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New Orleans Republican. [volume] (New Orleans, La) 1867-1878, June 16, 1871, Image 1

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NEW ORLEANS REPUBLICAN.
SINGLE COPIES: TEN CENTS.
• .
OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE 8TATE
OF LOUISIANA.
TEEMS: $16 00 PEE ANNUM.
VOLUME V—NO. 57.
NEW ORLEANS, FRIDAY, JUNE
16, 1871.
WHOLE NUMBER 1279.

AMUSEMENTS.
J^MATECB RACES,
AT THE FAIR GROUNDS,
On Tuesday, June JO, 1871.
FOR THE RELIEF OF SUFFERERS BY THE
OVERFLOW.
Tut- owners of fast horses, being desirous of as
sisting the sufferers from the high water, have
agreed to the following races, to take place over
the Fair Grounds Course, on TUE8DAY, June 20,
1871—good day and track. The proceeds of the
track to be turned over to the Relief Committee
selected for the sufferers.
FIRST RACE—Mile heats (trotting), best two in
three, in harness, to rule .with exception of
weights.
Dr. Smith names gr. g.-.
H B. Foley names b. g. Dick.
J. M. Wilson names bL m. Jennie Day.
R. K. Bonham names hi. g. Ned Dumas.
SECOND RACE—Mile heats (trotting), best two in
three, in harness, to rule with exception of
weights.
W K. Spearing names b, g. Tebe.
F.. Fulton names b g. Jonn Burnett.
L. K. Lemarie names sr. m. Idol.
J Durkin names b. m. Tin Tail
Charles T. Howatd names b. m. Nellie Walton.
THIRD RACE—Dash of two miles, trotting in har
ness, to rule with exception of weights.
Mr. Sykes names h. g. John Back.
J. Durkin names h. g.--.
A. Custar names gr. m.-.
FOURTH RACE—Pacing dash of one mile in har
ness, to rule with exception of weights.
.1 N. Burbanks names gr. g. White Cloud.
J. Madden names br. g. Tom Parker.
F. Green names b. g. Frank.
V. Gerodias names b. m. Fanny Washington.
John Grayer names blk. g. J. H. Williams.
FIFTH RACE—Dash of two miles (trotting in har
ness). to rule with exception of weights.
L E. Lemarie names b. g. Walker.
Jonn Hawkins names sr. m. Molhe.
Tickets, Fifty Cents.
To be had at the office of the Bank of New Or
leans. at the office of the Bank of America, at the
-office of Messrs. Sloeomb. Baldwin it Co., and also
of the gentlemen engaged in the races. jeU
V^UAKSPEARE CLUB PERFORMANCE.
ST. CHARLES THEATRE.
Monday Evening, Jnne 19,
MACBETH.
Guests will please remember that the dress
oircle and parqnette are reserved far ladies and
escorts.
Reception Committee will report to Chairman at
the theatre at 7 P. M.
Doors will open at half-past seven. Performance
■will commence at eight precisely.
By order of
j e!6 3t ICOMMITTEE OF ARRANGEMENTS.^
[.RAND promenade concerts.
AT THK
MAGNOLIA GARDEN
(Bayou Bridge).
Every Wednesday and Sunday Afternoons.
THE BEST BRASS BAND IN AMERICA.
Admission free. Refreshments of all kinds fur
nished at reasonable rates,
jei 6m T. J. JUDT, Proprietor.
O 1
FOR RENT.
F urnished house. -a furnished
house, with eight rooms, situated on St.
Charles street, in the immediate vicinity of Lafay
ette square, will be rented on very low terms till
the first of November, or the remainder of the
lease will be disposed of without the furniture.
The situation is pleasant and quiet, and the rooms
airy and cool. Apply to H. M. ROBINSON. Com
mercial place._ my 19 lm
F urnished rooms — spacious, airy,
comfortable and convenient, to rent, at summer
prices, at No. 114 St. Charles street, corner of North,
all fronting on Lafayette square, and fanned by
cool evening breezes. Apply at No. 114 St. Charles
street. myl6 lm
E legant rooms-light, airy pleas
ant and very comfortable, to rent, with or with
out board. They are situated in the three-story
residence No. 212 Caroudelet street, which has the
advantage of a large yard, and unobstructed
breezes from St. Charles streft. Prices to suit the
season. Apply at No. 212 Carondelet street.
myl6 lm •_
R ooms to rent-one or two fink,
large, airy, comfortably Furnished Rooms cap
be bad in a private family, with or without board,
where the French and English language* are
spoken, and free from the annoyance of children,
by applying at No. 321 St. Ann street, corner of
Derbtgny. The cars pass within a few doors of
the house. Terms verv moderate. oft3 °
WANTED.
W ANTED—AN INTELLIGENT COLORED MAN
to act as porter in a responsible position. One
coming well recommended will lind good occupa
tion. None need apply unless qualified as above.
Appiv immediately at No. 108 Canal street.
1©15 3t
TATANTED—ONE HUNDRED THOUSAND MEN,
v ▼ women and children afflicted with the folio wr
ing diseases: Dyspepsia, diarrhea, bilious and
other fevers, general debility, nervousness, low
spirits, etc.; to be cured by the celebrated Pey
chaud's Bitters. Piice, $1 a bottle.
ap30 8u We Fr ly
WANTED__AN A1 COOK, WASHER AND
II IRONER for a family of two. A middle-aged
colored woman preferred. Must have good refer
ences. Appiv at No. 273 Chestnut street, between
Efghtli and Harmony streets._ J BlJ
TV'ANTED—THREE OR FOUR GENTLEMEN OF
H good standing and character, to act as soli
citors of a life iLSurance company. Liberal com
pensation is offered to suitable persons. Address
Lock Box 344. _ m * 31 lm
P 8 VCHOMANCY —ANY LADY OR GENTLE
tuan can make *1000 a month, Mcure their
iwn happiness and independence, by read: g
"aye.homancy, Pascination or Soul Charming, 400
(ages Full instructions to use this power over
nen or animals at will, how to Mesmerize, become
'ranee or Writing Mediums, Divination, Spint
lalism, Alchemy. Philosophy of °"J Bna
>reams, Brigham Young's Harem, Guide to Mar
ia«e, etc.: 200,000 sold. 8ent by mail in cloth for
Si 25; paper covers. *1. The Pluladelphia Star
peaking of the book, says: Its author i* Herbert
lamilton, B. A., the celebrated Psychological tec
urer. The publisher T. W. Kvane, one of the
West established perfumers and publishers in the
ity.the mention of whose name hi. a sufflrtent
ruarantee of its merits. Mr. Evans
1)60,000 in advertising and getting out this extraor
inarv book. Skeptics in Psycho ogy read > and be
onviheed of this wonderful occult power.
