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New Orleans Republican. [volume] (New Orleans, La) 1867-1878, March 14, 1871, Image 1

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NEW ORLEANS REPUBLICAN.
SINGLE COKES: TEN CENTS.
-1 U
OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE STATE OF LOUISIANA.
TEEMS i $16 00 FEB ANNUM.
VOLUME IV—NO. 286.
NEW ORLEANS, TUESDAY, MARCH 14, 1871.
WHOLE NUMBER 1198.
di
____ AMUSEMENTS;_
t^Y. CHAKLE8 THEATRE.
Ir. roiu*e<]uence uf tlv wvprf indisposition of
Mr. JOSEPH K. FM^FT, tiie maun cement In*
keen compelled to chi.nge the pert'cruiaire tor
'hits (Tuesday) sv.-v.niy.
TursAty FvesfiuR, Utrck 14, 18TI,
Will lie presented the romantic drama of tlie
THREE GUARDSMEN.
Lady do Winter.....Mis Mary Mitchell A16auj;b
Athos............... v.............Mr. J. W. Albaucb
D'Artagnan... ....................Mr J. W. Norton
Supported by Ttsc entire strength of the company.
N. B.—Due .notice will be given of the re appear
ance of Mt. JOSEPH K. EMMET. mh!4 It
P*
DRM1 OF 1HSIC.
Soaldirg Cl .dwell |& Mncllonogli .....Proprietors
W. B. Cev.magb.........Director ol" Anumemei.t*
SECOND WEEK OE THE
GAJKTE IOM1QIK liROlFE OF
SPECIALTIES.
Full and Entire Change of Programme, Presenting
the Combined Novelties of the World.
Last Week of Mens. D'ATAUK, tls- Man of stoei."
and M il. ANOKLA. the •• Female Samson."
The entertainment will consist of' FIFTEEN OEMS
OF OLIO, concluding with W. B. Cavanagli's last
Sensational Drama, entitled
THE WATER SPRITES,
Gotten tip wit li due regard to ta-enery. Wardrobe
etc.
MONDAY. March 20—First Appearance of tlie
WAl.HAlihASnnd BIOPUSTH' TKOIFF. mhl4
^IKESCENT CITY MISEl'M,
Nos. 40 and 44 St. pknrlr) street.
Now on exhibition, a large and attractive aeifesot
lJVlNU WON8KRS,
ANIMALS, rare paintings,
.VXD
100,000 Cariosities,
From every part of the World.
ALL FOR ONE PRICE OF ADMISSION.
Open Daily front 8 A. M. to 9 P. M. _ ial 3in
^KCOND GRAND SUBSCRIPTION,
FANCY DRESS AND MASK BALL
or ties
dermnny Theatre Stock Company,
AT THB
NATIONAL. THEATRE,
On St. Joseph's Night, March IS, 1ST 1.
SUBSCRIPTION..........
three dollars.
ronniTmn ov a*»»* 8 v»** rs.
H. H. Waltf. Laiuia Stern, Joseph Sagner.
Dr. F. Mithoft, R. H. Berniers.
Gentlemen s tickets and ladies' invitations car.
he had of anr member of tlie above committee,
mb 12 14 16 18
S 1
'ECONO ANNIVERSARY
OF THB
HIliERNIAN BENEVOLENT
AXt>
MUTUAL AID ASSOCIATION OF LOUISIANA.
The variouaHibernian B«*uevolenland Mu^ia. Aid
Assoelatious of New Orleans, with those invited to
aasi.-t in tlie celebration of their Second Anniver
sary, will a.saemble on Canal street, at 9k. o clock
Friday Morniu(E, March IT, 1871,
in the folk.winy order
lurited Associations and Hibernian Benevolent
and Mutual Aid Xssoeiation, Branch No. 1, w ill con
stitute tlie Firat Division, which will form on the
north side of Canal street, head resting on Royal
street, extending east, under the supervision of
JOHN O'NEILL. Km*.
Hibernian Benevolent ai d Mutnnl Aid Asso' a.
tiou. Branch No. 2 and Branch No. J, will consti
tute the Seeoril Di visioy. and will form on tlie north
side of Canal street, head resting on Royal street,
extending west under the supervision of WILLIAM
ENKIOHT, Km*.
Hibernian B.r.evoleiit and Mutual Aid Associa
tion, Branch Nc. 4, Branch No. A. and Braucb No. *>
will constitute the Third Division, which wiT/onu
on the south side of Canal street, extending east,
under the supervision ol O. C. WILLIAMSON.
ROUTE.
Tlie Procession will form in line at the position
.nd.rated, precisely at half past nine, o'clock. The
head of the Procession will move up Bt. Charles to
Poydias. down Povdras to Camp, un Camp to St.
Patrick's Church, where tlie Associations will at
tend High Mass in a body. After Mass tlie Proces
sion w ill reform on Camp street, and proceed up
Camp to Julia, down Julia to Carondelet, up Ca
roudelet to St. Andrew, up St. Andrew to Prytama.
up Prvtania to First, up First to Magazine, down
Magazine to Felicity, up Felicity to Annunciation
down Annunciation to Calliope, dowu Calliope to
Magazine, down Magazine to Julia, down Julia to
Camp, dowu Camp to Canal, down Cana! to Royal,
down Royal to Esplanade," down Esplanade to Ca
saealvo. down Casaeaivo to Maudeville. up .Van
devilii to the Levee, up Levee to Esplanade, down
Esplanade to Chartres, up Cbartresto Canal, wheie
the Procession .will be dismissed.
The Aids to tl.e Grand Marshal will report to
him promptly at nine ociocf. A. M., at tlie V zj
Mat lie.
In theev, nt that the weatlier prevents the Pro
cession tak'ug place, it will be indicated by eleven
taps on the tire alarm bells, ri peated three t.uies
the Proi esbion will then stand postpone ! to the
following Sunday, same time and place,
a FIRST DIVISION.
P IUB'ARD SWEENEY. GramJ MaisLa'..
John MePhelin, Aid to Grand Marshal.
M. McMauigle. Aid to Grand Marshal.
Patrick Kelly Aid to Grwid Marshal, Branch No, 1
Tims. K. Cullen. Aid to Grand Marshal. Branch No.,2
W,n. H. Byrnes, Aid to GrandMaislml, Bram uNo.:.
