reported to this Court by the said Administra
trix. be ratified and confirmed, unless cause be
shown to the contrary.
On or before the sth day of July, 1909 ;
Provided a copy of this order be inserted in some
weekly newspaper printed and published in Bal
timore county, once in each of three successive
weeks before the said sth day of July, 1909.
The report states the amount of sales to be
$1,800.00. MELCHOR HOSHALL. )
E. CLINTON TRACEY, 1-Judges.
H. SEYMOUR PIERSOL, i
True Copy—Test: „
WILLIAM J. PEACH,
Register of Wills for Baltimore county.
June 12—4 t
-r ost.
On Friday, 4th inst., A BLACK AND TAN
BEAGLE HOUND, with white tip on end of
tail; had on leather collar and snap hook. Re
ward if returned to GEORGE M. RYE,
Old Harford Road, near Joppa Road.
June 12—3t*
David O. Mclntosh, Attorney at Law,
Towson, Md.
TRUSTEE’S SALE
—OF—
VALUABLE LEASEHOLD PROPERTY,
In Govanstown, Baltimore
County, Md.
By virtue of a decree of the Circuit Court for
Baltimore county, in Equity, passed in a cause
in said Court on the 3d of March, 1909, in which
Mtf the Bandallstown Building Association MB
*X?No. 1, of Baltimore county, is complain-gg
ant, and James J. Queeney is defendant, andby
virtue of an order of resale passed June lOtn,
1909. the undersigned. Trustee, will sell at Pub
lic Auction, AT THE COURT HOUSE DOOR,
IN TOWSONTOWN,
At the hour of 12 M.,
On Tuesday, July 6th, 1909,
ALL THOBE TWO LOTS OF LAND IN GO
VANSTOWN, BALTIMORE COUNTY,
One fronting 60 feet on the west side of an ave
nue 30 feet wide running south from Homeland
avenue and parallel, or nearly so, with the York
road, with an even depth of 250 feet, being the
same lot leased by James G. Wilson and others
to Mary Queeny. 15th June, 1894, (see Land Rec
ords L. M. 8., No. 205, folio 324.) and which ad
joins the lot leased by the said lessors to Patrick
Murray.
*yAND THE SECOND LOT,
froating 9 feet on the west side of said 30-foot
! avenue, with an even depth of 250 feet, and the
j same leased by James G. Wilson and others to
Mary Queeney,22d January. 1896, (see Land Rec- 1
ords. L. M. B„ 216, folio 405), and adjoining the
lot first described. The first lot being subject
to the payment of an annual rent of forty (40)
dollars, payable half-yearly on the Ist of June
and December, and the second lot being subject
to the payment of an annual rent of seven (7)
dollars and twenty (20) cents, payable in half
yearly installments.
The Improvements on said property consist of
a comfortable
TWO-STORY FRAME DWELLING
HOUSE. WITH TWO FRAME STA
BLES IN REAR.
TERMS OF SALE.—One-half cash and balance
in six months and Interest from day of sale, or
all Sash at purchaser’s option.
JS'Deposit of SIOO required on day of sale.
49*Taxea and ground rent adjusted to day of
sale. DAVID G. MCINTOSH,
WM. M. RISTEAU, Auctioneer.
June 12—ts
Feldner & Weaver, Attorneys at Law, Fidel
ity Building, Baltimore, Md.
jyjORTGAGE SALE
A VALUABLE HOUSE AND LOT,
Situate on the North Side of Herkimer
Street, Morrell Park, Baltimore
County, Maryland.
By virtuo of the power contained in a mort
gage from James R. Buckingham, Jr., and Rose
M. Buckingham, his wife, to the Frederick Ave-
Snue Building Association of Baltimore jtt
City, dated on the 15th day of May, 1908. Mia
recorded among the Mortgage Records of
Baltimore county. In Liber W. P. C„ No. 301,
folio 44, &c., the undersigned. Attorney named
in said Mortgage, will sellat Public Auction, ON
THE PREMISES, on
Tuesday, July 6th, 1909,
At 4 o’clock P. M.,
ALL THE PROPERTY
described"ln"said MORT
GAGE, BEING DESIGNATED AS
LOT No. 686. FRONTING TWENTY
FIVE FEET ON THENORTHERLY SIDE OF
HERKIMER STRISET, MORRELL
PARK, AS SHOWN ON A PLAT OF
M O R R E L iTpARK, FILED
AMONG THE LAND
RECORDS OF BALTIMORE COUNTY,
in Plat Book J. W. S., No. 1, folios 248
and 285.
improvements thereon consist of a
TWO-STORY FRAME DWELLING. Taxes
and all expenses to be ad j usted to date of sale.
