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New Orleans Republican. [volume] (New Orleans, La) 1867-1878, January 02, 1872, Image 1

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NEW ORLEANS REPUBLICAN.
Pynj&LE COPIES; ten cents.
OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE STATE OF LOUISIANA.
TERMS; $16 00 FEE ANNUM,
of <
win
tlie
Roya
IlfllM
MON
M-.tl
VOLUME Y—NO. 221.
NEW ORLEANS, TUESDAY, JANUARY 2, 1872.
WHOLE NUMBER 1417.
MON
M-.tl
FIX
priTlh
J•iliii,' Til EATRE.
Giroijj.p --
..............................Proprietor.
lollo- lEl ' Slot tiSS OP THE EMINENT ARTIST,
squa U 1,8 I , ( I LLE WESTERN,
one? AtiiSUJ '' y Mr ' J - A. HERNE,
feet ... ■
A" y £ venln «. Janunrv », 1S7J.
hftv- 1 1 :e powerful plav of
f.j; LEAH.
hy a .......................Miss Lucille Western
•?<■»!........................Vr. J. A Herne
o^H ^a'^-MASKS AND PACES,
f^kslptot ,,f M,SS Ll 'CILLE
com*
thirt
AMUSEMENTS.
ami <>ulv rt-^rt sanitation of FRol'
,j:i2 it
fiuee'* A ll0t SE ......... Ol'EKA IIOI SE
liiin. Tuesday, January J, IS7'J.
tlnr! T „ *
lam LtUA I»I LAMMKHMOOR.
^°or arts. Donizetti.
ance eoTnniemv6
from 9 A. M. to
ja2 It
Jour en at halt-past six; perform;
tore.' ea. Box office open daily
dree IE.MY OF .MUSIC
m i __, 1
tTr January J, 1S7'2.
lA SE " VEAU matin ee, MONDAY noon.
2 ■ ac,:t flfy appearance of the Proliant
muj anu g.uea young artiste,
,wo»S- F - S. CHAN FRAU,
on S .sited in the critics] esteem of New York,
'tunore, as a p<
and ot
•harms from
'r" ' f t'iLt'lelphiti and Balt.......
lei ntative ..t the emotional drama, and i>f those
teet ra nn Inch derive their « hief
achy identified with he? tame.' The emotioi
nun.uded upoxi T^tuitio
iouidie uove'i.t, entitled
tuea
Idyl), hy Unaric
Bli , DOHA.
, )w ^ianfrau wilihe sopporu-d f, T the Academy's
eessj if eompanv,
Mrs. U liitnfrasi's I**, fit. Satuidav. Cliar.
the #J' u ee. In r. l,eaa»! EXPIATION on.
8eC? r J'"» of fcrtat Lfr.ne), and ( HUlsTIK
Ter N - V 0 ?,! 1 cxpreHely written for Mrs. Chan
• **. I a vie ure.
dcU tiuie—Doors om| it a quarter to s* v< n
-——-perforin a nee at ■ »P- M. del:.
Sue. "■-
EATER?*
£<K( tKOM THP
> FIJI ISIaNDS,
nuseum ot Fijian and Sew Zealand curie-si
fieri
of
ties,
iqaf^tcn and t^ba^co low on exhibition at No.
f stre ( t, tor a few da>sonlv.
^ubU 10n SUy ^ tlU; ,:h£ *** '
publi
Kicb
en twenty-five cents.
St-'IV OF Ml SIC.
Cl do*
wit-* December 31-New Year's I
with-' * Abbott's Paiton me Troupe a
g"? MOTHER (lOO-K,
lion § 014
twoiK FE LLIES OF Hllil'TY DUMPTY
as p*
uatcr
^•UTl l.S THEATRE
t ront) n
s ^'i aNA bEK
para
uer o
:iig
LUtrf.NCE BARRETT,
•k-J«>HN H. StLWi.v,
"A Happy New V ear."
■ Uvcr.lc ;r..d
: s a
ccgasteitMp ot
Here: el:st:t.(uished ie»ii';,,B
passe -TOHN K. OU'F'IS,'
tics i appearMotulay-ffitU iesilay everdi g- c
* Neii' TIMS, and also iaFeiRTY WINKS.
TeI WcJtifsday Mati«e. D'>T.
deS-«b». e '-'eniug, SORiN SHINGLE, ami
-i»I i.V. 11 ir>nay evc.in^, Janu.iry 4.
H ## |i' (l Mr. JoirU K. OWLS'—D<*T. ainl LIVE
every Wednesdif ami Saturday: a<l
• ba.f px.ee. Bm*iuc«l M u-a^er. Lorraxi-.t*
jji easurer, Frai. k B. Cl 1 pv. cle J1 11
.earn*
to s* IIC AN UNION CLUB BALL.
A net:
.*1 id -
tweD^^v** Hnll, February 1.
ertv, _
aud*i ladies' invitations can '><• oUtaiccd
Bur^'ri{{Lt, Appraiser'* office. (.'ustoiiiliouse :
^ co& KnukM. Clerk Iburth District Court:
erly J^Lian, Recorder F .:-1 District; or aiy
stPNoi' t nf Club. *
eacl
ar^ reqm atid to af pe .r ;n
.7 14 21 tti
ul fori
.7 14 21 tti
ht. 1C HALL
— , ,l.nrt aetm, WBUnenctitg on
° IhrSlman Uav, December i~t.
X
Ol r.MA*s ItOYAL JAPANESE.
ti
PERFORMERS EVER IN THIS
Cfil'NTRT.
live costutre
of
Lata
Sixth
above
ajctie,. e s j :i j ch.idrm
sas-t
city, -R ATTEMPTED BT AMERICANS,
o'cloc
IO ALL ' ,nl Atl Bight wit* 1 this Trcjttpe.
F. Spe n 4 . cpveti o'clock. Performance to
at eight o'clock. ,
t'-tieda-wstv-five cento. Re-o-rvcd seats *1.
120-J ot Eail at tbe MiOOIUe Hall. Box office
g,ci* 9 \. J], t li 4 P. M.
Ten
GIFT JAP MATINEE
Tlle ,AV CRRISTMA8 DAY, AT 12 O'CLOCK,
F°ol- oce-as*®littleABBlchf will PRESENT
t>,.^ ' 0 , '^^^.boiaNS. Manager.
4. a. ftiiuLK A^eiit.
|g are Invited to attend tree of chaige.
FOE RENT.
■ NEW COTTAGE HOWt-li IS
fourth ii strict: contains se-'t-t: toon;
rtrv. front ami sale gal cries large yard.
*oki;g, for good he is. iu the Firatlhs
J Julia street from D A. M. to t
ele-lgi lm
" jtNo.
,*\T._WTTH GAS FIXil''RES, A VERY
• Sk-Huel well located l.oube, i eiuvement
T Srfcars and the maiket. ettnated on
*»' * Hre-e-r No. 201, neat the corner of 'lag
jsirs-.MU given uniuediati iv. Apply to
J, on,,, ot Canal and Delta streets.
Fo iff ROO HS-H KNISHKD—■WITH <>k
lea^X-ard iu that pleasant n-aideiiee No
to nrie* street Suites of loutas for fatnt
__
W'tti-TrK DESIRABLE TWU STORY
l-'o-enTfo. I.V.)Cailioit" street:
pro u .# 9 ii)vi j ifutly
A r) ;Ai Loc-k-box No.
