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New Orleans Republican. [volume] (New Orleans, La) 1867-1878, June 20, 1871, Image 6

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0f FICtAL JOURNAL OF THE UNITED STATES
OFFICIAL JOURNAL *0F JEW ORLEANS
THB NEW DEPARTURE.
Last Words of Vallnodiaiiain.
Cincinnati, June 18. — The Times and
Chronicle publishes an interview between
Vallandigham and one of the editors Wednes
day, in which Vallandigham said there
can be no more political campaigns fought
on the issues of the last few years. They
are dead, and if the Democratic party re
luses to move to the front, and accept the
new order of things, it will simply pass
away, and some other party made up of the
earnest and progressive elements of all par
ties, will take possession of the government.
When asked if he did not think the cam
paign of 1872 would hi fought on the present
issues, he said: That may be undertaken by
our party, hut it will fail. A year ago Grant
gave promise of his intention to lead the
Republican party into a new departure, aud
he would have done it, but a gang of old
politicians at Washington held him back,
and scared him with gabble about defeat,
until he went square back into the old rules.
Grant is an honest man, and would do
right if the politicians would let him; but
that they won't do. He took the back track
on the San Domingo question, in which,
apart from the corrupt means used, he was
clearly right. I tell you, sir. annexation of
territory, the central of all the outlying
fragments of this continent, is the destiny ot
the American people. We shall have San
Domingo aud Cuba, Mexico and all the
rest. We missed the greatest chance we
had in not getting Cuba during the Spanish
troubles. We could have had it then for
the mere asking and in a few years we
would have been the owners of the richest
and most productive piece of territory in
the world. Why, they used to talk about
me, and call me a disunionist. I tell you
earnestly and honestly, I never was a dis
unionist, and always did believe and now
believe that this Union will be perpetuated
and extended until it embraces the con
tinent'.
When asked how, with the hatred ex
When asked how, with the hatred ex
hibited toward him, he could stay in the
Democratic party, he smiled and said:
"What can I do f The Republicans won't
move forward. It wants to stick to its old
clothes, and my best hope is to get Democ
racy to push to the front; however, there is
no felling what three hundred and sixty
live days may bring forth, and of one thing
I am certain—if the Democratic party fails
to become the party of progress and ad
vanced ideas, and I, from conscientious
convictions, decide to act with any other
party, that other party will never inquire
what my past political record lias beeD.
Parties do not manage things that way."
New Cable Enterprises.
We copy the following from the New
York Keening Mail, a journal now controlled
by Cyrus W. Field, the pioneer in tbe At
lantic cable enterprise:
The first step is that which costs, in all
new enterprises, and this is especially true
of the daring undertaking which resulted
in the laying of the first cable across the
Atlantic. This victory, won by unexam
pled devotion, singleness of purpose, co
operation of scientific and practical skill,
aud remarkable organizing genius—it then
became a mere question ot time when every
sea would be traversed by telegraphic
lines. Only a few days since tbe comple
tion of the line to Hong Kong was an
nounced and attracted little attention, be
cause, great as must be tbe results to the
commercial world and to the newspapers,
such an extension of cable facilities was in
evitable.
Other great cable enterprises of nearer
interest to us are on foot, and will not be
allowed to rest until completed. One of
these is to connect the South Amencan
ports and the West India islands with the
telegraphic system of this country. Our
readers can see at a glauee what a great
addition this will be to the telegraphic
facilities of this country. At present we
are almost isolated from the countries in
whose future development we have more
interest than any other power. When we
are brought into close communication with
them by means of the cable, we will not
only take a new concern in their destinies,
hut will increase our commercial relations,
and begin to build up the kindly feeling
that ought to exist among all the weaker
L owers in this part of the world toward the
Fnited States.
There are other notable enterprises which
we can not allude to to-day, and in whose
success we have a deep interest. We look
forward to the not distant time, when the
readers of the Evening Mail will be able to
find in its columns cable news from all the
countries of the world, more fully reported
than in anj other paper whatever.
Hi. Louis Hensations.
A St. Louis dispatch of the fifteenth to
the Cincinnati Gazette says:
The recent raid against keno houses in
this city is likely to squelch them entirely.
Some of the cases were tried before the
police court to-day, and after one of the
proprietors had been find $250 by Judge
Cullen, the employes demanded a jury trial,
which was granted, and the whole batch,
after an appeal from their attorney for
leniency, and a statement that various keno
housekeepers had pledged themselves to
close their establishments pertnanently,
were let oft' at $100 dollars a head. A num
ber of players, most of whom had been in
custody since Saturday night, were fined
fifty dollars each. The remainder of the
cases will be tried to-morrow.
As evidence of the lavish entertainment
§ iven to the excursionists from Iowa yester
ay, twenty four hundred bottles of cham
pagne were drunk by tbe party, equal to
lour bottles to each woman and child in the
crowd. Of course, there were some light
heads yesterday, and aching ones to-day.
One day this week ayouug and handsome
girl died at St. Luke's Hospital, a vietim of
the perfidy and baseness ol a wealthy and
prominent merchant of this city—a husband
and father, and a prominent church mem
ber. The girl was serving as nurse in the
merchant's family when Tier ruin was ef
fected; and when it was evident she would
become a mother she was placed in the
hands of an abortionist, who practiced his
vile calling upon her. After this she was
sent to the country—not to be cared for that
her health might be restored, but put to
menial aud laborious service, which resulted
in making her totally blind, completely
wrecking her constitution, and sending her
to an untimely grave. The merchant, how
ever, still lives, and it is to be hoped will
carry a rankling thorn in his conscience for
ever.
This is a dispatch to the Louisville
Courier-Journal :
Washington, D. C., June 15. — Miss
Lizzie Poor, daughter of Rear Admiral
Poor, United States Navy, and Lieutenant
Commander Jewell, Uni'ted States Navy,
were married this afternoon at St. John's
Episcopal church, by Rev. Vaughan Lewis.
Among other distinguished gentlemen pres
ent were Admirals Alden. Jenkins, Rad
ford and Powell, General Ramsey and
others. The bride was dressed in a white
tulle dress, cn punier with flowing train.
Her head was covered with a long white
veil, crowned with a wreath of orange
blossoms. The bridesmaids were dressed
in the same manner, with exception of the
veil. The groomsmen, Lieutenant Com
manders Schouler, Logan, Hooker and
Tracy, all wore their uniforms. At the
conclusion of the ceremony the happy
couple held a reception at the residence of
the bride's father.