Noticb— Any person willing to act as A Sent will
eoeive a sample copy free. As no capital '* re
luired. ail desirous of gent^eel employment should
end for the work, inclosing ten cents ^ or I5J~¥®'
o T. W. Evans, 41 South Eighth ®treet, Phil&del
,hia. Pennsylvania. ap23mW*
L0SL
L OSX-A CERTIFIED ESTIMATE OF THE EX
penses and disbursements for enrolling and
rganizing the militia of the city and parish of Or
-ana Louisiana, dated May 31, 1866, certified "by
Edmonston, colonel commanding and superin
r-ndent enrolling officer, approved and signed by
•overasr J. Madison Wells. In lieu of said esti
late notice is hereby given that application will
e made to Governor Weils to sign a duplicate copy
hereof ___jell 18 25
FOUND,
— ' by ^hBW 1D!
No. 18 Royal street.
BUSIN^CHANGES.____
it
nam"o?l R awrence Brothers, P. J. Hebrard retiring
from the firm on this date^^ LAWRANCE
P. J. HEBRARD,
BENJAMIN R. LAWRANCE.
New Orleans, June 10,1871.
The undersigned takes great pleasure in inform
ing his friends and customers that
nected with the beuse of Lawranee Brothere, suc
cessors to Lawrance k. Hebrard, and that he wiU be
MISCELLANEOUS.
WILLIAM PHILLIPS, UNION STA
" bles, No. 180 Calliope, near St. Charles street,
has every accommodation in the line of Pleasure
and Fam ly carriages such as hacks, brettes, phae
tons, buggies, etc., for the use of the public, and
at rates to correspond with the stringency of the
times. All hackiug done below tariff rates. Or
ders for weddings, balls, picnics, races, etc., will
he attended to so as to guarantee satisfaction. I
am also prepared to hire vehic.es (alone) to par
tieshaving their own horses. je!6 lv
jQR. COOK,
dental surgeon,
(GRADUATE NEW ORLEANS DENTAL COLLEGB.)
No. 137 Baronne Street.
Artificial Teeth inserted for *20 per set. Teeth
filled at from *1 to *3. je!6
J OHN GRAYER,
PKOPKISTOR OP
THE PH1ENIX STABLES, AND UNDERTAKER
Nos. 35 and 37 Elysian Fields street, opposite Pont
* chart rain railroad, Tuird District, New Orleans.
Carriages, barouches, buggies aud saddle horses
to hire; horses bought, sold and kept on livery;
patent metallic burial cases; mahogauv. black wal
nut and plain-coffins always on baud; funerals at
tended to by the proprietor, who hones, by strict
attention to business, to obtain a snare of public
patronage. _ je!5 lm
IVTOTICK. —HAVING BECOME THE SOLE PRO
1.1 prietor of the Phoenix Stables (late Grayer A.
Millapaugh). the undersigned respectfully solicits
a continuance of the patiouage so generou ly be
stowed in the past, hoping, by a strict atteution to
business confided to him, to merit the kind con
sideration of the public. JOHN GRAYER,
Undertaker and Proprietor of the Phoenix Stables.
Nos. 35 and 37 Elysian Fields street, Third Dis
trict. jel56t
JgDVVARD O'ROURKE,
Steam Boiler Manufacturer and Blacksmith,
Nos. 183 and 185 Fulton and 213 New Levee streets,
between St. Joseph and Julia streets. Reside ce
No. 380 Clio street. Low Pressure, Locomotive,
Flue and Cylinder Boilers; Clarifiers, Filters and
Juice Boxes made at shortest notice; aud all work
done at this establishment will be guaranteed
equal iu point of workmauship and material to any
in the city or elsewhere. jel5 1 y
fJIO BUTCHERS AND PLANTERS.
GREAT BARGAIN.
A lot of fine English BERKSHIRE HOGS. Also, a
fine family CARRIAGE HORSK, for sale on reason
able terms. Apply at No. 2 Carondelet street, up
stairs. jel3 3t*
lyOTICE TO TOURISTS.
Round trip tickets, good to return until the thir
ty-first of October, can be procured at the General
Ticket Office, corner of Camp and Common streeta,
under the City Hotel, at the following low rates:
Knoxville, *46; Alleghany Springs, *52 25; Lynch
burg. *56 25; Charlottesville, *60; White Sulphur
Springs, *70 25.
Elegant Pullman Sleeping Coaches on all night
trains. Ask for tickets via Grand Junction and
Chattanooga.
JULIUS HAYDEN,
jell lm General Southern Agent.
gENSATION ON CARONDELET STREET
FISHERS REFRIGERATOR.
This new article, constructed on scientific prin
ciples, can l>e seen daily at the grocery of Clark
St Maeder, corner of Common and fcarondelet
streets. It is guaranteed to consume not more
than Fifteen Pounds of Ice in twenty-four hours.
It is the only kind made not to require the break
ing of the ice, aud it thoroughly separates the
w arm from the cold air. It is now recognized as
the only refrigerator in which the contents can be
kept perfectly dry and cold without freezing. Even
matches are kept dry in it for any length of time.
