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New Orleans Republican. [volume] (New Orleans, La) 1867-1878, March 12, 1871, Image 1

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VI V
SINGLE COPIES: TEN CENTS.
OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF fNK 8TATE
OF
LOUISIANA.
TERMS: $16 00 FEB ANNUM.
VOLUME IV—NO. 285.
NEW ORLEANS, SUNDAY, MARCH
12,
1871.
WHOLE NUMBER 1197.
AMUSEMENTS.
^iADEMY OF .Ml'MC.
GAIKTK UOMIQUE GROUPE OF
SPECIALTIES.
I'lUST CLASS AKTISTS
From Everv Amusement known to tlie World,
FAR^R COMKDY, DRAMA, Ol'KKA ANI) Bl'K
*n*qne, Minstrelsy SotiRB, llurr, Bullet
•ami AcTo'iatn.
FOR THIS WKKK ONLY,
COI.VILU5>S EUROPEAN NOVELTIES'
Tilt Tli-oat Fronoli Athletes, Un D'ATALIK, The
Man with tl»« Iron Jaw," <w *• Man of Stool:"
TtfQ Beautilul Herculean Lady, M ile ANfiKLA, the
Female Sainson ;
A?.il the Intrepid and Uarittfc Child, YOUNGZEPHYR:
" >11 ap|M*ar in the.ir inc^vdible teats, marking
ft new sensation in the Tutted States, vide the lilt
ing a cask containing forty gallons of water, and
terrific ascent from the p.vquette to the dome of
«he theatre, by molar newer alone, and in the
ftaeent supporting a lovely hoy.
SHKRIDaN and MACK, the Groat, Character
Comedians.
Mr. P. LKK, Orest Ethiopian Comedian.
Programme changed nightly.
A Startling Sensation in preparation. ml
gT. CHARLKS THEATRE.
Tnparalleled sucoesR of the the talented young
Character Comedian,
MR. JOSEPH K. EMMET,
emmet. emmet, emmet. emmet.
will appear Every Evening and Saturday
Matioee in Charles Gayler's new comic seusa
nation of
FRITZ. OUR COUSIN GERMAN.
FRITZ, pur Cousin German____Mr. JOS. K. EMMET.
Iu his celebrated Parlor Concert Scene, in winch
he will introduce liis charming CHARACTER
MELANGE; new Sougn, new Dances, Solos,
etc., ever greeted with demonstrationsot 1 do
uilil2 U
^lRKSCENT CITY MUSEUM,
Nob. 40 and 40 St. Charles street.
Now on exhibition, a large and attractive series of
LIVING WONDERS,
animals, rare paintings,
AND
100,000 Curiosities,
From every part of the World.
ALL FOR ONE PRICE OF ADMISSION.
Open Daily trom R A. M. to 9 P. M. ial !»m
gKOCND GRAND SUBSCRIPTION,
FANCT DRESS AND MASK BALL
OP TUB
<c-Titian.v Theatre Stoelt Compact,
AT THR
NATIONAL THEATRE,
Ots St. Joseph's Night, Mareh 18,1871.
SUBSCRIPTION...........
.THREE DOLLARS.
COMMITTKK OP AKUAMWNCK'N.
II. H. Wultf. Louis Stern, Joseph M.icncr.
Dr. F. Mithuft, JL H. Benners.
Gentlemen's ticket* and hide-e' invitations can
■he lmd of any member of the above committee,
lull lit 14 16 18
s
SECOND ANNIVERSARY
H1IVK RN IAN BEXfiVOLEN T
•MITTAL AID ASSOCIATION O-' LOUISIANA.
The various Hiiiemian Benevolent und Mut ual Aid
Associations ot New Orleans, with those invited to
assim in the celebration of their Seeond Anniver
sary, w ill assemble *u Canal street, at 9 ie o'clock,
Friday MorcuB*, Mareh 17, 1871,
n the following osdiir
Invited Associations and Bihrrnian Benevolent
and Mutual Aid Association, Bnincti No. 1, will con
stitute the First Division, which will form on the
north side of Canal street, head resting on Royaj
street, extending east, under the supervision of
JOHN O'NEILL, Ksq.
Hibernian Benevolent and Mutual Aid Associa.
t.un, Branch No. 2 and Branch No. 3, will consti
tute the Second Division, and will form on the north
side of Canal street, bead restinpon Roval street,
extending w est, under the supervision of WILLIAM
ENRIGHT, Esq.
Hibernian Don relent and Mutual Aid Associa
Hen Branch No. -4, Branch No. A. and Branch No. ti
w-.ll constitute the Third Division, which will fonu
on the south side of Canal street, extending east,
under tile super,ision of O. C. WILLIAMSON.
ROUTE.
The Procession w ill form in line at the position
indicated, precisely st half past nine o'clock. The
head of the Procession will move up St. Charles to
Poydras, down Poydras to Camp, up Camp to St.
Patrick's Churelt. where the Associations will at
tend High Mass in a body. After Mass the Proces
sion will reform on Camp street, and proceed up
Camp to Julia, down Julia to Carondelct, up Ca
rondeletfo St. Andrew, up St. Andrew to Prytania.
np Prvtania to First, up First to Magazine, down
Magazine to Felicity, up Felicity to Annunciation,
down Annunciation to Calliope, down Calliope to
Magazine, down Magazine to Juiva, down Julia to
Camp, down Camp to Canal, down Canal to Royal,
down Royal to hepiauadc, down Esplanade to Ca
sacalvo, down Catacalvo to Mandeville, up Man
tievilic to tlie Levee, un Levee to Esplanade, dow n
Esplanade- to (hart tvs, up Chartres to Canal, where
the Procession will be dismissed.
