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The Cook County news-herald. [volume] (Grand Marais, Cook County, Minn.) 1909-current, April 21, 1920, Image 2

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016544/1920-04-21/ed-1/seq-2/

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Entered as second-class mail matter
December 19th, 1907, at the post office
at Grand Marais, Minn., under the, act
of Congress of March 3, 1879.
Published weekly at
Grand Marais. Minnesota.
ONE JDOULAR A YEAR
MaH JOHNSON, Pu ens her.
otliclal County and Villa ice Payer.
No. 2184.
NOTICE OF EAflHAnON OP TIME
OF HiiUJiiUi'liON
OFF1CK OF COUWTY AUDITOR,)
Cuuiiiy oi uouk
lowlug'Vieue or"
ai.eu me coujny or COOK suite
iViiiiii^bUlU) dilU Known dillt iOeU
tii/11
ii.
lowiisiiip O'i, Kaiige
IN
anu
6
zuui uay 01 mu.ren, jLi#is, in proceeu-
And tnat ihe amount reauired to re
deem saia piece or parcel oi land from
oiuu teiA. suit: exclusive
is now assesseu in your name.
Tiictc on tne XOth aay ot May, 191b. u. ...
at a sai» ox ianu pursuant to uie reai
slioulu be at least an inch below tne
estate tax juugmem uuiy given anu
top of the fiat to permit thorough wa
lnaue in, anu uy uie JDistrict court 111 terine Whpn thp qoll is rp&dv the
anu lor saiu county ox CooK on tne
ing's to eniorctj
QttliilUuttliC UlJUJll icat iui Lilt? ..
sum ox
tne payment oi taxes
year lyio, lor &aiu county oi uook tne
me OJunars anu iuignty-three
cenis. •","J
unat the said piece or parcel of land
ail
me rignts ox me
nesuta,
of tne costs to
accrue upon tins notice is tne sum ol
beventy-tnree Uoliars ana twenty
cents, ana interest at the rate ot lz
per ceiiL per annum on $V3.20 thereof
irom Lne xoch chty oi April lyao, to the
aay sucn reuemption is made.
That the tax certincate of sale is
sueu to said purcnaser Has oeen pres
entea to me oy tne noiaer thereoi, ana
tins nonce requested.
That tne time for the redemption of
saiu piece or parcel oi land irom said
tax saie will expire sixty (b0 aays
aiter tne service ox tnis notice, anu
tne nims oi pruol of such service in
my on ice.
Witness my hand and official seal
this xth aay ot April X92U.
T. I. CARTER,
Auditor Cook County, Minnesota.
(Seai oi County Auuitor, COOK county,
Minnesota.) 4.21
No. 2183.
NOTICE OF EA*-1K.AM'10N OF
OF REDEMPTION
TIME
OFFICE OF COUNTY AUDITOR,)
County of Cook )ss.
State oi Minnesota
To Mary O. Sullivan
You are hereby notified that the fol­
lowing piece or parcel of land situated
in tne County ot Cook, State of Minne­
sota, arm Known and described as fol­
lows, to-wit: SWy4 of MK%, Section
24, Township 64, Range 3 West is now
assessed in your name.
That on the 10th day of May, 1915,
at a sale of land pursuant to the Teal
estate tax judgment duly given and
made in and by he District Court in
and for said County of Cook on the
25th day of March, 1915, in proceed­
ings to enforce the payment of taxes
delinquent upon real estate for the
year 1913, for said County of Cook, the
above described piece or parcel of land
was duly bid in for the state for the
sum of Nine Dollars and eighty-three
cents.
That the said piece or parcel of land
and all the rights of the State of Min­
nesota, upon and against said land by
virtue of said sale were duly assigned,
conveyed and sold by the County Aud­
itor to an actual purchaser under Sec­
tion 2126, G. S. 1913, on the 16th day
of April 1920, for the sum of Seventy
three Dollars and twenty cents.
And that the amount reauired to re­
deem said piece or parcel of land from
said tax sale exclusive of the costs to
accrue upon this is the sum of Sev­
enty-three Dollars and twenty cents,
and interest at the rate of 12 per cent
per annum on $73.20 hereof from the
16th day of April 19 Z0, to thfc day such
redemption is made.