See the Scientific American about FISHER'S RE
FRIGERATOR. je9 lm
TY'' OTICE, —THE ADVERTISER, AN EXPERI
XX enced accountant aud book-keeper, with unex
ceptionable references, will undertake (in English
and French) the adjustment aud verification ot
complicated accounts of every description, the
ojening, writing up or balancing of books, making
out statements of all kinds, and preparation oi
schedules for the courts. Will also undertake cor
respondence relative to settlements, adjustments
and collections. All communications addressed to
B. C., Lock Bov 998, Postofflce, will receive prompt
attention, and be considered strictly confidential.
iny31 lm*
JCE KING REFRIGERATOR.
ON EXHIBITION AND FOR SALE AT
No. 6 Carondelet street.
An indispensable comfort for a family during the
summer months. The public (and ladies in parti
cular) are respectfully invited to call aud examine
them. J. A. WARNER,
myl3 2m _ Agent.
^ ROUSSET'S FISHING TACKLE.
The undersigned, having studied the wants ot
the Southern market in the Fishing Tackle Line
for over twenty years, takes pleasure in offering
to his country and city customers one of the largest
and most varied stock of HOOKS, LIKES, RODS,
FLOATS and BASKETS, in all tlieir varieties, and
would beg your perusal of the following articles:
FISH h 60KS— Limerick Trout Hooks, bowed,
1 | 0 to 10 ( 0; Sheephcad Hooks, all sizes; Redfish
Hooks, all sizes; Chestertown Hooks, all sizes;
Croaker Hooks, Limerick Snooded Hooks, Wired
Hooks, Sea and Catfish Hooks, Sardine Bov Knife,
Artificial Bait, Artificial Flies, Trolling Bait and
Spoons. _ ,, . _
ASSORTED LINES—Cotton Cable Laid Trout
Lines, 25 to 300 feet; Cotton Twist Trout, Cotton
Perch and Croaker, Linen Trout and Fish, assorted
colors; Hemp Fishing, Plaited and Twisted Silk. Sea
grass Fish, Cork and other Floats, all sizes; Rigged
and Furnished Lines, Fishing Rods, assorted; Fish
ing Baskets, assorted; Pocket Corkscrews aud
Flasks.
And a complete stock of
HARDWARE AND CUTLERY.
Always on hand the Genuine Bamboo and Japan
ese POLES. „ ^ . ...
Soliciting an Inspection of my stock, you will
find my prices the lowest in the market.
Sign of the "Big Bamboo."
A. ROUSSET. Hardware Importer.
No. 17 Old Levee, opposite the Customhouse.
my7 lm _
J>ACIFIC WINE COMPANY,
Organized for the sale of
PURE CALIFORNIA WINE AND
BRANDY.
VINEYARDS nr ELDORADO COUNTY, CALI
FORNIA.
CHARLES B. PETTIT, Treasurer and Business
Agent—Office and Salesrooms, No. 98 Camp
street, New Orleans.
Tliis company is composed of the owners of vine
yards in the best grape district of California, who
have formed an association for the purpose of sell
ing their own Wines and Brandy.
The following list comprises a part of their pro
ducts now ready for the market:
WHITE WINE,
RED WINE,
CLARET,
HOCK,
OLD MISSION,
SHERRY,
TOKAY,
PORT,
ANGELICA,
MUSCAT,
CATAWBA,
ISABELLA,
SPARKLING,
WINE BITTERS,
GRAPE BRANDY,
BRANDY BITTERS.
All their Wine and Branny Warranted
Strictly Pure.
Arrangements are now perfected for weekly
shipments, direct from the vineyards, thus insur
in* a full and constant supply of these PURB AND
DELICIOUS WINES.
Defers, physicians and families are requested to
call and examine in regard to quality and price.
Ail orders should be addressed,
PACIFIC WINE COMPANY,
mhl9 6mo No. 98 Camp street. New Orleans. _
(JOW PEAS...................... COWr PKAS *
CHOICE CAROLINA CLAYED.
For sale by
ap2 3m
TOULMIN k MARTIN,
No. 41 Natchez street.
D
OUBLE-BARREL GUNS.
SS and 910—Great Bargains.
500 Double-barrel GUNS, at *8 and ,
200 Fine English GUNS.st *15, *1* and *20 each.
500 dozen Table KNIVES and FORD, at *1 »d
*2 per dozen. .
200 Flee REVOLVERS, at *8 and »l0s*eh.
For sale by C jj URCHILL & BB0
STATISTICS OP AMERICAN JOUR
NALISM.
The 'American Newspaper Directory for
1871," just issued by Messrs. George P. Row
ell &. Co., proprietors of the American Ad
vertising Agency of New York city, contains
certain tables of statistics whi«h have been
compiled with care, and can he relied upon
as substantially correct. They cover a field
of research which no statistician has before
touched upon, and furnish food for reflection
and wonderment. The following are a few
of the many lacts which a study of these
tables reveal:
The whole number of periodicals issued
in the United States is 5983. with 73 to be
added for the Territories, and 353 are printed
in the Dominion of Canada, and 29 in the
British Colonies, making a grand total of
f>438. of which 637 are daily, 118 tri-weekly,
129 semi-weekly, 4642 weekly, 21 bi-weekly,
100 semi-monthly, 715 monthly, 14 bi
monthly, and 62 are issued quarterly. New
York has the largest number of publica
tions, 894, of which 371 are printed in New
York city, and Nevada has the smallest
number issued in any State—only 15.
Nevada has more daily than weekly papers,
and is unique in this respect, every other
State having from three to twelve times as
many weeklies as dailies. Tri-weekly papers
are more common in the South than semi
weeklies, while in the Northern States the
facts are reversed.
The largest number ot daily papers pub
lished in any State is 89, in New York.
Pennsylvania is second, with 61. Next
comes Illinois, with 38, and California has
34, being the fourth on the list. DelawaTe
and Florida have each one daily paper.
