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The Cook County news-herald. [volume] (Grand Marais, Cook County, Minn.) 1909-current, November 13, 1918, Image 4

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016544/1918-11-13/ed-1/seq-4/

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Bank Notes
A bank accout will give you a£better business stand­
ing in the community. If your name is not on our
books we invite you to put it there. Why not do so
today? Cultivate the saving habit. You will find it
profitable. It is npt how much you earn but how
much you save that wilt count when the proverbial
rainy day comes. If you have no bank book, bring
in a deposit today and get one.
Grand Marais State Bank
The Bank of Personal Service
H. B. Poatlewalte, President. I J. A. Kirkwood, Jr., Vice President
A. M. Anderson, Cashier
RK^^HK|R^HDMKHBiBHOBlKiiQEKjCliBQBKfl(KiBKKlKHMOiMBBRHNB KBBbSBHOKSBSHI^IQIQO
MORE SMILES and MORE MILES
FOR YOUR TIRES
If you have them repaired as soon as
a break in fabric or tread appears.
DON'T WAIT far BREAK TO GET WORSE.
TUBES REPAIRED
No Matter How Large the Blowout is.
If you live out of town send them in
by parcel post.
V. N. Johnson Tire Shop
Grand Marais, Minn.
ETTEES from our boys in the trenches and
from the women in canteen and other
war work, all bring to us the same
sage—SEND
US NEWS FROM HOME.
World news is all right, but OUR BOYS
want NEWS OF THIS TOWN. They want
the home newspaper. Publishers are prevented
from sending their papers free to anyone, even
boys in the service. Consequently a national
movement has been started by Col. William
Boyce Thompson of New York, who is acting
as President of the Home Paper Service of
America to give the boys what they are calling
for. Every community is joining the movement.
Let us see that our boys are not forgotten.
Send to the publisher of this newspaper
whatever amount of money you can—5
cents or $50.00. We will publish a list
each week of those contributing, and the
amounts contributed.
Every cent received will be used to send
this paper to our boys at the front. If at
the end of the war, there Is any surplus, it
will be turned over to the local Red Cross
Committee.
There is no profit in this to the publisher—
even in normal times, subscriptions are not sold
at a profit. With war prices prevailing* and the
high rate of postage on papers sent to France,
our cost will scarcely be covered by our full
subscription price.
Remember that over in France, some brave
soldier or sailor from this town—perhaps even
some splendid woman working within sound of
the guns—is depending on you to "KEEP THE
HOME LOVE KINDLED."
They are calling to YOU from Over there
GIVE WHAT YOU CAN
1
-'V
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P®W
1
5
\i%d'
WHWTY
fc&i
i-'^ev Hi'
?a,L
•tatcforutmbaku
.tlmt# the stftt6
the vigorous support of three sue-
Session of 1913: Fund asked for,
$150,000 per year fund appropriated
$75,000 per year.
Session of 1915: Fund, afeked, $150,
per year fund appropriated $40,000
per year.
Session of 1917: Fund asked $150,
000 per year (reduced by forestry
board to $100,000) fund appropriat
ed $50,000 per year also asked $8,
000 fire emergency for remainder of
fiscal year 1917, and it was appro­
priated
We have also urged the appropria­
tion of $100,000 or more as an em
ergency fire fund to be expended
only with the approval of the Gov­
ernor, or with such other check as
the legislative might provide.
Gov. Eberhart, Gov. Hammond and
Gov. Burnquist have all consistently
urged increases in our appropria­
tions, and Gov. Burnquist went fur­
ther and recommended an emergency
fund of $200",000 which was not
granted.
What made it comparatively easy
for the recent catastrophe to occur
was the lack of a large enough train­
ed force in the field to catch fires in
their incipiency, to punish the part
ies setting them and to compel
prompt and effective work extin
guishing fires started by settlers,
woods workers, railroads, automobile
tourists, and road contractors. We
have frequently told legislative com
mitteemen that with the funds
available we were, able to give the
forest country only a 40 per cent
fire protection.
