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New Orleans Republican. [volume] (New Orleans, La) 1867-1878, April 17, 1872, Image 2

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|tnr Orleans ffqiublican.
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tfFIClAL JOURNAL OF NEW ORLEANS
THE DAILY REPUBLICAN
fa yubSjJtd every day (Mondays excepted) at So
M Canip street. Terms: #16 a year; #8 for six
jaomtha; #4 for three months—payable invariably
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Monthly advertisements. Inserted every other
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Second page monthly advertisements, each square,
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Transient advertisements, having the run of the
paper, first insertion #1 50 per square; each subse
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Second page transient advertisements, each inser
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id rertisemeuts inserted at intervals to he charged
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Secular advertisers, who advertise largely, will
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gor cent.
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THE WEEKLY REPUBLICAN
' u* published every .Saturday morning, and contains
^'Iis ppwb by telegraph, miscellaneous reading, edi
torials. local matters of general public interest,
commercial and monetary reports, and everything
appears in the Daily, except such items as are
Of little or no public moment. The WEEKLY RE
KMUCAS is an excellent family paper, valuable
C4> erell for instruction and amusement as informa
tion on the current topics of the day.
Terms* of Subscription.
One year, $5; six months, #2 30.
Advertisement*.
Transient advertisements same terms as in the
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tonrth of the daily rates.
A liberal commission allowed to those who send
OS elnbs of five or more.
51 ay Democrat* be Reformers?
From the New York Nation.
We all agree that the Democratic party
has no high aims, no patriotic intentions;
its purpose seems to be simply to get back
into power: and the only plea which can
make its existence excusable is that there
is so much looseness, vulgarity and selfish
ness among the managers of the party which
roles the country, that it may pay to keep
up a political organization for the sole office
of chronic and interminable opposition,
'i bis is the national impression about the
'Democratic party, and it is the truth. But
■ our impressions about the composition of
the party need, we think, some examination
and revision. The common view is that it
-is composed of selfish demagogues, disagree
able village malcontents, and "the Irish
vote." Where we do not think of indivi
dual Democrats, and just summon before
-our minds a Democrat—the typical Demo
crat—half a glance suffices to satisfy us
that there is something bad about
the whole stamp of him, something
..in his style of thought and speech
essentially' mean. But let us not be
content with this impression. It must be
remembered that the aggregate Republican
majority in the United States is hut 40,000
out of 5,000.000. Taking the Irish vote at
the largest possible reckoning, there should
remain an immense number of the native
-voter* of the Democratic ticket who, it is
to be' hoped, are better than the typical
Democrat. A State standing so high as
Connecticut for wealth and intelligence has
the two parties almost evenly balamied.
We wish now to ask who are Democrats;
to examine the composition of the party,
and to see if there he any among them who
may make material for supporters of reform
Can they he of any service against Tweed
and Murphy, the Tammany frauds, the
civil service vulgarities find abominations ?
or must they remain to the end of the
chapter in American polities the sons of
Belial and the children of darkness 1 For
some of them we think there is hope. The
managers of the Republican party organiza
tion do not believe it. or at least do not
desire to believe it. They are like the old
lady who said: "The Universalists expect
that all will be saved, hut we look for better
tilings."
The Irish are the most conspicuous, fun
damental amis inevitable members of the
party. The first Irish immigrants were, no
doubt, attracted by the name, and they
found it what its name indicated, the real
Democratic party of the country. Each
successive generation of immigrants went
where their fathers had gone before them.
They could not be said to have belonged to
the party, for, of course, they had no opin
ions : they huddled together iu it by the
* common gregarious instinct. The fact that
the Republican party seemed to be the
Know-Nothing party reiuspired with a new
idea, helped to perpetuate their opposition.
Autagonism to their rivals in the field of
labor, the negroes, finished whatever re
mained to he done. It is certain that the
Irish immigrants will continue to be Demo
crats during the lifetime ol the Democratic
party—perhaps during the lifetime of any
party called by that name. The native
Americans who composed the partv before
the war were acted upon by two classes of
influences. Upon many the older and purer
enthusiasm of the party still exercised its
spell. People who only know the name of
Democrat trom its recent associations, can
not conceive what that name meant to men
■who were hoys when Andrew Jackson was
President. To us, as we see it on the printed
page, the word has an expression sinister
and forbidding. To them its syllables rep
resented liberty, simplicity, purity, hope
tor mankind and the belief iu the devotion
and competency of the people. What
America was to the world the Democratic
party was to America. Some one told
General Jackson that a distinguished Ger
man traveling here had remarked to him
that all the intellect and culture of the
coufttry seemed to he on the side of the
Whigs. "You should have told him," ex
claimed Jackson with ire. "that all the vir
tue and integrity of the country was upon
ours." Democrats nowadays do not take
■quite so high a tone. Were Pendleton or
F ernando Wood to make such a speech,
each would lau^h at the other.
There are at the North a great many peo
r:nt who relied upon the South for'trade
. and employment. Our merchants had their
purchasers all over that country. They and
the manufacturers reaped great profits
from* the want of ready money at the
South, and the large prices the plauters
■were willing to pay for credit. They knew
tneir Southern customers, and liked them.
From childhood habit had used them to the
idea that over a large part of the Union
men were bought ami sold. The constitu
tion was said to acknowledge the existence
of slavery, and they revered the constitu
tion. They revered the Union, and tiie
abolitionists they regarded as the enemies
both of the Union and the constitution.
There were two passions which patriots
felt | in that time—the old passion for the
Union, and the new passion to purge the
country of the imperfection of slavery.
Men were Democrats or Republicans as one
or the other of these sentiments predomi
nated in them. Both sentiments were no
ble. The man who loved the Union so en
tirely that he dreaded the agitation of any
question that might iu the slightest degree
endanger it. did not seem to himself or to
his family d very terrible person. If he had
personal or commercial relations with the
South, or if he were a Democrat by educa
tion and association, these things made it
all the easier for him to believe himself the
only pure politician iu America.
Secession came, and the winter of 1800
and 18C1 found us pretty.much all Demo
crats. Some of the States, modified their
fugitive slave laws; the position of the
country seemed to he that everything must
he sacrificed to the Union—which was just
the position of the Democrats before the
war. Very few people yet contemplated
the possibility of war, or * believed that we
would or could invade the Southern States
and compel them hack into the Union.
And had we kept on feeling in that way,
we could not have done it. Cut suddenly
out of the clouds there fell epon the hearts
of men a joyous enthusiasm, an impulse to
defend the Union to the last, and the be
lief that we could do it successfully by
force of arms. This sentiment was a sur
prise to the very men it aroused. But it
took all hearts by storm; the sweep of the
impulse was irresistible; none, not even
the Democrats, could withstand it. They
either said nothing or they fancied that at
the end of a ninety days' skirmish the
South would return, that we should shake
hands, and love each other better than
ever. The most patriotic and, we suppose,
the_ worthiest of the Democrats made up
their minds that the Uuty ol the hour, or
the year, or the decade, was to crush
the rebellion, and such substantially came
over to the Republicans. But as tlie com
bat deepened, anil successive Bull Runs
taught us their hitter lessons, a large por
tion of the old Democrats began to draw
themselves apart. They believed we si ould
never beat the rebels, and, with inconceiv
able lolly, they imagined the possibility of
a peaceable settlement of. our differences.