TERMS OF SALE.—One-third cash, one-third
in six months, and the balance in twelve months;
deferred payments to bear interest; or all cash
at the option of the purchaser.
t3P“"A cash deposit of SIOO will be required of
the purchaser at the time of the sale.
FREDERICK W. FELDNER,
Attorney named in said Mortgage.
SCHWAB BROS. & CO., Auctioneers.
June 12—ts
ll lit in Hi
or single, don’t hesitate to send
I BUCK l
to my farm,
when she wants nice strawberries to eat.
H. Z. Mast, Baldwin, Md.
June 12—It
William IT. MeFaul and William C. Smith,
Solicitors, 310-312 Law Building,
Baltimore, Md.
ASSIGNEE’S SALE
VALUABLE LEASEHOLD PROPERTY,
3800 and 3811 Gongh Street,
Highlandtown, Md.,
Monday, June 21st, 1909,
At 4 o’clock P. M.
By virtue of the power and authority contained
in a mortgage from Elizabeth Leaverton to
Joseph Goldfuas, dated July 13th, 1908, and re
corded among the Mortgage Records
TTT Baltimore county, in Liber W. P. C., No.Ba
3017f01i0 562, &c., the undersigned. Assignee of
said Mortgage, will offer for sale by Public Auc
tion, ON THE PREMIBES, as above,
*ALL THOSE TWO LOTS OF GROUND
SITUATE IN BALTIMORE COUNTY
AND THUS DESCRIBED:**•
Beginning for the same at a point on the south
side of Gough street, at the distance of seventy
one feet eastward from the eastwardly side of
Fifth street; thence extending southwardly
binding on other ground about to be leased to
said Elizabeth Leaverton and on a line parallel
with said Fifth street eighty-three feet to the
north side of a certain ten feet wide alley ex
tending eastwardly and westwardly and com
municating at the eastern end thereof with a
certain other ten feet wide alley extending
northwardly into Gough street and southwardly
into a certain twenty feet wide alley, with the
use and privilege of said alleys in common;
thence extending eastwardly binding on the
north side of said first mentioned ten feet wide
alley and on a line parallel with said Gough
street thirteen feet to a point In the line of other
ground about to be leased to said Elizabeth
Leaverton; thence extending northwardly bind
ing on said ground and on a line parallel with
said Fifth street eighty-three feet to the south
side of Gough street; and thence extending
westward along the same thirteen feet to the
first mentioned point or place of beginning.
And beginning for the second of said lots at a
point on the south side of Gough street at the
distance of fifty-eight feet eastward from the
eastwardly side of Fifth street; thence extend
ing southwardly binding on other ground about
to be leased to said Elizabeth Leaverton and on
a line parallel with said Fifth street eighty-three
feet to the north side of a certain ten feet wide
alley extending eastwardly and westwardly and
communicating at the eastern end thereof with
a certain other ten feet wide alley extending
northwardly into said Gough street and south
wardly into a certain twenty feet wide alley,
with the use and privilege of said alleys In com
mon ; thence extending eastwardly binding on
the north side of said first mentioned ten feet
wide alley and on a line parallel with said Gough
street thirteen feet to a point In the line of other
ground about to be leased to Elizabeth Leaver
ton ; thence extending northwardly binding on
said ground and on a line parallel with said
Fifth street eighty-three feet to the south side
of said Gough street; and thence extending
westward along the same thirteen feet to the
first mentioned point and place of beginning.
gr*Each of said lots is subject to an annual
GROUND RENT of $35.75, and each is
Improved by * TWO-STORY BRICK
DWELLING.
TERMS OF SALE—One-third cash, balance
in six and twelve months, or all cash at the op
tion of the purchaser; deferred payments to
bear interest from the day of sale and to be se
cured to the satisfaction of the undersigned.
Assignee. Expenses to be adjusted to the day
of sale.
deposit of $75.00 will be required on each
property at the time of sale.