Pat. Comfort, Aid to Grand Marshal, Branch No. *.
Pat. Pliilbin, Aid to (iraud Marshal, Brancii No. 5.
Thus. Wurtnrv Aid to Grand Marshal, Branch No. 6.
INVITED ASSOCIATIONS.
Marshal, JOHN OVMLL.
HIBERNIAN B. and M. A. A.—BRANCH NO. 1.
SECOND DIVISION.
Marshal, WILLIAM KTRIOHT.
HIBERNIAN B. and M. A. A.—BRANCH NOi 2.
HIBERNIAN B. and M. A. A.—BRANCH NO. 3.
THIRD DIVISION.
Marshal, O. C. WILLIAMSON.
HIBERNIAN B. aud M. A. A —BRANCH NO. 4,
HIBERNIAN B. and M. A. A.-BRiN(*i NO. 5.
HIBERNIAN B. aud M. .V A.—BRANCH SO. 6.
mli 12 16.
£<T. NICHOLAS VARIETIES,
No- 109 Ht. Charles Street.
New and singular attractions this week.
INTERNAL IMPROVEMENT!;.
The stage is enlarged, and a eomfortable gallery
for co.oted oitizcu* lias been erected.
STUNNING FEMININE TALENT
On tlie stage and at the tables.
SINGING.
DANCING
DIALOGUES,
AND PRETTY" FARl ES EVERY NIGHT.
Adni.Ki.ion only Twenty-tive Cents. fe£5 1m
S'
T. IzOlW HOTEL. MASK HAULS.
-A scries of SIX GRAND I)UEtS8 AND MASK BALLS
will bo given in the spacious balJ room ot the ,8t.
Louis Hotel. as follows:
On ST. JOSEPH'S NIGHT, March 18.
These balls will be the continuation of the grand
entertainments given every year at the New Opera
House, w here their order and decorum Lave ren
dered them justly popular.
Jaeger s splendid Silver Cornet Band Las been
engaged for tlie whole series.
The entrance to the ball room is cn Royal street,
jnat below the corner of St. Louis.
Doors will open at 9 P. M. Balls to commence at
JQ. Gentlemen $3; ladies free.
Tickets can be had at the door on the night of
the hall, or at F. Dumontetl's confectionery, corner
Canal and Bourbon streets. _ ja!7 2m
REMOVALS. ___
R EMOVAL-DR. O. ANFOUX HAS REMOVED
his otliee to No. 2. Cgrondt let street, up stairo,
ear Canal. fe7 3m cod
MISCELLANEOUS.
1^| ONLY CAN NOT BUY IT.
FOR MGRT IS PRICELESS!!
BUT THE DIAMOND SPECTACLES
WILL PRKSKRVB IT.
THE DIAMOND GLASSES,
Manufactured by
J. E. SPENCER k CO., NEW YORK,
Which are now ette it'It to the public, are pro
nounced bv all the eelebrated Opticians of the
world to be the MOST PERFECT. The SC1F.N
TP'IO PRINCIPLE on which they are constructed
brings the core or centre of the lens directly in
front of the eve, producing a clear and distin«w
vision, as in tlie natural, healthy sight, and pre
venting all unpleasant sensations, such as* glim
mering and wavering of sight, dizziness, etc., pe
culiar to all others iu use.
Tliey are Motuited in the Fluent Manner,
In frames of the best quality, of all usoci
for tliat purpose.
EDWARD LILIKNTHAL.
JEWELER AND OPTICIAN,
Is sole agent for New Or leans, Louisiana,
Ne. 9-1...........Canal Street...........No. 93
From whom fliey can only be obtained. Tlieee
goods are not supplied to pedlers. nt any price.
He also keeps constantly on hand a very aige
and well selected stork of
Watches, Jewelry and Silverware.
Ail of which is of the very best quality, and fully
g us rat,teed. oo23 6m 3t Up
nine m atches and jewelry.
8. RI LV ERSTEIN,
193............Poydras street.............193
(Comer of Carroll street),
nr.ALKk in
GOLD AND SILVER WATCHES, PINB JEWELRY.
CLOCKS, SILVERWARE, SPECTACLES,
EYE GLASSES. ETC.,
Would respectfully inform his old friends and cus
tomers that he has reopened at the above named
location. His stock being entirely new, his goods,
consequently, are all of the latest styles, and are
warranted to be equal to anything in the market
Having bought for cash, he can sell lower thiffl
almost any other house in the city, aud being in
favor of quick returns and small profits, he will
guarantee bargains to all customers. Come and see
his goods.
Watches and Jewelry repaired in the very best
manner and at the shortest notiee. oc23 lie. Il2p
CARD. , __
Inconnection with COLFiMAN'SMILL FACTORY
No. 205 Tchoupitoulas street. New Orleans, 1 have
established at No. 44 St. Charles street, priposi®
tie St. Charles Hotel, a Depot for the sale of
COLEMAN'S
LATEST IMPROVED UNDULATORY
Corn and Wheat -HI I la.
These Mills are so well and favorably known,
having been before the public for over twenty
years, that a description of their peeuliarii les and
advantages is uuneeeofery. Iu addition to a stoek
of MILLS FOR ALL POWERS A*D PURPOSES I am
prepared to till orders tor Mill Stones, Mill Irons.
Mill Picks, Gin Bands. Mill Bands, etc.
I should be pleased to receive the orders of my
friends and others needing anything in my line.
H. DUDLEY COLEMAN,
ja22 lt2dp2mo No. 44 St. Charles sir- et.
LOTTERIES.
jQRAWING OF THE LOUISIANA
STATE LOTTERY FOR MARCH 13, 1871.
CLASS 61 .
9 10 I 11 : 12 13 ; 11
20 33 , 4 | ;* ! « — '
The above drawings ate published mail the prin
cipal papers, and are drawn in public d&Jy at the
rooms of the company
Information famished and prizes cashed bv
HOWARD. SIMMONS k Co.. Contractors.
St. Charles street, comer Unton. New Ormans.
Witness onr hands at New Orleans, Louisiana,
this thirteenth dav of March. 1871.