The Aids to the Grand Marshal will report to
h.rri promptly at enne o'clock A. M., at the (lay
St atue.
In the event that the weather prevents the Pro
cession taking place, it will be indicated by eleven
tap? on the tire alarm belle, repeated three times;
the Procession will then stand isistpouei! to the
lollowiug Sunday, same time and place.
FIRST DIVISION.
FDWARD SWEENEY, Grand Marshal.
John McPhelin, Aid to Grand Marshal.
M. McMauigle, Aid to brand Marshal.
Patrick Kelly, Aid to Grand Marshal, Branch No, 1.
Tlios. F. Cullen, Aid to Grand Marshal, Branch No. 2
Wm. H. Byrnes, Aid to Grand Marshal, Branch No.3.
Pat. Comfort, Aid to Grand Marshal, Branch No. 4.
Pat. Philbin, Aid to Grand Marshal, Branch No. 5.
Thus. Gaffney. Aid to Grand Marshal, Branch No. 6
INVITED ASSOCIATIONS.
Marshal, JOHN O'NEILL.
HIBERNIAN II. and M. A. A.—BRANCH NO. 1.
SECOND DIVISION.
Marshal, WILLIAM ENRIGHT.
HIBERNIAN B. and M. A. A.—BRANCH NO. 2.
HIBERNIAN B. and M. A. A.—BRANCH NO. 3
THIRD DIVISION.
Marshal, O. C. WILLIAMSON.
HIBERNIAN B. and M. A A.— BRANCH NO. 4.
HIBERNIAN B. and M. A. A.—BRANCH NO. 5.
HIBERNIAN B. and M. A. A—BRANCH NO. 6.
mh>2 16.
S T.
NICHOI.A8 VAHIhTIKS,
No. 109 8t. Charles Street.
New and singular attractions this week.
INTERNAL IMPROVEMENTS.
The stage is enlarged, and a comfortable gallery
for colored citizens has been erected.
STUNNING FEMININE TALENT
On the stage aud at the tables.
SINGING.
DANCING,
DIALOGUES,
AND PRETTY' FARcEfl EVERY NIGHT.
Admission only Twenty-five Cents. fe251 in
S t.
LOUIS HOTEL. MASK BALLS.
A series of SIX GRAND DRESS AND MASK BALLS
wi>! be given in tlie spacious ball room of the St.
Louis Hotel. as follows:
On ST. JOSEPH'S NIGHT, March 18.
These balls will be the continuation of the grand
entertainments given every year at the New Opera
House, iv here their order and decorum have ren
dered them justly popular.
Jaeger's splendid Silver Cornet Band has been
engaged for the whole series.
The entrance to the boil room is on Royal street,
just below the corner of St. Louis.
Doors will open at 9 P. M. Balls to commence at
10. Gentlemen $3; ladies free.
Tickets can be had at the door on the night of
the ball, or at F. Dumoateihs confectionery, corner
Canal and Bourbon streets. j"J7 2m
_l^CELLANEm.
•ftfONBV CAM NOT BUY IT.
FOR SIGHT IS PRICELESS!!
BUT THE DIAMOND SPECTACLES
WILL PRESERVE IT.
THE DIAMOND GLASSES,
Manufactured by
J. R. SPENCER It OO., NEW YORK,
Which are now offered to the public, are pro
nounced by all the celebrated Opticians of the
world to lie the MOST PERFECT. The SCIEN
TIFIC PRINCIPLE on which they are constructed
brings the cope or centre of the lens directly in
front of the eye, produeing a clear and distuict
vision, as in the natural, healthy sight, and pre
venting all unpleasant sensations, such as glim
mering and wavering of sight, dizziness etc., pe
culiar to all others in use.
They are Mounted in the Finest Manner,
111 frames of the best quality, of all materials used
for that purpose.
EDWARD LILIENTHAL.
JEWELER AND OPTICIAN,
Is sole ageut for New Orleans, Louisiana,
Ma.93...........Canal Street...........No. #3
From whom they can only be obtained. Tlieee
gowds are not supplied to pedh-rs, at any price.
He also keeps constantly on band a very large
and well selected stock of
Watches, Jewelry a*d Silverware.
All of which is of the very host quality, and fully
guaranteed. o< 23 6m 3t 2p
F
H!SE WATCIIE* AND JEWELRY.
8. S1LVERSTEIN,
19*5...... ......PoyHran street.............195
(Corner of Carroll street),
DKA1KR IN
GOLD AND SILVER WATCHES, FINE JEWELRY,
CLOCKS, SILVERWARE, SPECTACLES,
EYE GLASSES, ETC.,
Would reepeotfully inform his old friends and cus
tomers that he has reopened at the above named
location. His stock being entirely new. his goods,
consequently, are all of the latest styles, and are
warranted to be <«qu&l to anything in the market.
Having bought for cash, he ean sell lower than
almost any other house in the city, and being in
favor of quick returns and small profits, he will
guarantee bargains to all customers. Come aud see
his goods.
Watches and Jewelry repaired in the very best
manner and at the shortest notice. oo23 6m lt2p
^ CARD*
In connection -with COLEMAN'S MILL FACTORY,
No. 205 Trhoupitoulas street, New Orleans, I have
establish#^ at No. 44 St. Charles street, opposite
the St. Charles Hotel, a Dejmt for the sale of
COLEMANS
LATEST IMPROVED UNDCLATORY
Corn and Wheat Mil In*
These MiEs are so well and favorably known,
having been before the public for over twenty
years, that a description of their peculiarities and
advantage*. >s unnecessary. In addition to a stock
of MILLS FOR ALL POWERS AND PURPOSES, I am
prepared tc till orders for Mill Stones. Mill Irons,
Mill Picks, Gfn Bands, Mill Bands, etc.