WILLIAM C. SMITH, Assignee.
BCHWAB BROS. & CO., Auctioneers.
May 29—ts
rpRUCK FARM FOR SALE.
A highly improved TRUCK FARM OF 43
ACRES, situated at Silver Spring, Belair road,
which will be a Btate road; all cleared but about
5 acres, and in fine condition. Has been used
many years as a truck farm. Fine water, both
spring and pump. AH buildings in first-class
condition; 7 miles from Baltimore; school,
churches, stores and R. F. postal delivery. Ap
ply on the premises, or address,
FREDERICK B. JASPER,
May 39 —6t*] Fullerton, (R. F. D.) Md.
$7.500 TO
On first mortgages on real estate, in sums of
sl,oooand upwards. Aj^to
Attorney at Law, Towson, Md.
July M-tf
J. J. GEORGE & CO,,
PRODUCE COMMISSION
109 MARKET SPACE,
NEAR PRATT STREET, -—:o: BALTIMORE, Md.
WE SOLICIT CONSIGNMENTS OF ALL FARM PRODUCTS.
Sale of Wagon Lots, either from the Wholesale L-
Produce Market or Warehouse, a Specialty. |’ ?Sr
I Chick, Poultry and Pigeon Foods and Supplies. : : : : :
WE SELL 4 Also, Field Seeds, Special Mixture Fertilizers and Farm Supplies.
May 29—6 m .
gegal Notices.
Augustus M. Denhard, Attorney, 24 Central
Savings Bank Bldg., Baltimore, Md.
/CANTON PERMANENT BUILDING AB
- SOCIATION, No. 1. OF BALTIMORE
CITY, VS. RICHARD MILLER AND WIFE,
in the Circuit Court for Baltimore Coun
ty, in Equity.
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for Baltimore
county, this 3d day of June, 1909, that the sale
made and reported by Augustus M. Denhard, At
torney named in the Mortgage, for the sale of
the property described in the proceedings in the
above entitled cause, be ratified and confirmed,
unless cause to tbe contrary thereof be shown,
On or before the 28th day of June, 1909 ;
Provided a copy of this order be inserted in some
newspaper printed and published in Baltimore
county, once in each of three successive weeks
before tbe said 28th day of June, 1909.
The report states the amount of sales to be
$700.00. WILLIAM P. COLE, Clerk.
True Copy—Test:
June s—4tl WILLIAM P. COLE. Clerk.
William 8. Keeeh, Attorney, Second National
Bank Building, Towson, Md.
-JY-OTICE TO CREDITORS.
THIB IS TO GIVE NOTICE, That the subscri
bers have obtained from the Orphans’ Court of
Baltimore county, letters testamentary on the
estate of
MARY A. HINDES,
late of said county deceased. All persons having
claims against the Baid estate are hereby warned
to exhibit the same, with the vouchers thereof,
to the subscribers,
On or before the 28th day of November, 1909,
They may otherwise by law be excluded from all
benefit of said estate. Those indebted to said
estate are requested to make immediate pay
ment. Given under our hands this 20th day of
May, 1909. JOSEPH F. HINDEB,
HARRY C. HINDES,
May 22—4t*l Executors
Frederick J. Schlosstein, Attorney, 1009
American Building, Baltimore, Md.
JTOTICE TO CREDITORS.
THIS IS TO GIVE NOTICE, That the subscri
ber has obtained from the Orphans’ Court of
Baltimore county, letters testamentary on the
estate of
PHILIP GEBB,
late of said county, deceased. All persons hav
ing claims against the said estate are hereby
warned to exhibit the same, with the vouchers
thereof, to the subscriber,
On or before the 26th day of November, 1909,
They may otherwise by law be excluded from
all benefit of said estate. Those indebted to
said estate are requested to make immediate
payment. Given under my hand this 20th day
May, 1909. AMELIA STRUVEN,’
May 22—4t*l Executrix.
TO CREDITORS.
THIS IS TO GIVE NOTICE, That the subscri
ber has obtained from the Orphans’ Court of
Baltimore county, letters testamentary on the
estate of
FREDERICK HELWIG,
late of said county .deceased. AU persons having
claims against the said estate are hereby warned
to exhibit the same, with the vouchers thereof,
to the subscriber.