H. PERALTA.
---- ADAM GIFFEM,
Commissioners.
BEWARE OF BOGUS LOTTERIES. ap2S
STATE'
LOTTERY
J^OUIRIANA
COMPANY.
Incorporated August 17, 1663.
CHARLES T. HOWARD................PRESIDENT.
SINGLE NUMBER LOTTERY.
8FLENDID SCHEME—ONLY 20,000 NUMBERS.
Capital Prize............830,900.
CLASS D.
BE DRAWN AT NKW ORLEANS OH
Saturday, .March '15, 1871.
EOWaRD. SIMMONS k CO., Contractors.
SCHEME :
40.000 Number*--Ticket* (July BOO.
TO
prize of
950 t M0
is........ ....
...........06O 000
prize of
30,0«i0
18.............
........... 30.000
prize of
2() f IXi0
is.............
........... 20 000
prize of
10,000
is..—.........
........... 10,000
prize of
9.000
is.............
........... 9,000
prize of
8,OOP
is............
........... 8,000
prize of
7.000
16.............
........... 7,01*0
prize of
6,000
is..,..........
........... 6,000
prize of
5.080
is.............
..... ..... 5,030
prize of
4 00< l
is.............
. ......... 4,000
prize of
• 3,i*oo
is.............
..........." 3 000
prize of
2,000
is.............
........... 2,000
1 .
1 prize of
1 prize of
i prize of
1 prize of
1 prize of
1 prize of
1 prize qf
i prize of
i prize ol
1 prize of
1 prize of
1 prize »*f
I prize ol
1 prize of
1 prize of
1 prize of
1 prize of
1 prize of
I prize of
1 prize of
1 prize of
1 prize of
1 prize of
1 prize of
1 prize of
80 prizes of
317 prizes of
1,000
1.000
1,000
1,000
1,000
1,000
1 ooo
1,000
1,000
1,000
1,000
1,000
1,000
1,000
1,1*00
1,060
1,000
1,000
1.000
1,000
1,000
1,000
1,000
1,000
1,000.
500 are..
200 are..
85,000
36 Approximation prizes..
........... 85,006
........... 63,400
........... 18,600
440 prizes, amounting to....................$880,400
Whole Tickets, $20; shares in proportion.
Prizes payable without deduction.
Orders to be addressed to
CHARLES T. HOWARD,
Lock box 692, Postofliee, New Orleans.
Solid postoffice money order, or register your let
ter. |e
HOTELS AND RESTAURANTS
^ >AN AI. 8TREBT EXCHANGE.
The proprietor of the CANAL STREET EX
CHANGE, N«. 260 Canal street, cdRcr of Marais,
will hereafter set a .
Free Lunch, Morning and Evening,
for the comfort of hi. friend, and customers.
Best Wiles and Liquors constantly on hand,
rub 12 3t*
pAKIN KE8TAURANT,
34..............Bienville Street..............34
Between Chartres and Old Levee,
Under the direction of B. PHILIBERT.
Famished Rooms and Board by tlie Week or Month.
.Saloons tor private reunions.
_ NKW ORLEANS. __
s
AZAK.U RESTAURANT,
.10
10...............Royal Street.......
BY 8PARICIO.
The beet of everything in the market, Ulid pure
Wine, and Liquors, at down tov-n price*. Table
service elegant. Waiters polite aud attentive.
je5
£(ROMW£LL HOUSE,
"EQUAL PUBLIC PRIVILIGES.
BT
DR. R. I. CROMWELL,
471.........CUSTOMHOUSE STREET.........4T1
Comer of ViUere street. New Orleans.
Board and Lodging by the Day or Week. Reepon
Bible for all parcels, moneys, baggage, etc., left ia
my charge. StroBgeri taken to the cue*pert stores.
au30 ,'y
THE 3IEKIDIAN MASSACRE
STATEMENT OF J. AAEON M00EE
H5s Escape and Arrival in Jackson
jFrorn the Jai kseu Pilot, March 11.J
,1. Aaron Moore, the member ol" tlie
State Legislature residing at Meridian, and
who was reported as being killed in the
disturbance orenrrinjr in that place last
Monday, arrived sale aud eouni, except
being prostrated with excessive walking,
iu Jackson yesterday nioniing. We inter
viewed Mu Moore at iiis boarding-house
in the alteration, and took down in tiril tlie
following statement of tlie. incidents con
nected with the affair as far as iie is oogni
/.aut of the same. Moore w as upon his lied
mid suffering eousideraldy from exhaustion
and lameness, hut mentally seemed capable
ol" taking care ol himself:
Before tlie liie. ut about four o'clock on
Satusday afternoon last, 1 was passing by
the courthouse iu Meridian, aud heard
some persons in it appaieutly speaking. _ 1
accordingly went up. William Dennis,
sometimes" called William ( lepton, was
speaking. I took a seat and listened at
tentively to what he had to say. I could
uot exactly make out what object he had
in view. There were quite a number of
colored citizens present. Warren Tyler
was the next speaker. lie read aud
offered some resolutions. To the best of
inv recollection there was nothing incen
diary in them. The object seemed to he
that* the white and colored population
should get iu better accord, and that there
should be peace and quiet in the town. As
there hail beeli so many colored people
shot it st Pined necessary that something
should be done. I w as called upon, being
a minister of the gospel, to make some re
marks, and did so. The substance of wbat
1 Said was. that a concerted movement
should be had among both white and black
combined to keep out desperadoes. And I
stated that the t-tate Executive had said to
me that he would give his aid and protec
tion to the community, and further, that ii
the officials at the time on duty there were
■not ready to execute the laws, he would
cause their removal and appoint men who
would see that we had peace and quiet.
There were a number of white men ill the
audience who approved of all 1 said.. They
remarked that I w as right. The meeting
broke up quietly at about half-past live iu
the afternoon. This, it will he remembered,
was before tba tire.
In the evening the people (colored) got
together and beat a drum, and inarched
about, hut it was for no evil intent. If any
were armed I did not know it: I saw no
arpis. I then went home to my house. After
supper I heard the hells ringing and the
people hollering, aud 1 went to the door,
and saw the tow n was on lire. In about one
hour a friend came in. and said that it was
Sturges' store that was on tire. I had gone
to bed that night w iien Uloptou, otherwise
William Dennis, was reported to me as
dead. Afterw ard it was contradicted, and
1 heard that he had been beaten over the
bead w ith a gun, and ibeu arrested. I did
not go out to the tire at all.