I should be pleased to receive the orders of my
friends aud others needing anything in my line,
H. DUDLEY COLEMAN,
,ja22 lt'2dp2mo No. 44 St. Charles street.
LOTTERIES.
jry RAWING OF THE LOUISIANA
STATE LOTTERY FOR MARCH 11, 1871.
CLASS HO.
Tlie above drawings are published iu all the prin
cipal papers, aud are drawn in public daily at the
rooms of the company.
Information fnrnished and prizes cashed by
HOWARD, SIMMONS k CO., Contractor's.
St. Charles street, corner Union. New Orleans.
Witness our hands at New Orleans, Louisiana,
this eleventh day of March. 18H.
H. PERALTA.
ADAM G1FKEN,
Commissioners.
BKWAEF. OF BOGUS LOTTERIES. ai>28
JT^OUISIANA STATE LOTTERY
COMPANY.
Incorjiorated August 17, 1868,
CHARLES T. HOWARD................PRESIDENT.
SINGLE NUMBER LOTTERY.
SPLENDID SCHEME—ONLY 2CJ4W NUMBERS.
Capital Prize............850,000.
CLASS D.
TO BE DRAWN AT NEW ORLEANS ON
Ssturlai, March 1871.
HOWARD, SIMMONS k CO., Contractors.
SCHEME:
20.080 Number*—-Ticketa Only *20.
1 prize of
$50,000 is............
1 prize cl
30,000 is.............
........... 30JMK
1 prize of
20,000 is.............
........... 20 001
1 prize-of
is.............
........... 10,000
1 prize ot
9,000
1 prize oi
flJXXi
1 prize ct
7,000
is.............
........... 7,000
l prize of
6/KM)
is.............
........... 6.000
I prize of
f,,oon
:s........... .
........... 5,000
1 prize of
4.000 is.............
........... 4,<>00
I prize of
3.000
h .............
........... 3,000
1 prize of
2,000 18.............
.......... 2 Iff*)
1 prize of
1,0g0
1 prize of
1,000
1 prize ot
1,000
l prize of
1,000
1 pr.ze of
1,000
1 prize of
1,00ft
1 prize of
1,000
1 prize of
1,000
1 prize of
1.000
1 prize of
1.000
1 prize of
1.000
1 prize of
1,000
1 prize of
1,000
^are..........
... »,<*Wr
1 prize oi
1/iftO
1 prize ef
1,000
1 prize of
1.000
1 prize of
1,000
i prize of
1,000
1 prize of
1.0(10
1 prize of
1.000
1 prize of
1,000
1 prize of
IjOOO
1 prize of
1,000
1 prize of
1,000
I prize of
1,000
50 prizes ot
500
are...........
.......... 25,000
317 prizes of
800
are...........
36 Approximation prizes.........
440 prizes, amounting to..........
.........$280,400
Whole Tickets, $20; shares in proportion.
Prizes payable without deduction.
Orders to be addressed to ____
CHARLES T. HOWARD,
Lock box 692, Postoffiee, New Orleans.
Send postofhoe money order, or register your let
ter. I®
HOTELS AND RESTAURANTS
pARIS RESTAURANT,
32 ..............Bienville Street..............34
Between Chartres and ©id Levee,
Under the direction of B. PHILIBERT.
Furnished Rooms and Board by the Week or Month.
Saloons for private reunions.
NEW ORLEANS. .ia3%n
AZARAC RESTAURANT,

IB...............Royal street.......
by spabicio.
The best of everything in
Wines and Liquors, at down towu jmoea Table
service elegant. Waiters poirte and attentive.
i®5 _ _ ___
riKOHWEIX HOUSE,
"EQUAL PUBLIC PRIVILEGES.-*
BY
DR. K. I. C'ROMWEIX.
.J7J.........CUSTOMHOUSE STREET.........471
Comer of Villere street. New Orleans.
Board and Lodging by the Day or Week- Heap®"
affile for all parcels, moneys, baggage, etc. , ten
my charge. Strangers taken to the cheapest stores.
. au301y__ __—
REMOVALS.
R KMOVAD-DB- o . anfoox has removed
hi* office to No. i. Canpndelet rtreet. upstaira,
D('ij CWU*. ®
ALICE CARY*8 SWEETEST POEM.
Of all the beautiful pictures
That hang on Memory's wall,
Is one ot a dim old forest.
That seemeth best of ail:
Not for its gnarled oaks olden,
Dark with the mistletoe;
Not for tlie violets golden
* That sprinkle the vale l»elo , n ;
Not for the milk white lilies
That lean from the fragrant hedge,
Coquetting all day with the sunbeams,
And stealing their golden edge;
Not for the vines on the upland.
Where the bright red berries rest;
Nor tlie pinks, nor the pale, sweet cowslip.
It seemetb to um the best.
I once had a little mother.
With eyes that were dark and deep—
In the lap of that olden forest
lie lietli iu pace asleep:
Light as the down of the thistle,
Free as the w mils that blow,
We roved there the beautiful summers.
The summers of long ago ;
But his feet on the hills grew weary,
And one of the autumn eves
I made for my little brother
A bed of the yellow leu.\ < s.
Sweetly his pale arms folded
Mv neck in u meek embracf,
As the light ol' immortal beauty
Silently covered his face;
And when the arrows of sunset
Lodged in the tree-tops bright
He fell, in his saint-like beauty,
Asleep by the gates of light.
Therefore, of all the pictures
That hang on memory's w all,
The one of the dim old forest
Seemeth best of all.
"A like on the grand c anal."
A life on the grand eannl,
A home in tile cabin deep.
Where at night you're lu led to rest,
B.v tlie waves and the tiller's squeak;
Like a wild sea gull I p.ue,
Fora sight of the old tow-path.