On or before the 9th day of December, 1909 ;
They may otherwise by law be excluded from
all benefit of said estate. Those indebted to
said estate are requested to make immediate pay
ment. Given under my hand this 3d day of
June, 1909. PHILIP HELWIG,
June s—4t*l Executor.
No. 47268.
Will make the season of 1909 until
June 15th, AT THE STABLE OF J, rTTA,
OSCAR FRANCIS, Baldwin Station, i
Md. & Pa. R. R.. every day except Tuesdays,
when ho will be found at MR. R. W. RIDER’S
LIVERY STABLE, TOWSON.
He is a large, stylish horse, stands 16 hands and
weighs 1,200 lbs.; good bone and conformation,
sound and has good disposition. He is one of the
best bred horses in tbe State and shows 2:40 gait
at present; he has never been trained for speed.
He is coming 6 years old.
Anyone breeding for speed, road horses or gen
eral utility horses, will not find a better one to
breed to. „ . „
His sire is Admiral Kuser, 2:l9jg, by Col. Ku
ser, 3:11*; first dam Queen Red, ono in list by
King Red; sire of several better than 2:20. His
dam is Jenera by Allerton, 2.-09*. Jenera is a
full sister to Charley Hoyt, 2:05* ; first dam High
land Maid, two in list, by Alcantara, 2:23.
BT*Bervioe fee sls. with return privilege.
Correspondence will receive prompt attention
addressed either to
R. S. FRANCIS, Towson, Md.,
OR J. O. FRANCIS, Baldwin, Md.
Apl. 17—3 m
fTIHE HIGHLY BRED YOUNG STALLION
STAR KUSEK
Will make the season of 1909, com-- Ls f a
mencing April Ist and ending July Ist, at the
OWNER’S STABLE, Greenwood, Baltimore
county.
Description.— Star Kuser is a rich black with
a star and a little white on one hind foot. He is
16 hands and will weigh about 1,200 lbs. He has
Bplendid bone, tbe best of feet and he is suitable
for any purpose. Those breeding to him are sure
to get a colt that will either be a good roadster
or a draft horse. .
Pedigree.— Star Kuser by Prince Kuser, 2:29*,
full brother to Belle Kuser, 2:08, sire Col. Kuser,
2:11* ; dam Gladys by Garrison, (trial 2:17*) by
Orange Blossom; 2d dam Henrietta, 2:30 or bet
ter ; 3d dam a thoroughbred.
Terms.—sls to insure.
GEORGE W. STANDI FORD, Owner,
Apl. 17—2m*] Reokord, Md.
fTIHE FINK YOUNG BELGIAN STALLION,
PAUL KRUGER, Jr.,
Will make the season of 1909, commen-n
cing March 29th. at the following places :
From 3 P. M. Mondays to 3 P. M. Tuesdays at
Towson Hotel. Towson ; from 5 P. M. Tuesdays
to 10 A. M. Thursdays, at Wm. Pierce’s Chargate
Farm, Warren road: from 12 M. Tnursdays to 5
P. M. Fridays at John Skipper’s Snow Hill
Farm. 2 miles east of Glyndon; Saturdays at
owner’s stable.
DESCRIPTION.—PauI Kruger. Jr., is a rich
sorrel, 16 hands, and weighs 1,600 lbs. He is 4
years old, has a fine disposition, and will readily
commend himself to good judges as a sire of
colts that will be suitable for heavy draft and
farm purposes.
TERMS.—SIO.OO to insure.
WILLIAM M. ZINK, Owner.
Mch. 27—3m] Linden Farm, Falls Road.
npHE HANDSOME YOUNG STALLION
CABASH
Will make the season of 1909, from April Ist to
July Ist, at the following places: Mondays and
Tuesdays at the home of the owner. Chestnut
Hill avenue, Waverly; Thursdays and Fridays
at C. W. Forwood’s, Falls road; Saturdays at
Owner’s Stable.
This promising young Stallion was sired by
Morgan’s Cabash and is well broken to harness;
be is a light golden sorrel and very handsome,
reminding many persons of his grand sire's ap
pearance when owned by Mr. G. O. Wilson. He
is 16 hands and weighs 1,360 lbs. This horse must
be seen to be appreciated.
Tbrms.— slo the season, with return privilege
in case mare does not prove in foal.