Fir ' J
feqt
E*li adapted
terms moder
Now Orleans
S FOR SALE.
huu V vV .,
, r *g ii'orws, ii
P«bWK»
FDR SAIiK.-THK ESTAB
... u, tbe JACKSON s ew iJ..
vi /ft, utpftief of this
et and the Convent, is
^11 its implements complete.
Iiiu.es. etc., tin- pro),tie
front business. Said mill is
ler, is now running,
iuedin an us parts and details
•fffl> doing a ......I business.
ii^jn tit* pien.' - s, to
4>y 0
For par
"I I ALLGLE k PETIT.
' WANTED*
_IN A FAMILY OF THREE, TWO
'***(?[[RLS Orrman »r Knjz.:sli—ore to
if and ire.il, the other to take care of a
* h d * genera 1 housework Re t.-re-i
Call at
■^TTi POSITION AS (lOVERNKSS or
ikion to a ladv. Would t. ke tlieen
Tone or two cleldren, ami iust; .eet them
U »"'rf a, '-i
„d EnKhsh- '. s
j; ohjt -1 to go i
t ejt-i titan; also,
t good housekeeper,
count rv.
MRS. 1! WELA.'
No. Z" ' e'atn;i
*
r / M>0
b i'iinel'e, 4 tu ',, '
lilave dr*
fi Y »rH t5-* * S
t^SS
— 3
Hedin. arci^
and deposits
worth, then
pian minihei e'
live feet trout
dredi feet u. dep
m the reap bv j
Bai<t lot and otli
ing t Im- < oj lit-i of
lieing tlie t-auie prO|\
]iiirclias<- Im, in (Je<
fore Joseph Oiim, not
bevi-ut'-eiit Ii of (ictolx
Seized in th** above 8Lr>
Terms—Cabh on the s y
%
de2 n
Liie-i ifT o
MISCELLANEOUS.
P artnership.— i have formed a co
partners'rip with niv son-in-law. Mr. Augustus
Keiehard. under the firm of BA Ol'I K k REICHARDS,
to continue the hrokerTi
hand. Mr. Charles
Caiondeltt street
WIDOW CHARLES BAQUIK.
New Orleans. January 1, 1872. ia2 lm
business of my late hus
Baquie, at the old office, I*o. 16
'AIRBANKS scales
H All UcHeriptiouNf
FAIRBANKS SOUTHERN DEP'>
53
Untnp Street.
W. B. BOWMAN. A z
N
OTK E TO COKE CONSUMER?
♦ 'FT' 1
l "V TilK NkW OKLF.ANS Gasi.ioht C«
D« t ember 2i»
PHE PRICE OF CORK HAS BEEN REDUCED TO
Fifty CeiiM per Barrel.
de2r WILLIAM S. BROWN, Treasurer.
I N BANKRUPT! Y. — PETITION.
Seliedules prepared strietly aceordii
AND
prepared
krupt Law, general orders of the United
Mates Supreme Court, and rules of the United
States District Court, bv
JOHN S. CARTER.
At * he office of C. 8. Kelioir*:. Register in Bank
ruptcy. ,ii Customhouse building. de2: Jy
ROVER A BAKER'S
< KLEBRATED SEWING MACHINE
Def« ated the
i HINES a
ht leading SHUTTLE STITCH MA
i.e tifGi grand State Fa r of Lou
e. i•« d tlie only GOLD MEDAL at tbe third ufi
iiua' Stati Fair of Mississippi,
e? :i ( i-ivcd more FIRST PREMIUMS for best n a*
chiut-sand machine stitching than all the com
]»i Tit;ou combined, in M.ssi.ssippi, Alabama. L<*'i
,-iar.a and Texas, and has the people's verd
:i: the above Slat os, the sales being great
than !liat of any other machine. It is the
know]edged Southern favorite-,
b-ni-ral Southern olliee 1. 2 Canal street New (
i:s. d* 22 111
^OAIUIUED HAMS.
]c,(N.O peutnls SugarCured HAMS at cents per
peutal.
'.".cue p-.iumls Green SHOPLPERS at C cents per
pound.
T (Mio jmuiids BREAKFAST DAVOS at 10 Cents per
Pound.
A -0 for sa'.c. 5ft(- ('I.ELL VN SADTI.ES at *7
earl The above pries ate great bargains.
S. B. (Tint. li l.L.
No. -to Maj.izine street, between Natchez and
Gravn-r. under St. James Hotel. de2t lm
111 IK I.E Y,
MERCANTILK STATK >N11 K,
Job PRINTER,
III.ANK HOOK tlAM F.UTI KEI!,
No. -*.f C'ominrrriHl Flare, New OrlenDN.
II
IIR^E**—'MULES. —THE UN! ER^TGNKD
Ml of infonxriij: t ' • ; iUir ; I at
as p«*x tec4«*i! an-ari^i tueiits with 'V»stenilniv
i ' - : ; jl \% ill ♦'liable him to k* ♦ ]»coi t-!an! ull liai d
Ti.e .tr^* st asbortmenf of horses and :i, . • s to ? ut
ml city ileniand, which 1 n s«
ai d guaianUes a'.i stock
• i ••presei.ti'd.
JAMES II s
, 134 Baron:a
\N.
S()0
S«5 — WILLCOX
MAt HINK.
.ii reai
to
by
al lac
av
i»r foot.
ommeuded by tbe
• ft !i «le!i« ate ladies to use.
i:First class machines
■led for sale. The New DoiU'
: »• e made on an ♦ ntirc.iy new priru :ple. A
;♦* a-sortmeiit of ladies' ready made suits a!
-or. hard, fit'nil colors and styh s. inanuUc
■ d <•:: oni et-b biated sevirg mai'hiixes.
• ' iv M. S. HKIxilK K. Ne), 1".) Cana: street
eoUIit of its
!! kinds are
Sewing Ma
t'AFtlKTIK- i:\CTI INGE-e >>RNE
» 1'aupi.iue and Gust......... ..... streets, n t
■ -r t-^rt ot tic- '-'Hr.i-t.es Theatre. Tli
-t.-.gt.ed reiejM-etftjllv iefnrtiiH the pi....... o
1 av
OF
un
ti ,
w
L ii j nor b ai:«l
••lit Fii-p ID.
KERNT.ERGF!
Bn
a1 e
THE HK-T I'll Kill I »I
awarded at Tin:
e- Fniree ol I.oiiisiiinn mid .Mi»si»»i|ipi
TO
JOHN FRANK,
Importer and Dealer ;n
LEATHER AND SHOE FINDINGS,
And Manufacturer of
Fa 'OT AND SHOE I'PBF.RS.
No. I 12 I'oyilrme setroer,
r,,K
TITS BEST LEATHER OF AI.L KINI-V
A VII T It H
mani'Eacti'rkd boot and shoe lepers.
^JIEEiiK rV DitE.MAN,
Marrrrl'i cture f ve t hoitsand pout is of - . r ev
( itneiie* and Coiifeetionct ics.