The Rev. Mr. Johnson, a colored brother
in Sumter, South Carolina, was kn-kluxly
invited to leave or die. The colored
brethren held a five hundred man mass
meeting, and voted to kill two white men
for every black men murdered. This com
bating of Beelzebub with caloric has made
everything quiet at Sumter, South Carolina.
Mr. H. V. Redfield warns Cincinnati that
Louisville is "a dangerous rival. Sha may
be a peanut town, a suburban village, anil
all that, but her recent action in gobbling
up more miles of railroad than Cincinnati
is even talking of building, shows her to be
a tolerably sagacious and healthy village,
Some of her sort of peanuts are needed in
Cincinnati."
LAWS OF THE UNITED STATES.
Passed at the Third Hessian of the Forty
First CoDfresi.
[General Nature—N o. 46.]
AN ACT making appropriations for sundry
civil expenses of the government for the
fiscal year ending June thirty, eighteen
hundred and seventy two, ami for other
purposes.
Be it enacted by the Senate and Ilonse of
Representatives of the United States of
America in Congress assembled. That the
following sums be, and the same are hereby
appropriated, for the objects hereinafter
expressed, for the fiscal year ending the
thirtieth June, eighteen hundred and seven
ty-two, viz:
STATE DEPARTMENT.
For defraying the expenses of defending
claims under the convention with Mexico of
July four, eighteen hundred and sixty
eight, to be expended under the direction
of the Attorney General, twenty thousand
dollars.
For the compensation aud exjienses of the
commission for determining the peudiug
questions between Great Britain and the
United States, twenty five thousand dollars.
For the compensation and expenses of a
commission for determining the questions
pending between the United States and
Spain, growing out of the acts of the Span
ish officials in and about Cuba, fifteen thou
sand dollars.
For the increase in the expenses of the
diplomatic and consular officers of the
United States in Paris, caused by a state of
war; and also for comiiensation for extraor
dinary services performed by such officers
during the war: and also'for the additional
expense caused to the legations and consul
ates of the United States in Madrid, Paris,
Beilin and London by reasern ot the war,
and by reason of the protection assumed
by the United States of persons, legations
and consulates of other powers in Paris, a
sum not to exceed fifty thousand dollars in
all, or so much thereof as mav he necessary;
to be expended under the direction of the
Secretary of State, on the approval of the
President, and on vouchers to lie filed in the
Treasury Department, and a statement
thereol to be reported to Congress by the
Secretary of State.
To defray the expenses incurred by the
United States legation in Paris, in protect
ing the subjects of the North German Con
federation in France during the war be
tween France and Prussia, including extra
compensation to the secretaries, messenger,
and use of carriage of said legation, tour
thousand dollars ; and the foregoing appro
priations are hereby made available imme
diately upon the passage of this act.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT.
SUPERVISING inspectors of steam vessels.
For carrying out the provisions of the act
of thirtieth of August, eighteen hundred and
fiftv-two, for the lietter protection of the
livts of passengers on vessels propelled in
whole or in part by steam, and of the acts
amendatory thereof, the following sums, viz:
For salaries of fifty-nine local inspectors
of steam vessels, and clerk in local officers
at New York and New Orleans, fifty-eight
thousand two hundred dollars.
For ten supervising inspectors of steam
vessels, nine at two thousand dollars each,
and one at two thousand five hundred dol
lars, twenty thousand five hundred dollars.
For special agent of the department, two
thousand one hundred and ninety dollars.
For contingent expenses, viz: Traveling
expenses of ten supervising insjieetors, at
not to exceed eight hundred dollars in any
one year each, eight thousand dollars.
For traveling expenses of fifty-nine local
inspectors, fifteen thousand dollars.
hor traveling expenses of the special
agent of tbe department, one thousand four
hundred dollars.
For expenses of the meeting of the board
of supervising inspectors, including travel
and necessary incidental expenses, and
printing of manual and report, four thou
sand dollars.
For stationery and postage stamps; fur
niture for offices and repairs thereof; instru
ments, repairs, transportation, and storing
thereof; office rent, janitors, aud fuel: print
ing and binding certificates of license for
pilots and engineers, and miscellaneous
.terns, twenty-five thousand dollars.
For lile-saving stations: Salaries of two
superintendents of the life-saving stations
on the coast of Long Island and New Jer
sey. at one thousand five hundred dollars
each, three thousand dollars.
For fifty-five keepers of stations, at two
hundred dollars each, eleven thousand dol
lars.
For pay of six experienced surfmen to
man each of the boats at alternate life-sav
ing stations on the New Jersey coast, com
mencing at the first station from Sandy
Hook, from December fifteenth to March
fifteenth, to be appointed by the keepers
thereof, at forty dollars per mouth, ten
thousand and eighty dollars.
For contingent expenses of life-saving
stations on the coast of the United States,
ten thousand dollars.
REVENUE CUTTER SERVICE.
For pay of officers, viz: Thirty-five cap
tains, one hundred and two lieutenants and
fifty-one engineers, three hundred and fif
teen thousand three huudred dollars.
For rations for officers, twenty thousand
and thirty-nine dollars.
For pay of crews, viz: Eight hundred and
seventy-eight petty officers, seamen, cooks
stewards and boys, three hundred thousand
five hundred and twenty dollars.
For rations for crews, including liquor
equivalent, one hundred aD(l twenty-one
thousand seven hundred aud seventy-nine
dollars and ten cents.
For fuel for twenty four steam vessels,
one hundred and twenty-five thousand dol
lars.
For repairs and outfits of thirty-two ves
sels, one hundred thousand dollars.
For ship chandlery for the same, forty
thousand dollars.
For the traveling expenses of the officers
traveling on duty under orders from the
Treasury Department, ten thousand dollars.
For temporary employment of pilots,
heretofore permanently employed, anil com
pensation included in estimates for pay of
officers, ten thousand dollars.
For commutation of quarters for officers
tn shore duty, ten thousand dollars.
Contingent expenses: For payment of ex
penses incurred in the transaction of the
business of the two boards of examiners
(engineer board at Baltimore. Maryland,
and that for the line officers at Washington,
District of Columbia); also, for that of the
special commission, for rent of offices, in
cluding quarters forexamining surgeon, and
for miscellaneous expenses, exclusive of
clerk hire or compensation for service of
auy kind except consulting engineer em
ployed to supervise construction of engines,
five thousand dollars.