So soon as the wedge was entered, the old
habits of thought and the old associations
were too strong for the fresh ideas of the
war. As the South w;is again and again
successful, the cause of the North became
more and more identified with that of abo
lition. Necessary violations of law fur
nished the Democrats with grievances.
The public lost patience, and began to call
them bad names. This, of course, has in
tensified and embittered their hostility.
The vitality the party has exhibited since
is not at 'all difficult to explain. Of late
many things have come to pass to make it
easy to see how any man who was a Demo
crat during the war should have been tm
intenser Democrat alter the war. There
has been something in the general intent
of the controlling power of the country
to fill any conservative with disgust, anil
to root iu him a heartier satisfaction with
himself and a profounder contempt for his
rulers. One recent principle of the Repub
lican party may be fairly formulated as fol
lows: to break the law is a commendable
thing if you have a good reason, an
excusable thing if you have a good
pretext. We passed the fifteenth
amendment by readmitting into the
Union a few rebel States on condi
tion that they should accept it. The inci
dents of Andrew Johnson's impeachment—
the construction of the oath to vote accord
ing to the "law and the testimony," as per
mitting Senators to vote as they thought
best fur the interests of the country; the
visiting committee who came tit expostulate
with Senators sworn to vote according to'
the "law and the testimony; - ' the clergy
who came to pray with tliein; "the avowed
intention of the ' Republicans to put out
Johnson in order to make way for Wade,
who was to use the civil service to elect the
next President, and so "save the country"
for the twentieth time—all these proceed
ings are so outrageous that they now' read
more like farce or burlesque than history.
If we did not know what great things the
Republican party has done, we should won
der how it survived such a record.
Such the Democratic
of
it
a record.
Such was the Democratic party of the
North during and since the war. If we re
member with any gratitude the 500,000 sol
diers who perishe,d in the struggle, we can
never consent that the party which was
sneering, dabbling and hindering while
they were fighting shall in us old form and
character a^aiD come to the front. But in
ease the field of politics breaks up and re
adjusts itself, is there any portion of the
Democratic party which we can turn to
good account in the formation of a national
party of reform l We all of us know indi
vidual Democrats who are very nice peo
ple. They are spine of them good husbands
and good fathers; they pay their debts, are
often religious, etc. Yet taken together
they go to make up this dreadful Demo
cratio®)arty. Eliminate from a respectable
Democrat his Democracy, separate him
from his evil associations, and we believe
you can make of him a useful citizen in the
new era of our polities. Cater is paribus,
an old Republican will be a better reformer
than an old Democrat. In constituting the
new Reform party we must rely mainly
upon what has been the great, enduring,
patriotic, heroic, national party of the
country. Hatred of slavery and hatred
of robbery may he the qualities of men
slightly differing in their mental constitu
tions, hut they both have at the root the
love ol justice and of publio purity. The
fact that a man did not rightly discern the
duty of the hour in 1884 is prima facie evi
dence that he will not discern it correctly
iu 1872. Yet the qualities which fit men to
act intelligently iu the two periods are not
identical. Sympathy, indiguatiou, love of
jierfection. made men Republicans iu 185ti.
I lie mass ol that great Reform party
which is hereafter to rule this countrv, or
at least to endeavor to purify it, will be
composed of meu who unite these qualities
to others not necessary to the patriot uf
1856—a clearer discernment and firmer
texture of mind, tho knowledge of a rogue
or demagogue at sight, aud the hearty de
testation of him and his kind. It will hap
pen, however—it has happened—that men
who had heart enough to set their faces
against slavery, have been so demoralized
by laissez-faire aud loose impressions that
they may not see that civil service reform
is imperative, or that it is any wrong for a
Cabinet minister to break the law a little.
W e can easily conceive of a man whose in
stincts led him aright on the negro
question saying upon the doctrine of rota
tion in office that every dog should have his
day; we can conceive ol him indorsing as
most original and statesmanlike the remark
of Mr. Morton, that "we have, upon the
whole, the best civil service iu the world."
Down in his heart such a person believes
Tweed not a had sort of fellow. He thinks
that it is very well for Mr. Tom Murphy to
get his $50,000 a year (fie would take it, he
knows, if he could get it), while Mr. Clinch
does the work aud is content with a twelfth
of the pay. He believes a good politician
to he one who "sticks to his friends," aud
he thinks these new-fangled people are
making an unnecessary fuss about things
with which he has been long familiar, and
which nobody ever before thought of find
ing fault with. On the other hand, a man
whose instincts, interests aud prejudices
did not incline him to espouse the cause of
the slave, might have a respect for techni
calities and restrictions, a love of order,
and a wholesome detestation of public
thieves which would make him excellent
material iu the work of reform.
Morse Memorial Service*.
A Washington dispatch of Sunday says:
The preparations for the memorial ser
vices in honor of the late Professor Morse
are completed. The speakers are Senator
Patterson and Representatives Fernando
\» ood, Garfield, Cox, Voorhees and Banks,
l.ev. Dr. Adams, of New York, pastor of
the church which the Professor attended in
that city, will open with prayer, aud Dr.
heeler, the pastor ot the church which
1 rotessor Morse attended at Poughkeepsie,
w ill pronounce the benediction.
PresbW^T an,i . the Cabinet, the Vice
President, judges oi the courts aud other
prominent officials, have been invited. The
Governors ot States whft can not he present
m person have designated proxies to act as
vice presidents of the meeting. The See "
tary of the Navy has complied with the ap
plication for music by the marine band, anil
there will be vocal music by the Choral So
ciety of \\ ashingtou.
Numerous letters aud telegrams Lave
been received, some, of them statin^ that
similar meetings will be held on Tue*dav
evening in several cities.
Springfield has one sharp shopper. A
woman, after buying a spool of thread at a
dry goods store on Monday, insisted on
having the clerk unroll and measure it for.
fear it wouldn't hold out 200 yards.
REWARDS.
KEWAKD.-WHERKAS, pre
Lf natations were made on or about
seventeenth instant to burn the buildings of
' A Gorsucb, situated on the corner of Pitt and
I ciustou streets, in the Sixth District of this city,
ami whereas a number of fires have occurred of
late iu occupied aud unoccupied buildings within
tin- limits ot the said district, under circumstances
which show that they were not accidental, the
above reward of $ 1000 will lie paid for any informa
tion that will convict any person or persons of hav
ing made the aforesaid preparations, or of setting
tire or causing fire to be set hereafter to any builif
ing or buildings w-itliin the district aforesaid, or
any other part of the city of New Orleaus; this
o'ser of reward to be in foice during the period of
six months from tins date, after which it is to
cease and be of no effect.
d- YOUENES, Firewarden.
New Orleans, March 13, 1372. a p 5 t2o
DffBPBANOE.
MERCHANTS' MUTUAL INSURANCE
COMPANY OP NEW ORLEANS.