Kansas has as many as Vermont, West
Virginia, Mississippi and Arkansas com
bined. Nebraska and Nevada have each
more dailies than either Oregon, Rhode
Island, South Carolina, Vermont, West
Virginia, Arkansas, Delaware) Florida,
Maine, or Mississippi.
Of the 73 publications issued regulaily in
the territories 13 are daily and 50 weekly, 3
tri-weekly, 4 semi-weekly, 1 appears
monthly, 1 semi-monthly, and 1 bi-weekly.
The papers of New Y'ork State have the
largest circulation, averaging 7411 each is
sue. Massachusetts is second, with 5709
average: then comes the District of Colum
bia with 4323. Nevada has the smallest
average circulation, only 516, while Florida
averages 616, Arkansas 650, Texas 701, and
Mississippi 753. The average circulation of
all daily papers published is 2717, of the
weeklies 1598, and of the monthlies 4081,
The average edition of all the papers printed
is 1842, which, multiplied by 6438, the entire
number of publications, gives 11,858,796 as
the number of copies in which an advertise
ment would appear if inserted once in all.
The same advertisement, if continued one
year, would be printed the enormous num
ber of 1,499,922,219 times. The total num
ber of publications printed in an entire year
in North Carolina will supply only four
copies to each inhabitant, equivalent to one
paper to every soul once in three months.
Mississippi, Florida and Arkansas do
but little better, furnishing five copies
per year. Alabama, Minnesota. South Caro
lina. Texas and West Virginia all print less
than enough to give each inhabitant a paper
once in five weeks, while California gives
eighty-two copies "per year, exceeding
every other State except New York, which
prints one hundred and thirteen copies per
year for every soul within its borders. As
New Y'ork papers circulate everywhere,
while those of California do not go much
out of the State, it is evident that the
papers issued there have a better local sup
port than any other State of the American
Union.
In the District of Columbia we find that
one newspaper is published for every three
square miles ot territory. Massachusetts
has one to thirty square miles, and Rhode
Island one to fifty; then comes New Y'ork
with one to fifty-seven: Connecticut has one
to sixty, New Jersey one to sixty-three,
Texas one to two thousand three hundred
and forty-five, Florida one to two thousand
six hundred and ninety-three, while in the
territories one newspaper spreads its cir
culation over no less than fourteen thou
sand four hundred and sixty-five square
miles.
There are five hundred and forty-eight
papers in the United States which print
more than five thousand copies each issue,
and eleven which print more than one hun
dred thousand. The New York Weekly has
the largest circulation given : among the
political mediums the New Y'ork weekly
Tribune takes the lead, and, among the
agricultural weeklies, Moore's Rural Neve
Yorker stands first. The New Y'ork Inde
pendent is the largest paper and has the
largest circulation of any religious paper.
Nearly one thousand papers are printed on
the auxiliary plan—that is, on sheets pur
chased from New Y'ork. Chicago and other
centres, with one side already printed.
This number has more than doubled within
one year. More than one thousand new
newspapers have been established since the
first of March, 1870, and the number of new
ones announced since January 1, 1871, has
averaged nearly four per day. The num
ber of suspensions is about one-fourth as
large as that of the new issues announced.
Messrs. George P. Rowell Ac Co. assert that
the number of newspapers issued has fully
doubled within six years.
In looking over the publications devoted
to specialties (or class publications), we find
the religious largely predominate over any
other class, which shows the interest the
public press takes in the moral and religious
welfare of the country. There are in the
United States 283 publications advocating
evangelical or sectarian ideas, with twenty
two in the dominion of Canada, with none
either in the territories or colonies. Of this
number New Y'ork city has forty-four, Phil
adelphia twenty-three, Boston twenty-one,
while Florida, Kansas, Nevada and New
Jersey-are entirely unrepresented.
The farmers, horticulturists and stock
raisers have their interests represented by
an agrioltural press numbering no less than
106 publications, many of which are gotten
up at great expense, and are very exten
sively circulated.
The medical profession enlightens its
members through the columns of seventy
two publications, of which five are week
lies, fifty monthlies, three semi-monthlies,
three bi-monthlies and eleven quarterlies.
Nearly if not all the schools of medicine
hare thejr representative organ, -which cir
culate* among its admirers and is criticised
severely by its contemporaries whose views
differ from it about the "healing of the na
tions," while there are a number that fur
nish intelligence of interest to all medical
men, as well as the general reader, without
taking sides for or against any particular
school of medicine.
Most of the colleges and many of the
State boards of education have their repre
sentative orgari, besides several publica
tions that treat educational matters in a
general way. Of this class we have eighty
four in the United States and six in the Do
minion of Canada. They are mostly month
lies, with an occasional weekly, bi-weekly
and quarterly.
The large cities have their commercial
papers, which are nearly all issued weekly.
Insurance is discussed through the medi
um of nineteen special publications, twelve
of which are issued monthly, and a number
of them being noted for their superior typo
graphical appearance.
Freemansonry, temperance. Odd Fel
lowship, music, mechanics, law, sporting,
real estate and woman's suffrage have each
their representative organs, many ol which
are edited with ability and have extensive
circulations, and net large incomes to their
enterprising publishers.
The list of class publications is increasing
rapidly of late, its ratio of increase being
greater than that of the entire press of the
country taken together, owing, probably, to
the fact that the inciease of wealth and
population of the country make it possible
and profitable to publish class papers where
Statement showing the average circulation of the newspapers and periodicals printed in
the United States and Dominion of Canada:
►.
it
sc
J. >*
Em
* ?
M
9
9
>5
£U
9
. >»
a a
£ §
2
a
o
j.2
« a
o
►»
§
*5
Q
*
is
£
3
a
V.
9
h
Alabama................
.. i960
838
944
1500
1070
Arkansas. .............
. . 788
250
652
600
650
California ..............
.. 3387
2500
1077
1308
1500
3519
2000
1846
Connecticut.............
.. *160
1080
783
1632
1278
4260
700
410
10425
1500
3000
District of Columbia....
2500
'500
4323
Florida .................