That the tax certificate of sale is­
sued to said purchaser has been pres­
ented to me by the holder thereof, and
this notice requested.
That the time for the redemption of
said piece or parcel of land from said
tax sale will expire sixty (60) days
after the service of this notice, and
the filing of proof of such service in
my office.
Witness my hand and official seal
this 17th day of April 1920.
T. I. CARTER,
Auditor Cook County, Minnesota.
(Seal of County Auditor, Cook County
Minnesota.) 4.21
No. 2182.
NOTICE OF EXPIRATION OF TIME
OF REDEMPTION
OFFICE OF COUNTY AUDITOR,)
County of Cook -)ss.
State of Minnesota
To Mary O. Sullivan
You are hereby notified that the fol.
lowing piece or parcel of land situated
in the County of Cook, State of Minne­
sota, and known and described as fol­
lows, to-wit: NW% of NE14, Section
24, Township 64, Range 3 West, is how
assessed in your name.
That on the 10th day of May, 1915,
at a sale of land pursuant to the real
estate tax judgment dulg given and
madp in, and by the District Court in
and for said County of Cook on the
25th day of March, 1915, in proceed
,lngs to enforce the payment of taxes
f! delinquent upon real estate for -the
,-i year 1913. for said County of Cook,
the above described piece or parcel of
land was duly bid in for the state1 for
the sum of Nine Dollars and eighty
three cents.
That the said piece or parcel of land
and all the rights of the Statate of
.! Minnesota, upon and against said land
by virtue of said sale were duly as
signed, conveyed and sold by the Coun
ty Auditor to an actual purchaser un
•r der Section 2126, G. S. 1913, on the 16th
a A 1 9 2 0 S
'1 enty-three Dollars and twenty cents.
And that the amount required to re
deem said piece or parcel of land from
said ax sale exclusive of the costs to
accrue upon this notice is the sum of
Seventy-thre© Dollars and twenty
cents, and interest at the rate of 12
per cent per annum on $73.20 thereof
from the 16th day of April 1920, to
the day such redemption is made.
That the tax certificate of sale is
sued' to said purchaser has been pres
ented to me by the holder thereof, and
this notice requested.
That the^ time for the redemption of
said piece or parcel of land from said
tax sale will expire sixty (60) days
after th eservice of this notice, and
the filing of proof of such service in
my office.
Witness my hand and official seal
this 17th day of April, 1920*t
CARTER,
lsTowa:
It reduces tka cost of Ihiig.
It employs labor that would
•••s, .f. otherwise .fee.' idle.
It relieves the burdm on trans^'
portation.
In-Country:
It means better linnf.
It reduces grocery bills._
III. PLANTS SHOULD BE STARTED
EARLY.
.Ma__ ..
^Many
Ol
JSS.
Oi iULxlillCibU la
x'o Ai.j.ry O. £uinva.u
lou ciie iiuitiuy uo tilled that the ioi
tne tender vegetables, sucn
as tomatoes and peppers, and others
as possible. The soil for such purpose
Darcei oi Yaaa siVu- need not be very rich, but should be
OA
light and friable. Small boxes, called
y,..
planting the plants should not be pull-
ed out of the soil but should be lifted
out with a knife or fiat instrument
pushed under the roots.
The hotbed consists of a frame cov­
ered with a glass sash. Protective heat
is supplied by a layer of fermenting
horse manure from one to three feet
deep inside of the frame. The man-
ure may be piled on the surface of the
ground and the frame set on this. The,
fi'ame having been placed, manure
should be piled around it fo keep out
cold winds. After three or four days
the soil may be put in from four to six
inches deep and the seeds sown.
During the summer the hotbed may
be used for cucumbers, celery, or some
other crops.
A cold frame is made in about the
same way as a hotbed except that no
manure is used to furnish artificial
heat. Cold frames cannot be started
until very cold weather is passed. The
first of April is early enough. Plants
started inside to be transplanted to
the garden later should be hardened
before transplanting by exposing them
gradually to the open air.—R. S. Mack­
intosh, horticultural specialist, Exten­
sion Division, University Farm, St.
Paul.
Die Home Garden
In Town:
It reduces the cost of living.
It employs) labor that would
otherwise be idle.
It relieves die burden on trans­
portation.
In Country:
It means better living.
It reduces grocery bills.