N*. 104 Canal street.
SEVENTEENTH ANNUAL STATEMENT
In conformity with the requirement* of then
charter, the company publish the following state
ment:
Premiums received during the year ending May
31, 1871. including unearned premiums of the
previous year—
On fire risks............................. #737,573 68
On marine risks......................... 103.806 61
On river risks........................... 239,680 33
Total premiums............
Less unearned premium*..
Net earned premium*, May 31, 187i.... #878,640 64
Losses paid—
On fire risks...............#429,790 37
On marine risks........... 69.230 27
On rivy risk*............. 73,791 63
Total....................#571,312 r
Taxes...................... 46,531 71
Reinsurances aud return
premiums.............. 30,053 37
Total...................,#648,396 33
Deduct interest, less ex
penses................. 33,260 73— #615,133 60
..........#1,101,062 6i
.......... 222,422 00
Profit...................................#263.505 0 <
The company have the following assets—
Real estate............................. #110,963 11
City bonds.............................. 354,050 0(
Bank and railroad stocks.............. 37.436 00
Notes secured by mortgage............ 410,932 8
Notes secured by pledge............... 103,596 8
Bill* receivable................. 37,755 43
Premium* in course of collection...... 62,023 94
State bonds........................... 1,500 00
Scrip of other companies.............. 6,112 50
Stock of Vallette Dry Dock Company.. 19,800 00
Stock of Levee Steam Cotton Press.... 2,300 01
Stock of Marine Dry Dock and Ship
Yard Company...................... 3,700 00
Harbor Protection Company........... 1,500 0C
Mortgage bonds Orand Lodge of Louisi
ana.................................. 2,000 00
2,000 00
5.000
3.000 00
18,134 10
Mortgage bonds Turners' Association..
Mortgage bonds Odd Pellows' Hail....
Stock Opera House Association........
Judgments..............................
Cash on hand........................... 381,363 83
Total aaaet*...........................#1,483,189 SI
Lew—Unclaimed iatereat
and interest payable
July next en all out
standing scrip* of the
company.............. #78,745 90
Issuei of scrip tor the
years 1863, 1864 and
1865, payable in July.. MS,890 00
Unearned premiums on
May 31, 1871............ 222,423 OO- #481,057 90
#1,002,131 67
The above statement Is a just, true and correct
transcript trom the books of the company.
P. FOURCHY, President.
G. W. NOTT, Secretary.
Stan of Lhcntsss,)
Pariah sf Orleans, City of New Orleans. 1
8worn to and subscribed before me the third day
of June, 1871.
JOSEPH CUYILLIER, Notary Publio.
At a meeting of the Board of Directors, held on
the third day of June, 1871, it was resolved to de
clare a scrip dividend of thirty per cent on the net
earned participating premiums for the year end.
ing thirty-first of May. 1371 for which certificate*
will be issued on and after the first day of Anguat
next. Hso, to pay on and after the second Mon
day in July next the whole issues of Scrip for the
years 1363, 1364 aud 1365, and six per cent interest
on all outstanding scrip of the company.
DIRECTORS:
P. Fomrchy, L. F. Genere*
P. Maspeto. p. 8. Wilts,
D. McCoard. S. Z. Re If,
M. Puig, Joseph Hoy,
D. A. Chalfraix, Charles Lafltte
1»4 ly J. J. Fernandes.
JJBW ORLEANS MUTUAL,
INSURANCE COMPANY.
Office Corner of Camp and Canal Street*.
ASSETS DECEMBER 31,1370, $302,742 07.
Insures fire, marine and river risks, dividing th*
profits on each department separately to the la
•"Pk „ „ 1 TUYES, President
J. W. Hiscxs, Secretary.
Director*.
George Urqnhart, M. Pavro
A. Rochereau,
G. W. Babcock,
A. Schreiber,
Charles Lafitte,
T. Baiily Blanchard,
mvl2 ly
Placide Forstall.
Augustus Reichard,
Ernest Miltenberger,
W B. Schmidt,
J. Tuyea.
a
mvl2 ly
0RESCENT MUTUAL
INSURANCE COMPANY
Twenty-second Annual Statement.
NEW ORLEANS, May 19, 1871.
The Trustees, in conformity to the charter, snb
mlt the following statement of the affair* of th*
company on the thirtieth day of April, 1871:
Fire premiums for the year... #138.572 50
Marine premiums for the year 70,195 62
River premiums for the year. 222,613 83
-#473,382 00
Earned premiums, less reinsurance and
return premiums.................... #400,010 ft
Losses paid and estimated as follows:
On fire risks.......#45.799 95
On marine risks... 19,195 09
On river risks..... 72,639 45
•--#137,634 49
Taxes paid and estimated... 43,819 21
Discount in hen 6f scrip,
stamps, expenses, inter
est account, etc., less dis
count, etc................ 50,103 53
231,557 2
Leaving net profits..................# 168,453 4 «
The company has the following assets:
Bills receivable............... #24,339 11
Loans on bond and mortgage 91,143 33
Loans on pledge of stocks at
call....................... 236,716 66
Cash en hand................ 119,095 77
#116,533 44
405,312 43
. 75,000 00
. 228,745 0
. 82,572 65
.$903,662 52
Real estate..............................
City bonds, bank and other stocks.....
Premiums in course of collection.......
Total................................
The company has also suspended—
Notes, stocks and bonds..................$233,246 15
Forfeited scrip............................ 9 t 904 79
Less interest on scrip.................... 53,439 52
The above statement is a true and correct
transcript from the hooks of the company.
THOMAS A. ADAMS, President.
Hinrt V. Oocen, Secretary.
Parish or Orleans, >
City of New Orleaus. j
Sworn to and subscribed before me, this nine
teeuth day of May W, Y. EVANS,
Second Justice of the Peace.
The Board of Trustees resolved to pay interest
at six per cent in cash on ail outstanding cenifi
8 cri P- snd aieo to pay in cash FIFTY PER
cent of the issue of 1860, to the legal holder*
next** 01J aUU aftel the fir8t Moaia Y in Jane
They have a':se declared
FIFTY PER CENT
a scrip dividend of
on the earned premiums en
ii*i i . wwnuvju JflCUIrUUiB DR'
f pait:eipat< ', for the year ending April 30,
i83 ° ed °° ««•
srnznent fax! *" Auguat of gov
THOMAS A. ADAMS, President.
Hsvar v rtn ' T ' BBDDKC5E ' Vice President
Bmsky V, Oqdun, Secret ar y,
TRUSTEES:
Thomas A. Adams, Samuel H. k«r n t1 »
O. T. Buddecke,
8. B. Newman,
A. G. Ober,
P. Simms,
4. Elmer Bad
J. J ■ Garrard.
P. H. Foley,
A. Thomson,
John Phelp*,
E. H. Summers,
B. Newgass,
*7*1 lj
INSURANCE.
MM EKCIA L INSURANCE COMPANY
OF NEW ORLEANS.
Sixth Annual Stateiuont.