Tie largest candy in a tin fact ,-rv in ti,- Vn:
St.,!es. They niaiiUf .e-tiire e-vet-, k : -1 of si ;,-k 11
■ 'ii;i j 1 - ', candy eti.-l do es, at ! * i; LiiT
lie,:; ns a-;e! k-sses. iosse-nges, and hundreds ot i
te-rei.t candles. Also, agents of Dr. Henley's e«
i,rated w.ueand e-oe-k-tail hitfeis: ar.d keep <,
at.it.:.von hand all kinds of re ines and liquors. A
a'.arge stock e.-t fireworks and fire crackers. >!
cl ai.,i>>' delivered iu tin- city fre-e of djayage, a
for country orders tree i t drayagt- to
land r:gs are! depots.
Eight good candy makers ate want, d. :o
ee ,. be given steady cnipiovinent. dc!2 in
..n. i io;.
n
> .\ 411K PLANTS FOB SAL^.
(Te«cer;t Cify lliemle 1 I'lantins
a:.d
MANTFACTI'RING COMPANY.
RAMIE PLANTS, securely packed for shipping
for sale by thee thousand at reasonable rates
Terms—Cash when ordered.
Books of subscription to the capital stock of this
company are now open at the office, No. 1'22 e'aron
deiii street. WILLIAM HALL, President.
Ei.wakd Towatis. Treasurer. oe 18 3m
j
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\VTM.1AM PHILLIPS, UNION
>T Lies
STA
bl**8, No. 130 Calliope, near St. C harlesBtrewt
bus pv ti v accoininoclation in tbe line of Pleasure
at-'i K.iirj 1\ carriages surh ;u4 backs, breftes, pbae
to;.*., bupKiee. etc., for tlie use of the public, and
at rates to correspond with tlie stringency of flit
times. All backing done below tarill rates. Or
deisfor weddings, balls, picnics, races, etc., wJP
be attended to so as to guarantee satisfaction. I
am also prepared to tine vehicles (alone) to i>ar
tieb having their own horses. _ je!6 Iv
JOHN GKAYKH,
Preiprii-tnr e»f PLc-nix Stnl»le-p atal Uneiert.-iker, Nos.
35 and 27 Elvfcian Fieiiis sir* et, opposite Pontcliar
train railioa-l, Tliire! Distriet, New Orleans. C»r
tinges. Baioueiiea Buggies anei Saeidie Horses to
lare. Horses bought, solel ami kept oil livery.
Patent Metallic burial Gases, Mahogany, Black
Walnut and plant ( itriits always ou I and. Fuller
tps attended to By the Proprietor, who hones, by
si tic! attention to business, to obtain a snareeM
public patronage. _ i y28 1 v
pi Ml Ol .N-TYT ............FINE (iUNS.
J. Ii. COOPEIfS
Cc-:- : P a and Central File Breetii '-oael ng
nCI BI.K GUNS
Know i s l ot tlie world lor the a superior
quality.
Oidetow. ake-ufor the importation of
ONE OR MORE
aftLe above line gtiLfa hv
JOSEPII LENE8,
No. 75 Gravier street, up stairs.
N. B.—Gun iinph-oieuts always ou Land.
I
OBITUARY.
Jacob Barker, Broker ami Financier,
[From the New York Herald.]
Jacob barker, the well known American
financier an.l money broker, died In 1'biia
delphia on the twenty-sixth instant.
Mr. barker was ninety three years of aji 1 .
He enjoyed an almost world-wide reputa
tion on account of his taet, skill and general
judgment in the exercise of the pcculiai
l.rofesstoual ability win. it he possessed.
Jacob barker was born tit Swan Island.
Kennebec county, Maine, on the seventh of
December, in the year 1772. He descended,
hy his mother's side of the family, front the
same stock as Hr. Franklin, to whom, in his
very proudest moments, lie was ever glad
to claim a certain family resemblance. Mrs.
barker, his mother, was of a Quaker family
in Nantucket. Young Jacob was brought
up in the communion of the Friends, to
which, as to tiie unpretending style of dress
costume of the society, lie adhered for very
many years. When lie was sixteen years
old he was set adrift in the wo left "lord
he
cu tp
of hiiiiself.'' which lots
age a ••heritage of woe
Jacob eaiue To New York,
employment with Isaac lli<
sion merchant in this city. H
active, intelligent and venturesome in spec
ulation. Commencing to trade on his own
account in a small way, he realized before
the attainment of his majority so much
money that when he arrived at 'he age of
twenty-one—a period of live years from his
reaching New York—he was in possession
of four ships and a brig, and l ad his notes
re gularly discounted tit the United States
bank. Mr. barker married Elizabeth,
daughter of Thomas Hazard, of New York,
mi the twenty-seventh ot August, in the
year 1S01. Sitting at Ins wedding dinne r,
in company with Mr. He nry I>ewees. lor
whom he had indorsed heavily, news was
brought to banker ot' the failure of both.
He passed the letter over to J>ewees, had
"the pleasure of wine with him. " and took
no further notice of the matter. He soon
afterward entered into a contract with the
American gove rnment for a supply of oil.
iie was then doing a large -hipping busi
ness. In this iim he rece ,v>'d tut* lust con
signment of the tirst steam engine a-eel on
the- North river.
many ol his
le obtained
a cornmis
was bright,
'The war with Great Britain breaking
out. Mr. barker took the iieinocrutic side
m Doiilics. He pledged himself to rai>e
;i l(-an <»f •*•»,000, (M Xi lor the us(' ol the
United States government. He was made
one of the building committee which was
appointed to superintend the erection of
oiel lamtnany Hail, and took putt in the
fist meetings held within its walls. He
lost many—all. we believe—of his ship*
dttrit;g the- jirogre-ss of the w,»r with
England. I'tirsuiug ids political care e-r.
h» became State Senator from New York.
-is eapitcit v 111 the Court o!
tin
ipimon n oj
Her Kent it.
■r Ken' h, id ;
•1 "intended"
is sta'eel in
loi n it ure
put!
tl
Sitnng .it :
Kirmlie
>.lien to ti
in-unince c;
if the u:a-tt
j deviute fi-ou
| Iw.li-V ti..
I barke r ln-ic
j follow ;i]-pl
i Mii-tained burke r'- \
Mr. barker c-tald
pajicr tt» advocate the eb-ction 1'- Wit
Clinton to the otli-.-e 1 • r ol' tU
State- of N'i w Ye rk.
He suhscoui-ntly comnie :.e o'. • • me. 1:rr»*
eld-ply on the me sict ie - of national -rcdi;
ana ex]i-uii.Uitcs. Keeping t:t• .,it itninim
oiiteide. i.e.:--:!lcs~ ;:t the 'itmc *e - mi th in .
tin- year l'l-j. e-atabli.-'iu-d :I t lixcbang
bank iu Wail stre e t. Hi.- t;nut. i.-.I .ii-alitig
v, it it tilt- g"\ (TUim-nt were tli it i \ i. r .
he-itvy. In tin- Exchange bank ft- c. ...
me-uetd his caie-er as a Rjitculateir u, stocks
and a>{iirt-(l, it was said, to tic "tnc tin
regulator-ii - lii-f and prii
the money dealings ot th
cumstalict-s. the- laws and ;
trausaettous of tin- day 1
tion. and. as a hold sp.
nearer to its aii-olutc r
occurred in the history
ua! depending
•I:.mm
1 it.s amtii
•nlator. he < aim
izatioli tliiitl has
an v one iudit hl
Exchange 1-ank broke in I si barker
turned ro'.tn . and made adroit and a- ;.ve
ti-**- e-i many either bunking institutions
chartered in eiitle reut States. lie th > con
t imcdiiis business operation* uml e-u su.j.
a large scale during many years subsc
ii'icntiy that i.e was though: to i.,te control
ot a great amount •-! eap:u 1.