MARINE HOSPITAL SERVICE.
For supplying deficiency in the fund for
the relief of sick and disabled seamen, one
hundred and fifty thousand dollars.
LOANS AND TREASURY NOTES.
For paper, engraving, printing, express
charges, and other expenses of making and
issuing the national currency, seventy-five
thousand dollars.
For expenses in detecting aud bringing to
trial anu punishment persons engaged in
counterfeiting treasury notes, national bank
notes, bonds, and other securities of the
United States, as well as the coins of the
United States, and other frauds upon the
government, one hundred aud twenty-five
thousand dollars.
miscellaneous.
For payment of the necessary expenses
incurred iu defending suits against the Secre
tary of the Treasury or his agents for the
seizure of captured or abandoned property;
and lor the examination of witnesses in
claims against the United States pending
iu any department; and for the defense of
the United States in respect of such property
in the Court of Claims, to be expended
under the direction of the Attorney General,
sixty thousand dollars, no paft of which
shall be paid to attorneys at law for profess
ional services, for appearing and assisting in
the trial of causes in the Supreme, circuit or
district courts of the United States, or
Court of Claims; and that the Attorney
General make report to Congress at the end
of the fiscal year of the manner of the ap
propriation of this fund, and to whom aud
lor what purposes paid.
For this sum, or so much thereof as may
be necessary, to be expended under the di
rectiou of the Attorney General in the de
tection and prosecution of crimes against
the United State*, ttftjrthousand dollars.
For expenses to be incurred in the prose
cution and collection of claims due the
United States, to be disbursed under the
direction of the Attorney General, twenty
five thousand dollars.
For continuing the collection of statistics
of mines and mining, to be laid before Con
gress, to he expended under the direction
of the Secretary of the Treasury, ten thou
sand dollars.
For esmpensation of clerks and for addi
tional compensation to same in the office of
the Secretary of the Treasury, twenty-two
thousand five hundred debars".
For facilitating communication between
the Atlantic and Pacific States by
electric telegraph, forty thousand dol
lars: Provided, That no part of this
amount shall be paid to any company which
shall refuse or neglect to perform telegraph
ic service for the government of the United
States in accordance with the provisions of
an act entitled "An act to aid in the con
struction of telegraph lines, and to secure
the government the use of the same for pos
tal, military, and other purposes." approved
July twenty-four, eighteen hundred and
sixty-six.
For construction of revenue vessels in ac
cordance with recommendation of the
special commission, approved by the Secre
tary of the Treasury, two hundred thou
sand dollars.
For furniture and repairs of furniture for
paid
not
public buildings under the control of the
Treasury Department, one hundred and
fifty thousand dollars.
For fuel, lights, and water for public
buildings under the control of the Treasury
Department, two hundred and twenty-five
thousand dollars.
For heating apparatus for public buildings
under the control of the Treasury Depart
ment, fifty thousand dollars.
For vaults, safes, and locks for public
buildings under the control of the Treasury
Department, one hundred thousand dol
lars.
For photographing, engraving and print
ing plans of public buildings under coutrol
of the Treasury Department, ten thousand
dollars.
For pay of custodians and janitors for the
public buildings under the coutrol of the
Treasury Department, two hundred thou
sand dollars.
For repairs and preservation of all public
buildings under the control of the Treas
ury Department, two hundred thousand
dollars.
To enable the Secretary of the Treasury
to pay for repairs of government buildings
in San Francisco, used by the assessors'
department of internal revenue service in
the years eighteen hundred and sixty-six
and eighteen hundred and sixty-seven, the
same being in lieu of rent authorized to be
d for offices of assistant assessors, and
so paid during the occupancy of said
building, seven hundred aud eighty-one
dollars and eighty-eight cents.
To pay for incidental printing for the
Territory of Montana, the amount due to
Messrs. Wilkinson and Ronan. six hundred
and forty-one dollars.
For rent, fuel, lights, postage stamps,
stationery, printing and incidental expenses
of the secretary's office of Idaho Territory
for the fiscal year ending June thirty,
eighteen hundred and seventy-two, three
thousand dollars.
To pay T. L. MeElroy balance due for
printing journal of house and council of
Washington Territory, session of eighteen
hundred and sixty-five and sixty-six, of
legislature thereof, eight hundred and
seventy-five dollars and sixty-one cents.
To pay the United States marshal of
Wyoming Territory the sum of five hundred
dollars for superintending taking of the cen
sus of that Territory in the year eighteen
hundred and sixty-nine, pursuant to the
organic act.
For amount to pay Charles Prosch for
printing for legislative assembly, Washing
ton Territory, session of eighteen hundred
and sixty-seven and sixty-eight, nine hun
dred and seventy-four dollars and forty-five
cents.
To pay for incidental printing for the
Territory of Idaho the amount found due
to Frank Kenyon, four thousand eight hun
dred and one dollars and thirty-eight
cents.
For necessary expenses in the erection,
furnishing machinery and putting up the
same, outbuildings, fencing grounds and
superintendence of the branch mint at Car
son city, thirty thousand three hundred anu
twenty-six dollars.
UNITED STATES COURTS.
For defraying the expenses of the Su
preme Court and circuit and district courts
of the United States, including the District
of Columbia; and also for jurors and wit
nesses. and likewige for defraying the ex
penses of suits in which the United States
are concerned, and of prosecuting offenses
committed against the United States, and
for the safe keeping of prisoners, two mil
lion dollars.
For the support and maintenance ol con
victs transferred from the District of Colum
bia. ten thousand dollars.
_To pay expenses incurred in arresting
William Kelly, under the direction of the
territorial authorities of Wyoming, six huu
dred and one dollars and twenty cents, or
so much thereof as may be necessary.
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR.
PUBLIC LANDS.
For rent of office of surveyor general of
Louisiana, fuel, books, stationery, and other
incidental expenses, two thousand live hun
dred dollars.
For rent of office of surveyor general of
Florida, fuel, books, stationeiy, and other
incidental expenses, one thousand live huu
dred dollars.
For rent of office of surveyor general of
Minnesota, fuel, hooks, stationery, and other
incidental expenses, two thousand two hun
dred dollars.
For rent of office of surveyor general of
Dakota, fuel, hooks, stationery, and other
incidental expenses, two thousand dollars.
_ For rent of office of surveyor general of
Kansas, fuel, books, stationery, and other
incidental expenses, two thousand dollars.