In conformity with the requirements of their
charter, the Company publish the following state
ment:
Piemiuina received for the year ending March
31, 1872:
Fire....................................... #56,612 65
Marine.................................... 24,305
Biver..................................... 91,638
Add unterminated premiums March 31,
#170,556
17,479
Less uuterniinated March 31, 1872.
Paid fire losses...........
Paid marine losses ......
Paid river losses.......
Paid rebate...............
Paid reinsurance.........
Paid return premiums....... 2,721 97
Paid taxes.................... 8,734 98
Paid contingent............... 1.513 57
PaidTent..................... 4,775 00
Paid expenses, salaries,
stamps, etc.......15,170 13
$143,863 94
$133,036
. 12,464
$ 175,571
Less profit and loss and iu
teiest.....................
127,290 94
Profits................................ $43,230 40
ASSETS:
Stock notes............................... #73,400 00
Bills receivable.......................... 120,387 24
Furniture.............. 3,883 93
Harbor boat stock....................... 1,24100
City bonds............................... 1,320 00
Bills in course of collection, net........ 2),430 63
Cash on band............................ 124,438 21
Total.............,.................. $349,101 00
The above statement is a just and correct trans
cript from the books of this company.
J. H. OGLESBY, President.
Walter Huntington, Secretary.
New Orleans, March 30, 1372.
Citv of Nbsv Orleans, April 9, 1372.
Sworn to and subscribed before me, notary.
EDWARD IVY, Notary Public.
At a meeting of the Board of Directors, held on
the eighth of April, it was resolved that a dividend
of Fifteen Dollars per share be declared, to be cred
iteil on the stock notes.
J. H. OGLESBY, President.
JOHN T. HARDIE, Vice President.
Walter Huntington, Secretary.
New Orleans, April 9, 1872. apll lm
90
67
1
fjVVlVh VF 'fUt SUM JllITtAl
INSURANCE COMPANY
OF NEW ORLEANS,
01................Camp street................6]
FIFTEENTH ANNUAL STATEMENT.
N*w OrlsaNS, January 21, 1871.
In conformity with the requirements of their
charter, the company publish the following state
ment for the year ending December 31.1370:
Amount ofpremiumsfor the year ending thirty-first
Decembe via.:
On Fire Risks.................$102,060 88
On Marine Risks.............. 43,465 64
On River Risks............... 74,305 59
$224,332 11
Add
Unterminated Risks for 1369.. 51.511 Oft
-#276,34
Deduct—
Unterminated Risks for 1370.. $45,613 00
Return Premiums............ 914 56
Net earned premiums for 1370........#229,816 5!
Losses paid during same period via. ;
On F.re Risks......$73,539 no
On Marine Risks... 51,005 61
On River Risks....
Taxes..............
General Expenses..
Discount on Prem
ium*.............
2).964 38—150,510 0«
13,913 79
37,012 72
16,031 91
Interest en Scrip*.. 47.434 42
Re-insurances...... 3,114 33—117,507 22
Amount reserved for unad
justed losses less savings.. 6.759 04
#274,776 35
Discount and interest, and
profit and loss..............
57,995 80
216.780 55
Net Profit......................... #13,036 00
The Company have the following Assets, esti
mated at the lowest market cash, values, vis:
165 Consolidated and Rhilroad City
$338,435 00
5,160 OO
23,630 75
4.000 00
3.000 00
1.000 00
99.000 00
36,600 00
11.900 00
9,372 00
1,200 00
6.900 00
1,800 00
1,500 00
325 00
54,363 45
72,450 00
2,800 00
6,381 60
3,457 20
28.000 IX)
63,286 82
Bonds.........
6 State Bonds.........................
44 City Seven Per Cent Bonds.........
4 L O. O. F. Bonds.....................
3 Grand Lodge of Louisiana Bonds....
2 N. O. Turners' Association...........
600 Shares N. O. Gas Light Company*...
224 Shares Citizens' Bank of Louisiana.
35o Shares Union Bank of Louisiana*...
223 Shares Canal Bank*..................
60 Shares Crescent City Bank.........
59 Shares Louisiaaa State Bank*......
50 Shares Mechanics' and Traders'
Bank..........................
30 Shares Harbor Piotection Company
5 Shares Merchants' 3ank.............
Loans on Pledge.........................
Loans on Mortgage......................
Bills Receivable..........................
Scrip of other Insurance Companies....
State Coupons............................
Premiums in course of collection.......
Cash on hand............................
Total................................. #774,061 82
Including Dividends.
The above statement is a just, true and correct
transcript from the books of the Company.
THOMAS SLOO, President
Thohas Anderson, Secretary.
Statx or Louisiana, Parish or Orlians, )
City of New Orleans. J
Sworn to and subscribed before me this twenty
first day of January, 1871.
ANDREW HERO, Jr.,
Notary Pnblio.
The Board of Directors have resolved to pay six
per cent interest on the outstanding Certificate* of
Profits, on and after the second Monday of Febru
ary, 1871; also, fifty per cent on the balance of the
scrip of the year 1858, payable on and after the
third Monday in March, 1871, and they have fur
ther declared a dividend of ten per cent on the
net earned Participating Premiums for the year
ending December 31, 1870, for which certificates
wrill be issued on aud after the twentieth day of
March next.
THOMAS SLOO, President.
JOHN G. GAINES. Vice President.
THOMAS ANDERSON, Secretary.
DIRECTORS:
John G. Gaines. E. J. Hart,
B. Biscoe. Henry Renshaw,
I. N. Marks. 5V E. Seymour,
J. Weis, R. S. Venables,
W. A. Kent, Riehard Flower,
Hugh Wilson Thomas Sloo.
Ian It
J^AFAY'KTTK Fifth
INSURANCE COMPANY,
OF NEW ORLEANS,
Capital..,.............................0300,000.
Office comer of St. Andrew and Magazine streeli
up stairs: entrance on St. Andrew street.
INSURES AGAINST LOSS OR DAMAGE 3i FIRJ
AT LOWEST RATES.
OFFICERS:
KASPAE AUCH, President; ROBERT JACKSON
Vice President.
Louis Matnis, Secretary; John Purcell, Inspect©)
directors:
Philipp Drumm,
J. H. Keller,
E. H. Burton,
W. R. Fish,
O. F. Theisman,
Louis Faessel,
Henry Ellermann,
Henry Bensel, Jr.,
Charles Kummel,
Christian Mehle,
B. H. Schene,
August Bernard.
Henry Rice,
L. L. Levy,
Florence Pfiister,
J. F. Kranz,
Dr. S. S. Wood,
Alfred Shaw.
E. R. Chevalley,
J. H. Norton,
J. M. G. Parker,
1*10 U
jyEW ORLEANS MUTUAL 1MSI KAMCE
ASSOCIATION,
* Office No. IO Exchange Alley.
FIRST QUARTERLY STATEMENT.
Iu conformity with their charter, the NEW OR
LEANS MUTUAL INSURANCE ASSOCIATION pub
lull the following statement of their affairs for the
first quarter of i872, eudiDg March 31, 1872:
Fire premiums...........................$208,316 63
Marine premiums........................ 117,482 49
River premiums..........