Where is beard the driver's song,
-fud his hearty,careless laugh.
The stout boat plows her way,
Drawn by the brave' old team.
While far o'er head, in tioeks.
The circling night lnrds scream:
Tlie farmer may till his fields,
Aud others do as they will.
But give nu- the old canal.
Whose waters are never still.
First Natiounl Bank.
This bunk bus now been in tlie hands ol'
the Receiver, Colonel Case, for nearly four
years, anil, as yet, no dividend has been
declared, though Colonel Case has been
anxious to expedite tlie liquidation and set
tlement of its affairs. The delay lias arisen
from the fact that claims against the bank
Lave been set up iu behalf of the United
States, which, if allowed, would absorb al
most its entire assets. These claims have
been eontested in a suit brought by the
creditors of the bank against the Con
troller of the Currency, which was argued
before the Supreme Court of the United
States, hist Tuesday, by the Solicitor
General and Assistant Attorney General for
the government, and by Henry B. Kelly.
Esq. aud Hon. John A. Campbell for the
creditors. It is thought a decision will he
rendered in the case at an early day, pos
sibly on the twentv-lifth instant.
Ilardee's Alaji of Louisiana.
Mr. Edgar A. Steel, the publisher, showed
us last night a completed map of tlie State.
Hardee's second edition. There has been
an unavoidable delay iu the publication,
caused by the necessity of putting in the
new parishes of Webster ana Red River,
created by the last Legislature. But the
edition is now well on the press, and several j
hundred copies are ready for delivery. !
Everybody will have a chance to buy one
in a few days.
Peychaud's Aromatic Bitters. —We in
vite the attention of our readers this morn
ing to the certificate of sundry physicians
of this city in relation to these hitters,
which appears in another column. We take
great pleasure iu calling attention to this
matter, because we consider that the more
publicity given to the proof of the
value of this great medicine the
greater the service dune to the pub
lic, and the sooner will those suffering
from all the terrible diseases for which they
are a sure remedy be cured. They are no
quack nostrum, but an article of real
merit, made from the purest aud simplest
vegetables, and hundreds of eases where
they have been used successfully have come
under the notice of the writer. They ean
be found at all retail drug and grocery
stores. Let those afflicted with dyspepsia
and debility try a bottle of them.
Hathaway Home /or the Boon and
Friendless.— At a late meeting of the
Board of Administrators the following
officers were elected: Hon. O. J. Ditnu,
president; Hon. John Lynch, treasurer; G.
H. Fayerwcther, se -rotary. -Messrs. O. J.
Dunn, John Lynch. G. H. Fayerwcther, C.
B, White and G. W. Healy, executive com
mittee. Mrs. S. Straight, Mrs, 0. J. Dunn,
Mrs. G. W. Healy, Mrs. G. H. Fayerwcther,
Mrs. G. S. Martin, Mrs. T. G. Taylor, Mrs.
C. C. Antoine, Mrs. G. W. Menard, Mrs. P.
B. S. Pinehbaek, Mrs. C. H. Shute, Mrs. J.
11. Ingraham, and Mrs. G. Lynch, lady
managers. The Home will be open in a
few da vs.
Improved Real Estate at Auction by
the Sheriff. —Attention is culled to the
sale at auction to lie made to-morrow at
noon, at the Merchants aud Auctioneers'
Exchange, Royal street, by the Sheriff
of the parish of Orleans, of four lots of
ground, with the buildings and improve
ments thereon, situate in the Fourth Dis
trict of this city, on Philip street, between
Solis or Locust and Maunsel streets. For
full particulars see advertisement.
A Store Worth Visiting.—S uch of our
lady friends as have not yet paid a visit to
Dauziger's splendid store at No. 20J Canal
street, should lose no time in doing so, es
pecially now, as they aro receiving their
beautiful new goods. Some of these are
really grand—those light spring silks, for
example, and those Japanese silks and
genadines.
They Never Fail.—S uch is the verdict
of all who use Grover & Baker's great sow
ing machine. Sewing of every kind ean be
done upon them, for the household and the
manufactory. Mr. J. H. Gardiner, corner
of Canal and Dryades streets, is the agent.
Straight University.— Rev. Dr. Thomp
son will preach this mocMing and evening
at tlie usual time of church services. Sab
bath school at 3 P. M. To these services
all are cordially invited.
Do not fail to read the report of a sermon
on the "Little Church Around the Coiner,"
on an inside page of this morning's Re
rUBIJCAN.
William T. Clark, formerly editor of the
Liberal Christian, is Mr. Tilton's principal
assistant in conducting the new paper, the
Golden Age. ___
The largest cargo of ootton since the war
was cleared at Mobile yesterday.
BELIEF OF FBENCH SUFFEREBS
Appeal to Human Sympathy
UnARITY CONTRIBUTIONS TO-DAY
To-day will be sanctified by a holy
eliaritv; for not only throughout the city,
but throughout the broad country, in
churches of every denomination, differing
widely in various points of faith and doc
trine, there will be a union of common
benevolence, the object of which is to
succor the famishing thousands now suf
fering under the miseries that war has
brought upon unhappy France.
It is not necessary for the public journals
to commend this work ot holy charity to
the attention of the benevolent. The mere
mention that such a collection is to be
made will open the hands of thousands;
and there is something the more inspiriting
in the circumstance that the charitable
efforts of to-day will pervade the broad
Union, and that from every quarter benevo
lent hands v ili contribute to save a gallant
people from the famine and pestilence that
is assailing them. The pure charity which
we have now the opportunity to exercise is
far removed from all partakings of sectarian
ism or of party feeling.