1V. SOIL NEEDS CAREFUL
PREPARATION.
An ideal garden soil has a rich,
sandy loam surface with silt or clay
under that. The surface soil should
be from 6 to 10 inches deep and free
from sticks, stones, sods, and rubbish.
It should contain a large amount of
decayed vegetable matter and plenty
of plant food. This means the addi­
tion of stable manure, hen or sheep
manure, or other fertilizers. Commer­
cial fertilizers should be distributed
before the crop is planted. They should
not be allowed to dome in contact with
the foliage. All rubbish having been
removed, the soil should be spaded br
disked both ways, or plowed six or
eight inches deep, and then raked or
harrowed several tfines to form a fine,
firm seed bed.
The best time to kill weeds is before
they appear above the surface of the
ground. Stirring the soil with a rake
or similar tool destroys thousands of
weeds that are not seen, and keeps the
soil in good condition to encourage the
growth of garden plants.—R. S. Mack­
intosh, horticultural specialist, Exten­
sion Division, University Farm, St.
Paul.
In Town:
It reduces the cost of living.
It employs labor that would
otherwise be idle.
It relieves the burden on trans
portaiion.
|n Country:
It means I tetter living.
It reduces grocery bills.
V. DOUBLE
GARDEN CAN DO
DUTY.
"Nearly all parts of the garden
produce more than, one crop durlllg
the
season.
stance,
tor early use, should be started In the ^''uLfST'Lv'.
kitchen, or in a hotbed, Just as iearly nutted to the Chief of the Fire Depart-
as iuiiovvt, to-wi: b** oi jn**. bee- flats, are filled with the soil and made permit, or not in confaSy wUh this hot sUr
ine 8011 18
uu lue
&Late
oi Mm-
upun aim against saiu land
virtue oi saiu su,ie were uuiy assigneu,:
conveyeu anu soici by tne county Aud­
itor to an actual purchaser unuer Sec­
tion zx-io, is. xsj.3, on tne xbtn aay
oi Aprn xa^u, ior uie sum oi aeventy
three juonars and twenty cents.
reaay
auri»ce
1
1110
trenches for the seeds are made by
kAVll, A JXO, XU pi VvCCU- VMVUVO *v* WAV 7a Af ,7 7aoc tilt?
pressing the edge of the board into the
soil about a quarter of d,n inch.
reat estate lor tile «, t,...,.,.
auwve ueseriueu piece or poaeei oi lanu ery or other fine seeds may be scatter-1
Was amy u«u in lur tne state lor tne
Cel- I
th surface and a thin laver of
sand or light soil dusted over them.
--=•—1
A piece of burlap or other coarse cloth. f^?.ted
nvo-
uy OVGT
the surface before sprinkling
will'prevent the seeds from washing
out of place.
Seedlings growing in such flats
should Je transplanted before they
grow tall and spindling. In trans-
Succession cropping
means that one crop IOIIQWS another in
!, the same place.. Companion cropping
means that two or more crops "are
grown near togjether While small, and
that as one mivturesv^additional room
is provided for? the later crop. -For in-
radish
^. haVe ^wooden ^«uppo^t«
1
seeds are sown with
carrot se^d. !The radishes are Boon
An,, Ordinance providing for' lire
limitR mid
Mngni*ii«n
Minnesota al rnL^
L?ect'on 2-
1
hereafter be built, enlarged or altered
a
stri^u?J«PHSED
... ,| otrUCiUrCS h6rG8ftGr ©rcctfid without
west firm by pressing the surface with the ordnance shall be removed. be not less than 6 inches from any
edge of a board. The top of the soil permit
U1ha?ISh^r?'U^K+e
jm^ve4
Section 4. Permissible Wooden Struc­
tures Within Fire Limits.—No frame or
wooden structure shall hereafter be
built within the fire limits as given
herein, or as they may hereafter be
established, except the following and
all roofs placed upon such buildings or
structures shall have an incombustable
covering:
(a) Temporary one story frame
buildings for the use of builders
(b) One-story sheds open on the
long side, not over 15 feet high, with
sides covered with incombustable ma­
terial, and with an area not exceeding
500 square feet, A wooden fence shall
not be-used to form the back or side
of such sheds
(c) Wooden fences not over 10 feet
high
(d) Piazas or balconies not ex­
ceeding 10 feet in with, nor extending
more than 3 feet above the second
story floor beams. No such structure
shall extend beyond the lot line, or be
joined to any similar structure of
another building
(e) Bay windows when covered with
incombustable material
(f) Small outhouses not exceeding
150 square feet in area and 8 feet in
hight
Wooden sheds or outhouses shall not
be located within 5 feet of any lot line,
not less than 30 feet from any other
building oyer one story high.