» Total............ ; .....
Mss unearned premiums.
Less returned premiums...
Net earued premiums .
Fire losses..................
Marine losses...............
River losses................
Reserved for unadjusted
fosses.....................
...............$413,930 03
. $152,330 97
273 13— 152,604
..............$261,325 93
$17,942 83
60.000 00
Total...................
Reinsurance................
Rebate......................
General expenses..........
License and internal rev
enue stamps..............
Profit and loss..............
$137,144 82
13,201 93
4.041 61
12,836 17
1,418 30
80 21
Total....................$168,773 54
Add two aud a half per
cent interest for first
quarter ou capital paid,
$21,261 80, less discount
aud interest, $20,337 03.. 373 96— 169,1
Net profits............................ $9 2,1
ASSETS.
Stock notes............................. $147,624 10
Cash.................................... 109,238 67
Notes aud bills receivable.............. 5n9,761 62
Stock anil bouds........................ 108,689 50
Real estate.............................. 74,789 89
Assessment of 65 per cent on $237,555 32 154,410 05
Total.............................$1,104,564
The above statement is a correct transcript from
the books of the New Orleans Mutual Insurance
Association. C. CAVAROC, President.
G. Lanai x, Secretary.
Statr of Louisiana,
Parish of Orleans, City of New Orleans.
Sworn to aud subscribed before me this sixth dav
of April. 1372. G. LKUARDEUB. JR.,
Notary Public,
At a special meeting of the Board of Directors
hebl this dsy, it was resolved, iu conformity with
article VII. of the charter, to collect forthwith
from stockholders an assessment of sixty-five per
cent ou the net earned premiums of the first quar
ter of 1872. subject to assessment, aud amouutiug
to #237,555 32; and it was furthermore resolved to
pay to stockholders, ou demand, a quarterly in
terest of two and a half per cent ou the amount of
capital paid in.
Director*.
C. CAVAROC, S. CAMBOV,
CHS. DE Rl'YTFR, A. POINCY,
LEON HAAS. JR., I. KULI,
K. F. MlOTON, P. S. WILTZ,
W. AGAR, . L. Ql'KYKoUZE.
A. THIBAUT. ap7 lm
5!
Q.UAKDIA.N MUTUAL LIFE INSUR
ANCE COMPANY OF NEW YORK.
Established n 1S39.
ALL POLICIES NON FORFEITABLE.
CASH OR THIRD NOTE PREMIUMS.
NO NOTES REQUIRED.
Last Cash Dividend Fifty Per Cent.
h assets over..............
Policies in force...............
Annual income...............
Losses paid since 1359........
..........#1,000,(XX)
.......... 25.000,000
.......... 1 , 000.000
.......... 600,000
OFFICERS :
w. H. PBCKHAM, President.
W. T. HOOKER. Vice President.
L. McADAM, Secretary and Actuary.
G. A. FRED&IKAR, Superintendent of Agencies
DIRECTORS:
Hon. John A. Dix. New York.
John J. Crane, President Bank of Republic.
William M. virmilye, Banker, Wail street (Ver
milye A Co).
Charles G. Rockwood. Cashier Newark Banking
Company.
Hon. George Opdyke, ex-Mayor of New York.
Minot C. Morgan, Banker.
Thomas Rigney, firm Thomas Rigney A Co.
Benjamin B. Sherman, Treasurer New York Steam
Sugar Refining Company.
Aaron Arnold, firm Arnold. Constable A Co.
Richard H. Browne, of Wetmore A Browne, lawyers
E. V. Haughwout, firm E V. Haughwont A Co.
William Wilkens, firm W. Wiikens A Co
Julius H. Pratt, Merchant.
William W. Wright, Merchant.
Charles J. Starr. Merchant.
William Allen, Merchant.
George W. Cuyler, Banker, Palmyra. New York.
George T. Hope, President Continental Fire In
surance Company.
John H. Sherwood, Park Place,
Walton H. Peckham, corner Fifth avenue end
Twenty-third srieet, New York.
William T. Hooker, Wall street.
Edward H. Wright, Newark, Ne** Jersey
George W. Farlee, Lawyer.
. L. Cogswell, Merchant.
JOSEPH MAUNER,
Manager for Louisiana and Texas, No. 158 Common
street, New Orleans. fel8 9y
|^0UISIANA Ml'Tl'AL INSURANCE
COMPANY'.
Eighteenth Annual Statement.
In conformity with the requirements of their
charter, the company publish the following state
ment :
Total premiums for the year ending
twenty-ninth of February, 1872..... $359,567 16
Viz: Fire premiums.......$145,487 85
Marine premiums..... 175,875 36
River premiums....... 33,203,95— 359,567 16
Unearned and returned premiums and
rehateonpremiums................. 63,487 03
' Net premiums..... ................. $296,030 13
Fire losses....................$35,023 44
Marine losses................. 132.189 75
River loses................... 15.976 22
Expenses, etc., less discount
account..................
Balance..................
$233,139 41
10,925 63
22,234 71— 266,399 75
.................... $29,630 33
The company have the following assets estimated
at the lowest cash market value:
City and other bouds.................... $55,oOO 00
Bank aud other stocks................... 13,708 00
Scrip of insurance companies........... 84,623 60
Real estate............................... 36,450 13
Bills receivable ou mortgages........... 75,219 61
Bills receivable.......................... 40,523 52
Premiums iu eourse of collection........ 43,536 77
Cash on hand and in Europe............. 144,010 97
Total.................................$503,077 90
The above statemenj is a just, true and correct
tiaascnpt from the hooks of the company.
CHARLES BRIGGS, President.
J P. Roil, Secretary.
State of Louisiana, parish of Orleans, city ol New
Orleans: Sw orn to aud subscribed before me this
nineteenth day of March, 1372.
P. CHS. CUVELLIER, Notary Public.
Six per cent interest outlie outstanding certifi
cates oi scrip w ill he paid to the holders theivof, or
their legal representatives, ou and after MONDAY,
thirteenth of May, 1872.
CHARLES BRIGGS, President.
ANT. CARKILKE, Vice President.
J. P. Roux, Secretary.
Board of Trustees elected on the nineteenth ot
February, 1372:
Charles Briggs,
Ant. Carriere,
( eorge A. Fosdick,
R. Brugier,
P. Anderson,
A. Frerichs,
George W. Dunbar,
K. F. Stockmeyer,
George w. Hynson,
A. Montgomery,
Fcnry J, Y'ose,
E. Marqueze,
Charles Weisbaar,
A. Lecourt.
Frank Williams,
Thomas Byrne,
George Foster.
Charles Lafitte,
John S. Wallis,
Rudolph Sieg.
H. F. Given,
W. C. Black,
Thomas H. Hunt
Chu. Houold, '
D. Jamison,
R S. Howard,
Felix'Larue,
Aug. Bohn,
G. D. Fisher,
idward Toby,
Wash. Morton,
R- Grieainger,
William Knox,
mh21 lm
the
63
49
03
93
10
67
62
50
89
05
mSUEOOE.
JJELTA INSURANCE COMPANY.