Their differing wide apart in religions or
political views ean make common cause
in extending aid to a gallant people pros
trated to earth l>y no fault of their own,
of starving thousands guiltless of wrong,
but on whose innocent heads the storm of
war falls with the same unrelenting force
as it visits the armed warrior in the field.
I; is earnestly hoped that no hand will lie
held back from this good work, but that all
will give freely, as the Lord has prospered
them. There has never been a nobler field
for lienevolence since America became a
nation.
It may be hoped, too, that the contribu
tions to the unfortuunte victims of war will
not be confined to the frequenters of the
churches aione, but that many will attend,
if it be only for the purpose of swelling the
contributions. "He that hath pity upon
tlie poor lendeth unto the Lord, and that
which he hath given will He pay him
again.''
Rev. Dr. Loomis, of New York, who
visiting the Southern cities, in the interests
of the American Seamen's Friend Society
returned to this city, from Texas, on Friday
evening. He spent last Sabbath in Galvcs
ton. In the morning bespoke in the Baptist
Church, and in the evening addressed
a largely attended union meeting held in
Dr. Walker's church. The Galvestonians
seem in earnest in looking after the moral
and social culture of the sailors who visit
their port. During the day nearly $400
wer# donated to the cause. Dr. Loomis
will spend a few days in our city, and will
then return North. His special work here
now is to organize a New Orleans Seamen's
Friend Society auxiliarly to ihe American
Society. The Legislature grauied a dona
tion of $15,000, which will enable tlie society
to begin work at once to secure valuable
property.
Miss Sas.oi B. Anthony v.: lobbying at
Lansing last week. She converted the le.
islutive reporter of the Detroit Free Press,
and the ingenious young man tells how it
was done, as follows: Susan—"Are you the
Free Press reporterf (Looking to see if
she had a club.) "I am.'' Susan—"Then
let me introduce myself to you as Miss
Susan Bertha Anthony, of Massachusetts."
(Blushing very red.) "I h-hope you have—
have no designs against my—my eharac—
against roe." Susan—"None whatever, I
assure you." Both extend right hands.
Both squeeze. Both blush, and squeeze
harder. Both enter into conversation,
during which the fact was developed that I
always favored woman's rights, and always
shall.
The State of Florida proposes to sell to
Alabama the strip of country lying between
tlie latter State and tlie Gulf of Mexico, aud
stretching from the Apalachicola ri v er on
the east to the Perdido on the west, for
$1,000,000. It would give to Alabama an
additional area of about sixty-four million
acres of territory, covered mostly with
primitive forests of pine, juniper, cedarand
cypress, and including the harbor of Pen
sacola, besides several others of minor im
portance. The people of West Florida are
anxious for the change, but Alabama thinks
tlie price too high.
An Evening of Sacred Song. —Philip
Phillips, the celebrated vocalist, will he
in this city about the middle of March, and
w ill sing selections from his repertoire of
sacred songs at Ames church, on Friday,
twenty-fourth inntaut. He is believed to
be the best singer of sacred music in the
world. We return thanks to Rev. J. C.
Hartzell, pastor of Ames church, for com
plimentary tickets.
A nice, cheap, elegant, commodious and
convenient residence is offered for sale on
easy terms. The house is new, and has gas
and water throughout, bells and all the
modern improvements. A portion of the
money can be paid down, and the balance in
monthly instalments of oaa hundred dollars
each. A rare opportunity is offered to
obtain a real bargain. Read the advertise
ment, and then address "Owner, - ' at the
Reuublican office.
We owe an apology to that respectable,
intelligent anil fine appearing organization,
the United Brothers Benevolent Society,
for not before acknowledging the agreeable
serenade they honored us with in passing
along Camp street the other day. In fact,
it was one of those good things that will
keep, and hence we preserved it until
Sunday.
There is a brisk demand for property in
the vicinity of the Base Bail Park and the
new State House grounds. One party sold
throe lots, at advanoed prices, Friday, and
yesterday the St. Charles Auction Exchange
presented an animated spectacle during the
bidding on np-town squares. Several sales
wore made at prices largely above The ap
praisal by experts.
Religious Notice. —There will be divine
services to-da}', commencing at 11 A. M.
and 7 P. M., in Ames Methodist Episcopal
church, corner of St. Charles and Calliojfc
streets, Rev J. C. Hartzell palter. All are
welcome.
Tlie Jackson Railroad—An Accommoda
tion Train to be Put Oil.
The new management of the New Or
leans, Jackson and Great Northern rail
road have done everything possible to
accommodate through travel and to facili
tate the speedy transmission of through
mails. They have done excellent well,
anil deserve due credit therefor. Now,
over the Mississippi Central and Jackson
road, Colonel McComb being president of
both corporations, there is no detention at
Canton because the. trains fail to connect
as they run between Humboldt to New Or
leans without change.
This remedies the delays tha* previously
existed when mails and passengers were
detained from six to twelve hours waiting
lor the departing train from Canton in either
direction. The result is, that wc have re
ceived our New York and Western mails
with surprising regularity, au«l passengers
have not been compelled to wait over and
seek the accommodation of wayside hotels.
There was, however, one difficulty to be
bridged over, and that was the incon
venience and vexation arising from the
occasional necessity of waiting at local
stations one, two, three, four and five hours
for the incoming through trains. There
was hut one way to avoid this evil, and
that was the establishment of an accommo
dation train to run between New Orleans
aud Canton, or some other point on the
road. The condition of the track aad the
insufficiency of the rolling stock have prob
ably had some effect in delaying the estab
lishment of a local train, but we now learn
that an accommodation train will be run
through the summer by the New Orleans,
Jackson and Great Northern Railroad Com
pany to Magnolia and all intermediate sta
tions, to arrive in New Orleans iu time for
business, and return in the evening, and
that season and commutation tickets will
lie sold at rates to encourage summer travel
to local points on the line of the road.