As a means of supplementing the
efforts of the rangers, and im a mea­
sure to cover a weakness in the for­
est law, I asked the Commission of
Public Safety to issue an order pro
hibiting the setting of fires, except
under permit of forest officers, with­
in certain dates. Accordingly, orders
numbered 5, 9, 29 and 33 were issued
by the Commission and posted wide­
ly throughout the northern half of
the state. Our rangers have made
numerous arrests and obtained quite
a number of convictions of persons
disregarding these orders.* In this
and other respects the cooperation
of the Commission of Public Safety
has been exceedingly valuable
Following a fall and spring with
many running fires, which drained
our fund, we were forced to call for
financial aid from the Public Safety
Commission and the federal govern­
ment. The former paid fire expenses
to the extent of more than $6,000
and the latter increased our allot
ment by $2,000.
These running fires are different
from the slow-burning peat fires
with which we have had to contend
at practically all seasons, except
mid-winter. Some, in fact, continue
to burn the year around. The con­
trol and extinguishment of peat
fires has of -necessity been- put up
mainly to the local authorities.
If this kind of fire is to be hand
led at all successfully by the state,
there must be a complete field force
to prevent the witting- of such fires
or to extinguish them when' small.
When well established and burning
extensively In dgen .bofs ^r
fftoiENjtWi: ON #$Nl£SY FIRES subdue, vthei^SWttiS/ltiiese-.fires
f«r ItNMrt frtfMtrophly damage Is t© the laiid itself. %|f
during the-early part of October,
practically alt the fires were Jr peat
The State 'Forester, William T. fires of this kind, and to extinguish
Cox, with respect to prevention"©* them would have required an army
forest fires which should receive
the most careful attention of every
citizen of the state, 'Mr. Cox proves,
,,
M%mn,
Kavh. A-*.
cessive administrations, have done
all in their power to -provide effect­
ive means for preventing and fight­
ing forest tfires, but the legislature
consistently refused to grant the ne­
cessary j&ppropiiations. The result
of this short-sighted poHcy is that
the forest service have been able to
give the forest country only a 40
per cent fifce protection,"
With regard to the recent destruc­
tive fires Mr. Cox shows that every­
thing possible under the circumstan­
ces had been done to prevent the
calamity, and that it in all probabil­
ity would have been prevented if
the necessary funds had not been re­
fused for the organization and main­
tenance of an adequate force of fire
fighters. The Public Safety Commis­
sion had done all it could do in the
premises and thanks to its effective
cooperation many running fires have
been checked this fall. But nothing
short of a comprehensive system of
fire protection will avail to forestall
destruction of life and property in
the forest regions of the state. The
question is up to the people. They
are the rulers and theirs is the re­
sponsibility. Let every voter read
and read again Mr. Cox's instructive
statement, which here follows in
full:
"First, with reference to appropri
ations asked for and those granted
during the legislative sessions since
1911, at which session the Forest
Service was created, with funds of
§75,000 per year for 1912 and 1913.
•MML
id ^MrpoDSive fight to
i&rn themselves out without dehrel^
ofcittg into funning fires, and the on?
of men^ and besides, the danger ap­
peared no greater .than on numerous
other Occasions.-^
To have had them dug out at an
io
by an array of incontrovertible facts «.
nave naa
tnem oug out at at
iAArtAA
... expense of
.•
$100,000,
tofo
& .service .with, ^i. ... «. .t-,
.. Dihty of thorough patrol durnng the
with no postii
j„„„
**",
en8UJne d&yS Wld We8kS to
the starting of new fires would have
been a procedure „pf possible^ but
doubtful effectiveness. We might
have gone to. the Governor and the
Safety Commission and asked for
th^ $100,000, but did not do so. I
would not have asked for less. It all
comes back to the matter of regular
and systematic patrol, the expense
which the Safety Commission
was not expected to meet."