OFFICE CORNER CARONDELET AND COMMON
STREETS, NEW ORLEANS.
CAPITAL STOCK DEPARTMENT.
Shares $ 100 each. Annual interest dividends ten
per cent.
PREMIUM DEPARTMENT.
Ail dividends to Stockholders payable in Cash.
FIRE. MARINE and RIVER policies issued by this
Company at Current Rales of Premiums.
TRUSTEES:
A. Baldwin. C. J. Leeds,
O. P. Biancand, F. Laborde,
A. Elmer Bader, A. H. D'Mtza,
O. Bercier, Emile Dupre,
A. Teitrou, John Bruuaso,
B. Hufft, D. Boulignv,
R. W. Theurer, A. Palacio,
M. A. de Lizarui, T. M. Simmon;, Joseph Aleix,
E. Ganucbeau.
L. H. Gardner,
J. Lapene,
O. Hopkins,
C. II. aioutin,
W. B. Conger,
E. Bordelois,
T. L. Airey,
OC316m
OFFICERS:
E. GANUCKEAU, President.
A. BALDWIN, Vice President.
L. W. BAQU1E, Secretary.
J^MCKERDOCKEU life
INSURANCE COMPANY
OF NEW YORK.
PRINCIPAL OFFICE NO. 161 BROADWAY.
Asset* Over 08,000,000.
SOUTHWESTERN BRANCH OFFICE,
31........... Carondclet .Street...........
31
New Orleans.
A. N. CRAIG, Manager.
COLONEL R. N. OGDEN, General Agent,
mli!) lm
dav
per
to
in
of
OOHSTABLESygAUBB.___
J. N. Slinwhnn vs. Bryan J. Berltery.
William Carroll surety—Second Justice Court
for the parish of Orleans, No. 541.
B y virtue of a writ OF FIERI FACIAS
to me directed by the H 011 . W. L. Evans, Second
Justice of the Peace in aud for the parish of
Orleaus, in the above cause, against William Car
roll, surety, I will proceed to sell at public auction,
at the Mercliauts'aud Auctioneer s'Exchange, on
Royal street, between Canal and Customhouse
streets, in the Second District of this city, on
SATURDAY', May 11, 1372, at twelve •'clock M.,
the following property, to wit—
A CERTAIN LOT OF GROUND, wi*h all the im
provements thereon, situated in tile First District
of the city of New Orleans, in the square bounded
by Roman, Prieur, Palravra aud Common streets,
said lot being designated by the number twenty
eight on a plan by J. Pilie. surveyor, in the office of
L. McCay. late a notary public of the parish of Or
leans, aud measures twenty seven feet five inches
and two lines front ou Common street, by a depth
of one hundred and thirty-six feet and two lines
on the line dividing it from lot number twenty
seven, aud twenty-seren feet in the rear, and one
hundred and thirty-one feet one inch and four lines
on the line dividing it from lot number twenty
nine. Being the same property acquired by said
William Carroll from Mii-tress Ann Eliza Compton,
widow of Charles Bannister, by act bef re W. B.
Kleiupeter, notary public, of date Jauuary 9, 1371.
Seized in the above suit.
Terms—Cash on the s;iot.
aplO _ ANDREW J. DAVERN. Constable.
t». Uoye* v*. Mr*. Ilervint nml l.eontine
Dervint—Third Justice court for the Parish of
Orleans, No. 7641.
B y virtue of a writ of pfibi facias
to me directed by the Hon. Joliii P. Montamat.
Third Justice of the Peace in aud for the Darish of
Orleans, t will proceed to sell at public auction,
ou SATURDAY'. April 20, 1S72. at eleven o'clock A.
M.,at my warehouse. No. 33 Exchange alley, the
following property, to wit—
ONE LOT OF FURNITURE.
Seized in the above entitled aud numbered suit,
as per invenforv deposited at my office.
Terms—Cash on the spot.
aplO 16 2i) WILLIAM WEEKS. Constable.
Ph. Ka**el v» Henry Walter anil Wile
Sixth Justice Court for the palish of Orleans,
No 7852.
B Y VIRTUE of a. writ of fieri facias TO
me directed by the honorable Sixth
Justice of the Peace in ami for the parish of Or
leans. I will proceed to sell at public auction, at
m.v warehouse, No. 231 St. Andrew street, ou
WEDNESDAY. April 17. 1372, at twelve o'clock .SL
ONE FOUR WHEELED SPRING WAGON.
Seized in tlie above numbered and entitled suit.
Terms—Cash iu United Slated currenev.
ap9 i'2 17 JAMES MOORE. Constable,
L. F. Deliizize vs. .11 r. nnd 31 r*. 'looney
—Third Justice Court tor the Par ish of Orleaus,
Kioe anti T'iftT
Xos 7506 and 75(17.
B Y VIRTUE OF TWO WBITS OF FJERI FACIAS
to me directed bv the Ilou. John P. Ylontamat,
Third Justice of the Peace iu and fur the pai ish of
Orleans, I will proceed to sell at public auction on
SATURDAY'. April 20, 1372. at twelve o'clock,
at my w arehouse. No 35 Bienvijie street, the fol
lowing property, to w it —
ONE LOT OF FURNITURE.
Seized iu the above entitled and numbered suits,
as per inventory deposited iu my office.
1 erius—Cash ou t lie spot.
apft 14 20 WILLIAM WEEKS. Constable.
AUCTION SALES. _
By Albert Paul.
ASSIGNEE'S SALE.
CONTF.STS OF A COOPER SHOP AT AUCTION.
B V AI.BERT PAT I,, AITtAneER. OFFICE
No. 56 Exchange alley.—FRIDAY. April 19. 1872
at eleven o'clock A. M., will be sold at public auc
tion, at the 6tore No. 13 Couti street, the entire
contents of said store, surrendered bv Oscar La
naux iu bankruptcy, comprising—
A large aud valuable assortmeut of new and
second hand Barrels ami Kegs, Desks, Cha'rs
Benches. Coopers' Tools, etc.; also, a Barrel Wagon
and Harness.
Terms—Cash in United States treasury notes.
apl7 td
By Bi. 1C. Sc B. J. Montgomery.
HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE. PIANOS. CARPETS
ETC., AT AUCTION.
B Y R. M. dc B. J. MONTGOMERY—X.
M. MONTGOMERY, Auctioneer—Will be sold
on everv SATURDAY. TUESDAY, and THUESDAT
ai the Old Auction Mart, 87 (.Amp 9 ireet, at elevet
o'clock—
A GENERAL ASSORTMENT OF NEW and SEC
OND-HAND FURNITURE, suen as Rosewood
Mahogany and Waluut Bedsteads, Armcira. Bu
reaus, Washstauds, Parlor Furniture, Marble Tot
Centre Tables. Carpets, French Plate Mirrors
Mattresses, Cooking Stoves, etc.
' ALSO.
A large invoice of Cottage Beds, Cane end Wrod
Seat Chairs. Aieo. Upright and Saaare Pianos of
Pleyel, Favre and other manufactories.