GOTLEIB ENGLE, Owner.
Apl. 3—3m] Waverly, Baltimore, Md.
GGS FOR HATCHING t
EGGS FOR HATCHING 1
I am now booking orders for immediate and
future deliveries of EGGB THAT WILL
HATCH—guaranteed fertile. These eggs are
from THOROUGHBRED STOCK.
Barred Plymouth Rocks SI.OO setting 15
White Plymouth Rocks 1.00
Single Comb White Leghorns IDO
Single Comb Black Minorcas 1.00
Single Comb Black Orpingtons.... 1.50 “
EUREKA POULTRY YARDS,
JOHN LIPPINCOTT, Proprietor,
Feb, 6—tf] Belair. Md.
~FARMS FOR SALE,
Wicomico C 0.—70 acres, good buildings $ 800
St. Mary’s Co.—loo acres, plenty buildings.. 1,000
Charles C 0.—340 acres, near railroad 2,100
St. Mary’s Co.- 250 acres, 1* million ft. pine 3,000
Baltimore C 0.—186 acres. Second district... 3,250
Baltimore C 0.—25 acres, near Tlmonium... 3,500
Harford C 0.—92 acres, on railroad, SSOO cash 4 200
Harford C 0.—150 acres. Dairy Farm 4,500
Bt. Mary’s C 0.—400 acres, on Patuxent. 5,000
Baltimore C 0.—143 acres, on N. C. R. R 5,500
Harford C 0.—200 acres. Dairy Farm 6,000
Harford CO.-280 acres, fine dwelling., 12,000
J. LELAND HANNA,
Jan. 23—ly Baltimore, Md.
Application
—FOR—
TRANSFER OF LIQUOR LICENSE.
Orrica or the Clerk or the Circuit Court I
for Baltimore County, >
Towson. Md„ June 4th, 1909. 1 '
Notice is hereby given, that application has
been made to this office for tbe transfer of li
cense to sell spirituous or fermented liquors
from
George W. Kappel, 3738 East Lombard street,
12th district, to John Bien, 3738 East Lombard
street, 12th district.
And that unless cause be shown In writing to
tbe contrary.
On or before the 20th day of June, 1909,
the transfer applied for will be issued, provided
the applicant complies with all the require
ments of law. WILLIAM P. COLE,
June s—2t] Clerk.
-I^rOTICE— STOCKHOLDERS’ MEETING.
Belair, Md., May 28th, 1909.
Tbe Annual Meeting of the Stockholders of tbe
BALTIMORE AND BELAIR ELECTRIC
RAILWAY COMPANY will be held in the Com
pany’s Office, in Belair,
On Monday, June 21st, 1909,
At 11 o’clock A. M„
For tbe purpose of Electing Seven Directors and
tor such other business as may come before said
meeting. JOHN D. WORTHINGTON,
June s—3t] Secretary.
IpitßceXlatuejotiß.
Watson R. Sherwood, Attorney, 1400 Conti
nental Building, Baltimore, Md.
ORPHANS’ COURT SALE
—OF—
VALUABLE
LEASEHOLD PROPERTY,
Known as Nos. 3222 and 3224 Toone Street,
Canton, Baltimore County, Md.,
BY PUBLIC AUCTION, ON THE PREMISES,
Wednesday, June 30th, 1909,
At 4 o’clock P. M.
In pursuance of an order of the Orphans'Court
of Baltimore county, passed in the matter of the
estate of Elizabeth F. Monroe, deceased, the
undersigned, Administratrix, will offergA
•fffor sale as above
ALL THAT LOT OF GROUND AND THE
IMPROVEMENTS THEREON, SITUATE
IN SAID COUNTY AND THUS DESCRIBED:
Beginning for the same at the intersection of
the north side of Toone street with the east side
of Bouldin street and ruDniDg thence north on
tbe east line of Bouldin street 75 feet; thence
at right angles to Bouldin street and parallel
with Toone street east 35 feet: thence at right
angles to Toone street and parallel with Bouldin
street south 75 feet to the north line of Toone
street, and thence on said north line of Toone
street west 35 feet to tbe place of beginning.
of“Bubject to an annual ground rent of $61.25,
and improved by TWO TWO-STORY BRICK
DWELLINGS WITH FRAME BACK BUILD
INGS.
TERMS-CASH UPON RATIFICATION.