'1 iie occurrence of some transai-'ioiis con
nected with ti.e North Kiwr Hat h -ale
ed him to open personal insult at tlie hands
of one David lingers, barker demande d.tn
explauution. He did not rec ;-. e at: v from
lingers, hut iu its ste-iid came an indictment
nd hv the grand jurv. charging him with
- ,,
tin- otiense ol sending a challengi .Mr. lint
ke-r took his trial, lie defendedhimseit lie.
i fore the court with great ingenuity au«l
I subtlety of argument. He denied the fact
i ot the challenge. The judges and jurv did
not coincieit- iu hi- view ol the points ot iaw.
bo we vei
r. He was found g :
lilt v. and sen
tenced t
o disfrauehisement ..
1 hi> political
rights.
Governor Clinton re
lieved him «>1
Tiie pen.
ilty by executive ac
tion. On the
failure ;
titer ward of the Lift
i«i n <1 . L .:. • I n -
suruTue
Uompaiiy, Air. Barket
was indicted.
with utners, under a elair^e •
f conspiracy
to delta
ud.** The trial was b
n^ehy. C'oiin
sc] re*| a
ired time to study Li*
s ii• *l< > before
eeimmeucing the defense.
Mr. llitike-r. according in a s;:gg.-«:;.,i. ,,}
it v friends, began it himself, ii• • !...<:• •..,t
taken the points in writing, but. t 'twin:
standing, his effort was lcgareie-ei a- ,t "pio
<i:-gy -si aloffty . even bv b; v, ;- I-.n.aa
T he- jury disagreed on the fir-: tr lie
was comicteel on tin second, but a rtew
trial v.t;- granted. Tin* indictme ti' v. ,,s
eptasheel after tb«- third, barker jib-Taiucd,
ti neeve-r. from personal efiorts in tic latest
instance, leaving Ins ease in the i anels of
j h s legal advisers. The- law proceedings in
i this ease and in many other suits distracted
j his attention from his business. I• 'may be
| said* that they ruined him by destroying
| public cnmielcnce in his ojn-rations. lie
j alleged tiie- exist* nee of a onsjtiracy against
i him. fieirne-ot'the most iiitiuenti.il citizens
| of New f olk headed the moveme nt uot
| witiistanding: so his allegation went ior
I naught.
Mr. barker took his elej>a.rtme- from the
i Northe rn metropolis in tin-year IKH. Jle
j went to New Orleans. Here he applied
himse-lt to the study of law. He was ad
nutted to the- bar and to practice in the
courts of that city after having been tin- j
successful in his first examination. His ua- I
ture remained restless; his vital energy
powerful. In New Orleans he mixed hint
self in matters of jurisprudem'-e, general
society and eoiuiuercc to ;
i ve rv ii
i li lit
utiul
extent. .
Many
stories are
told of
his
busi
m ss ingc
■unity
and self-pe
•SKSSioil
. I:
! was
generally
conw
•eleil. iueleei
1, that 1
H3 hi
1 ( 1 ' lie)
♦ ou.il amoii^
the class '
o wliiel
i h<
■ Iw
longed, a
class
peculiar to
all vast
me
e all
tne communities.
it was said of Mr. Barker that he pos
sessed '•boundless assurance, pet feet pos
session of Ills faculties, the power to per
form an immense amount, of intellectual
labor an.l the the* < a -ur like ability of
doing many important tilings at same
lime."
JACOB BARKER \NI> GENERAL 7 LER.
The following correspondence v,-j>; re,-all
to the minds of our leaders ti e tervent
let-lings of the moment iu tlie- late war for
the Union :
Bank • f < , vvi f. ,
New Orleans, Mu 1
l:.
In oiieelicucc to the order of Ma jor Gen
eral Butler, this bank will discontinue the
receipt and tne purchase of ( oufederate
•States treasury notes ou and after the
twenty-seventh iuetant. With a! person*
who nave or may make deposit* iheiein.
under a special written eotitiae t. geod faith
will be kept and payments made as usual
pursuant to the term of su,-!t contract.
Since the discredit of shin phis! e v* ; Ids ban!:
lias issued to it ve ry small amoaiit ta.;. s of
the denomination of one, two. thr-. a'td
live dollars, more ior eons, pu-.m-e 'ban ler
I relit, and will continue ta do soon the
terms prescribed by Major Genera! Butler
iu his published order, giving them out at
par ior city and State notes anil l'or current
!.auk notes, redeemable iu the same de
scription of paper when it can be procured.
| i „,; x .meed hir
to pay expelts
The clause inserted on the face of the
hills. *• Payable in < ity bank notes six
months after the termination of the present
war," is to assure the public that they will
ultimately he redeemed at par with gold
and silver, which will assuredly he done as
soon as the banks generally resume specie
payments, and to guard against a scarcity
of other small notes which may arise from'
the hanks refusing to issue small notes.
JACOB JJARKER.
Home Plantation, May 15, 186h
Jacob Barker. Esc:
IM.au Sii:—T his will introduce to your
favorable notice Mr. Edward Poehe, the
overseer of this place, who visits the- city
to search for some of our slaves who ran
away last night. Any assistau'd you can
render him w ill be reciprocated v. ith pleas
ure. shot.id an opportunity ofie:
Y o u rs, re * pc c t fu 11 v.
\V. I.. ADAMS.
\T;v, Orleans, Mar hi, IselJ.
tv. L. Ailao Es<; , a* tbe- Hope I'-.-n-ation:
Duak Silt—In reply to your letter of the
fifteenth instant, I have to intorrn you that
Mr. Poe-lie leaves this day with t pass from
the military authorities on his return with
two of your 'hits. The other he could no* find.
ot»your account i:tty dollars
s. which you wiT, when con
venient, return. The* freedom with -which
passports are granted must convince all of
th<- gc .id faith of G. ueral butler. Allow me.
dear sir. to solicit for those eb -tided boys
your clemency. Kindness will have a much
bettor elb-ct on the whole human race than
sever; v. Vi-i v le sjiectfuliv. tour ohedie-nt
servant. ' JACOB bARKLIi.
ns nev
i .1 t; :t
A Uni.
•UL s-EI>.
-.tittia! published the following
remarks on barker's political position:
" Mr. Jacob barker's rebel and pro-slavery
organ, the -le/rex ■!(<, has -been -uppressed.
On the thirteenth instant the ' anker and
trader gave- us an article of seventeen lines
on ' 1 he baiiot-box.' It was ivi.tten iu the
ruinbl
ing. mumbling..
bungling
tvle of the
uislox
ill ulll
editor, i
nit i: \\iks
all a seees
sioni.**!
crmia
ask in
tbe way .
;f defiance.