ALSO,
AN IMMENSE STOCK OF NEW FURNITfRY ;
all desenption at private sh'.e.
Terms—Cash
GOOD HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE. CARPETS, MIR
RORS, ETC., AT AUCTION ON ACCOUNT OF
DEPARTURE.
B Y R. SI. At B. J. MONTGOMERY
R. M. Montgomery. Auctioneer.—Win be si.id'
on FRiDAY. April 19, 1872, at eleven o'clock at No'
142 Prvtania street—
THE ENTIRE CONTENTS OF SAID RESIDENCE
consisting of good mahogany aud waluut'bed
room, parlor aud dining-room furniture carpets
mirrors, China and glassware, kitcheu furniture,'
Terms—Cash in Uuited States Treasury note*
aplT
By J. B. Walto^.
FOUR DESIRABLE LOTS OF GROUND IN THE
SIXTH DISTRICT, ON FROST AND OCTAY'IA
STREETS, VERY HIGH, FORMERLY HURST'S
WOOD YARD.
SUCCESSION OF MRS. ADELAIDE ROBERTSON
Second District Court for the Par
No -.
of Oileaus—
TJY J. R. WALTON, AUCTIONEER-OFFICE
, Common street.—SATURDAY. May 4,
]• ' twelve o'clock 51, at tin- St. Charles Aue
tion Exchange, by virtue and iu pursuance
01 an order oi the honorable the St-coml District
Court for the parish ol Orleans, iu the matter of
tile succession of Jlrs. Adelaide Robertson, court
docket No.-. dated M ireli 13, 1372, will be sold.
the following described property, to wit—
FOUR LOTS OF' GROUND, in the Sixth District of
this citv, ia square No. 4. hounded by Joseph, Levee
(now Tchoupitdulas), Octavia and Front streets,
designated by the Nos. 7, 8, 9 and 10 on a plan drawn
by B. Unison and W. T. Thompson surveyors, dated
the twenty-third day of March, 1819. and deposited
in the office of James Graham, notary public. Lots
Nos. 7, 8 and 9 adjoin each other, and measure
each. 31 feet (more or less) front on Front street'
hv a depth of llo feet, between parallel lines lot
No. 9 forming tin- corner ot Front and Octavia
streets. Lot No. 10 lies immediately in the tear of
said lots Nos. 7, 3 anil 9, mt-asuring'30 feet front on
Octavia street, hy a depth of 1J9 feet 6 inches, be
tween parallel lines.
Terms-One-third cash in United States treasury
notes, and the remainder at one and two years, iii
the notes ot the purchasers, iu equal amounts,
secured by special mortgage, hearing eight per
cent interest per annum from date until paid;
the mortgage to embrace the clause of five per
cent for attorneys' fees iu case of suit
before Thomas J. Beck, notary pub
expense of the purchasers, including the
luited States revenue stamps.
mh31 ap6 13 20 27 my4
AUCTION S ALES.
By E. A. Deslonde.
EXTENSIVE SALE OF PROPERTY
iff
THE STATES OF TEXAS AND MISSOURI.
Consisting of
LANDS IN HUSK, TITUS, LEON, WALKER p?
SHUR, DE WITT, FREESTONE AND 00X
ZALES COUNTIES, IN THE STATE OF TEXys
And
A TRACT OF LAND SITUATED 15 ST. LOl'Is
COUNTT, IN THE STATE OF MISSOURI,
AT AUCTION.
FOR ACCOUNT OF THE SUCCESSION OF THg
LATE HUGH MtKENXA.
Second District Court for the parish of OrV»n„
B y E. A. DESLONDE, AUCTiONRRD
Office N*. 45 Baromie street— SATURDzv
May 13, 1372, at twelve o'clock M„ at the Mer
chants anil Auctioneers' Exchange, on Royal street
between Canal and Customhouse streets,'by virtos
aud in pursuance of an order of the Hon r,,,'
is Dtivisueaud, Judge of the Second District Court
for the palish of Orleans, duted February 23
docket No. 20,412, will be sold, for account of the
succession of Hugh F. McKenna, deceased, tliefol
low ing lands aud property, as hereiubelow set forth
aud described— "
I, nnd* in Gonzales County, Texas.
1. ONE-THIRD OF A LEAGUE OF LAND, moreor
less, granted to the heirs oi John Cain, containinv
about 1476 acres, the titles of which lands were r
corned June 1« 1349. r ''
2. ONE-THIRD OF A LEAGUE OF L»ND. granted
to Joseph Martin, assignee of Joaquim Del 1 un .Id
deed for which was recorded July 13, 134 a ' 8
3. ONE THIRD.OF A LEAGUE OF LAND, granted
to the heirs of George Joulminsnn, the deeds fi,?
w hich were recorded July 17, 1849.
4. ONE THIRD OF A I,RAGUE OF LAND, granted
to Archibald Gibson, the title to which waslernra
ed Jillv 19, 1349.
5. NINE HUNDRED AND EIGHTY-ONE ACRES
OF LAND, more or less, in same comity, granted to
Phi ueas James: deed for same recorded fiepteuiber
1, 1349.
6. THREE-QUARTERS AND LABOR OF LAND
situated in DeWitt county, Texas, known as the
William W. Arlington tract, coulaiuing 3321 a< re ,
mure or less, the titles to which were recordi*i
September 1, 1849.
7. FOUR THOUSAND SIX HUNDRED AND FIVg
ACRES, more or less, iu Leon aud Freestone coi n
ties, Texas, granted to Gertrude Diaz, the deeds
for which were recorded as follows: Iu Leon
county, August 4, 1849; in Freestone county, August
3. A TRACT OF LAND, situated in W»lfc w
county, Texas, granted to Cesario Commana. con
taining 1476 acres, more or less, the deeds for
which were recorded Juue 16, 1849.
All th* above lands were acquired by Hugh?
McKenna, deceased, from Lmlovic Colqahoun. "The
title deeds and description of the lands may be sera
at the office of MeShrs. Hunton -V Grower, No. 123
Gravier street, or at the office of the auctioneer
No. 45 Baroune street.
These lauds havq been represented by agents of
McKcima, who attended to the payment ot taxes
etc., but it is not known whether all the taxes
have been paid in full.
ALSO,
THE UNDIVIDED INTEREST of the succession
of Hugh F. MfKenua iu the following lauds be
longing to said succession and James S. Breuder,
the interest of both parlies being sold, viz: '
9. A TRACT OF LAND iu Burk county, Texas,part
of 1 lie headriglit survey of John Blair, containin'
570 acres, more or less.
lft. A TRACT OF' LAND in the same county, part
of the headriglit survey of J. S. Baructt, coutaimn
42rt acres, more or less.
The above two tracts of land were acquired br
deed of sale fio*i the sheriff of Rusk eoun' v, Texas,
dated June 1, 1352.
11. A TRACT OF LAND in Titus county, about
one mile and a half east otMouut Pleasant, acquired
from J. W. Witkee. by deed dated -Mar 26, 1356, cou
taiuing 286* 3 acres, more or less.
12. A TRACT OF LAND in Titus eonntv, in Texas,
part of sutvey of 879 acres, made out of 'the original
survey of Wade H. Viniug. acquired from K. H.