Calcasieu Sulphur .nines.
Tlie Picayune says in reference to tlie
Calcasieu sulphur mines:
Having recently indulged in one or two
little pleasantries at the expense of the
Calcasieu sulphur mines, we propose in re
turn to give a few brief facts concerning
the respects of the working of the same by
the company formed in this city.
There were placed upon exhibition, yes
terday. at the office of the company on Car
ondelet street, a number of glass jars con
taining specimens of the crude and analyzed
sulphur obtained from the several strata of
the mine, which had the effect of bringing
together qititp a number of gentlemen in
terested in the Calcasieu milling project.
From the labels upon the jars and the ac
companying chart upon which the various
strata are worked, it was snow u that the
strata which yields the greatest results, viz:
ninety-six aud one-fourth per centum of
pure sulphur, is situated at a depth of four
hundred and eighty-six feet, extending
downward to a depth of four hundred aud
ninety-six feet.
The extent ot the various strata, the de
posits from which, when mixed together,
produce eighty per cent of pure sulphur, is
one hundred aud twelve feet in depth.
When the first shaft was sunk the sulphur
was reached at a depth ol lour hundred and
twenty-eight f^:t.
In the present shaft, which is situated
about uue hundred aud titty feet from tlie
former, the sulphur was not reached until a
depth of four hundred and forty-two feet
had been attained.
Tlie engineer of the company, we are in
formed, is to leave iu a few days for Europe,
for the purjiose of having a cast iron shaft
constructed, after the plan of a recent in
vention by a French aud Belgian engineer,
said shafts having the reputation of being
by far the best now constructed for many
purposes. The company expect to be in full
operation at the roinineneemeut of the new
vear, and we are afraid wc should not be
believed, if we were to give an idea of tlie
profits they confidently predict will arise
from their work during the first season
alone.
A somewhat careful estimate places the
value of the sulphur already discovered in
the grounds of the company at thirty-five
million dollars. The capital stock is seven
hundred and fifty thousand dollars, and no
increase of capital will be required to bring
the rich products of the mines to the surface
of the earth, from whence it may lie ship
ped to the markets of the world.
Concert of Hiss Melanie .Hay.
Minerva Hall was tilled to the utmost on
Friday evening by a selected audience, on
tlie occasion of the complimentary conceit
given to Miss Melanie May by lier pupils.
It is exceedingly gratifying to say that tlie
concert was a most complete success in
every sense. The music was judiciously
selected and splendidly executed, and it is
not possible to name any portion of the per
formance undeserving of the highest praise
Mr. Chase delighted the audience with
his splendid performance of "the Star of
Love," aud the "Rose Bush." Madame
Blache was in excellent voice, and it would
be difficult indeed to surpass the soprano
aria liv Donizetti, or the duet "La Fee au
Roses," performed with Mr. Uassard.
Ihe interest of the evening concentrated,
however, upon the pcrlorwauee of Miss
May s pupils, particularly the overture for
eight hands. We think that any competent
judge of the subject would acknowledge
that the touch, time and expression dis
played by the pupils of Miss May are indis
putable proof that she is a teacher of re
markable talent; a teacher, not only, but a
pianist whose brilliancy of execution and
delicacy of touch, combined with true
artistic feeling of the theme, has been sel
dom equaled, still more seldom surpassed.
We sincerely hope that this concert will
lead to a wider appreciation of Miss May as
a very superior instructor on the piano.
Commerce street, Mobile, has been put iu
proper repair after the general tear up that
occurred from laying down the track of the
New Orleans, Mobile and Chatanooga rail
road. Tlie people have stopped fretting
about the through track.
Mark Twain once attended a funeral in
Nevada, where every one was trying to say
something pleasant about the late lamented.
The only statement that met with universal
assent, was ono ventured by a conscientious
and observant mourner, that tlie departed
1 niade a nice, quiet corpse."
The "Imperial Boer Saloon," No. 134
CommoB street, will open next Tuesday
morning under the proprietorship of Morris
Wilson and Albert Sadusky. Lunch will
be, spread from half-past ten to two o'clock
daily. The opening will be properly cele
brated.
It is stated that at a recent revival meet
ing in New Hampshire, one. of the young
brethren arose and said that he had re
ceived a revelation from the Lord that it
was his duty to kiss Sister- ; an ,i N },e,
nothing loth, rejoined that if the Lord was
willing she was, and the kissing was pro
ooeded with then and there, to the evident
satisfaction of both parties.
BY TELEGRAPH.
LATEST NEWS FRO* ALL FOISTS
Revenue Officer and Illicit Distiller
EACH KILLS THE OTHER
FIRST SHOT A DEATH WOUND
The Ku-Klux Bill to be Passed
TBJBUNE AND HERALD ON SUMNER
ITS EFFECT IN NEW HAMPSHIRE
Trochu Insane — Rochefort Dead
THE RED8 PROPOSE R NEW REPUBLIC
Anarchy Among the Insurgents
ACCIDENT ON GREAT WESTERN RAILWAY
ELEVEN PKliSONS KILL.KD
A STOKVI IN MOBILE YESTERDAY
WASHINGTON.
Democratic Members Will "Stick"—In
teraal Revenue Collector and n Dis
tiller Kill Each Other at the First Fire.
Indian Hostilitien Indicated—Eight Va
cant Scats in the Senate—Satisfying
Demands of Southern Republicans—
Only the Hu-Hlax Bill to be Enter
talued—Weather Report and Weather
Probabilities.
Washington, March 11.—Tlie Democratic
caucus this morning resolved that it was
the duty of every member to remain in his
seat to defeat dangerous legislation.
Collector Wallace, of the third South
Carolina district, reports that his assistant
anti an illicit distiller killed each other at
the first fire.