(g) Ice houses, as usually construc­
ted.
No frame building shall be moved
from without to within the fire line.
Section 5. Repairing Frame Build­
ings Within Fire Limits.—Any existing
frame Wuilding within the fire limits,
which may hereafter be damaged by
fire, decay or otherwise to an amount
greater than one-half of the present
value, exclusive of the foundation, shall
not be repaired or rebuilt, but shall be
removed.
Section 6. Buildings Having Pro­
hibited Occupanices Within Fire Limits.
—No building shall hereafter be con­
structed for a public garage or dry
struction.
Section Walls.—All exterior or
division walls of buildings hereafter
erected shall be of sufficient thickness
to support the load to be carried but
in no case shall a brick, concrete or
hollow block wall be less than 12 inches
thick.
I In all buildings, except dwellings,
frame buildings and skeleton con­
struction, party wails and fire walls
which serve as building walls on both
sides, shall be not less than 16 inches
thick in the upper two stories or
upper 30 feet, increasing 4 inches in
thickness for each two stories or frac­
tion thereof below. All other fire walls
shall be not less than 16 inches thick
in the upper 4 stories or upper 50 feet,
increasing 4 inches in thickness for
each two stories or fraction thereof
below. No two story increment shall
exceed 30 feet in hight. Portland ce­
ment mortar only shall be used in
(such walls.
Reinforced gravel concrete walls with
the steel reinforcement running both
horizontally and vertically and weigh­
ing not less than one-half pound per
square foot of wall, may have a thick­
ness 4 inches less than that prescribed
for brick walls.
Stone walls shall be 4 inches thicker
than required for brick walls.
All walls and partitions in schools,
hospitals and places of public assem­
blage, over one story high, and all
walls and partitions in theaters, shall
hereafter be built of brick, stone,
hollow or solid blocks or metal lath
and Portland cement plaster on metal
studding, or other equivalent incom­
bustable construction
Section 8. Exits Reauired.—In every
building hereafter erected, except in
private dwellings, each floor area above
the first shall be provided with at
least two means of egress remote fro'm
each other, one of which shall be an
enclosed stairway.
Section 9. Buildings with wooden
frame work clad with sheet metal, or
veneered with brick, shall be classed
as frame buildings.
W aaaed to the firebrick or sdapstone,
"8, ®"a construction and equipment tue or cast roa nuy be used, if solidly
buildings therein in
vthe
Village of backed with lriclc or concrete.
tiranilMarais, Minnesota. I Spciiw 11. Woodep Beams Separated
4 Be it Orrtalnfirt hv r^v Frywi: Jttaeenry,, Chimneys.—No wooden
cil of the Viiiamf -fir
aim"
GSand' Martus-
J? ney or flue. Whether the same be for
section. 1. ^Flre Limits—The follow- smoke, air or any other purpose,
^he^^lffi^WiSf^
:to
structure, building or part thereof shall least S inches of trick work or other
p1*"1 of the proposed work to-
visions herein cont^Sed, issue permit busuabi^ p^tmons^oi^^flci^^usrbe
construction.
until
inss. surrounding buiid-
.. ..
se^l^
building- permit shall recite this
Section 3. Incombastable, Walls,
Fire Limits.—Every building hereafter
ana a mm layer oi Cornices and Roofs Renuired within
1
Pr„enlarged
*i,n snail be enclosed on all sides'
with walls constructed wholly of well
hr,i"1'
burned brick, reinforced concrete blocks
or other equivalent incombustable ma­
terials and shall have the roof, top and
sides of all roof structures, including
dormer windows, covered with incum
bustable material. All cornices shall
be of incombustable material.
cleaning establishment within the fire, ?'emedy such violations or defects with
limits unless it be of firenrorvf pon- reasonable time and when not
limits, unless it be of fireproof con- otherwise specified each ten days that
prohibited conditions are maintained
shall constitute a separate offense.