Sp.-al:
* n <**
tlie re •
ent electio
ns in New
York.
( l;. jU i
ind I •
lisylvania,
Air. Barker
If
rep 'f.s 1-e con tinned an aruiis
'!. follow. N'e-gotiat ons once
there will not be anv more
lighting. Wimther an armistice results from
t |- t . ] lemtieraTn sui*ct*>s or l'roiu loieigu in
t- rvention. .we shall hail .: as a peace im-a
e-.itmtii-tii
. w
Th
;t ..
sure to ii.
Jacob b
i - mat ka ;
end gold.
> i(pair
Pole 1
we-lc lined by all parties.'
trker subseipu-ntiy pt.'olishe-d his
ie b-tter on the subject of cotton
the relative reiatictis of tin
n'
ttn
Island. K
:n ins uin
I1"I|; tile
was a On.
e Ni
W Yl
ik Wyj .
!
nan
•i«T.
Wbe^d
'Nttl: is an*
!:!!;•
r , w;
s a iu! i
. e of Sv\ an
i n t ;
Main*
find w,t8
rd \
< ar.
He e:
|.-". a* i.e
old.
*n
mo*
*i*-r - sale
ock
>r. Kran
kiili. She
•gitil atg basin, -s
hr- own ac
■ tecty-one
a •. As an
ig ort-a k last a
noiineing tin- cull 1 1 1 - re,ai
and hi- friend was handed !
. ti It; s,-1 f
He read
ti .- let
t< . J. V< it to bis iriei
nd asked ,
him to
' k< tl . * .
lebratiou
v. i'
■ au\ ot j»erti i
iie re
Ce .veil
ti.e • onsj^nnient t; •* •
-t «team
»-ti a !■:•
'< . ii i North ri\ <- . I •
j the war
o: 1812
]u took the I>euiocntUe -:d
e in p'di
t
tate
•tv j,
;ili
: U t
ml on
. - el tin
|
j
1
j
,
1
grand dtry
iiiniT die-ten!
ft altchised.
'"'.e inor
<! telitly to
actions, in
! eip nie-n .ti iipt-nsition to ( i.....
j ami was sustained nt it by the ee :rt. In
the /'/ico newspaper lie' adv,- ,;!e,i the
! e!> tion ot Clinton. In IslT kc went
! wholly into tiie business of .sju-euiation,
the Ex-huu.ee batik rt Wail
1 ttiimng at the power o: regu
j luting the markets nt the ceumttv. i he
I Kxchajige bank tail-el in IS!! 1 . 1, .- ;} r...tgh
banking e-onne-ctioi - in various ts of
' tl;*- coiiurry in - 1 ii 1 maintained a reuuta
| tion tor wea ; :h. Having sent , l.alienge
j to Mr. Hogers. he was indicted bv ti7e
end. notwithstanding fct« bril
. he was s> nteliecd *ei 1 e ([is*
From this he was i- beved by
uton. He was indicted stilise
tr.iud in insurance traus
t,l ter a billiiint eb-l'e use. in
wl.'.eh he w ,|S oliposeel hy the rio-st emi
nent lawyers. lie was acquitted.
In I-s'! | he i-Curm-d to New t (rlean®. and
ceuitmueil in liusitK-s* there uiir. . few
years sin,- . when ! is bank failed, musing
Mtvh in -ouvetiienee iu N'ew < lie
t:.i «iu< e lived in r-tiiettn t.*.
i
|
j
j
I
:
|
i
•senator Trumhtill. of lii.nois
;
:
!
j
j
j
|
j
|
j
j
I
. everybody
I'rumbal! 'n.,s
-- anti Grant
he has tain n
onsi-ie tit a
-urixin-. tiv
no 111 ;!
'iiion
1 'Os
n any
ms are
in's can i'."' e out
i r coalitions. 1 •
en th-- giitto-.ing
-s ,;s --*»I.I an oil
i* .ts ehar.tete r a
nstitii'-ncy or tl:
eeiiiiion within
we?-,, ntnt.
r js-r?' n's
own, and
'■I"
'mil Tariv
• liaelem of
• t e l pur
the favor
r-_ it el ot
- 1 x t v
tin- mak'-rs
Heart ranks.
I vtn in Trumbull borders t
years of age. and comes of that
Trumbull family in Connecticut wiii.-u
given America iu fore ign count! j. s tlie
name of Brother Jonathan—Jonathan be
ing Washington's genial appellation of Jon
athan Trumbull. Gove-tnorof Uonneyticitt
in levolutioriarv times. Trumbull left Id*
home in the Nutmeg State very early in life
to go to Georgia anei teach school, t-i make
his own living. The Trumbull* had been
all persevering, speculating, in'cllee
tual me n. Let any man read the ife of
Trumbull, the painter, jvlm.-c handiwork is
now a part of the ornamental ion of the Cap
itol, and explore his a-stdie-as successes
over John Randolph and .1; ; censotimis
Sent h*-l n critic* of tiiat dae . and see his pt
tient, laborious pertinae t\ in *•< !i*-*-tit--/ t :
portraits of many i-omineiipiaee people m
the re voiiitionart time, in a larger sviise
Le mail Trutnlnill lia* all ti e pow: r iu let."
and in generalities that the painter had.
Connecticut melt have told me of tbe scene
in his native town when lie, resolve-el to go
to Georgia, and the people gathered around
tin- stage-coach to seethe most promising
boy in that part of Connecticut >,:i i..s
kindred.
Then, as now. la* was thin are! ecu' tall
and well regulated, and lie D-l't his native
village w ithout nut ward tears, although ie
greHeit thei*- as the model of the country.
IVrb-ctiy sclfe "in•■-•titrated, without selfish
ness. and \e-t without vereltijicy. this spar,
rib ed a, youngster took his wav to ti e eti*
taut lii-ld* of Georgia, ami was a Jr.tor
there-tor some tin.c : and iu tlie portiv':. of
(In-State where he re.-ided his cool p vet
and insensibility to local or partisan p., ;■ t
t* still remembered Being now a man
well al mg m days, it is not t :n.-mb r ,. ;
;
, . „
.<"ia, eet
|
,
i
j
'
|
♦ bat Ihirf
of th - I.
i Hi
W !
slain Ti
the
wa* a tr
-it
st t-pltll g.
of State
;n. 18 D, !
Court of l
The L-Ntye
ere. and for ii
•• was Ju.stic
he State, lie
' '• i at-*, n _,iiLtl 1 g
» <"■' :*-•• SuprJmo
was elected te the
lower Hi-use of Congress, but belore taking
his seat he was chosen to tlie Senate at
Washington, and therefore he L ( s n- vet
had any term of probation in the 1 wer
en of tli
at period,
made a
speech re
:t at that
time. ai
party n<*
v applaud*
e assume
(Land the
countiy.
of riotous
a part
eountr,
wl:ose
gentle.
jmblici
to et ;
House. His education has been chiefly ju
dicial. ami his public life Senatorial.