For rent of office of surveyor general of
Colorado, fuel, books, stationery, and other
incidental expenses, two thousand dollars.
_ For rent ol office of surveyor general ot
New Mexico, fuel, books, stationeiy, and
other incidental expenses, two thousand
dollars.
For rent of office of surveyor general of
California, fuel, books, stationery, aud other
incidental extienses, seven thousand dollars.
For rent of office of surveyor general of
Idaho, fuel, books, stationery and other in
cidental expenses, two thousand five hun
dred dollars.
For rent of office of surveyor general of
Nevada, fuel, hooks, stationery, and other
incidental expenses, three thousand seven
hundred dollars.
For rent of office of surveyor general of
Oregon, fuel, hooks, stationery, and other
incidental expenses, two thousand dollars.
For rent of office of surveyor general of
Washington Territory, fuel, books, station
ery. aiiil other incidental expenses, two
thousand dollars.
For rent of office of surveyor general of
Nebraska and Iowa, fuel, books, stationery,
and other incidental expenses, two thou
sand dollars.
For rent of office of surveyor general of
Montana Territory, fuel, books, stationery,
aud other incidental expenses, two thou
sand dollars.
For rent of office of surveyor general of
the Territory of Utah, fuel, books, station
ery. and other incidental expenses, one
thousand eight hundred dollars.
For rent of office of surveyor general of
the Territory of Wyoming, fuel, books,
stationery, and other incidental expenses,
two thousand five hundred dollars.
For rent of office of surveyor gen
al of the Territory of Arizona,
fuel, hooks, stationery ana other incidental
expenses, including the necessary furniture
to establish his office, three thousand dol
lars.
To enable the Secretary of the Interior to
pay the account for services of the super
intendent of construction of the penitenti
ary in the Territory of Montana, the sum of
sixteen hundred dollars, or so much thereof
as may be neeesspry.
EXPENSES OF THE COLLECTION OF REVENUE
FROM SALES OF PUBLIC LANDS.
For salaries and commissions of registers
of land offices and receivers of public
moneys at eighty-one land offices, three hun
dred and ninety-one thousand two hundred
dollars.
For incidental expenses of the land of
fices, thirty-nine thousand two hundred and
seventy-five dollars.
For expenses of depositing moneys re
ceived from sales of puolic lands, ten thou
sand dollars.
metropolitan police.
For salaries and other necessary expenses
of the Metropolitan Police for the District of
Columbia, two hundred and seven thou
sand eight hundred and seventy dollars;
provided, that a further sum, amounting to
one hundred and three thousand nine hun
dred and thirty five dollars, shall be paid to
defray the expenses of the said Metropolitan
Police force by the cities of Washington
and Georgetown, and the county of Wash
ington (beyond the limits of said cities), in
the District of Columbia, in the proportion
corresponding to the number of privates
allotted severally to said precincts: and the
corporate authorities of said cities, and
proper authorities of the District of Colum
bia, are hereby authorized and required to
levy a special tax, not exceeding one-third
of one per centum, which shall be specially
deposited once in each week, as such collec
tions are made, to be expended for said
purpose only, lor the service of the fiscal
year ending June thirty, eighteen hundred
and seventy-two.
seventy-two.
GOVERNMENT HOSPITAL FOR THE INSANE.
For the support, clothing, medical, and
moral treatment of the insane of the army
and navy, revenue cutter and volunteer
service, who may have become insane since
their entry into the service of the United
States, and of the indigent insane of the
District of Columbia, in the Government
Hospital for the Insane, including five hun
dred dollars for books, stationery, and inci
dental expenses, one hundred and twenty
five thousand dollars.
For repairs and improvements of the west
wing of the hospital edifice, fifteen thou
d dollars.
For completing the inclosure and building
the wall along the river front, ten thousand
dollars.
For inclosing the tract of land known as
tbe "Shepperd Farm," three thousand dol
lars.
COLUMBIA INSTITUTION FOR THE LEAF AND
DUMB.
DUMB.
For the supply of the institution, includ
ing salaries and incidental expenses, the
maintenance of the beneficiaries of the
United States, aud five, huudred dollars for
books and illustrative apparatus, forty
thousand five hundred dollars.
For continuing the work on the inclosure
and improving and grading the grounds ot
the institution, six thousand dollars.
For necessary expenses in the erection,
furnishing and fitting up of the buildings
of the institution, in accordance with plans
heretofore submitted to Congress, eighteen
thousand dollars.
COLUMBIA HOSPITAL FOR WOMEN AND LYING
IN ASYLUM, AND OTHER CHARITIES.
For the support ot the Columbia Hospital
for Women and Lying-in Asylum, over and
above the probable amount which will lie
received from pay patients, fifteen thousand
dollars.
For rent of building, three thousand dol
lars.
For purchase of surgical instruments, five
hundred dollars.
For the National Soldiers and Sailors'
Orphans' Home of the city of Washington,
District of Columbia, fifteen thousanddol
lars, to he disbursed under direction of the
Secretary ot the Interior.
For care, support and medical treatment
of sixty transient paupers, medical and
surgical patients, in some proper medical in
stitution in the city of Washington, under a
contract to be formed with such institu
tion. twelve thousand dollars, or so much
thereof as may be necessary, under the di
rection of the Secretary of War.
SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION.
For preservation of the collections of the
surveying and exploring expeditions of the
government, ten thousand dollars.
For the completion of the hall required
for the government collections, ten thousand
dollars.
BOTANIC GARDEN.
For concreting anil paving walks around
the buildings of the Botanic Garden; for
general repairs to the buildings, and for im
proving the large basin with brick or stone
wall, and with white marble eoping, six
thousand dollars.
For the completion of the paving of the
main walks through the Botanic Garden
with Seneca brown stone flagging, aud
taking up and removing the blue stone
flagging now in the main walk, and relaying
the same in Maryland avenue, along" the
south side of the Botanic Garden, nine thou
sand eight hundred and forty dollars.
For two additional laborers at Botanical
Garden, eight hundred and fifty dollars.
rCRLIC BUILDINGS.
For compensation of librarian of the Sen
ate library, in tbe office of the Secretary of
tbe Senate, two thousand two hundred and
twenty dollars.
Under the direction of the Architect of
the Capitol extension:
For improving the heating and ventilating
of the Senate, under ths direction of the
Architect of the Capitol extension, three
thousand dollars.