Section 10. Chimneys and Fireplaces.
Except as herein provided, all chimneys
in. every building hereafter erected,
and all chimneys hereafter altered or.
rebuilt shall be constructed of brick,
stone or reinforced concrete. No ma­
sonry^: chimney shall have walls less
than 8 inches thick unless it be lined
on the inside with well burned terra
cotta or fire clay chimney tile, set in
Portland cement morter, in which case
the wall shall be not less than 4 inches
thick. The lining shall be continuous
from the bottom of the flue to its ex­
treme hight.
No' chimney shall be corbeled out
more than 8 inches from a brick' wall,
and' such corbeling shall consist of at
least five courses of brick.
Brick set on edge shall not be per­
mitted in chimney construction,
4
(can
The smoke flu,e of every high preas
tire steam boiler, and every appliance
producing a corresponding temperature
in a. flue, if built of brick, stone, re­
inforced concrete or other approved
masonry, shall have walls not lesg'tlian
12 inches thick, and the inside* 4 inches
of such walls shall he firebrick* laid in
fire morter for a distance of at" least
25 feet from the point where the smoke
connection of the' boiler enters the'flue.
All chimneys shall, project"1 at, least
three f^et above the point of contact
with'" flat- roof& of 2 feet'- above the
ridge of a pitched roof ,. !.
Portland cement morter only shall, be
used] in ,.th.e construction' of. chimneys.
No icbimney in ahy buil3inir sfiall
of any kind,
supportsw stiall^^^inb'ombtts^
out of the *way and th^carrots have all which
the room^J^Ia^y cqmbinatipns are pos- fj-om^ny cause shall be repaired" and
e... stnd
beams or joistsv shall be placed within
2 inches oftheoutside face of a chim-
Sectl^
.»? iovrPib Village pipe shall be within 9 inches of any
wogam lath and
i^rtr^eVen-UT?' vifcair®~piei-*and Wttere smoto pipes pass' through a
Marais and Bl^iX ??«9frand wooden lath r.nd plaster^ partition, they
Twenty- /aoi
and shal1 be
VillaK^of to the ventilated thimbles at least 12 inches
C*rand Marais, Minnesota.* larger in diamdjter than the pipes, or,
H' Smoise"'Pli»e.—No smoke
guarded by", galvanized iroi
Permit Required.—Np wall by galvanized iron thimbles built in at
incombustable material,
No smoke pipe shall pass through
any floor, or a roof having wooden
framework or covering.
Section 13. *Hot Air Pipes and Regl-
inheft^orrifn^ie^??ic^!? who-iters .—All heater pipes from hot air
doubled tii\ pipes With at least 1 inch
ail*
en h^twroti thfrm tIj-.i-jfTj-Ln.-f
pfpes
a'woodwork, unless the woodwork be
of mi obtained from the' covered with loose fitting tin. or the
is-nated^ tment or other
(des-
rmt itsi.A official shall of corrugated .asbestos, in which latter
mpnt thA Pei"mit if in his judg*. case the distances from the woodwork
a a a 3
•,seriously increase the inches.
pipe be covered with at least inch
No hot air pipe shall be placed in
a wooden stud partition or any wooden
enplosure unless it be at least 8 feet
horizontal distance from the furnace.
Hot air pipes contained in cottibustable
partitions shall be placed inside another
1 pipe
arrau8'ei
within "the" "fire
to maintain inch air
space between the two on all sides or
be securely covered with inch of
corrugated asbestos. Neither the outer
pipe nor the covering shall be within
1 inch of wooden studding, and no
Wooden lath shall be used to cover the
portion of the partition in which the
hot air pipe is located.1 Hot air pipes
in closets shall be double, with a space
of at least 1 inch, between them on all
sides.
Section 14. Stoves and ranges.—No
kitchen range or stove in any building
shall be placed less than 3 feet from
any woodwork or wooden lath and
plaster partition, unless the woodwork
or partition are properly protected by
metal shi^Kls,- in which case the dis­
tance shall be not less than 18 inches.
Metal shields shall be loosely attached,
thus preserving- an air space behind
them.