On Sunday morning W.uTcn Tyler. Isaac
Radford and I went fo m e the sheriff' about
Dennis. I asked how Dennis was getting
along. The sheriff said lie was doing quite
well. The light resulting in Dennis' arrest
is rejwn ted to have taken place at the lire
on Saturday night. Of that I personally
know nothingl. I asked the sheriff' it bo
considered the prisoner would be perfe tly
sate in his hands that night. 11 ■ answered
that he would, aa^f intended to have a
guard about the pi^^all night. I asked to
have Mieli guard composed of blacks and
whites, and thought that Mich action . n the
officer's part would show the community
that there was no partiality on the part of
the authorities for people of one color or the
other. He thereupon told Warren Ty'er :<
go out and bring him half a dozen ora no cl
reliable colored men to act as guards.
Tyler subsequently informed me that he
obeyed the order, went out and secured
men. and was going with them to the
sheriff's office Sunday night, when he met
with a crowd of armed white men some
where between Died. Finley's and the
courthouse, and tlie white men said that the
sheriff" had ordered them to go out and dis
arm every colored luau they could find.
Tyler says that he informed these persons
that be" was also actiag under the same
sheriff's orders. They replied that it made
no difference, they had just received the if
orders and must disarm them.
1 was in the pulpit at the Methodist church,
ready for the evening's service, that night
about seven o'clock, when Warren Tyler
came to me and said that if he were in my
place he would have no services on that oc
casion. 1 answered that "we must adminis
ter the Word of Gotl.'' I then took my text
;ind commenced my sermon. In a few min
utes in came Henry Kiso, and said *'nut Mr.
Mostly, the Sheriff, had ordered tin white
people to go out and take away ali the guns
from thecolored people. Shortly thereafter
armed white men commenced marching
back and forward in frout of the church,
confusing the congregation, aud dually the
meeting broke up. I was clone preaebing.
aud had sat down, when a colored man
came iu and informed me that a dozen or
fifteen white men had been to my house. 1
said '"surely, they could he there for no
ha t in, for I have done no harm to any man. '
1 went home, when 1 found that they had
frightened my wife and little children off.
My wife came back soon. Presently a
neighbor came in and told me That these
same white men had been at his house, de
manded aud taken away his gun. and that
three different squads of armed w hite men
had been patrolling the streets all the night
through.
1 went to Ix-d aud slept until Monday
morning.
On Monday morning I went to seo the
shuiiff. aud iuquirod ii he had given orders
to Take the people's arms from them. He
said: " Yes. I issued an order last night to
disarm every colored man " I then said
that there was such confusion about the
church that tlie services had to be discon
tinued. He denied telling them to go near
the church, but acknowledged that he had
ordered the colored people's arms to he
taken away. I asked why. He said he
"'was afraid they would, get up a fuss.'' I
then answered that if such was the ease the
better way would have been to have put ou
a guard composed of both races, and have
the city patroled all night. He informed
me that the white people were going to have
a meeting, of which printed notices had been
posted, and invited us to attend. He wanted
to see me there. It wau held in the court
house. I went to the meeting, and was glad
to see that there were at last hopes that the
matter would be amicably arranged. I at
tended. hut was not allowed to speak, as I
desired.
Subsequently Warren Tyler and I were
engaged in talking to Joshua Sun: h, the
postmaster, when Sheriff Mosely rushed up
and said that Tyler and I must consider
ourselves under arrest. I asked what l had
done, when he said 1 need nut feel uneasy,
that I was all right, I would not he hurt.
I insisted that X should know why I had
been arrested. Hi 3 said, "for the speaking
kgtl last Saturday." He added: "I am told
that you made a good speech." And Mr.
Smith said: "Yes, ii was a lovely spee.uh. to
the effect that he wanted all-white and
black—to go together like brothers."
He then went with me to the meeting
alluded to. Mr. W. W. Shearer desired
that 1 should s}»eak, but 1 could not get a
hearing, home resolutions were passed,
the purport of which wan that the Gover
nor was to be memorialized. Some dissent
ed and wanted to take the government into
their own hands; the object seemed to be
to put the Mayor out of office, with all
jither Republican officers, and pat in those
ot' their own choice. I suppose there were
twO 1 hundred white persons present,
At Jhe examination, where 1 arrived at
3 P. K; Judge Bramlette was presiding.
The chaigo of making speeches on Satur
day was being examined, the defendants
were Warren Tykr. William Clopton alias
Dennis, and myself. Mr. Ford, the prose
cuting attorney, asked what I had to say.
I said 1 was not guilty, and did not know
anything of it. 1 needed no attorney, for
1 liad done nothing. The witnesses "were
then examined. They seemed to agree that
Trier and Clopton had made tin tiling
speeches, but tliai min* was on the side of
lienee and good order. Afterward came
the comluct ot Warren Tyler at the fire on
Saturday night. Clopton asked if they
were trying him fpr what he did Saturday
night. The prosecuting attorney said for
all.
Dennis, alias Clopton, averred that he
was tiruuk that night and could not tell
what he had said or done, hituself. Several
witnesses were sworn. Mr. Krautl.v—a
white man—gave his testimony. At this
tin.e ail the colored policemen were called
in. The Mayor had lieen in the room, hut
only remained a lew minutes. The
prosecuting attorney asked Brantlv
what lie had hoard Warren Tvler spy on
the street that (Monday) morning. He
answered that he was passing along the
street when lie heard "this Ixiy here" (he
didn't know his name) say that "the Dem
ocrats were gettiug frightened." This
was in answer to a question some one liad
asked Tyler as to the meaning of the notices
of the meeting which liad been posted near.
Brantly testified that he called Tyler a
tl—<1 liar, aud that be bail a great mind to
shoot hint down or blow his brains out tin
the spot. At this. Tyler said he desired
Brantlv to keep the floor for a moment
until he could go out and get two men who
would impeach his (Brantly's testimony).