To look upon, at present. Trumbull is tall,
moderately thin, well-regulated, respecta
bly appareled, with a high forehead and
thin lower face, dark hair, without a gray
strand in it. daik dress, gold spectacle*,
and somewhat of the lock of a doctor of
divinity. He is a widower, with ckiiilien
grown up to the age of citizenship. Although
alleged in certain circles to he dispassionate,
and some say ''a cold-hearted man,'' he- is
known to have been cue of the most idola
trous husbands rind fathers within the pro
vince of the legislative government. It
was wh»-n In- took the strong and curious
•stand of opposition to Johnson's conviction.
under the terms of impeachment that his
devoted wife died under the shadow of the
Capitol. Trumbull loved his wife its few me n
in public life regard those who take
their name. One oi the last acts This
wife presumed to do—for she- was as unre -
strained and as independent as himself—
was to write a letter to the newspapers,
showing up the base conduct c-fae lergv
man who attempted to give himself w >riel!y
importance by attacking his parishioner
anil supporter. The Senator from Illinois.
Mrs. Trumbull's death was hastened by
the uncivil and impious row ove r :he im
peae-hineut matter, and, with all the resent
ment of the statesin:
Trumbull has never
Herring to his eoniliu
though the li; publican
him ior the po.-i - ion h
scene lie spared the
party greed.
Senator Trumbull is about six feet high,
moderately thin, and bis address i- gentle .
without being impulsive, to strangers,while
with jtoliticians he is eminently a reflective
person, and his conduct is guided by his
tlmught. There is a great ileal of mean,
subordinate lift* in Washington, but Trum
bull joins no coalition and takes nobody's
opinions. Ills presumption of paniotism
appears to he that, tinder the forms of
modern development, many indefinite
things ought to lie assumed by the feileral
State, while the public conscience should b
made to know that the highest form of
national gave rniuent is distributive, and
that a State well animated hy love of coun
try is better than a State supine at the feet
of federal dicta,ion; in shoit, that our
Ul-ou is a stronger one fur having every
State, every county and every voter moder
ately independent Than To stc party spirit
temporarTy directing e verything by force
and prescribing e xactly what patriotism
should be in every part of the Union.
It is almost impossible iu social inter
course to know Trumbull as he is. He does
not uutagoni;
contrary, he
ttve eapaeiti
ones, and ids
that with Ids
" so near and ye
To throw
to experie-u
when KoLci
ingtun i-u tl
low vet "!
of giiue^ fell.
on Capitol Tli!!. in the open square, playing
croquet with Ids young children, or noticed
him in New York, running around
among tl" theatres with the suscep
tibilities of a young boy out of col
lege and permitted to si e- the sights, can
sy.nathize with Ids high notions ,,i public
p!a--e and ! is 1, ml resolution never to be
employed f»r private us*-* while he make*
f *!.-• pe rmane-nt government of the
. There is no man in p.ddic life
utidi v dis, iplinc is so beautiful and
Ii:s position at present in the Ke
: party is that of a man who means
there, and n it to lead any new ele
*. lie-feels that, on the w hole, his
legislative life has been the best representa
live of what the- lb-puhli, an party should
have been, and he does not mean to let the
creatures of circumstance within that party
take his plan and drive him out. There
fore, in* will join no new party movement,
but he favors a new nomination.
:o him:
Re If wi
tb people :
on the
tist< ns
to tli*
m : lmt hi
s retl-.-c
■s master h
is demon
etrati ve
best l'iien»Is :
some time s
lament
IX pe
of lac
c and lam
d he is
yet sc
i far."
our ar;
ms ■
•and Tran.
.bull is
- tlie- ;
same j
--•use of *'•
lock as
M wi i
* slap]
ieil George
AVash
back
anil - a
Heel aim "
old fel
amhnl
! i* we
ndrou -ly el
,*irous
v-hip.
Whoever has
■t-n him
Trumbull, while in smut- respects an am
: bitious man. is n- vtr willing to permit his
ambition to ! <■ subservient. When he was
| ilrst elected Abraham Lincoln's friends ap
i peared to have sufficient votes iu the Illinois
Legi-iature to send him to the Se nate in
case Trumbull would withdraw. Trumbull
was approached, and lie disdained to w ith
draw. No u:i ution of compromise would
make him elo so. But Lincoln demonstrated
li is faith in him when he said :
"Between Trumbull and any other candi
date I can not have choice. Let all my
friends support him. lie will do honor to
Illinois."
Lirn-oln advocated Trumbull's re-election
in I s :'!. and iu IStiT he was opposed by Gov
ernor Palmer, who is now in trouble with
the federal authorities for manfully oppos
ing General Sheridan's direction of the city
government of Chicago after the t.rt*. In
this he eleriv- s. unexpectedly, his n. ist im
mediate ami manful help from Trumbull,
who thinks that the federal government
has tic business to administer cities without
direction from Congress.
Trumbull is called a cold man. and v, t
Washington life is full of exe-mpliLcations
of his impulsiveness. Take tl e ease of
Vinire Ream. What is ealle il tin- intel
lectual school united to destroy this girl.
li-it li as an artist and as a family charact* r. ]
\ half d-./' l. l't-uinlcs. like Mr- Au,,-. Mis.
Lippillcott and that cla.-s, res- nteeL the giv- I
ing of a commi-s uii to In r to make a star n- j
Mr. Line .In. and mile 1 h.-r a little half
Dutch gill from Wi'.-oitsin and Kansas.
11 ;ie• t■ on ('a
j'articular!
r, hut h.
Train wa- a at ighbor t ti 'u iliii of
Vmnie Ream,
formed about
tin eor, U-de ra;,-el dLspo-it ion to put
I.--:- down, and one- night, of l.is own
Volition, appeared at act' lathe t's house ami
j gave her l.is support. II,- voted for t ie
appropriation to her. and when she was
sent abroad, lamenting licr help < ssness
and youth, he t-nde avoreel w ith all his for; e
to have her lather g'-t some government
position so that the girl's character could
be supported by the family contact and
she relieved from feeding her father anil
i mother. Few persons know how often
| Xrumlmll is seen in matters of this sort, as
a generous advocate, and in proportion to
his advocacy of helpless eases see-ms to be
his opposition to large, organized party
movements against individual*.
He has sold his house on Capitol Hill to
Mr. W illiam M. Evans, of New Y'urk city,
and now occupies very plain and cheap
quarters in the second stoty of a small
three-story brick house in ti.e rear of the
Kitkwood Hotel. The clerk of his com
mittee in the Senate ts his nephew, and his
companion in his lodgings is his son, both
full grown voting men.
Trumbull is by far the chief personage
ti-- in the Senate. H, is the i-ooit.stand
he st debater there—always in earnest and
vet never at fault, and lie now stands in
,.-:e rapport with tie- able me n of the Sen
a' - who flew*oll' from his suggestion iu the
impeachment trial. Mr. Sumner thinks
highly of him, ansi all seem to acknowledge
that he is a lu.at not to he put aside, either
by passion, interest or ambition, and who
will sir in the seat which lie occupies and
drive his team toward what he wishes, and
even if supreme power be in the way will
not deviate! from his path out id' any deli
caey; at the same time, if supreme power
atleet his notion ol self respect, he will
drive over it. In short, Trumbull is a
jurist, looking within himself for motives,
and believing that bv a high grace of puh
lie character, coustituencie * may be raised
to a level with their statesme n, aud that
this ;s e as;; r ttnd nobler than to reduce
erne ' ■ - If to a de it.: •• tie and lei d the
con.-.ituetji-y by uuworth.t means.