Hotel and restaurant ranges shall De
provided with a metal hood, placed at
least 9 inches below any wooden lath
and plaster or wooden celing, and have
an individual pipe outlet connected with
a good brick flue. The pipe shall be
protected by at least 1 inch asbestos
covering, or its equivalent.
Se'ction 15. Duties of Enforcing Of­
ficer.—The Chief of the Fire Depart­
ment or other designated official is
hereby authorized and empowered
First: To enforce all ordinances re­
lating to the construction, equipment,
management and condition of all prop­
erty within said town or village.
Second: ~To supervise the construc­
tion of all buildings.
Third: To report monthly to the
mayor or Town Council regarding the
condition of the town or village on all
matters pertaining to fire prevention.
Section 16. Penally for Violation.—
Any and all persons who shall violate
any of the pro-visions of this ordinance,
or fail to comply therewith, or who
shall violate or fail to comply with any
order or regulation made thereunder
or who shail build in violation of any
detailed statement of specifications or
plans submitted and approved there­
under or any certificate or. permit
issued, thereunder shall severally for
each and every such violation and non­
compliance respectively, forfeit and
pay a penalty in the sum of twenty
five dollars. The imposition of one
penalty for any violation of this ordir
nance shall not excuse the violation, or
permit it to continue and all such
perspns shall be required to correct or
The application of the above penalty
shall not be held to prevent the en­
forced removal of prohibited conditions,
as provided in Section 2 of this ordi­
nance.
Section 17t Conflieatlng Ordinances
Repealed.—All ordinances and parts of
ordinances inconsistant herewith are
hereby repealed.
Section 18. Date of Effect.—This
ordinance shall take effect and be in
force from and after its passage and
legal publication.
J. C. MURPHY,
Attest: President.
G. F. LUNDQUIST,
Village Recorder.
Passed April 15, 1920.
Published April 21. 192A
No. 2185.
NOTICE OF EXPIRATION OF TIME
OF REDEMPTION
OFFICE OF COUNTY AUDITOR,)
County of Cook )ss.
State of Minnesota
To Mary O. Sullivan
You are hereby notified that the fol­
lowing piece or parcel of land situ­
ated in the County of Cook State of
Minnesota, and- known and described
as follows, to-wit: Lot 2, Section 24,
Township 64, Ralige 3 West, is now
assessed in your name.
That on the 10th day of May, 1915,
at a sale ,of land pursuant to the real
estate. tax judgmen duly given and'
made in, and by the District Court in
and for said County of Cook on the
25th day of March, 1915, in proceed­
ings to enforce the payment of %taxes
delinquent upon real estate for the
year 1913, for said County of Cook,
the above described piece or parcel of
land was duly bid in for the state for
the aum of Eight Dollars and forty
one cents.
That the said piece or parcel of land
and all the rights of the State of Min­
nesota, upon and against saig land by
virtue of said sale were duly assigned,
conveyed and sold by the County Audi­
tor to an actual purchaser tinder Sec­
tion 2126, G. S. 1913, on the 16th day
of April 1920, for
f-the
sum of Sixty-
three Dollars and ninety-eight ceints.
And that the amount required to re­
deem said piece or parcel of land from
said tax sale exclusive of the costs to
.accrue upon this notice is the sum "of
Sixty-three Dollars and ninety-eight
cents, and inter jest at the rate of 12
per cent per annum on $63.98 thereof
from the 16th day of April 1920. to
the day such- redemption is made.
That the taxr certificate of sale.-is­
sued to said purchaser has been pres­
ented to meTby the holder thereof, and
this notice requested,
a That the time for the redemption of
said piece or parcel of land from said
tax sale will expire sixty (60) days
after the service of this notice.- and
the filing of proof of such service in
my office.
-'Witness my hand-'and official seal!
this 17th day of April, 1920.
T. I.'. CARTER,
Auditor'Cook County., Minnesota.'
liKearaisr
like this
n.i
leadfrn? Som'furSce sh^l
$706,000 August 1, 1921
470,000 February 1, 1922
705,000 August 1, 1922
405,000 February 1, 1923
sl
(Seal of County Auditor, Cook County,
Minnesota.) 4-21
Didn't Phas« Him -4
Socrates lifted his -cup—^'What's
this stuff?" he aslcedir- ?y
'i'"Hemloek" replied^ tihe^cup^bearer.