Brantly replied: "What did you say 1" Tyler
repeated his remark, when Brantly caught
up the hickory stick of the city marshal,
from a table near, anti with it started
t'u- Tyler, The last J remember of it
Tyler was retreating backward toward
tlie sheriff's room. , 1 heard several
say: " Shoot him T "Shoot him!"
I, had just got behind Judge Bramlette,
w hen I heard the shot; ami the judge fell to
the floor. I fell with him, he lulling di
rectly upon my left shoulder. 1 was not
hit. but the blood from Judge Bramlette
covered toy clothing and arm. The. tiring
became general. I can not say who tired
the shot at Judge Bramlette. 1 was at the
time of the mind that it had been aimed at
me and hit him. There was soon tiring all
over the room. I hearil the marshal shout
out for the tiring to cease, as the magistrate
was killed. I saw that he was dead aud re
inaiueB quiet. 'When the crowd was dis
persed 1 looked up and saw Clopton
also dead. Deputy Sheriff" Belt was
nigh, with a pistol in his hand, anil I
sought his protection. He averred that
he could not protect anybody. Soon there
after I picked up my hat and walked away,
covered with blood, aud everybody suit
posed that 1 was mortally wounded. 1 only
told one person that 1 was not hurt. I
reached home, told my wife she must take
care of the children and herself, gave her
what money I had, aud left. I only went
about three-quarters of a mile, when 1 sent
a friend back. He soon returned to tell me
that one hundred men were at my house
looking for me. I there got down ou my
kuees. aud prayed the good Lord to aid me
t.i escape. I traveled all that night, and
until two o'clock Tuesday morning, when I
reached a friend's house. I stayed there all
that day. Another triend came there and told
uie that my home and all 1 had in it,with the
church, w as burnt up, but I learned nothing
of my wife and children until to-day. I
prayed me for the help of the Lord. On
Wednesday I liad the train flagged at Tur
ner Hill. but 1 am tliauklul that it did not
stop, a> I learn that there were a number ot
armed men on it looking for me. Then I
left that place, and traveling on foot day
and night, got here this morning at Dim
o'clock.
On the train from' Meridian yesterday
aft era,ion. can:e two additional refugees
from the reign o: terror supposed to be pre
vailingin that locality. One m'these wa:
the wife of the palieecnan tlik Joseph, win
-1'" u 1 . r! frsu i tt s'.-;i:io-ed to he
J .... iji uij, out m the v* Oils to . t where,
[awaiting" a safe opportunity to get to
i Jackson. " he other is Jake Haley.
I bake: , rosining vuii.il recently iu Meridian,
I and who i- severely wounded, having been
j shot through the breast, shoulder and fore
arm. He states that he was taken out of
the bakery nt three o'clock last Tuesday
I morning, by one Frank I .indy, who accused
him of having taken his pistol from him on
Monday previous. A crowd of men beat
him with sticks as he went toward the
depot. Thinks he was struck four hundred
blows, anil is badly braised. These men
subsequently released Batey. but one of
them shot him as he was leaving, when the
others fired also. He made his escape, how
ever, hiding in the bush, and got upon the
train yesterday, which, as stated, brought
him here. It is supposed that there aie
several more yet to arrive.
The Jackson 1'ilot of Friday says :
Nearly all those killed at Meridian in the
recent affray at that place were negroes.
11" so-, whose, fight was it! It was a dis
J grace to the nation aud the State, and.par
j ticularly to the decent inhabitants of
| Meridian, it is a stain cu their general
cliarat ter, and will be a very noticeable
harm to their property. Fvi ry one will
avoid Meridian until by some great and
good work she partially obliterates the
memory of the recent sad transaction from
the minds of our citizens.
We learn from the same paper that Me
ridian will now lie run l»y the following
parties, who have been nominated and
confirmed for the several offices named :
John W. Smith. Mayor; H. ('. Fallon,
John A. - Lewis and L. A. Duncan aider
men; W. W. Henry and J. 1*. Allen,
justices of the pence; L. K. Latham. J. W.
F. Temple, J. C. I'orter aud Duncan Kelly,
supervisors.
Valuable Improved Rf;al Estate at
Auction bv tiie Sheriff', at Twelve
Months Credit. —We are requested to call
public attention to the sale at auction, to be
made by the Sheriff this day, at twelve
o'clock M., at the Merchants &. Auctioneers'
Exchange, Royal street, of the one undi
vided half part of a lot of ground, with all
the buildings and improvements thereon,
situated at N'o. "G Orleans street, between
Royal and Bonrbon streets. Second District.
For full particulars aud terms see ad
vertisement.
Iu the summer of lHGt!. the water of the
Mississippi rose, to a greater height than
ever before or since, and the highest water
mark made that year has ever since been
used as the gauge of comparison con
cerning the height of the Mississippi water"
On the nineteenth of January last the
river was sixteen feet four inches and ten
lines below the high water mark of IStrJ.
Yesterday the water was three feet nine
inches and ten lines below tlie high water
mark of 18Gd. Therefore the river has
risen since the nineteenth of January twelve
feet five inches and ten lines.
The Pointe Coupee Echo says:
Plowing and cane and corn planting dur
ing the past week have be< n going on quite
briskly wherever the weather and soil per
mitted. Although oar planters are very
baekward they now seem determined to
make up for lost time, ar.d the only regret
new is that the weather is so much against
them.
John Green leaf Whittier, the poet, was
editor of the Pentisylmnia Freeman, from
1836 to 1839. Rev. L. C. Mattaek. of this
aity,was associated with him. The Free
man was the pioneer of anti-slavery papers
in the United fitates . _
At midnight thore vwt indications of a
rain.
Meeting of the City School Board,
At the meeting last evening the hoard
was called to order by the president, Judge
Dibble, the following members being pres
ent: Messrs. Bootbbv, Cooper, Clay, Hahn,
Jackson, Joubert, Longstreet, Cynn, Mat
lack, Pierce, l'incbback aud Toy.