For furnishing and repairing the work on
the Capitol extension, and for curbing and
flagging upper terraces, sixty five thousand
dollars.
For enlarging air-shaft, plastering ceiling
of corridors, readjustment of fines under
the fioor, new registers, and tor new floor in
the hall of the House of Representatives;
for additional fans for the exhaustion
of vitiated air from the hall, and for engines
to operate them, and for additional ventila
tors in the roof of the hall, and for neces
sary alterations iu the lighting, heating and
ventilating apparatus, twenty thousand
dollars, or so much thereof as may be neces
sary.
For widening the passage-wavs between
the Senate and House wings of tW-Capitol,
ten thousand dollars, or so much thereof as
may he necessary, if the Architect shall
deem the same safe and practicable; and
any expenditure on a plan tliat shall cost a
greater sum to complete it, shall be un
lawful.
For annual repairs of the old portion of
the Capitol building, painting, glazing,
keeping roois iu order, water-pipes, pave
ments and approaches to the building, ten
thousand dollars.
For finishing and repairing the work on
the new dome of the Capitol, five thousand
dollars.
For continuing the work of grading and
filling the grounds around the Capitol,
twenty thousand dollars.
For completing the north front of the
Patent Office building, and grading and
paving G street, from Seventh to Ninth
streets, and to replace amount returned to
the treasury under the fifth section of the
act approved July twelve.eighteen hundred
and seventy, two thousand five hundred
dollars.
For the extension of the Government
Printing Office building, upon the plans
prepared by the Architect of the Capitol
extension, including the cost of hoisting
works, said appropriation to be available
during the present fiscal year, forty-five
thousand dollars; and any expenditure on
a plan that shall cost a greater sum to com
plete it shall be deemed unlawful.
SURVEYING THE PUBLIC LANDS.
For surveying the public lands in Louis
iana, at rates not exceeding ten dollars per
lineal mile for township and eight dollars
for section lines, twelve thousand two hun
dred and forty dollars.
For surveying the public lands in Florida,
at rates not exceeding ten dollars jie.r lineal
mile for standard, seven dollars lor town
ship and six for section lines, twelve thou
sand five hundred dollars.
For surveying the public lands in Min
nesota, at rates not exceeding fifteen dollars
per lineal mile for standard lines, twelve
dollars for township and ten dollars for sec
tion lines, forty thousand dollars.
For surveying the public lands in Dakota
Territory, at rates not exceeding ten dollars
per mile for standard lines, seven dollars for
township, and six dollars for section lines,
twenty thousand dollars: Provided, that
not less than ten thousand dollars of this
amount shall be expended within the limits
of the Pembina land district in said Terri
tory.
For surveying the public lands in Mon
tana Territory, at rates not exceeding fifteen
dollars per lineal mile for standard lines,
twelve dollars for township, and ten dollars
for section lines, forty thousand dollars.
For surveying the public lands in Ne
braska, at rates not exceeding ten dollars
per lineal mile for standard lines, six dollars
for township, and five dollars for section
lines, forty thousand dollars.
For eurveving the public lands in Kansas,
at rates not'exceeding ten dollars per lineal
mile for standard lines, six dollars lor town
ship, and five dollars for section lines, iorty
thousand dollars. .
For surveving the public lands in Colo
rado, at rates not exceeding fifteen dollars
per lineal mile for standard lines, twelve
dollars for township, and ten dollars for sec
tion lines, forty thousand dollars.
For the survey of the public lands within
the limits of the land grant to Kansas
Pacific Railroad Company in the Territory
of Colorado, thirtv thousand dollars; pro
vided, that the foregoing appropriations tor
surveys of public lands within the limits ot
the above railroad land grants shall be con
ditional upon the compliance of said com
panies or parties in interest with the
requirements of the twenty-first section of
the act of July second, eighteen hundred
and sixty-four, entitled "an act to amend
an act to aid in the construction of a rail
road aud telegraph line from the Missouri
river to the Pacific ocean, and to secure to
tbe government the use of the same for
postal, military nud other purposes." ap
proved Julv first, eighteen hundred and
sixty-two. Statute- volume thirteen, page
three huudred aii ! .uxty-tivc.
For surveying the public lands in Idaho,
at rates not exceeding fifteen dollars per
lineal mile for standard lines, twelve dol
lars for township aud ten for section lines,
thirty thousand dollars.
For surveying the public lands in New
Mexico, at rates not exceeding fifteen dol
lars per lineal mile for standard lines,
twelve dollars for township and ten dollars
for section lines, ten thousand dollars.
For surveying the public lands iu Ari
zona, at rates not exceeding fifteen dollars
per lineal mile for standard lines, twelve
dollars for township, aud ten dollars for
section lines, twenty thousand dollars.
For surveying the public lands in Cali
fornia, at rates not exceeding fifteen dollars
per lineal mile for standard lines, twelve
dollars for township, and ten dollars for
section lines, seventy thousand dollars:
Provided, That the Commissioner of the
General Land Office, iu his discretion, may
hereafter authorize public lands in said
State, and also in Oregon and Washington
Territory, densely covered with forests or
thick undergrowth, to he surveyed at aug
mented rates, not exceeding eighteen dol
lars per mile for standard parallels, fifteen
dollars for township, and twelve dollars for
section lines.
For surveying the public lands in
Oregon, at rates not exceeding fifteen dol
lars per lineal mile for standard lines,
twelve dollars for township, and ten dollars
for section lines, thirty-five thousand dol
lars.
For surveying the public lands in Wash-
ington Territory, at rates not exceeding
fifteen dollars per lineal mjle for standard
lines, twelve dollars for township, aud ten
dollars for section lines, forty thousand
dollars.
For surveying the public lands in Oregon
situated west of the Cascade mountain?,
densely covered with forests or thick un
dergrowth, at the rates of not exeeding six
teen dollars for township and section lines,
fifteen thousand dollars.
For surveying the public lands in Utah
Territory, at rates not exceeding fifteen
dollars per mile for standard lines, twelve
dollars for township, and ten dollars for
section lines, fifteen thousand dollars.
For surveying the public landsin Nevada,
at rates not exceeding fifteen dollars per
lineal mile for standard lines, twelve dol
lars for township, and ten dollars for sec
tion lines, forty-five thousand dollars.
For surveying the public lauds in the
Territory of Wyoming, at rates not exceed
ing fifteen dollars per lineal mile for stand
ard, twelve dollars for township, and ten
dollars for section lines, forty thousand dol
lars.