. . 45<>
400
635
616
Georgia.................
. 2095
8T6
587
1050
433
3*73
1270
Illinois..................
3294
464
2249
4000
7756
6069
5500
1504
2907
Indiana..................
.. 2490
450
628
1129
587
4102
3000
1490
Iowa.....................
480
734
983
500
1862
750
1013
Kaunas..................
.. 1539
309
1024
10665
5000
5000
1828
Kentucky...............
.. 3348
500
i080
1768
2880
1968
Louisiana...............
.. 3903
4tK)
1000
846
2838
1168
1220
Maine...................
.. 1490
348
2377
480
720
2763
2257
Maryland...............
1831
2075
1500
2077
Massachusetts. ........
.10436
600
1983
4541
1267
1670
8852
4000
6174
5709
Michigan................
.. 2354
13m
1429
800
3318
980
1654
Minnesota...............
.. 1126
480
225
1124
2056
1121
Mississippi..............
.. 881
480
4000
719
1968
1179
753
Missouri.................
. 4511
2997
1633
7900
3111
1050
isoo
2104
Nebraska................
. . 910
885
1000
1021
913
Nevada.................
. 660
575
493
516
New Hampshire.........
. . 961
1760
400
6880
1000
2194
New Jersey.............
.. 2164
300
1146
200
500
2646
1475
New York...............
.10714
1007
49541
6300
900
5332
10899
38700
3162
7411
North Carolina..........
.. 694
233
1181
835
300
2500
650
814
663
1720
2883
2000
2748
4140
1400
500
3154
Oregon..................
.. 1264
1257
5000
500
1352
Pennsylvania...........
.. 7789
5000
50O0
2938
2671
10175
2717
3400
3704
Rhode Island...........
. 4410
1000
2066
900
2489
South Carolina..........
Tennessee...............
. 1686
906
4!*>
1054
5338
475
1354
1150
1700
1383
1305
1747
Texas....................
.. 628
704
443
721
980
701
Vermont.................
.. 963
1465
256<'0
2528
Virginia................
. 1651
772
986
1001
950
1389
1107
Wept Virginia...........
. 1267
350
216
801
600
1550
842
Wisconsin...............
. 2044
1600
2050
1200
1383
20)49
1317
Territories............
. 733
222
645
933
1000
960
858
New Brunswick, I). C .
. 2367
400
1600
2000
5000
700
1500
1750
Nova Scotia.............
. 1367
1610
1165
400
2283
1334
Ontario, D. C...........
. 3046
lino
7«H»
1594
3267
3800
1897
Quebec, D. 0............
. 3154
1647
1596
2687
14500
1492
900
1409
British Coloaies.........
. 367
350
556
758
700
640
Total average.......
. 2717
1057
1272
1598
1096
2741
4081
7421
1951
1842
Statement showing the number of newspapers and periodicals published in the United
States, Territories, Dominion of Canada and British Provinces of North America.
M
>1
&
j-3
ts
fit
« £
9
a j
9 a
x 0
a
0
a a
0
at
■5
A
•t
£
5 :
a
a
a
O'
E
Alabama...............
2
66
1
78
Arkansas...............
4
2
41
4
51
California...............
34
3
6
129
2
II
1
187
Connecticut............
17
l
51
1
3
13
l
87
Delaware............
1
3
13
1
18
District of Columbia...
6
12
6
1
25
Florida..................
1
1
1
21
1
25
Georgia.................
14
5
7
86
2
9
123
Illinois..................
38
1!
7
371
3
5
58
2
4
499
Indians..................
J
3
209
3
25
1
264
Iowa.....................
20
5
3
231
1
t
18
1
230
Kansas..................
. 14
3
85
8
1
1
112
Kentucky...............
2
5
76
12
1»5
Louisiana...............
9
2
3
71
3
2
90
Maine...................
6
1
43
1
1
9
66
Maryland...............
9
77
9
1
%
Massachusetts..........
21
1
13
165
4
5
60
1
10
280
Michigan................
13
4
10 :
1
1
a
2
139
Minnesota.......... ...
8
5
i
85
5
104
Mississippi............
4
5
1
75
2
6
93
Missouri................
5
227
5
29
i
i
289
Nebraska...............
7
31
1
7
46
Nevada ..... ..........
7
2
6
* .
15
New Hampshire........
.. 7
39
2
6
i
1
56
New Jersey.............
21
i
98
i
1
16
138
Now York...............
89
3
18
563
2
25
167
2
20
894
North Carolina......
8
3
4
43
1
1
5
65
Ohio ...................
9
5
306
1
9
53
2
1
411
Oregon ...............
5
25
1
l
32
Pennsylvania...........
61
2
i
410
it
82
3
3
534
Rhode Island...........
6
1
18
1
26
South Carol 11 a.........
5
4
2
42
4
2
59
Tennessee...............
. 12
2
l
79
1
9
104
Texas................
11
8
7
95
2
123
Vermont...............
3
39
2
44
Virginia..............
.. 16
8
8
71
2
a
116
West Virginia...........
3
1
1
49
1
3
58
Wisconsin...............
16
2
3
165
6
9
201
581
102
108
4330
16
93
676
13
59
5983
Territories............
13
3
4
50
1
1
1
73
New Brunswick. D. C
3
1
18
1
l
1
1
26
Nova Scotia. D. C.......
3
5
20
1
3
32
Ontario, D. C..........
. 21
1
2
166
21
1
1
213
Quebec, D. C............
13
5
7
43
1
i*
1
82
49
12
9
247
2
2
37
l
3
353
British Colonies.........
3
I
8
15
2
29
Totals .............
. 637
118
129
4642
21
100
715
14
62
6438
Statement showing the area, population, annual circulation of all newepapers and period
icals printed in the United States and Dominion of Canada, and the number of copies
printed per year for each inhabitant.
No. of copies
Square miles
Square
Total
for each
for each
miles.
Population.
Circulation.
inhabitant.
publication.