Governor Halm, from the committee ap
pointed at the previous meeting to report
upon an estimate of the expeuses of the
present year, in acenrdanee with section
seven of the act creating the present board,
math- a report satisfactorily its follow^:
Pay rolls of teachers and porters,
and ordinary expenses.......... $360,000
School books aud stationery....... 25,000
Buildings and repairs.............. 95,000
Total..........................$430,000
Of which the January roll has been
paid out of funds received from
the State, about................. $30,000
We may expect from future appro
priations of the State............ 100,000
\nd will require from the city of
New Orleans.................... 3-<0,000
Total..........................$480,000
The report was accompanied by the fol
lowing resolution:
Rrml ret/, That the estimate of the amount
of funds necessary to carry on the public
schools under the charge of this board for
the current year lie fixed and adopted at
$130,000. of which $350,000 will be required
of the city of New Orleans by assessment
aud levy on the taxable property of tlie
city, anti that the ssime be reported to tlie
Board of Administrators of the city of New
Orleans accordingly.
The report was received, and the accom
panying resolution was adopted.
An additional resolution was offered by
Governor Hahn, that an official notification
he forwarded to tlie city administration in
time for tlieir session to-morrow evening.
Mr. Bootliby, on behalf of the Committee
on Rules and Regulations, made a partial
report, comprising the rules for the regula
tion of the Board of Directors. The report,
so far as prepared, was. on motion, received
and ordered to be printed, and a copy to be
laid before each member previously to tbe
next meeting.
Tlie board then adjourned, to meet in tlie
Council room on Friday evening next.
Mutilated Currency Receivable in I'ny*
mem of l'oNtnge Stniups.
A Tennessee postmaster inclosed to the
United States Treasurer a slip cut from a
recent North Carolina paper, setting forth
that the postmaster at Hillsboro, North
Carolina, has boen fined two dollars and
ninety dollars costs tor refusing to receive
mutilated currency in payment for postage
stamps, aud says that since the appearance
of this article in print his office has been
Hooded with mutilated currency, and de
sires to know whether he is compelled to
take or may refuse tlie money so presented.
Treasurer Spinner replies, stating that under
the rules of the Treasury Department post
masters arc authorized to receive such cur
rency for its full value, in payment of
postage stamps, when, in eases of United
States notes, not more than one-twentieth
of the note is missing, and in cases of frac
tioual currency, when not more than one
tenth is missing. When such notes and
fractional currency are mutilated beyond
the standard referred to, no one -is com
pelled to receive them for any part of tlieir
value, and the only place where such notes
may he redeemed is at tlie United States
treasury.
We learn from our contemporary, tlie
Timm, that letters just received from Liv
erpool announce that there is now a regular
demand for ramie there at the rate of fifty
six pounds per ton. The supply is by no
means equal to the demand, and is taken
up as soon as offered. The rate above given
is for the bark of the plant in its crude
state. If bleached and properly cleaned
the price would be more than doubled.
Tlie real estate sales this day by Messrs
C. E. Girardey & Co., at the Merchants aud
Auctioneers' Exchange, on Royal street,
will be in the matter of Francis Mouney,
bankrupt, by virtue of an order of the
honorable the United States District Court;
the property is situated in the First and
Second Districts, and will be sold, without
appraisement, to the highest bidder, for
cash, payable at tlie time of adjudication.
The list is as follows, viz :
1. Three lots on Banks, between Roehe
blave and Dorger.ois streets, in square ad
joining tlie Claiborne street railroad depot.
2. A large building lot on Dmnaine, be
tween Rocheblave and Dorgenois streets.
3. Tbe double one-story aud attic frame
cottage, with three lots of ground, form in
the corner of Dmnaine and Dorgenois
streets.
4. The elegant and commodious one-story
and attic frame cottage on Dorgenois, be
tween Duniaine and St. Philip streets.
5. Two choice building lots, forming the
corner of St. Philip and Dorgenois streets.
6. Five large lots, with small cottage, on
Dmnaine, between Broad and White streets.
The whole property is well situated, in
neighborhoods fast improving, convenient
to city cars aud every family comfort.
Ou about June 1. next, the Postofliee Dc
parnnent will issue a circular to postoftices
throughout the country, requiring each
postmaster to keep an account of the total
amount of stamps canceled in his office
during tlie six months beginning July 1,
1871, and ending December 31, 1871. Also,
the amount collected on unpaid letters, on
newspapers and other private matter, and
for box rents during the same period.
Postmasters are also to be instructed to
make out, on the first day of January, 1872,
and forward to this department imme
diately thereafter, a sworn statement of
tlie amounts arising from each of tlie above
named sources. This will be done to enable
the Postmaster General to review and re
adjust salaries, from and after July 1, 1872,
upon a proper basis.
The "Water Sprites of Boston" take well
at the Academy ol Music. The views of
Boston—the State House and church
spires; of Bunker Hill monument aud
Charlestown, arc. exceedingly accurate.
The combination at tlie Academy is
superb, but next Monday evening another
troupe will be added, consisting of ten
artists, and then Monsieur D'Atalie aud
Mile. Angela will have left the Academy
hoards for the present.
The weekly coffee statement of Messrs
Small & Company, for last week, is re
ceived.
The Southern Express Company has again
placed us under obligations for the New
York Tribune of ;be latest dates.
BY TELEGRAPH.
LATEST NEWS FROM ALL FOOTS
TEE IEENCH SPOLIATION CLAIMS
SUMNER AND CAMERON
QUESTIONED SENATORIAL CREDENTIALS
Tea, Coffee and Coal on the Free List
SUBSCRIPTIONS TO NEW LOAN
Blanc hard's Nomination Withdrawn
SHIP'S OFFICERS WASHED OVERBOARD
Proceeds of French Relief Lecture
REDUCTION ON WESTERN FREIGHTS
CONFERENCE ON EASTERN QUESTION
Its Close and tlie Treaty
WASHINGTON.
No Southern Nominations—Mr. Sumner
and French Spoliation C'lninis—Ques
tioned Senntorinl Credentials-Joint
Resolution to Adjourn Wednesday
Passed jhe House—Con I, Tea and
Coffee on the Free List—Weather Re
port—Eight Millions Subscriptions to
the New Loan—Blanchard's Nomina
tion Withdrawn—Bill to Amend Texas
Pacific Railroad Bill.
"Washington, March 13.—There were no
Southern nominations to-day.