Jordan, March 13. 1356. containing 279 acres, mote
or less.
18. A TRACT OF LAND in Cpehifr countv, Texas
containing 64ft acres, being part cf the headlights
suivcy of Joseph Castleberry, acquired lrotu Ja:u : s 8
D, '1 odd, by deed dated May 14,1351.
ALSO,
A CERTAIN TRACT ®R PARCEL OF LAND, situ
ated iu the county of St. Louis, state of Missouri,
part of what is commonly known as the Lacroix
tiact, l ,,ited States Survey No. 1664. commencing
at a point in the north line of what was tonuerie
known as the Olive street plank road (60 feet wide),
which point is twenty-six and thi-ee quarters of an
arpeut west ward Iv from the eastern line of sad
Survey No. 1664; thence running westward!}' with
the north line of said Olive street road 5 ] , arpenti,
equal to 1106 feet and ins* inches: thence
nortwardly at right angle to said Olive
street road i62 feet and 6 inches to the
northern line ot said Surrey No. 1664: thence eaai
wardly with said northern "line of Survev No. 1664
5 J ., arpenta. equal to 1106 feet end 10inches
thence southwardly at a right ancle to said north
ern line of said survey 162 feet and 6 inches to Ills
place of beginning, bounded ou the north bv the
Barraheau tract, Survev No. 1663: on the east bv
McPherson; cn the south by the Olive street load:
aud on 1 he west by James s'. Brainier.
This tract of land is to be sold subject to auv
claim of the widow of Hugh F. McKenna, Mrs.
F/auees Mi Keuua. It is believed she has no legal
claim to any part of this land.
Terms and Conditions of Sale—Cash in United
States treasury notes on the spot. The purchaser!
to assume the payment of auv unpaid taxes, aud
to bear 1 ost of transfer of title aud stumps.
aplO 13 27 my4 1113
auc
La
and
By Sherifl Sauvinet.
of
;
SUCCESSION OF THE LATE EMANUEL BURTHE,
deceased.
Second District Court for »lie parish of Orleans—No.
34,317.
B Y VIRTUE OF AND IN OBEDIENCE A!f
order of sale rendered September 9, 1871, aud
to me directed by the honorable the Second District
Court tor the pMrjsli of Orleans, in the above
entitled matter, I will proceed to sell at public
auction, at tho Merchants and Auctioneers' Ex
change, on Royal street, between Canal and Cus
tomhouse streets, in the Second District of this
city, on 31 ON DAY, April 22, 1872. at twelve
o'clock M., tlie following described propertv, to
wit—
THE UNDIVIDED ONE-FOURTH IN AND TO A
CERTAIN S(^t ARK OF GROUND, with all the im
provements thereon. situated in the parish of Jef
tersou, in this Sfate, comprised within Nayades,
St. Patrick and Edmund streets and Clay avenue,
designated as square number nimuv on a plan by
Nimeggar, on the twenty-fourth of Januarv, 1854,
deposited in the office of A. Chiapella, lure a notary
public in this city, as plan number sixty-four, con
taining twenty-seven lots, numbered from one to
twenty, inclusive, and measuring, according to said
pian, three hundred and thirty-live feet six lines
trout on Nayades street, two hundred and eighty
three feet ten inches front ou Edmund street, three
hundred and twelve feet six inches front on St. Pat*
ricir street, and three hundred and eightv one teet
seven lines trout on Clav avenue,
lei ms—Cash on the spot. #
, C: S. SAUVINET,
tnh-laplO 21 Sheri tT of the Parish of Orleans
SLClEosION OF THE LATE OoCAK J l)l>5
DECEASED.
Second District Court for the Parish of Orleans—
No. 33,055.
B Y YTP.TUE OF AND IN OBEDIENCE TO AN
order of sale rendered Mareli 15 1372, aud
to me directed by the honorable the Second Distnet
Court tor the parish of Orleans, in the above enti
tied matter, I wUl procet-d to sell at onblic auction.'
at the Merchants and Auctioneers' Exchange,
Royai street, between Canal anil Customhouse
vV'vV'pil IV Vi 6 District of this citv, on
SAIt RDAY, May 4, 13,2. at twelve o'clock M.. for
account ot said succession, the followin ' described
property, to wit— -
.,ihi A , oT AIS LO , T . OF GROUND, together with
n J, * D- 1 --''mgs and improvements thereon, and
?Y _ '.V 2 ''i t8 l wa - vs ' Privileges aud appurteiiances
thereunto belonging or in any wise appertaining,
situated in the First District of this citv, iu the
bv S ai A aI ' Claiborne, Gaxfuet and
l ir o-Vi.t il! 8 ' alul 'L-sign atyil as lot number
drawn hv V for "'""bered twenty, on a plan
Of tin- lar< ' snrv eyor, under date
1 -fJi Lmo. a V? V °L Mav - m °- and deposited for
notai vVnhh 1 ,he „ ottK ' p of David L. McCav, late a
FnilPh , U tb,s < ltv: "bieii said lot measures,
Streer 8 bw. , SUr a' ^"'y-five feet front on Canal
?n depth J w e J ,UUdred lV Ml six foot seven inches
MiWrtv w ' P arall o' lines. Being the same
PUMdiai hlim b »r a ' r ,,UIre ' 1 bv sai, i deceased by
t lsiiW A,,na Cbn-a Meyers, the widow
CKiWit' ,mi l s<a ' as I** a Jr thereof passed
on i hi twi le n er °' V'" " ota 'T public iu this city.
VVv U 1 of December, 1869.
(« hereon KS " 0 ^^ ten paidTin
l«Ti A l"'i9 F 17'V.l" T l FI i : ' lTKS ' numbered 1956, 1937.
'Tr,.? 0 ','', *"'o dollars each, isstnd by
s VerUiwl t . , , r ndt i' 1 Hrieat.s, tot moneys
suj.cnhi.dtoi the erection of its hall
terms—For the real estate, three thousand five
mndu d dollars cash, and the loanee at one vear'i
" tfo- notes nr the purchaser, divided into
Hi es ofo ar ;.' , ,'r, r, ; < V a!i n>inistra t rix. said
. S } . ***\\'t™*t at eight percent per annum
t.om date until pam; aud for the stock, cash ou the
spot.
mli20 apiO mat
m , f' SArviSKT.
0.1 o n ft of the Parish of Orleans
SUCCESSION OF THE LATE GEORGE YV. RAGAS
DECEASED.
Parish Court, East Baton Rouge, No. 1131, Probate
B Y- nRTUE OF AND IN OBEDIENCE TO AS
order ot sale, rendered April 6 1 % " .1
Sfo,me^; , C?h bie tl1 " f >ar; ®b Court ot East
nrocetMl t f «ff t n!n VC eut *tle4 matter. I will
proceed to etll at public auction for account of
LalidXfoh 1 unfll MARK ' "bout fifteen and a half
Befomrini Bb'GGV or CARRIAGE,
belonging to said succession.
Terms—Cash on the spot.
ap9 15 29

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