Alabama...............
50,722
1,002,240
8,891,432
9
676
Arkansas...............
52,198
474,818
2,438,716
5
1,065
California................
188,891
559,742
45,869.408
82
1,032
Connecticut.............
4,750
537,418
15,697,320
29
60
Delaware................
2,120
125,015
1,596,480
13
118
District of Columbia
60
131.706
11,637,400
39
3
Florida.... ........
59,248
176,741
841,880
5
2,693
Georgia..............
58,000
1,188,857
14,447,388
1 *
489
Illinois...............
55,410
2,538,337
102,686 204
41
116
Indiana...............
1.642,451
28,515,862
17
130
Iowa...................
55,045
1,193,08:)
19,344,636
16
?04
Kansas.................
81.318
361,961
12,465.763
35
726
Kentucky................
37 680
1.309.128
17,392,044
11
:m
Louisiana................
41,346
717,026
14,628,028
20
954
Maine..................
35,000
630,719
9,082,596
14
538
Maryland ..............
11,124
779,750
19,461,660
25
122
Massachusetts.......
7,800
1,457,351
107.691.952
74
30
Michigan................
1 184.2C6
17,513,120
15
425
Minnesota...............
83,531
432,367
2,811,120
7
811
Mississippi.............
47,156
859.0**6
4,403,460
5
518
Missouri.................
65,350
1,722,102
37,737.564
n
233
Nebraska..............
75,995
116,888
3,147,120
27
1,302
Nevada..................
81.539
42,667
1,714,960
40
5,436
New Hampshire.........
. . 9.280
317,603
5,711,720
18
179
New Jersey..............
8,320
902 980
19,766,104
2*
63
New ^ork................
4.370,846
492,770,868
113
57
North Carolina
50,704
1,074,235
4,220,676
4
305
Ohio.....................
2,662,681
93,592,448
35
101
Oregon..................
. 95,274
90,922
3.658,304
40
*,977
Pennsylvania...........
3,511,543
233.380,532
67
33
Rhode Island .....
1,306
217,393
10,048,048
46
50
tSouth Carolina...........
34,000
739,000
5,804,136
8
686
Tennessee................
45,600
1,237,41*
15,712,236
13
456
Texas....................
. .. 274,356
885,000
5,813,432
7
2,345
Vermout.................
10,21*
330,235
4,486,944
14
232
Virginia...............
38,35#
1,195,278
13,790,788
12
342
West Virginia...........
23.000
442,000
3,372,668
8
396
W isconsiu..............
53,9*4
1,052,878
20,577,396
20
277
Territories..............
297,934
3,829,121
13
14,465
New Brunswick. D. C .
27,105
319,091
3.961,808
12
1,043
Nova Scotia, D. C........
18,660
391,073
3,838,784
10
583
Ontario, D. C............
Quebec, D. C.............
... 121,260
2.000,000
33,757,528
17
580
.. 210,020
1,400,000
21,812,560
16
2,561
Total..-.............
... 3,380,254
42,617,960
1,499,922,219
36
550
Wc learn that several prominent citizens
of large means, among others Messrs. Car
riere, Rochereau. Sloeomb and Smith, called
yesterday on the Mayor, and proffered
whatever security might be necessary to
take out an appeal in the case of Mrs. Myra
Clark Gaines vs. the city of New Orleans,
in which case judgment was rendered
against the city for over one hundred and
twenty-five thousand dollars.
An old lady gives this as her idea of a
great man: "One who is keerful of his
clothes, don't drink spirits, kin read the
Bible without spelling the words, and eat
a cold dinner on wash day without
grumbling."
but a very few years back they could not
have been made self-supporting.
The number of papers published in other
than the English language is growing
rapidly, owing to the immense immigration
from foreign countries, especially Germany,
France, 8candinavia and Italy.
The publications printed in the German
language in the United States number 341,
and the Dominion of Canada 5, and are
over three times as many as the sum of all
the other publications in foreign languages
combined.
The publications in the French language
are confined principally to Louisiana and
the province of Quebec, where the language
is in common use.
The Scandinavian publications number
eighteen, and are confined entirely to the
West and Northwest (with a single excep
tion, that of a daily, semi-weekly and
weekly in New York city), the immigrants
from Denmark, Norway and Sweden hav
ing principally settled there. Many of the
thriving Western towns have been almost
entirely built up by these industrious and
frugal people, who use their native tongue
universally, and frequently never learn the
English language.
In the Spanish language there are but 7,
Hollandish 6, Italian 4, Welsh 3, Bohemian
2, Portuguese 1, Cherokee 1, none of which
have a very wide circulation or influence)
owing to the reason that the population
speaking these languages is comparatively
limited and widely scattered.
Columbus, Ohio, has a decided sensation.
The elements are: The theft of a large
amount of jewelry from a banker's house
by the lover of a servant girl in the family;
his flight to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania; his
arrest, confession and return; the recovery
of the jewelry; his release for some mys
terious reason (and this is the point of the
sensation), and the payment of $500 reward
to the detectives.
On the streets of Norfolk, Virginia, last
Sunday week, a little girl six or seven years
old was seen leading her drunken rather
homeward. Resisting the efforts of all
other persons to take him home, he was per
fectly passive in the hands of his child.
After getting her father to the steps the lit
threw her arms around his neck
and kissed him. All who witnessed the
scene and the notion were affected to tears.
BY TELEGRAPH.
LATEST NEWS FROM ALL POINTS
BOUTWELL GOING NORTH
THE COTTON CROP OF 1871
GREATLY REDUCED ACREAGE
ESTIMATES OF 3,300,000 BALES
FRENCH MANIFESTO AGAINST INTRIGUES
General Trocliu's Self-Defense
APPEARANCE OF FESTIVITY IN BERLIN
Preparations for Triumphal Entry
Arches, Decorations and Banners
CELEBRATING THE POPE'S JUBILEE
DEATH OF COMMODORE TATNALL
Republican Convention Broken Up
WASHINGTON ■
Secretary Boutwell to Leave—Cabinet
Meeting To-day—Recess of Southern
Claims Commission—Cotton Crop of
1871—Reduced Acreage—Crop Esti
mated at 3,300,000 Bales—Arrival
from Tehaantepec— Sixty of a Hundred
Men Ment to the Hospital with ChUls
and Fever—Appeal of Central Railroad
Tax Case Denied.
