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New Orleans Republican. [volume] (New Orleans, La) 1867-1878, May 14, 1872, Image 1

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SIMLE COPIES: TEN CENTS.
OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE STATE OF LOUISIANA.
TERMS: $16 00 PER ANNUM.
VOLUME VI—NO. 30.
NEW ORLEANS, TUESDAY, MAY ]4, 1872.
WHOLE NUMBER 1560.
AMUSEMENTS.
ACADEMY OF MUSIC.
D. BIDWELL..............Proprietor and Manager
Sunday, Monday and Tuesday. May 12,
13 and 14.
The management announce that in compliance
with the wish and request of many patrons of the
Academy, who were unable to witness the first
representation of the popular spectacle,
THE BLACK CROOK,
That it will be revived for
THREE SIGHTS ONLY.
The full and talented dramatic organization will
be brought into requisition, in connection with the
HERNANDEZ TROUPE of Actors, Pantoaumists,
Gymnasts, etc.
GRAND UAL.LET,
The principals of which have been engaged and
brought direct from New York.
A Musical, Gymnastic and Terpsioborean Olio
changed nightly.__ ™T 12
nightly.__
t^ARIETlES TH KAT
UE.
LOUIS MARIOTTI..........................Manager
A. G. CAMBRIDGE...............Business Manager
SIGNOR BOLIVAR............Leader of Orchestra
ENGAGEMENT EXTRAORDINARY !
ITALIAN OPERA,
FOR A SEASON OF FIVE GRAND OPERAS.
The ITALIAN OPERA TROCPE wiU present
series of Operas, in the following succession:
WEDNESDAY, May 15—Donizetti's grand tragic
opera of LUCIA DI LAMMERMOOR, with the
foHowing great caste:
LUCIA.....Mine. EUGENIA BELLINI DK MARIOTTI
Alica...................................Mme. Boudro
Edyardo.......................Signor Pietro Daccei
Aston................................Signor G. Reina
Arthur............................Signor L. Jburdan
Kamiondo.............................Signor Dubose
Normando..................... Signor G. Paoliui
Full Cnorus and Orchestra.
Musical Director..................Signor G. Hicolao
THURSDAY, May 16—Verdi's sparkling opera of
LA TRaVIATA, with Mme. Elena Corani as
Violetta Valere.
SATURDAY, May 18—Grand Maiinee. The Opera of
LUCIA DI LAMMERMOOR (by request).
SUNDAY, May 19—The chef-d'ouvre of Bellini's
NORMA, with both prima donnas. Mme. Elena
Corani as Nonna, aud Mme. Eugenia B. De
Mariotti as Aitalgisa.
TUESDAY, May 21—Verdi's great opera of IL TRO
VATORK, with Signor Pietra Baccei as Manric-).
Box Office open daily from 10 A. M. until A P. M.
PRICES OF ADMISSION—Private Boxes, admitting
eight persons, $10, $15 and $20; Season
Tickets $9 tor the five opera nights; general
admission $2; gallery .5 cents. No extra
charge for reserved sea s. my 12 At
gT. CHARLES THEATRE.
BEN DaBAB..............................Proprietor.
GEORGE RYKR.....................Stage Manager.
Wednesday, May 13, and Every Evening
and Satnrday Matinees,
Dion Boucicault'a Beautifhl Drama entitled
THE OCTOROON |
OR, LIFE IN LOUISIANA.
ISABEL FREEMAN as............Zoe, the Octoroon
GEORGE CLARKE as................George Peyton
The type of a Southern Gentleman. '-''i
WITH THE FULL COMPANY OF THE VARIETIES
THEATRE.
Box sheet now open. my!2
J^ETE CHAMPETltE
AT
CARROLLTON GARDENS,
Commencing Tuesday Evening, May J4,
For f benefit of
EMANUEL CHURCH, SIXTH DISTRICT.
COMMITTEE OF MANAGEMENT:
Mrs. L. BOWERS.
Mrs. GEORGE G. GARNER,
Mrs. WILLIAM CHAFER,
Mrs. B. B. SIMMES, "
Mrs. S. SEYMOUR,
Mrs. HARRIS,
Mrs. H. H. HANSEL,
Mrs. T. B. BODLEY,
Mrs. BISBKK,
Mrs. FETLI8,
Mrs. H. E. SHROPSHIRE,
Mrs. B. J. WEST. mvlO 5t
•^TARIETIES THEATRE.
LAWRENCE BARRETT.........Lessee and Manager
LORRAINE ROGERS..............Business Manager
LAST NIGHT OF THE DRAMATIC SEASON.