MISCELLANEOUS.
To mark and define the boundary lines
between the Territory of Utah on the north
aud of Idaho on the south, six thousand
four hundred and eighty dollars.
To enable the Secretary of the Interior to
pay the expense of the survey of the diinin
isheil reservation of the Great and Little
Osage Indians, in the State of Kansas,
seventy-five thousand dollars, or so much
thereof as may be necessary; provided, that
the amount so paid for said survey shall lie
refunded to the treasury from the proceeds
of sale of said reservation: anil provided
further, that the comueusation for making
survey shall not exceed the respective
prices per mile allowed by this act tor sur
ve.ving public lands in Nebraska and
Kansas.
For continuing the geological survey of
the Territories of the United States.' by
Professor Hayden, under the direction of
the Secretary of the Interior, forty thou
sand dollars.
For continuing the completion of the
survey of the Colorado of the West and
its tributaries, by Professor Powell, under
the direction of the Smithsonian Institution,
twelve thousand dollars.
For expenses of prosecuting the inquiry
authorized by law' iuto the causes of the
decrease of the food fishes of the coast and
the lakes, five thousand dollars, to be ex
pended under the direction of the Secretary
of the Treasury.
For additional compensation to Henry
Douglass, iu the employ of the Doorkeeper
of the House of Representatives, for the
present fiscal year, one hundred dollars;
and his regular annual compensation is
hereby increased that amount, a sum suffi
cient to pay which for the next fiscal year
is hereby appropriated, and hereafter his
compensation shall be eight hundred and
twenty dollars per annum.
And Godfrey Weitzel, of the corps of en
gineers, United States army, and in charge
of the improvement of the Louisville canal,
is hereby empowered and directed, subject
to the approval of the Chief of said corps
of engineers, to adjust and pay, out of any
money appropriated for the improvement
of said canal, to John B. Brown, any legal
or equitable claim he may have against Hie
United States arising out of his contract by
him to perform work on said improvement
of said canal, in eighteen hundred anil
seventy: Provided, That there shall not
he paid to him in any event over eight
thousand two hundred dollars, nor more un
der that sum than, together with any sums
already paid him on account of said con
tract aud work, shall be equal to the fair
and reasonqjile value to the government of
the work done by him for the government
under such contract.
To pay Vinuie Ream, for making the mar
ble statue of Abraham Lincoln, ten thou
sand dollars, which, iu addition to the sum
of five thousand dollars already paid, shall
be in full of all claims for said work.
To reimburse S. Wolf, recorder of deeds
for the District of Columbia, for certain
books of record and indexes purchased by
him for the use of his office, one thousand
two hundred and forty-eight dollars.
To Marv B. Walker, widow of Robert J.
Walker, for money expended by him when
territorial governor of Kansas, thirteen
thousand and tnree dollars and seventy-five
cents, or so much thereof as may be neces
sary, to be paid on vouchers to be sub
mitted to the proper accounting officers of
the treasury.
For defraying the expenses of taking the
ninth census of the United States, one mil
lion two hundred and fifty thousand dol
lars.
For the payment of pensions under the
"Act granting pensions to certain soldiers
and sailors ol the war of eighteen hundred
and twelve, and the widows of deceased
soldiers," approved February fourteen
eighteen huudred anil seventy-one, four
million five hundred thousand dollars.
WAR DEPARTMENT.
BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS IN AND AROUND
WASHINGTON.
For repairs, care, and improvement of
public buildings, grounds, and works in the
District of Columbia, under the direction of
the Chief Engineer of the army, namely:
For casual repairs of the Navy Yard and
Upper bridges, five thousand dollars.
For repair of government water-pipes and
fire-plugs on Pennsylvania avenue, five
thousand dollars.
For care and improvement of reservations
en New York, Massachusetts, Vermont
and Maryland avenues, fifteen thousand
dollars.
For cleaning out sewer-traps along Penn
sylvania, avenue, one thousand dollars.
For improving Massachusetts, Connecti
cut, New kork, Maine, Delaware, and New
Jersey avenues, twenty-tivo thousand dol
lars.
h or annual repairs of fences around re
servations, two thousand dollars.
api
For care and improvement of public
reservation number two, anil Lafayette
square, seven thousand five hundred dol
*For removing snow and ice from pave
ments aud public walks, one thousand dol
lars. „ . ,
For manure and hauling the same to pub
lic grounds and reservations, three thousand
For painting iron fences arouuil Lafayette
square, in front of tbe War and Navy De
partments, two thousand dollars.
For improvement, care and protection ot
seats and fountains in Capitol grounds, two
thousand dollars. .
For hire of carts in the public grounds,
three thousand dollars.
For purchase and repair of tools used in
public grounds, two thousand dollars.
For purchase of trees and tree-boxes, and
ttf whitewash tree-boxes, and fences, live
thousand dollars. ,
For purchase of flower-pots, mats, glasses,
and twine, one thousand dollars.
For lighting the Capitol, Executive Man
sion, and public grounds, forty thousand
dollars.
For pay of lamplighters, plumbing, gas
fitting, lamps, lampposts, matches, and re
pairs of all sorts, ten thousand dollars.
For fuel for centre building of the Cn
tol, one thousand five hundred dollars.
For annual repairs of the Executive Man
sion. five thousand dollars.
For refurnishing the Executive Mansion
five thousand dollars.
For care and improvement of grounds
south of the Executive Mansion, five thou
sand dollars.
For fuel for the Executive Mansion, three
thousand dollars.
For repair of green-house at the Execu
tive Mansion, and purchase of plants, three
thousand dollars.
For an iron bridge across the canal at
Thirteenth street west, and improvement of
Monumental reservation, five thousand dol
lars.
For repairs of green house at Propagat
ing Garden, three thousand dollars.
For contingents of office of Public Build
ings and Grounds, two thousand dollars.
For improviog Franklin square, opening
and graveliug walks, aud planting trees
and shrubbery, five thousand dollars.
For improvement of circle at the intersec
tion of Massachusetts and Vermont avenues,
six thousand dollars.
For paving on Pennsylvania avenue and
Fifteenth street in front of the property of
tbe United States, in accordance with the
law making change of grade, fourteen thou
sand seven hundred and ninety-two dol
lars.