Hi.' "i u.L Holiday rttLsi.N.*.—A
ire nt trial in I..union a t, tv pro
b '-••••J t* d< ' e-lopcjl. A witness alleged
li st he was an " early caller," and that he
supported himself by calling people iu the
morning. Ilis business hours were from 3
A. M. t:l! 5, anti Ins first customers were
baker*.
BY TELEGRAPH.
LATEST YEWS FROM ALL POINTS
NSW YEAE'S
WASHINGTON
WEATHER
UNFAVORABLE
.MINISTERIAL ( RISIS IN SPAIN
EMANUEL IN THE QUIKINAL
TIIE MEXICAN REVOLUTION
PACIFIC STORMS UNABATED
Tlie I*aeif:c- Ktiilroad Bloelied
THE ALEXIS HUNTING PARTY
KU-KLl X
GENERAL SHERMAN IN FRANCE
WASHINGTON.
No Uuustnl Ine-iilent*—New Yenr's Cere
monies—I ti fa vo mbit- Weather.
WASiiiNe.rnN, January 1.—No unusual itt
oidents today. New Years ceremonies
we re observed as usual. Weather unfa
vorable.
FOItEIGN.
Ministerial ( risis in S|>nin—The Jfcxicnn
Kevolulion—Arrival of Gi-uerai Sher*
■nan nl dlarseilie*.
Madrid, January 1.—There is again a
ministerial crisis in consequence of the ap
pointment of Si nor Torres Mora to succeed
General Crespo' as second in command in
Cuba, and of General Morales as successor
to tiie officer in the military direction of the
eastern department of the island.
lie i me. January 1.—Emanuel was received
to-elay on the Oairinal.
San Frani :mjii, January 1.— Mexican ad
vices report tiie government merely hold
ing tlie revolutionists of Neuvo Leon in
check, the w lane available force lie ing used
to crush Diaz. Diaz, after several engage
no nts. wnscoim.c Bed to retreat into Oaxica.
The troops scut by Diaz to invest (juerrara,
were-defeated and driven back to Oaxic-a.
Western ci-ast except Oaxica and port of
M.ezatlon quiet and in possession of the
federal authorities.
London, January 1 —The Prince of Wales
is reported much improved to-day.
The Queen will probably open Parliament
in person.
Paris, January 1. -General Sherman Las
arrived at Marseilles.
Ne-gotia'ions are on loot for the formation
ot a Bank des Communes, with a colossal
capital. h ! ue iiim subscribes 10.00D.b00
francs. Its object is to use the credit of the
communes for municipal purposes.
President 1 biers gave the- usual recep
tion to the diplcmatic body to day. No
speeches were made.
M viuiiii. January 1.—Rumors of a minis
terial crisis are denied. No confirmation is
given of tin- reea',! of .Minister Roberts
from Washington: but should it prove true,
there is little doubt that Admiral Palo
would he his succes-or.
Riimb. January 1.—The King of Italy re
ceived embiDsaehirs to-day. He hoped for
the i- iiitinnauce e,t the con.-ord which had
contributed .-o much to the unity of Italv.
Joseph 11,1,7 ; i i^ dl.
]
I
j
MISCELLANEOUS.
Assault artel Battery ot* an Editor—Sue*
l»o«i-*l .Murders—Family Murileree! by
Outlaw**—Pnritic Storms Unabated—In
dian War Aeiirehended—Pacific Kail
road Blocked With fSnow—Southern
Railroad Needed—The Alexis Hunting
Party—The Ku-Klu.x Trials.
* San Fkan<' is* i>, January 1.—.lulge Lake
]*leaded guilty ot assault on I>e Young, of
the Chronicle, with a pistol. He was lined
> lot 0.
Two reputable voting men have disap
peared from Sacramento, and are supposed
to have been murdered.
Seven days Eastern mails has arrived.
To-day a man, his wife and two children
were murdered near Ttteson, supposed by
outlaws driven from Sonora.
The storm in California, Oregon and Ne
vada is unabated. It is raining incessantly.
Mail and telegraph communication inter
rupted northward.
An Indian war in Arizona is apprehended.
Omaha. .January 1—The* Pacifc railroad
is still hh
cuts w liii-1
Southern
,.,i
■ight feet oi snow iu
: shove-lied twice. A
needed io t it- Pacific
Cun v.e>. Jut -.- v 1.—The Al -xis hunt
ing party m ;•:* a? Omaha on the tenth of
J muary. If :1 ■ '-now is te-> deep for sport,
tiie patty will ;>r, eeed to San Francisco.
Ansai-clis. J .unary !.—In the NYharton
trial Ge'ntt su'd that Tottrey stated an
iiupo*sihilit\ when he said iTe got tartar
emetic wlieu treating sulphide of antimony
precipitate- w ith potash. If he ha 1 obtained
what he said lie did. it would have proved
that no tartar emetic was there, evidence
iueompre-heiisiveiv technical but >o*ilive in
i-s contradiction ot results obtained by tiie
prosecution.
Dr. John J. Rose, occupying the chair e f
me elical jurisprudence and texicoiogv in the
University ot Pennsylvania, testified that
Atkins' testimony does not, to w iti.ess' mind,
establish the presence of antimony iu
Ketehum's stomach or iu the tumbler.
Some very imi'urtant tests were; omitted.
Some tests applied tailed. Iu the tests most
re lied upon there were sources of fallacy
w hich rendered them uncertain and incon
clusive. Touroy's tests were also insufficient
to establish the presence of autiutonv.
Columbia, s. ('..January i. —At tlie open
ing of the Ku Klux court this morning,
A very, defendant was found absent. The
prosecution proceeded with the rebutting
evidence, and called attention to Avery's
absence. Wilson, of counsel for defense,
said Avery had gone to York county to visit
his family, and he understood that he would
return ou the next train. Judge Bond de
manded to know- of Mi-Master, of defend
ants counsel, where A very was. McMastcr
hoped the court would excuse him from an
swering the e; lies tion. Judge Bo tel ordered
Ale-M ister to show cause why fits name
should not bo stricken from the roll of
attorneys.
1 he court signed the order fe r the for
feiture ot Avery s bail, and issued a writ of
s ire facias, re turnable Wednefday. Dis
trict Attorney Corbin asked time to ecu
side r whether the ease should go to the
jury in Avery's absence. The court ad
journed to to-morrow. Avery's bondman
is J. T. Dowry, of York county. The
amount ts i' jUDD. The general impression
is that .Avery has absconded, believing con
viction inevitable.
1 he emancipation celebration ink place
to elav. 1 lie- streets were erowde «l. A large
audience w as at the State House, where ap
propriate addresses were de-liveweel by At
torney General Chamberlain. Congressman
Eiiiott and others.
Charleston. 8. C.. January 1.—Arrived—
Steamer \ irginia. from Philadelphia: ship
Martha Barker, from Savannah. Otf the
port—Ship Edith, from Havre; sliip Mus
e digue, Irom Liverpool. Sailed — Bark
Q-age. Grave, tor Glasgow; Dark David
.-IcXutt, tor Liverpool: steamer Falcon, for
Baltimore.