"Oh!" said 5Socratee, /'that** 'all
it'^wasonetofthose
Catarrh Cannot Be Cured
With LOCAL APPLICATIONS, as they
cannot reach the seat of the disease.
Catarrh is local dlaeaa*, jfreatlyi in-
34 Ifears "Work,
^HAT is. the kind of increase in salary
the minister fyas received. His living
expenses have risen, just as fast and as far
as yours.
But he is paid on the average just 52 cents
more per church member than he was paid 34
years ago.
The Minister Never Fails You
Every officer of the Government with a war
message to deliver appealed to the ministers first
of all.
But 80% of the ministers receive less income
than government economists figure as a minimum
for the support of ah average family.
When hospitals need money they enlist the
support of the ministers—and receive it.
But when sickness visits the minister or the
members of his family they must be treated in a
charity ward. His pay is less than a day laborer's.
8 out of every 10 ministers receive less than
$20 a week—about half the pay of a mechanic.
We Pay Him Half the Wages of a Mechanic
And of these pitifully inadequate salaries, how much do
you contribute? Nothing if you are outside the church
an average of less than 3c a day if you are a church
member.
All of us share in the benefits of Christian ministers to
the community. They marry us bury us baptize our
children visit us when we are sick. In their hands is the
spiritual training of the youth.
We Are All Profiteers at Their Expense
Part of the Interchurch World program is this—a living
wage for every minister of Jesus Christ an efficient plant,
and a chance to do a big man's job.
If you want better preachers, help to pay the preachers
better. It's the best investment for your community—and
for your children—that you can ever make.
INTERCHURCH
WOUJD MOVEMENT
45 WEST 18th STREET, NEW YORK CITY
The publication of this advertisement is made possible
through the co-operation of 30 denominations.
$4,700,000
STATE OF MINNESOTA CERTIFICATES
OF INDEBTEDNESS
Bearing 5% Interest, Payable Semi-Annually,
February 1 and August 1.
Offered for sale to the public in denominations of $100, $500 and $1000 at
par and accrued interest from April 20, 1920.
These certificates are direct obligations of the State of Minnesota, and exempt
from all taxes, Federal and State.
Sale begins April 20 and will continue IS days, or until certificates are sold.
Allotments will be made in the order filed.
Schedule of Maturities:
$705,000 August 1,1923
405,000 February 1,1924
705,000 August 1, 1924
405,000 February 1,1925
The Soldiers' Bonus Board is offering these state.certificates for sale
to the public to raise funds with which to continue paying soldiers' bonuses
without interruption. Present funds will become exhausted about May 1.
These obligations are a gilt-edged investment. By putting your surplus
funds into these securities yofi will not only be'making a good investment but
will be performing a patriotic service, as the proceeds from the sale of certificates
will be used in making bonus payments to returned service men and women.
For subscription blanks or additional information, apply to your local bank.
Any bank will take yoursubscription, or you may rqmit direct to Henry Hindi.
State Treasurer, Bonus Division, St. Paul, Minn.
In making remittance "to State Treasurer, add accrued interest after April
20, 1920 at 5 per cent. No sale accepted for fraction of $100.
Certificates may be fully registered or as to principal only ft
llueaeed by constitutional conditionjB.^aiid
in order to cure it you must take an
internal remedy.^ HaU's Catakrh Medi­
cine is taken' internally^ and %cts thru
the blood on the mucous surfaces of the
system. Hall's Catarrh Medicine was
prescribed by one.of the best physicians
fn this country for years. It ts^com
posed of some of th* .best tonics Jcndwn,
confined with an« of ,sthef beBtl blood
purifiers. .The perfect combination ff
UMTInsredients fn Hall's Catanfr Medi
dw ls what produces such wonderful"
its in- catarrhal conditions Send for
ionials: free. .v.
jk CO., Props., Toledo, O.
'"fSMIta-te* rfonsnjiiflcin
principal only if desired.
W. F. RhinQw, Adjutant General
J. A. 0. Preus, State Auditor
Henry Rines, State Treasurer
The Minnesota
Soldiers1
Bonus Board.
Correct ENGLISH
'K HOW TO bSE IT,
A MOHTHLY MAOAZlNE
$2.5j0 THE YEAR
Sentf 10 Cents for Simple Cow
11
to ..u
Correct English Psb. Co.

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