Washington, June 15.— Secretary Bout
well leaves for a week. The Cabinet meets|at
noon to-morrow, and will be full except
Akerman and Delano.
The Southern claims commissioners will,
shortly after the close of the present month,
take a recess till fall. Their time till ad
journment will be fully occupied by cases
already assigned, and they are no'w upon
applications from claimants and attorneys
afloting their time from adjournment till
their report to Congress in December next.
The Department of Agriculture has re
ceived returns from nearly 300 counties
representing the most productive districts
of each of the cotton States and showing
the comparative average and the condition
of the crop in the first week of June.
A diminution in the area planted in cot
ton appears in every State except Florida.
The most careful analysis of the returns
with due regard in making averages to the
extent of the cotton production in the re
spective counties, gives the following per
centage of reduction in comparison with
last year:
Virginia 30 per cent. North Carolina 14,
South Carolina 13, Georgia 12, Alabama 13,
Mississippi 15, Louisiana 8, Texas 14, Ar
kansas 16, Tennessee 12.
These State averages reduced to a gen
eral average the assumed acreage of the re
spective States being an element in the
calculation, will place the reduction of the
cotton of 1871, as compared with that of
1870, between fourteen and fifteen per cent,
equivalent to nearly a million and a third
of acres. This would leave between seven
and a half and eight million of acres as the
in
The average yield lias not in former
years exceeded 150 pounds per acre; that
for 1870 was more than 200 pounds. The
condition of the growing plant is below an
average in nearly every State. The spring
has been unusually wet and cold, retarding
the growth and causing many of the plants
to turn yellow and die, and obstructing the
cultivation to a large extent. Replanting
has refilled the vacant spaces of imperfect
stands. The weather has recently been
more favorable, and it is not impossible tbat
an average condition may be attained by
the commencement of the packing season.
The condition of cotton in July, 1869, a
year favored with an abundant yield, was
only a little better than the showing for
June of the present year, while the prospect
is slightly improving, but there is nothing
in it of a decisive character. The per cent
age below an average condition is respect
ively as follows in the several States: North
Carolina ten per cent, South Carolina eight,
Georgia eighteen, Alabama seventeen, Mis
sissippi sixteen, Louisiana ten, Texas seven,
Arkansas seventeen, Tennessee ten. In
Florida the condition is three per cent
above an average. An official estimate of
the ultimate result so early in the season
would be an absurdity.
The influence of future rains, floods,
frosts and insect enemies can not be calcu
lated upon in advance; but in view of the
extremely favorable circumstances affect
ing the crop of last year, there can not be
expected in the present year, upon a re
duced area, a crop exceeding 3,500,000 bales.
An early frost, or the prevalence of insects
the
a very unpropitious season might, reduce
i yield to 3,000,000 bales, and a still fur
ther reduction is possible in the union or
severity of several ot these causes of
failure.
The Kansas, from Tehuantepec, has ar
rived. Sixty of her crew go to the hospital
with chills and fever. Her crew numbers
one hundred.
It is understood in the Central railroad
tax case an appeal from the Revenue Com
missioner to the Secretary of the Treasury
was denied, because the road can appeal to
the courts. The amount involved is over a
million dollars.
NEW YORK.
Jerome Park Races—Advance in July and
January Governments — Southern Se
curities Rather Dali—Another Gold
Pool Company Formed.
Hew York, June 15.—At the Jerome
Park races, the track was heavy to-day.
The first race, mile heats, was won by Chil
licothe. Time: 1:52—1:53.
The two-mile race was won by Judge
Darrell. Time: 3:47.
Third race—Ladies' stakes for three year
old fillie, mile and an eighth, won by Nellie
Gray. Time: 3:03.
Fourth race—Sweepstakes for all ages,
one and three-quarter miles, won by Bel
mont. Time: 3:231^.
I ifth race—One mile, For all ages, won by
Climax. Time: 1:53.
Money easy at 2 a 4. Sterling weaker.
Prime bankers' 10. Gold ll23g®112Vs.
Governments (July and January issues) ad
vanced Ik; otherwise steady- State bonds
rather dull; new South Carolinas, little
offered; Tennessees 70 * 4 ; new 71; Virginias
68; new 73; Louisian* 69; new 63: levee
sixes 68M>: eights 87; Alabamas 102; fives
72; Georgias 88: sevens 93; North Caro
linas 47; new ■J^ s 4; South Carolinas 76;
new 62.
Another g»Ifl pool company has been
formed front the debris of the old company.
This combination put up gold to 112^, and
made c*»h gold worth 1-16 for to-morrow.
Gold opened at 11214, with little business
untH after government sales, when an ad
vance occurred, and late in the day one to
four percent was paid for carrying. Sixes of
1881, 1173s; five-tweuties of 1862. 112; ot
1864, 112; ot 1865, 112; new, 114%; of 1867,
114%; of 1868, 11414; ten-forties, 110.
The congregation of the Redemptional
Church commenced to-night a celebration
of the twenty-fifth annivertwry of pontifi
cate of Pius IX. by a torchlight procession.
Three thousand wan were in the line, and
twenty-five thousand in the streets through
which the procession passed.
The annual quoting match for the cham
pion silver quoit was won by David Bell,
of Buffalo. There were forty-four contest
ants.
Twenty-six bids for gold to-day, amount
ing to $8,567,500, at 111.21 to 112.36. The
awards will be two millions, at 111.37 to
112.36. __
LONDON.