Colonel (ieorge Brown has been appointed
Treasury Agent, vice Major James Belger.
who resigned in consequence of a resolution
to rejoin the army.
- W. D. Gallagher was confirmed as Pen
sion Agent at Louisville.
Senate —Mr. Sumner asked his successor
to take kindlv charge of the French spolia
tion bill, and press it to its passage. Mr.
Cameron thought it hardly fair to expect
the new committee to accomplish in one
session what hail failed the late committee
during ten sessions.
(Questioned credentials were referred to
the Committee on Elections and Privileges.
The names referred were Messrs. Vance.
Goldtliwaite. Blodgett, Hamilton and
Reynolds; also. Abbott's claims.
The Cincinnati aud Southern railroad "bill
was read the second time and referred to
tlie Committee on Commerce.
The Senate then adjourned.
House —A vast number of bills were in
troduced to-day, most of them old ac
quaintances.
A joint resolution to adjourn on Wednes
day at noon passed by a vote of 125 to 60.
The bill placing salt on the free list passed
by a vote of 145 to 46.
"Tlie bill placing coal on the free list passed.
132 to 57.
The bill placing tea aud coffee ou the free
list passed, 141 to 49.
These bills were passed under a suspen
sion of the rules, and take effect upon their
becoming acts.
Weatiikr Report.— The following is tlie
synopsis for twenty-four hours:
* Clear and fair weather has prevailed since
last evening south of Pennsylvania and the
Ohio valley. Clouds with occasional light
rains have moved from Illinois to Western
Pennsylvania. The storm which prevailed
in Connecticut and Eastern New York has
moved to the northeast beyond our sta
tions. Tbe barometer has risen rapidly on
Lake Ontario. It has been variable on the
remaining lakes anil in thejSouthern States.
A very sudden fall in the barometer, with
a great increase of temperature and brisk
southerly winds, are reported from the
Western plains.
Fair weatlier will probably prevail on
Tuesday in tbe South aud middle Atlantic
States, "threatening weather on the gulf aiid
in the Eastern States. The storm is now
approaching from Nebraska and will proba
bly be felt on Lake Michigan Tuesday.
Subscriptions to the new loan reach
$8,000,000.
The President sent a message to the Senate
to-day, withdrawing the nomination of 11.
P. Blanchard as Postmaster at New < ir
leans.
In the Senate to-day. Mr. Kellogg intro
duced a bill to amend the Texas Pacific
bill by changing the eastern terminus from
Marshall to the eastern boundary of Tex:is,
due east from Marshall, and that the guage
of the whole road shall be uniform.
NEW YORK.
Washed Overboard from Steamship Eit
ropn— interference of English Diplo
matists in Sumner's Removal Denied—
Dry Goods Failure—Proceeds of Wen
dell Phillips' Freneh Relief Leeture—
Dentta of a Princess—Governments
very Dull — Southerns Dull—Speedy
Trial for General Jordnn Ashed—
Heavy- Reduction on Western Freights
— Leeture on the Roman Question.
New York, March 13.—Captain McDon
ald, first officer, and Davis, third officer,
were washed overboard from the steamer
Europa. on the fourth instant. A fearful
sea prevented the launching of a boat to
rescue them.
Secretary Fisli, in a letter to tlie Post, de
nies tlie reported interference of tbe English
diplomatists in Mr. Sumner's removal.
A failure in dry goods of $500,000 is re
ported.
The proceeds of Wendell Phillips' lecture
for the relief of the Freneh is over $1400.
Princess Leopoldina. daughter of the Em
peror of Brazil, aud wife of the Duke of
Saxe, is dead.
Evening.—Money closed very easy. Ster
ling lOiri* ®109V 'Gold UHi allies. Gov
ernments very dull: five-twenties, 112 :i 4.
Southerns dull. Virginias very strong:
North Caroliuas. little off. Tennessees 04:
new. 64's. Virginias 67; new, 68Mt. Louis
ianas'68; new, 63; levee sixes, 72*2; eights,
85. Alabama eights 100: fives, 89 l s. Georgia
sixes 81; sevens 80. North (Tarolinas 47:
new, 26W. South Carolinas 786 new, 66*2.
Prime discounts 6^2 a 7. Gold dull all
day. Sixes of 1881,11512; five-twenties of
1862. 112 :, 4; 04s, 112: 65s, 112; new, 110>:
67s, 111; 68s, 111*4; ten-forties, 108 7 „.
Benjamin N. Phelps, counsel for General
Thomas Jordan, indicted for alleged viola
tion of the neutrality laws in tittmg out an
expedition against £puin, asked a speedy
trial for his client, but the government not
being ready, the case went over till \\ ednes
day morning.
There has been a heavy reduction in
railroad freights to the West. First class
rates to Chicago are now one dollar per
hundred pounds, with a corresponding re
duction 011 other classes ami to other points.
The present indications point to a general
railroad war and much lower freights, as
there is already some cutting under the
regular rate of one dollar to Chicago.
James Roosevelt Baily, Roman Catholic
Bishop of New Jersey, lectured 011 the Ro
man question to-night in St. Joseph's
church, before a crowded congregation.
After referring to tiie present position of
tlie Pope, he said he had watched the
course of the Italian government
since its formation, and no govern
ment, ancient or modern, had gained its
points so much by bribery, falsehood and
treachery. lake Prussia, now leading
power of Europe, it attained its present
strength by corruption, and its present di
mensions by robbery. It took the Papal
States on the. principle that might,
conquered right. Tbe Italian government,
has robbed both the Church and private
individuals, and. not content with robbery,
was doing all in its power to undermine re
ligion and morality. Newspapers contain
ing immoral and infidel teachings were pub
lished under its auspices, and immoral and
disgusting pictures were exhibited in the
shop windows. Liberty is only truly un
derstood iu the United States, and if
Americans better understand tbe nature of
what is ealle.il liberty in Europe—freedom
from all restraint, aud tbe right to commit
crimes against society—they would show
no sympathy for its champions there.
He denounced Garibaldi as a self
admitted pirate, who, lie said, had
one idea—the diabolical hatred of priests.
He concluded by prophesying that the
Pope would eion again rule in Rome.