NOTICE FOR PUBLICATION.
Department of the Interior.
:U. S. Land Office at Duluth, Minnesota.
September 30, 1918.
Notice is hereby given that William
Walters, of Grand Portage. Minn., who,
on Nov. 11th, 1915, made Homestead
application, No. ©12203. for SE% of
NW% and SW% of NEJ%, Section 25
Township 64 N., Range 5 East, 4th. P.
Meridian, has tilled notice of intention
to mike Final commutation Proof, to
establish claim to the land above de­
scribed, before George Leng. Clerk of
the District Court, at Grand Marais
Minnesota, on the 16th day of Novem­
ber, 1918.
Claimant names as witnesses:
Rube Smith, Anton J. Fischer, Peter
M. Liinnell, Lester Smith, all of Hov
land, Minn.
JOSEPH WINCZEWSKI,
*0-9 Register.
No. 2152.
NOTICE OF EXPIRATION OF
OF REDEMPTION.
TIME
OFFICE OF COUNTY AUDITOR,)
County of Cook, )ss.
State of Minnesota.
To Ed. Lynch, R. H. Fagan, Hi
Hoyt, Jennie Krojanker, Marais Inv't
Co.
You are hereby notified that the fol
lowing piece or parcel of land situated
the County of Cook, State of Minne
dota, and known and described as fol
lows, to-wit: Undivided 7/12 Lot Three
in Section Twenty-five, Township Six
cy-flve, Range Five West, is now as­
sessed in your name.
That on the 1,2th day of May, 1913,
at a sale of land pursuant to the real
estate tax judgment duly given and
made in and by the District Court in
said County of Cook, on the »3rd day
of March, 1913, in proceedings to en­
force the payment of taxes delinquent
upon ireai estate for the year 1911, for
said •County of Cook, the above de­
scribed piece or parcel of land was sold
to the State of Minnesota for the sum
of Five Dollars and twenty-one cents,
and was on the 16th day of September,
A.. D. 1918, duly assigned to purchaser
for the sum of Twenty-nine Dollars
and fifty-eight cents that the amount
required to redeem said piece or parcel
of land from said assignment, exclu­
sive of the costs to accrue upon this
notice, is the sum of Twenty-nine Dol­
lars and fifty-eight cents and interest
thereon at the rate of twelve per cent
per annum from said 16th day of Sep­
tember, A. D. 1918, to the day such re­
demption is made.
That the tax certificate of sale is­
sued to said purchaser has been pres­
ented to me by the holder thereof.
That the time for the redemption of
said piece or parcel of land from said
tax sale will «expire sixty (60) days
after the service of this notice, and
the filing of proof of such service in
my office.
Witness my hand and official sea?
this 12th day of October 1918.
T. I, CARTER
Auditor, Cook County, Minnesota.
(Seal of County Auditor, Cook County,
Minnesota.) 10-16
SOME BULL.
The highest price ever paid by a
Canadian breeder for a purebred bull
was paid to Tom Moore, of Clares
holm, Alta.. when Prank Collicut of
Crossfield, Alta., purchased a 5 year
old Hereford bull at" the fancy price
of $20,000.
Claiming that the animal had been
killing his cattle, George Merts, a
farmer north of Crosby, shot a bear,
regarless of the Minnesota laws pro­
tecting bruin.
OLSON
Team and Auto Livery
Feed and Sale Stable
Draying and all kinds of heavy
team work in connection
Special attention given to
Haunters and Cruisers
We will serve*you promptly and
reasonably.
Tn
4
IITU»AH AUtaifeAuWC
*0*. LUTHERAN CHtlltOM
mm,
will1 be no services in tlie
Lutheran church next Sunday.
Ifi'MSle, Etc.
N -IS Vs*!
I
f.- 1
Rate—6 cents per line
15 cents a month.