The government has official advices from
Camp Supply iudieating Indian hostilities.
The tribes, instead of killing bnffalo, are
fattening their ponies, which the knowing
ones say indicates a general raid on the
white settlements.
Nothing has transpired regarding the
proceedings of the high commission, except
the details of their dinners.
There are eight vacant seats in the Senate.
The Republican caucus have determined
to remain in session until Southern affairs
are fully discussed, anil some law devised
which will satisfy the Southern extremists.
Mr. Morton's bill, making outrages amen
able to the federal courts, aud exacting iron
clad oaths from federal jurors, will lie
presented Monday.
The Senate caucus appointed a committee
of five to confer with a similar committee
from tlie House caucus to devise a force
bill.
Later and more, reliable facts regarding
the Republican Senatorial caucus state that
it was resolved that only the Ku-Klux hill
he entertained; that efforts in favor ot legis
lating on salt, coal and the Cincinnati and
Southern railroad failed. A majority of all
parties seem indisposed to enter upon gen
eral legislation.
4:35 1'. M.—The barometer lias risen upon
tlie Atlantic coast, but only to fall rapidly
since this morning. There has been a very
general but irregular diminution of pressure
west of tlie Alleghenies; a decided fall, with
heavy rain, on the gulf, aud a heavy full,
with threatening weatimr, at the Rocky
Mountain Station.
The winds are everywhere light or fresh,
an 1 no serious disturbance is anywhere in
dicated. Threatening clouds very gener
ally prevail north of the Ohio valley, and
the same, with occasional rains, on the
Atlantic and gulf coasts.
It is probable that cloudy weather will
prevail on Sunday iu the gulf and central
States, aud that an area of diminishing
pressure will be developed in Ohio to-night.
Fresh winds and cloudy weather are in
dicated for tlie Atlantic coast.
NEW YORK.
Governments Steady—Southerns Inactive
—Bank Statement—Jury Disagreed—
Tribune and Herald on Sumner's Re
moval— Its Effect on New Hampshire
Election—News from South America—
Earthquake at VaSpnraiso— Unmaae to
Shipping.
New York, March 11.—Gold Ill's « 111 A.
Money a 4. Governments steady. South
ern securities inactive. Virginias and South
Carolinas very strong. Tennessees (ilL;
new, C4 :, 4. Virginias 6(1 tiz; new, fiS. Louis
ianas 68iv: new, 6"; levee sixes, 7— 1 y; eights.
85'q. Alabama eights 100; fives, 58. Georgia
sixes 80; sevens 00. North Caroiiuas 47;
new, 26. South Carolinas 79; new, t'-S'.i.
Sterling: long, 9 : l»; short, JO**.
Exports of specie for the week amounted
to nearly a million of dollars.
The bank statement shows: Loans in
creased over $6,750,000; specie decreased
over $500,000; deposits increased $4,750,000;
legal tenders decreased nearly $1,000,000.
The jury in the Federal Court, in the ease
of thej government vs. William Weld A fo
ot Boston, for $100,000, sugar tariff', failed
to agree.
The Sturtevant House, au immense, and
elegant hotel ou Broadway, Twenty-eighth
and Twenty-ninth streets, tinder the manage
ment of the Leelanils, was formally opened
to-night by a reception to members of the
press and others.
The Tribune to-day says, editorially: "Tho
impolicy of removing Mr. Sumner from the
chairmanship of the Committee on Foreign
Relations, without a better pretext than his
discordant social relations with the White
House and State Department, must now be
clearly manifest to the dullest official at
Washington. No debate, since the
Sau Domingo commission was au
thorized, Inis aroused so much feel
ing or elicited such strong language
as that of yesterday on tlie election of the
standing committees of the Senate. It
seems plainer than we could wish, from the
line of that debate, and troni the language
oi' the influential journals of the eountry
troin which we quote, that a new cause of
dissension has been needlesslv forced upon
the Republican party."
The Herald says editorially: "Until yes
terday the Republicans felt confident of
carrying New Hampshire by at least seven
teen hundred majority; but the news of tlie
action of tlie Senate caucus is reported to
have somewhat shaken their confidence.
Yesterday evening a prominent Republican
published an article denunciatory of Presi
dent Grant for bis course toward the, Mas
sachusetts Senator, which has, our cor
respondent states, east a gloom over the
party, and elated llie Democrats consider
ably. Whether it will give the State to the
Democrats is uncertain; but it is evident
that the quarrel between President Grant
and Mr. Sumner is destined to produce war
of factions in the ranks of their party, at
least in New England."
Evening.—Gold steady all day. Gov
ernments opened steady, but fell 'off about
noon, and closed steady at about higher
than lowest price. Sixes of 1881, regis
tered, 115 V, coupons, 115^; five-twenties
of 1862, registered, 112; coupons, 112 V 64s,
112; 65s, 112; new, C7g, 110V CSs,
Ill's; ten-forties,registered, lOS-V coupons,
111 "*5; currency 6s, 114.
A South American steamer brings the
following news:
The new government of Bolivia has been
established. It promises to maintain friend
ship with Peru aud had withdrawn the
note.addressed to Peru by predecessors.
Mulgerjos, the ex-Preaident, barely es
caped with lii« life. The Indians are pursu
ing him over the frontier into Peru. Of hie
escort of thirty-four souls only five jtceoni
pauieil him to Lima, all the rest having
been slain. The Indians committed terrible
atrocities. Alter the battle of La Paz
many bodies were mutilated. Morales, in
command of the revolutionists, was pro
claimed provisional President of Bolivia.
The Messrs. Dreyfus have been appointed
fiscal agents of the new government in
Europe.