Napoleon Visiting Kent Cricketers—Bol#
Movements Rumored—The Immense
Desi ruction of Life and Property ia
Paris—An American Artist's Recep
tion-Royal Marriage Arranged—Rail
way Crowded With Germans Return
ing Home—Workmen of Paris Com
munists
London. June 15.— Napoleon visited the
Kent cricketers yesterday. He received
iiuite an ovation and held a fete. He is un
doubtedly surrounded by old adherents, and .
bold movements are rumored. Persons ar
riving from Paris say half has not been,
told of the troubles in that city, and that
the destruction of life and property im
mensely exceeds both the government and
newspaper accounts.
The American artist Bradford's reception,
at Leghorn was a success. The Duke of
Argyle, Marquis of Lome, Princess Louise,
Mi^jor Rawlinson and others were present.
[Special to the New York World. J
A marriage has been arranged between
Princess Thvra, of Denmark, and the Duke
of Edinburg.
Paris journals say the eastern line of rail
way is daily crowded with Germans return
ing to their homes and laden with plunder.
The workmen of Paris are almost unani
mously communists. They are very bitter
because their cause was defeated, and hate
both Thiers and Bonaparte. Many of them
will emigrate to America.
VERSAILLES.
Manifests Protesting Against Intrigue*
With Monarchists—Efforts of French
Bishops to Commit Prance to Res
toration of Pope to Temporal Power
Ridiculed—General Troche's .Self
Defense Continued—Taxation of Pass
ports on Persons Entering Prance.
Versailles, June 15.— The manifesto of
the deputies of the left, protesting against
the intrigues of the monarchists, is gener
ally approved, but a radical address to the
voters of Paris creates a bad impression,
because it endeavors to excuse the com
mune.
The press generally, with the exception of
the religious journals, ridicule the efforts of
the French bishops to commit France to the
restoration of the Pope to his temporal
power. They pronounce the question as
settled, and declare France can not inter
fere.
General Trochu continued, before the
Assembly to-dav, the remarks commenced
on Tuesday in vindication of his defense of
Paris. He said the individuals arrested as
Prussian agents during his conduct of the
military affairs of the capital had reap
peared as leaders of the insurrection, and
instanced the case of General Dombrowski.
The insurrection, said the general, was
merely a continuation of the war with Prus
sia.
He concluded by condemning in vigorous
terms Prince Bismarck and with mild allu
sions to the commune.
A motion was introduced in the Assembly
for taxation on the passports of persons
entering France, as were also motions j rj .
posing that the present Assembly sit tor
two years and that it enabt organic laws for
the control of the finances of the country.
BERLIN.
Unparalleled Appearance of Festivity
Preparations for Triumphal Entry ot
German Army—Arches, Decoration*
and Banners—Close of the German
Parliament-Emperor William's Speech
of Thanks and Congratulation.
Berlin, June 15. —Berlin presents an un
paralleled appearance of festivity. The
city is crowded with people from all parts
of Germany and other countries of Europe,
and quite a number of Americans are also
here. Preparations for the great event ofl
to-morrow, the triumphal entry ol the Ger
man army into the capital of the empire
are about completed. Arches have been
erected in many streets, and adorned with
laurel evergreens and flowers, and contain
mottoes appropriate to the occasion. Unter
der Linden is absolutely covered with
decorations and banners, and the royal
palace and other public buildings present a
magnificent displav.
fine weather to-daj was splendid, and the
signs are favorable tor to-morrow.
The session of the German Parliament
closed to-day with a speech from the throne.
The Emperor thanked the members for
the grants they had made for the support of
the widows and orphans of the soldiers
killed. He reviewed the legislation of the
session referring particularly to the debate
on the bill incorporating Alsace and Lor
raine. He said it showed that however the
Germans might differ the spirit of union
was strong within them. The Eriiperor
closed his speech with the aspiration. "God
grant peace to the new German Empire."
PARIS.
Joy that the Bourbons Expose their
Hands—Review of Troops on Munday—
Charred Corpses Found in the Ruins of
the Hotel de Ville.
Paris, June 15.— The republican journals
express joy that the clerical members of
the Bourbon family have exposed their
hands, and *11 of them urge the electors to
reject all candidates for the Assembly whose
platform is vague or ambiguous.
It is said the Duke of Chartres will assist
at the review of 190,000 troops to be held in
the Champ de Mars, Sunday.
Charred corpses were found in the ruing
of the Hotel de Ville, and are undoubtedly
the remains of persons left in cells by the
communists.
Three hunnred communists have been ar
rested in this city between Saturday and
Friday last.
MADRID.
Denunciation of the International Society
Ministerial Crisis Expected.
Madrid, June 15. —At yesterday's session
of the Cortes. Minister Sagosta spoke in vig
orous denunciation of the international
society. A motion which had been submit
ted, looking with some favor upon the aims
of the society, was thereupon unanimously
rejected.
A ministerial orisis is expected.
FLORENCE.
Full Liberty to Celebrate the Jabilee_
Precautions Against Disturbances.
Florence, June 15.—A circular from the
Minister of the Interior instructs the pre
fects to give the people full liberty to cele
brate the Jubilee, but to take proper pre
cautions against disturbances.
All quiet at Rome.
MISCELLANEOUS.
Refusal to Permit Regimental Parade oa
Sunday—Republican Convention Phtln^
delphia—Death of Commodore Tatnall
Public Funeral Honors-Contract for
Grading Nelina Railroad to Holly
Springs - Suspected Horse Poisoner
Hanged by a Mob-Pbiladeiphla Con
vention Broken Cp-Social Science
Congress-Capture of Mexican and
Indian Marauders-8olvlng the Indian
Question With Rifle and Revolver.
Boston, June 15,-The Charlestown Board
of Aldermen, by a vote of 3 to 2, refuse
Colonel r isk s request to parade his regi
ment in that city on Sunday K
Philadelphia June 15.-The Republican
convention for the nomination of coroner is
very boisterous. The insiders had to bar
ncade the doors to prevent ths entrance of
o*MXiriuaD og nen** ran*]

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