2S~ A deposit of SIOO.OO will be required of the
purchaser at the time of sale. All expenses to
be adjusted to tbe day of sale.
EMMA C. MONROE,
Administratrix.
SCHWAB BROS. & CO., Auctioneers.
J une s—ts
Tackett’s Gape Core
RILLS Tilt WORM
WELL AS THE GERM
TC/HacKrtt
I—W— HILUBORO,Mq
It’s a powder. The chloks inhale it.gKilla
both worm and germ. Whole brood treated in
five minutes. Retail price. 25c.; by mail, 35c.
For sale by drug and general stores. Write for
full information. Address,
T. C. HACKETT,
Apl. 10—3m] Hillsboro, Md.
THE FAMOUS
FENDALL STRAWBERRY
—AND—
OTHER CHOICE VARIETIES.
Fine Fruit for Sale June Ist and After.
C. & P. Phone—Towson, 93 W.
Charles E. Fendall & Son,
TOWSON, Md.
May 29—3 t
VEGETABLE $ PLANTS
OF ALL KINDS
SALE^
Let Us Book Your Order for Transplants.
S. W. SHANKLIN & SON,
WHITE MARSH, Md,
Apl. 24—tf
WANTED^^
LARGE TREES,
Walnut, Poplar, Chestnut and Oak.
Apply to or address—
JAMES W. SHEA,
Apl. 10—tf] LUTHERVILLE, Md.
PLANTS x FOR * SALE!
Cabbage, Peppers,
Tomatoes, Egg Plants,
Sweet Potatoes.
LARGE OR SMALL QUANTITIES.
Call or address, ANTON REIER,
Glenarm, Md., R. F. D. No. 2,
Residence—Near Old Copper Factory.
May 15—tf
ESTABLISHED 187$. BOTH PHONES.
DANIEL - RIDER,
1001 GREENMOUNT AVENUE,
BALTIMORE, Md„
COMMISSION * MERCHANT
For tbe Bale of Hay, Grain and Straw.
Orders for Mill Feed, Gluten Feed, Cotton
Seed Meal, Oil Cake Meat, Salt, Ac., will receive
prompt attention. [Apl. 3—ly
FOR SALE.
IRON-BOUND WHITE OAK HOGSHEADS
Capacity 100 gallons each at $2.00 f. o. b. factory.
Suitable for Hog Scalding, Meat
Curing or Cisterns.
EVERY FARMER BHOULD HAVE ONE.
KINGAN PROVISION CO..
Holliday and Pleasant Sts., Baltimore, Md.
May 29—4 t
HARVEST MACHINERY
Binder Twine, Haying Toole.
ST'Repairs furnished promptly.
H. E. BARTLKSON,
May 16—tf] COCKEYBVILLE, Md.
for sale
™se° plants
CABBAGE ■ LH 11 I U
By J. D. HURLINE,
May 29—3t] BALDWIN, Md.
BG-QSforHATCHING
BARRED PLYMOUTH ROCK,
BUFF ORPINQTON. :
75c. for 13 Packed for Shipment.
50c, for 13 at My Yards. : : :
4®-Call and see my stock.***
S’L B. MARKLET,
SINGLE COMB WHITE LEGHORNS!
" LARGE WHITE BIRDS.
THE KIND THAT LAY WINTER AND SUMMER.
I have bred these birds for three yean and have
never tailed to get winter eggs. I also took 3 first
and 5 second prizes at Tlmonium Fair last fall.
R3F"Egga for batching, SI.OO per 13.
FRANK C. WOOD.
Feb. 20 - ly] Towson, Balto. county. Md,
OTICE—STOCKHOLDERS’ MEETING.
The regular Annual MeetlDg of the Stock
holders of the MOUNT WASHINGTON ELEC
TRIC LIGHT AND POWER COMPANY will
be held at the Office of the Company. Mt. Wash
ington, Md.,
On Thursday, June 17th, 1909,
At 2 o’clock P. M.
THOMAS W. OFFUTT.
June s—2t] President.
rpo LOAN ON FIRST MORTGAGE
One sum of S6OO, one sum of S6OO, one ■um of
SI,OOO, one aum of $2,000.
JOHN F, GONTBUM.
Attorney at Law, Towsontown, Md.
May 4.—tf.

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