Emancipation dry was generally observed
hy the colored population. A procession,
including a troop of cavalry, a regiment of
infantry and a largo number of civic ami
political societies, all colored, paraeled the
streets. An oration and speeches were de
livered anti salutes lired. The celebration
was marked by p -rfect eirelcr throughout.
Weuther Report.
War Dkpartmsit, )
Office Chief Signal Offieter, >
Washington, January 1, 1872, 7:3n P. M. J
SYNOPSIS OF THE PAST TWENTY-FOUR HOURS.
The area of lowest barometer, which was
Sunday afternoon over the lower lakes and
Canada, has been rapidly followed by an
area ol high pressure, now central over the
same region. The clouds and rains have
generally cleared away west of the Apala
ciiian range, and is clearing on the Atlantic
coast, with falling temperature. Northerly
winds, with partially cloudy weater, are
reported from the Gulf States. Southeast
winds, with increasing cloudiness, falling
barometer and rising temperature, now
prevail from Missouri anil Michigan north
west to Dakota. No reports ha\ee been re
ceived from the Pacific coast, where it was
raining Sunday afternoon. Threatening
anil cloudy weather prevails in Wyoming
and Utah.
PROBABILITIES.
The barometer will continue rising on
Tuesday morning, with partially cloudy
and clear weather in the middle ami East
ern States, followed Tuesday night by fall
ing barometer, and easterly winds, with
cloudy weather, will prevail on the South
ern anil Gulf States. An area of low ba
rometer will develop in the Missouri valley,
ami rising temperature, with southeasterly
w inds, veering to south, will prevail from
Arkansas to Lake Superior. Dangerous
winds are not anticipated for the Atlantic
e-(,a.-,t to-night.
River Inteiliaenre.
Southwest Pass, January 1, 6 P. M.—
Barometer J0:60. Wind north-northeast,
light, with fog. Arrived—Steamship Gen
eral Sedgwick at '2:10 P. M.. Ellis, master,
from New York, to George A. Fosdiek it
Co.; American ship Reynard, Amber
coni. master, thirty two days from Bristol,
in ballast, to master: had fine weather
during the whole passage: spoke ship Gold
stream, Green, master, in latitude nineteen
north, latitude seventy seven we-st, twenty
first of November, from Bristol, bound to
Galveston: American shin Lizzie Mosses,
Cox. master, forty-four days from Liver
pool, in ballast to Decan. Zeroga & Co.
Sailed—Steamships Wevbossett and St.
Mary.
Vicksburg, January 1.—Down—Belle
Lee. 8 I'. M. Up—Argossv. I P. M.j City
of Vicksburg. 7 P. M. Cool and clear.
River falling.
Mempis. January 1—Clear and cool.
Up—J. H. Groeslieck, Kate Putnam.
Down—Julia, Capitol City.
Cincinnati, January !.—River fifteen feet
and rising very slowly. Weather partially
cloudy. Mercury T .
Evansville, January 1 .—Weather cloudy
and mild. Mercury 4(D. The river has
risen thirty inches. Up—Armadillo at 11
and Mollie Ebert at 1 P. M.
Pittsburg, January I— Nine feet water.
Both rivers rising fast. Cloudy, mild. The
run of coal will he large if the water holds
out.
Cairo. January 1. —Arrived — Andes. Pey
tona and barges. Glencoe, from New Or
leans. Departed—Glencoe, for St. Louis;
Shannon, Esperanza. for New Orleans: Pey
tona, Robert Mitchell, for Louisville.
Cloudy. River risen fifteen inches.
Louisville, January 1.—Eight feet in
canal: six feet six inches in chute: rising;
ten feet expected on falls. Cloudy anti
coul.
Foreign Markets.
London, January 1.— Spirits of turpen
tine 52s.
Frankfort, January!.—Bonds fifi**.
Paris, January !.—Rentes 55f 85c.
hiRE this Morning—B etween twelve
and one o'clock this morning fiatues issued
forth from a small on. story frame building
corner of Delta and Lafayette streets, oppo
site the Pontehartrain railroad depot.
The building was occupied for the sale «f
liquors by the gla*s or in larger ej it antities,
and was known as ** a barrel house." About
half a dozen stcan.ei s .itai several hand en
gines poured on water, and when the build
ing was nearly C"i:- tm* el the fire was extin
guished. without farther lose than to the
building and con:- n*s. The blaze gave the
appearance of a big five, hut it did not
amount to much.
" Dotheboy's Hull)' Paralleled.
A committee, employed in investigating
the alleged cruelties commit' ted at-the Su£
quebanna Valley Home for Children, near
Binghamton, New York, by Superintendent
A an Epps, have made public their report,
censuring the superintendent and the boarel
of managers. According to the evidence
given at the investigation, boys anei gh #3
at the home have i»-en stripped naked,
taken into a damp ar.d chilly cellar, called
the bathroom, and subjected to a cold bath,
by being plunged into the water and having
it dashed over them from pails. Sometimes
smart-weed switches have been used upon
them while in the hath. This Van Epps
called "healthful as well as disciplinary."
By tliis man s system th*- children,- after
praying in concert at the foot of their beds,
are put to bed by one another. Van Epos
having them after performing the pious
duty of listening to their prayers. The lar
fi'-r hoys undressed :t.e smalle r ones who
could not undress themselves. No adult
was kdt in charge-«d them, end in ease of
sickness they were con died to help them
'•'Ives as best they m :r. They were not
pciinitteel to have a drink of water front
supper—tour o elocjf -until the next morn
ing Their food wa* measured out to them,
and no child dat ed to ask "for more," none
of them possessing the assurance of Oliver
l v- ist. 1 ho food was coarse and common,
am!, as A an Epps said, "not what he would
give to boarding-school children."
A London surgeon is reported to have
successfully applied the magic lantern to the
study of diseases ol the skitt. A transpa
rent photograph of the skin is taken, and
then placed in a magic lantern. A strong
hydro-oxygen light casts tlie figure enlarged
(in a white sheet, and in this way the small
est details are brought out with astonishing
minuteness.
The following conversation took place at
the cemetery of Montmartre on All Souls'
Day: Lady in black—"How much is this
wreath!" La marchamle—"Five francs."
Lady iu black—"Good gracious! If I were
to give five francs fora wreath, my hus
band would rise from his grave to reproach
tne. He was so economical—the poor, dear
man!"
The Danbury Ac;rs speaks of a dejected
individual who asked the editor what the
charge was for inserting a notice of tlie
death ot his wile. On being told that it
would be elones to? 1 nothing, he brightened
up considerably, and observed that "death
had been robbed of half its terrors."
A young gentleman well known in society
was discovered the other evening, by a
young lady on whom he had called, mount
ed on a chair in front of the mirror admir
ing the set of hi* inexpressibles.
An Indianapolis pap* r records that a six
year old daughter of a "prominent citizen,"
being called upon ler a toast, produced
Rip's famous seutim -tr. slightly altered
"Here's your good health and your family's,
n*a.', you all live lon^ae possible."
Duluth is tho most hopeful place iu the
country. It lias now a population of 4500,
but expects an increa of - 10,000 next year
by immigration.
It is saidAVilliam M. Tweed has rn> desire
to enter the kingdom of heaven since he has
read Revelations, xiv , 2. and learned that
there will be u\:i /'* - »■ there.

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