For paving Pennsylvania avenue in front
ol the Botanic Garden, from the northwest
gate of the Capitol grounds to Third street
west, including grading, laying side-walks,
flag footways, resetting curb, paving, and
building sewer, under act of July eight,
eighteeu hundred and seventv, twenty-five
thousand eight hundred anil thirty-eight
dollars.
For cutting street through the President's
grounds, as per plan, one thousand one
hundred and ninety-two dollars.
For construction of circular fence around
and through the President's grounds to
Seventeenth street west, including foun
dation walls, curbing, flagging, and iron
fencing, forty-five thousand five hundred
dollars.
WASHINGTON
AQUEDUCT.
WASHINGTON
AQUEDUCT.
For finishing coping and iron railing on
bridges numbers one, two, three, and four,
ten thousand dollars.
For widening embankments over conduit
and macadamizing roads, ten thousand dol
lars.
For completing gate-houses at distribut
ing reservoir, twentv thousand four hun
dred and ninety-six dollars.
For completing high-service reservoir,
four thousand dollars.
For ventilators over conduit, two thou
sand eight hundred dollars.
For fencing reservoirs, three thousand six
huudred dollars.
For building office at Rock Creek bridge,
three thousand three hundred dollars.
For engineering, superintenilesce, and re
pairs for the fiscal year ending June thirty,
eighteen hundred and seventy-two, twenty
thousand dollars.
For completing earthwork and making
the slope-wall of division dam, twentv thou
sand dollars.
For completing slope-wall of ilistributin
reservoir, twenty thousand dollars.
ARMORIES AND ARSENALS.
For Springfield armory, Springfield. Mas
sachusetts: Repairs and preservation of
grounds, buildings, and machinery, twenty
thousand dollars; macadamizing public
roads in and around the armory grounds,
two thousand dollars.
For completing the bridge at Rock Island,
being an unexpended balance covered into
the treasury under the act of Julv twelve,
eighteen hundred and seventv, five hundred
thousand dollars.
For Rock Island armory and arsenal.
Rock Island, Illinois: Containing the devel
opment ol water-power, two hundred thou
sand dollars; permanent forging shop, two
hundred thousand dollars; constructing per
manent workshop, two hundred thousand
dollars; purchasing and laying pipe, eight
thousand dollars: two blocks of subaltern
officers' quarters, fifty-five thousand dollars:
ruac&daujizing main avenues and streets
five thousand dollars; tools and machinery
required for new' shops nearly completed
twenty thousand dollars.
For Alleghany Arsenal, Pittsburgh.
I ennsylvania: For repairs to public
buildings, grounds, and machinery
oue thousand five hundred dollars!
one-half the cost of grading, pav
ing and curbing on Thirty-ninth and For
tieth streets, trorn Butler street to Penn
avenue, and on Penn avenue, between
ibirty-Dinth and Fortieth streets, eleven
thousand five hundred dollars; under-pin
ning and boundary wall, five thousand
seven hundred dollars.
For Augusta arsenal. Augusta, Georgia
Quarters lor married soldiers, one thousand
seven hundred and fifty dollars
For Benicia arsenal,'Benicia, California:
I ermanent barracks tor enlisted men and
cistern lor same, fifty-two thousnu.1 eight
hundred and fifty-seven dollars; cistern for
new office, two thousand eight huudred and
hlty-seven dollars; brick reservoir, fourteen
thousand two hundred anil eighty-six dol
a-s; guardhouse and tire enginehouse.
eleven thousand four hundred and tweirv
uine dollars; grading aud improving
arsenal grounds, five thousand dollars; re
pairs of public buildings and machinery
one thousand dollars. *■ '
For Columbus arsenal, Columbus, Ohio
Cisterns and wells, one thousand dollars
grading grounds making roads, and drains,
live thousand dollars; repairs to buildings
one thousand dollars.
For Charleston arsenal, Charleston, South
Carolina: Repairs of officers' quarters, en
listed mens barracks, and other public
buildings, grounds, fences, and drains, five
thousand dollars.
For Detroit arsenal, Dearbornville, Michi
gan: Repairs to public buildings and
grounds, five hundred dollars.
*'? r p ®rt Monroe arsenal, including gun
yard, with new fence, three thousand dol
als -, repairing two store-houseg, one thou
sand five hundred dollars; painting and re
raStr idiEg "' "" thousand five
For Fort Union arsenal, New Mexico: One
set of quarters, one thousand five hundred
and seventy five dollars; repairing S i
and grounds three thousand dolfars. *
pSSKKaf
Indiana* U Gnanj , R li8 arse ? a1 ' Indianapolis
f.. . d8 . an,t roa >iway.. five thousand dol"
. . five thousand dol"
KanR a s-'' a R« 1,W0 - lth * rsenal - Leavenworth
Srand^alk" g fi b " i ^ DgB ' *&*•
enworth, three thousand dollars
hundred dollars. **' * thousand nine
For Pikeavillo arsenal, PikesviUe, Mary
1: Repairs and preservation of arw ,
racks, quarters, workshops,
land:
barracks, quaiwrio, ™unumiins, stabl.
magazine and inclosnrcs, two hundred a .
lars. ao1 '
For Saint Louis arsenal, Saint Louis y
souri: Officers' quarters on Jefferson jp
racks orduunce reservation, eighteen tho!
sand dollars.
For San Antonio arsenal. San Antoni
Texas: Erecting a store building for stabW
wagon house and store room for fora!!'
harness and tools, three thousand dollar!'
repairs of officers' quarters, office anl'
painting fences, roofs and gutters of r, u hij:
buildings, two thousand five hundred dol
lars.
For Vancouver arsenal, Washington Ter
ritory: Repairs to nublic buildings and
grounds, oue thousand dollars. *
For Washington arsenal, Washington
District ot Columbia: Improving magazin*
grounds, two thousand dollars. *
For Watervliet arsenal, West Troy. Xe»
York : Repairs to buildings, roof's anil "per
manent sheds, three thousand dollars; «
pairs to bridges, roads, fences and inc-loein.
walls, one thousand dollars. '
For Watertown arsenal, Watertown. Mas.
sachusetts: Repairs of buildings, ground,
and machinery, five thousand dollars.
For contingencies of arsenals : Repairs oj
smaller arsenals, and to meet such unfo ts .
seen expenditures at arsenals as accident!
or other contingencies during the year mar
render necessary, ten thousand dollars. 1
BUREAU OF REFUGEES, FREEDMEN aSTy
ABANDONED LANDS.