Father Farwell, pastor of the church
whose championship of Italian unity re
cently caused so much sensation, thanked
the large congregation for tlieir attendance
on so stormy a night.
LONDON.
Conference on the Eastern Question
Closed—Trenty Signed nt tlie Foreign
Office—Emperor William's Return to
Berliu—The Black 8ea Conference—
Two Radical Members in the Unbinet
Proposed—Mnc.Mnhon Returned to
France.
London. March 13.—Iu the House of
Lords, to-night. Lord Granville announced
that the conference on the Eastern question
had closed. The treaty was signed at the
foreign office. It abrogated tbe restriction
on admission to foreign men-of-war into tho
DardeuelW and Bosphorus. The Porte. ;*
times of peace, may admit into those waters
nuvais ot friendly powers whenever needed
to inforee the treaty of 1856. The Danuhian
Coiuniission is prolonged twelve years. The
protocol expressly declares that no power
can release itself of the obligations of the
treaty without the consent of all the signa
tories.
Emperor William has set out on his re
turn to Berlin, accompanied by a large aud
brilliant start of princes and officers of the
army and representatives of the German
governments. The party reached Epernay
at noon to-day, and were received with
great enthusiasm by the returning troops,
with whom the city was crowded.
Marshal MacMahon has returned to
France. The Black Sea conference were in
sessiop to dav, all were present, including
Du ede Broglie. All matters have been ar
ranged: this will probably be the last meet -
ing.
[Special to the Sew York World.]
London. March 13.—Hoping to strengthen
tlie government against impending disas
ter, Gladstone proposes to introduce into
the cabinet two radical members, vizi
Holmes, member from Hockney, other's
name unknown.
PARIS.
Montmartre Tranquil—Placard* of th«
"Reds" Denounced.
Paris, March 13.—Montmartre is per
fectly tranquil. A fraction of the national
guards, however, still hold possession of a
number of cannon, and refuse to deliver
them to the authorities..
The Journal Acs D'hats denounces tho
placards circulated by the "Reds" us in
citing the arrnv to revolt.
ZURICH.
Judicial Investigation of Rerent Dis
turbances.
Zurich, March 13.—The council has or
dered a judicial investigation of the recent
disturbances between tlie Freneli and Ger
mans here. No further trouble i« antici
pated. The troops which were called out
to keep the peace huvp been dismissed.
HAVANA.
Troops Take the Oath of Allegiance to
the King and Constitution—Defear of
an Insurgent Corps.
H av ana, March 13.—The troops took the
oath of allegiance to the king and constitu
tion. The volunteers only took an oath of
fealty to the king.
The Villa Melius corps of insurgents were
defeated near Sancti Spiritus, with a !o>s of
eighteen killed.
MISCELLANEOUS.
Arrest of Felons—Unemployed Laborers
in New Zealand Holding Monster
Meetings—Earthquake shocks at the
Hawaiian Islands—Former Keeper of
the Elephant Hannibnl Dead—Commo
tion Among Cineinnaii Liquor Denlers.
Lowf.ll, March 13.—Two of five men
who were charged with violating a young
woman, after knocking her escort senseless,
were arrested aud held in $5000 hail. Tho
others are known and can not escape.
S.^N Francisco, March 13.—Tlie unem
ployed laborers of Auckland, New Zealand,
are holding monster meetings, and appoint
ing committees to wait upon the superin
tendent of the provinces to obtain redress
of grievances. Tliey are also showing their
discontent in a more threatening manner.
Three incendiary fires, all believed to have
been the work of disaffected laborers, have
taken place. The first burned tlie ship
City of Auckland and cargo, valued at
£200,000. The second burned the kerosene
depot and 10,000 gallons of kerosene, and
the third the musical hall. Attempts were
also made to burn other property.
Shocks of earthquake were felt a.. Ha
waiian islands on the nineteenth ultimo.
They were general throughout tbe group.
In Lansi great rocks were hurled down from
tlie cliff's. Some of tbe valleys were ren
dered uneultivatable by debris from the
mountains. Great wonder is expresseil
that no lives were lost. At Honolulu the
shocks were three in number, followin'' in
rapid succession ai d lasting, altogether,
over a minute.
Hudson, N. Y., March 13.—William H.
Brandon, for many years keeper of the un
ruly elephant Hannibal, died suddenly yes
terday iit Athens. New York.
Cincinnati, March 17.—Some commotion
lias been produced among liquor dealers
here by private advices from New Orleans,
tliat Indiana whisky was being sold in that
city for seventy live cents per gallon, which
is about seven and a half cents below tho
government charges, insurance, freight and
commission, without taking account ot cost
of producing.
River Intelligence.
Southwest Pass, March 13, 6 P. M.—
Barometer 29:80. Wind east southeast,
ligiit. with thick fog. Arrived: Steamship
Cuba, at 12:35 P. M.. Dukehart master,
from Baltimore, via Havana, to Wither
spoon, Moss &. Co. Sailed: Steamship
Victor. Ou the bur bound out: Steamship
Fire tyueen. Outside waiting for fair wind
to sail: Ships North S*ar and Caledonia.
Pasu-a-i/Outre. Mareh 13, 6 P. M.—
Weather calm, with a thick fog. Ar
rived: Steamship Florida. McBaker, mas
ter, at 4:30 P. M.. from Apalachicola, to V.
W. Perkirs Co. No departures. The
towboat Rio Grande, sounded the bar to
day while con -ng iu. with the following re
sults : 13. 12V.. 12v.. 12Vj. Pits. 1,1, |2V 13
12V6, 13. 13.
Memuhis. March 13.—Weather clear and
warm. River stationary, with fifteen inches
below high water mark. Passed up- Belle
Lee. City of Cairo and Long-worth. Down
Belle St. Louis end H. M. Shreve.
V ii KSiiUR.i, March 13.—Passed down :
Richmond at 8, Mollie Ebert at 10. Pauline
Carroll, at 12 last night; Belfast at 10 A. M.
Passed up: Viola Belle at 7 A. M. River
tailing. Weather clear anil warm.
MARKETS.
Domestic Markets.
New York, Mareh 13, Evening.—CoMff
closed firm; offerings light; sales 4411 kfflff 9
|CONTINUED ON BIOHTB PACK]

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