P"™*
FOR SALE—A thorobred Ken­
tucky fox hound. Write or see Tom
Blomberg, Good Harbor HilL
FISHERMEN—wishing stencils to
label fish kegs with call or write V.
N.^ Johnson. ($1.75 each.)
FOR SALE OR TRADE—one team
of horses. Will consider cattle in
trade.—See or call on C. O. Johnson
FOUND—a part off a radiator of
a Ford car. Owner can get same
calling on Sware Mattson, Brule.
FOR SALE—160 acres of timber
suitable for pulpwood, or both land
and timber. 1% mile from shore in
town of Colvill. John Anderson, Col
vill.
FOR SALE—160 acres, *well timbereel
2% miles from lake Superior. 15%
of SW%, W% of1 SE%, of Section 33,
Township 62, Range 2 East. Apply
to W. E. Lucas, Haliburton, Ontario
Canada.
LEATHER
UST- returned from
Duluth where I fnir
chased a large stock of
leather and shoe nails
which I will sell to the
public tit very reasonable
Prices.
G. A. Ramstedt
Do
YOU
Know
About
We are
•. \.j '9*y£J~
COME AND 3EE U£
o„ «.' '.
V* '5i"^
its
•TOW
''ofjqS&szj&S.•!?WiSuS
SheriiT,...........
cierfc of court.. 4.^ .r*
Jud^re of Probate. v.C
Attorney...
.V.-'iV
Supt. of Schoole. ..'.i'..
CorOner...
Highway
(0
htreyoo
find out
•boot tbem
Thej will
interest
yoo wbeo
yoa'rein
need of
printing
}.
Engineer I -.
6,1
Surveyor" ...........:. .A. -Sfc"
P$:
^Tfflag»\OOie«ii^
•'i iV. SV ..iMM
a •.. i1....»
r.
President.
"Clerk""...
Treasurer..
per week.
FOR WATKINS GQODS write to
Andrew Fredrickson,^ P. 0. Box 894,
Two ftarbors, Minn.
by
HORSE FOR SALE—ra chunky all
purpose horse, weight 1,000 pounds.
Sound and no tricks. Inquire at «the
Herald office.
Trustees J. G.~^eott, P. J. Bay
Ed. Tofter.
Justices. .Geo H. Durfe^ Matt^ Jo&^son
Iniepesdent Sch«H Diffe
Chairman UtP.
Clerk Clause
Superintendent H. Xi^V
K?*1 Library BearC" 4
President .H. H.
yice President. Mrs. Efl
Clerk .S. Cr, ||urphL,
Treasurer .Mrs. John' WoodSi
I
Grand. Marais II
Estate and Im
proveiiient Co.
Excellent residence and
ImsmcHH locations still
to be had. '8ee
Geo. H. Durfee,
$ A E N
Grand Marais. Mian.
I
k||
f*
'W
V:..
AT PKICKS AND (t
TERMS THAT OFFEH||j
SA PK INVESTMENT^
CHAMCES.^ 1^%
**r.
General
Blacksmith
HORSESHOEING
and
REPAIRS-WORK
Dealers in
Wagons, Plows
and
Farm Machinery
Prompt S
ervll^
Reasonable Pri
Grand Marais, Minn.
T. M. ROBERTSON
DENTIST
Grand Marais, Minn.
Office open during *summer.
Mall repair cases to me durine win­
ter at Coffeyville, Kansas. j(
AGAINST FIRE LOSSES
IP?®
m.
BY^ INSURING IH TEE jv
COOK COUNTY
Mutual Fin Insarmce
GDMPAHY
OF
HOVUIin.^ Mil OTA,
We insure dwellings and
contents, barns,^ stock,
machinery, ^^^Hgarnst
loss by fire and lightjning.
Annualjretriium~.
Im"
SIQO.QO
.j$a
J*
I
fr
llw

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