For collection aud payment of bonntT
prize money, anil other legitimate claims of
colored soldiers and sailors, viz: For salj.
ries of agents and clerks; rents of office,
fuel, and lights; stationery and priming;'
office furniture and repairs: mileage and
transportation of officers and agents; tele
graphing aad postage, eighty-seven them
sand five hundred dollars.
For support of Freedmen's Hospital and
Asylum at Washington. District of Colum
bia". viz: Fay of medical officers and attend
ants: medicines, medical supplies, and ra
tions; clothing; rent of hospital buildings,
fuel, anil lights; repairs and transportation,
seventy-eight thousand dollars: Provided!
That no part of said appropriation shall be
used in the support of, or to pay any of tbe
aforesaid expenses on account of any per
sons hereafter to be admitted to said hos
pital and asylum, unless persons removed
thither from seme other government bos
pital.
SIGNAL OFFICE.
For manufacture, purchase, or repair me
teorological and other necessary instru
ments; for telegraphing reports; for ex
penses of storm signals announcing proba
ble approach and force of storms; for
instrument shelters; for hire, furniture, aud
expense of offices maintained for public nse
in cities or posts receiving reports: for majs
and bulletins, to be displayed in chamber,
of commerce and boards of trade rooms; for
books and stationery, and for incidental
expenses not otherwise provided for. one
hundred and two thousand four humlred
and fifty-one dollars; provided, that no pan
of this appropriation, nor of any appropria
tion for the several departments of the gov
eminent, shall he ex|ieniled for telegraph
ing between said departments anil their
officers or agents, except at rates first to be
established by the Postmaster General,
under section two of chapter two hundred
and thirty of Statutes of eighteen hundred
and sixty-six.
miscellaneous.
For contingencies of the army, namely:
To enable the Secretary of the Treasury
to settle the accounts of disbursing officers
for expenditures already made in pursuance
of law. which will not involve anv actual
expenditure, but merely a transfer on the
books of the treasury, 'two hundred thou
sand dollars.
To enable the Secretary of the Treasury
to settle the accounts of disbursing officer,
'or expenditures already made iu pursu
ance of law, which will not involve any ac
tual expenditure, but merely a transfer on
the books of the treasury, seventy-five
thousand dollars.
For payment of costs and charges of State
penitentiaries for the care, clothing, main
tenance. and medical attendance of United
States military convicts confined in them,
fifty thousand dollars.
For continuing the surveys of the north
ern and northwestern lakes, one hundred
and seventy-five thousand dollars.
LIGHTHOUSE ESTABLISHMENT.
For repairs and incidental expenses is
refitting and improving light houses and
buildings connected therewith, two hun
dred aud twenty-five thousand dollars.
For salaries of seven hundred and tLirty
two light-house keepers aud light-beaccn
keepers, aud their assistants, lour hundred
and thirty-nine thousand two huudred dol
lars. #
For seameu's wages, rations, repairs,
salaries, supplies, anil incidental expenses
twenty-five light-vessels, aud seven re
lief light-vessels, two hundred and sixty
one thousand six hundred and forty-seven
dollars and fifty cents.
1 or expenses ot raising, cleaning, paint
ing, repairing, removing, and supplying
losses nt buoys, spindles, and day-beacom
anil for chains, siukers, and similar neces
saries, two hundred and seventv-five thou
sand dollars.
For repairs and incidental expenses in
renewing, refitting, and improving fug
signals and buildings connected therewith,
thirty thousand dollars.
lor expenses of visiting and inspecting
lights and other aids to navigation, two
thousand dollars.
1 or supplying the light-houses and bea
con lights on the Atlantic, Gulf. Lake, and
I'acific coasts with oil, wicks, glass chim
chamois skius, spirits of wine, whiting,
polishing powder, towels, brushes, soap,
paints, and other cleaning materials, and
ior expenses of repairing and keeping in
repair illuminating apparatus and ma
chinery, and ot guaging, testing, transpor
tation, delivery ot oil and other supplies for
iight-houses, ana other incidental necessary
expenses, three hundred and thirty-one
thousand seven hundred aud seventeen
dollars.
SURVEY OF THE COAST,
h or continuing the survey of the Atlantic
and gult coasts of the United States, and
. Champlain, including compensation
ot civilians engaged in the work, aud ex
cluding pay anil emoluments of officers of
the army and navy anil petty officers and
men ot the navy employed in the work,
three hundred aud ninety-one thousand
dollars.
For continuing the survey of the Western
coast of the United States, including 00®
pensation of civilians engaged in the'work,
two hundred and forty thousand dollars:
rovided, that the operations shall include
a hydrographic development of the dan
nml 0t .,' K ,', an na 'igation between San
Diego and Panama.
hor pay anil rations of engineers for the
_ eaiRera used in the coast survev. no longer
thousand dollars. De P ar{ment > " ve
For continuing the publication of theob
r\ ations made in the progress of coast
survey, including compensation for civilians
engaged m the work, the publication to be
made at the Government Printing Office,
ten thousand dollars.
tor repairs aud maintenance of the coni
piement of vessels used in the coast survev
lorty-five thousand dollars.
Tor extending the trianguiation of tie
coast survey so as to form a geodetic con
nection between the Atlantic and Pacifio
coasts of the United States, including com
pensation ot civilians engaged in the work.
th0l ' 8and dollars; provided, that
r,*^ ul ? tIon s,laI1 'letermine points in
rpninB'l** 6 °* *! ie L'nion which shall make
,P ro V 81 ? ns for Bs own topogra
} "Hal and geological survevs.
UNDER THE NAVY DEPARTMENT
T-, l0R navy yards.
r°r navy yard at Portsmouth. New
Hampslure : Repairs of all kinds, seventy
five tnousand dollars.
Ke
hor navy yard at Boston. Massachusetts:
< p.ur> ot all kinds, thousand
Ke
< p.ur> ot all kinds, seventy-five thousand
dollars.
.For navy yard at Brooklyn. New York:
ilofbwf ° kinds, one hundred thousand
bur navy yard at Philadelphia, Pennsvl
Repairs of all kinds, forty thiiu
, aa ', .Bars; for building landing-wharves.
ii S'figand filling in, commencing quay
i„;„ i8 ' , store houses, carpenters' shop (
jo uers shop, smiths' shop, machine shop,
mces, steam engines, scows, boats, der
crs aud machinery and tools of all kind*
dollars^* 16 kd an d> tw ® hundred thousand
I or fiavy yard at Washington, District of

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