News has come bv way of Bolivia from
Uruguay that the rebel General Lope a
Jordan had been defeated and had fled into
Encni Rios.
Advices from Chili to tlie tenth state that
shocks of an earthquake were felt at Valpa
raise, accompanied by a severe storm
Much damage was done to tbe shipping.
LONDON.
Accident on the Great Western Railway—
Napoleon not Going to Uhisellitii'Mt at
Present.
London, March 11.—Au accident occurred
on the Great YVestern railway, by which
eleven persons were killed, and twenty
throe wounded.
The report that the Emperor Napoleon
was coining to Chiselliurst is premature.
He is not expected, at present.
PARIS.
Troehu Reported Insane—Henri Roche
fort Died of Heart Disease—The Redo
Propose a New Republic — Belleville
Battery Pointing at Paris Unmasked—
Anarehy nmonc the Insurgents—Troop*
Sent to Versailles to Protect the As
sembly.
Paris, March 11.—General Trochu is re
ported insane.
Henri Rochefort died of heart disease.
[Special to the New York World.]
Paris, March 11.—The reds propose the
formation of a new republic, with Victor
Hugo as President, Garibaldi as Minister of
War, and Blanc and Rochefort at Florence
as ministers.
The Belleville battery, a complete earth
work, with glares embrasures, platform,
scrap trenches, sharpshooters, angles and
mitrailleuse embrasures, containing guna
pointed at Paris, were unmasked yesterday.
Anarchy prevails among the insurgents. A
number of regiments of the line have been
sent to Versailles to protect the assembly.
M. Thiers' influence is w anting.
Paris, March 11—Evening.—The insur
gent National Guards still hold possession
of 417 cannon. * •
Nothing new as to tlie situation in Mont
mutre, or other faubourgs.
The reported death of Henri Rochefort
has been contradicted.
The l ninn Liberal, of Versailles, lias
commenced inquiry into the acts of violence
and plunder perpetrated by the Germans
during their occupation of the city. It is
stated that requisitions and des^fptiou ol
property are continued by the Germans.
General Vinoy to-day reviewed a corps of
40,000 men from the army ol' the Loire, who
form the new garrison of Paris.
A notice issued by authority of the North
western railroad says the Germans them
selves are responsible for the accident at
Preteaux.
The rioters ol'the tenth of December have
been tried by a council of war. Blonqui,
Flourens, Girand and Avrille were con
demned to death for contumacy; Goupille
to two years imprisonment and Valles to
six months imprisonment. The rest of the
rioters were acquitted.
The Elecfeur Libre says the rumor that
General Trochu lias become deranged is
without confirmation.
BERLIN.
South-German Elections—German Armies
During Next Phase of Occupation ot
France—Returned Prisoners from the
Ueded Territories to be Immediately
Released.
Berlin, March 11.—The South-German
elections resulted in tlie election of fifty
liberals, ten conservatives aud fifteen
clericals.
Bouapartist intrigues are rife iu Brussels
and elsewhere.
The Sard Uewsrhe Zntung says the posi
tiou of the German armies, during tlie next
phase of tlie occupation ol' France, will bo
an uninterrupted line from the lower Seine
to Dijon. Au order has been issued that
the laudwolir. in organized corps and garri
sons, shall be dismissed at their homes. Re
turned prisoners from ceded territories are
to be immediately released, but officers and
soldiers from other portions of France will
only be set at liberty after tlie negotiation
of a definite treaty of peace.
ZURICH.
German Celebration in Honor of Return
of Teace Disturbed by Frenchmen—
Tbe Riot Quelled and the City Quiet.
Zurich, March II.—A German celebra
tion in honor of the return of peace, which
began Thursday, was disturbed by the
French officers who are detained here as
prisoners of war. The German Toutralle
Music Hall was attacked and occupied by
tlie French, aud several persons injured in
the melee. The Sw iss Federal Council at
once ordered the adoption of military meas
ures to put an end to the tumult, and pre
vent its recurrence. Disturbances, never
theless, were resumed Friday, when
the lontralle of the Germans was
again stormed by the French, and
the German flag torn to pieces. Sub
sequently a large number of people oi
Zurich, who sympathized with tbe Ger
mans, attacked the prison in which sixteen
officers of the French Mobile guard, who
were arrested on tlie previous ilay, were
imprisoned. The Swiss soldiers, guarding
tlie prison, at once fired upon, and repulsed
the mob, but unfortunately killed and
wounded several innocent people iu the
houses on the opposite side of the street.
The riot lias been thoroughly quelled, and
to day the city is perfectly quiet.
Zurich, March 10, II 1*. M— Later.
There was only oue person killed during
the disturbances. The federal council
sent for a battalion of infantry and two
batteries to assist in keeping'the peace.
Further disturbances apprehended.
ROME.
Disturbances in Jesus Church—Order Re
stored.
Rome, March 11. —Disturbances occurred
tins morning in Jesus church; though there
was considerable fighting, no person was
wounded. Order was promptly restored bv
the authorities.
A8PINWALL.
The Darien Expedition — Coal
Wrecked—Unfavorable New s
Central America.
Aspinwau., March 7, via Kingston, .1
rnaica.—Commander Barclay anil I'avna
ter McMahon, of the United States steam
Reeacca. arrived, from Panama, and rei>«
that Commander Selfridge, of the Dari
expedition, witli four officers, fourteen mi
and ten laborers, left Paya on the tit'ecu
ultimo in launches, expecting to .........
week. Others of tbe expedition wore pro
cuting a survey of tlie course of the Toya
river, and would continue until tbcv ix
the party from the Atlantic coast.
llie bark Uussie, from Baltimore wi
coal, ran on a reef and has been condemn!
Ihe Ossipee and Jamestown were «
;meted at Panama within four w eeks. ]
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