Tuesday, May 14,
Grand entertainment by the Ladies' Benevolent
Association of Louisiana for the purpose of com
pleting the Confederate Tomb in Greenwood Ceme
tery. and last appearance of Charlotte Thompson in
VICTOHINE, OR I'LL SLEEP ON IT,
Supported by the star company.
Note—Persons buyin" tickets of the ladies of the
Association can have them exchanged for seenred
seats at the box office by paying fifty cents extra.
MONDAY. May 13—The theatre will be occupied
by the Shakespeare Club.
WEDNESDAY, May 15—The Italian Opera.
my!2 3t
gT. CHARLES THEATRE.
BEN DeBAR ...............Proprietor and Manager.
Last Night and Grand Farewell Entertainment
of the great
MAKT1NETTI-RAVEL PANTOMIME
TROUPE.
For the last time,
JOCKO.
PAUL in his great personation. New songs, new
dances, and the beautiful ballet,
ROSE AND BUTTERFLY.
All the stars in the east.
To conclude with the most laughable comic panto
mime, THE MYSTIC GIFT. The great JCLIAN
as CLOWN.
Wednesday, May 15—The Varieties Dramatic
Company, for a shoi t season. my!2
MISCELLANEOUS.___
jgOUDRO'S RESTAURANT,
AT THE LAKE END OF THE PONTCHARTRAIN
RAILWAY,
Is Now Open for the Season,
Having been refitted end furnished. The best of
wines and all delicacies. Prices liberal,
my 5 3m
OUGAR-CURKD HAMS AT IO CENTS.
O Sugar-cured H AMs at 12 H cents, at retail.
10,1100 pounds Sugar-cured HAMS at 10 aud 123$
cents.
10,000 pounds BREAKFAST BACON at 10 cents.
5,000 pounds GREEN SHOULDERS at 6 cents.
Also, 500 McClellan saddles at $5 each, for
sale at S. B. CHURCHILL'S,
No. 40 Magazine street, between Natchez and
Giavier streets, under St. James HoteL
aplO ly
AND — WILLCOX k GIBBS
8EWING MACHINE, always in ordei
and ready to sew, to run by hand or foot
Recommended by the medical faculty as the only
one fit for delicate ladies to use, on account of it*
lightness. First class machines of all kinds are
offered for sale. The New Domestic Sewing Ma
chine is made on an entirely new principle. A
large assortment of ladies' ready made suits al
ways on hand, of all colors and styles, manufac
tured on our celebrated sewing machines.
del6 ly M. S. HEDRICK. No. 103 Canal stTeet.
yfOnWKnnnMMH.iM".....*......NOTICE.
M1RAMON,
Dealer In All Kinds of Furniture.
508. 99.101 and 103 CHARTRKS STREET, New Or
leans.
Has constantly on hand an assortment of
Cottage Bedsteads (extra make, with four inch
posts), with tca6ters, $12.
Solid Walnut one-fourth Marble Bureaus, $20.
Solid Walnut Portable Arwoirs, with two Uraw
ers inbottom, $2o.
Victoria Bedroom Sets, in Walnut, Mabogauy and
Imitatiou Rosewood, ten pieces, $120.
Spring Mattresses made to order, $25 and $30.
Parlor Sets, in Walnut, Mahogauy and Imitation
Boeewood, ten pieces, at very moderate prices.
Also, an assortment of Looking-Glasses at moder
te prices. felfl ly
LOST.
L ost.—a promissory note fob $1000.
drawn by John Baltz to his own order, and by
him indorsed. and also indorsed by R. K Delafleld,
paid;___ „ _ H___________H
notary public, on the twenty-Beveuth of Decern
her, 1810, on a lot of ground etc., First District,
square bounded by Tchoupitoulee, Lafayette,
Poydraa and Commerce streets, lot No. 12. Said
note is the property of the.Phanix National Bank,
New York. myl 30t
OIQARS.
1,500,000 c,<iAKS
always on hand.
REAL HAVANA TOBACCO
Of Every Variety of Brand, Manufactured and
for sale by
GEORGE ALCES'
PREMIUM CIGAR MANUFACTORY,
No. 1S5 Rampart Street
(below Canal.)
ap2 3m
LOTTERIES.
RAWING OF THE LOUISIANA
8TATB LOTTBRY FOR MAY 13, 1872,
CLASS 114.
2 28 ! 10
9 | 10 . 11 r l» I
The above drawings ere published In ell the prin
cipal papers, and are drawn in pnbUo daily at the
rooms of the company.
Information furnished and prizes cashed by
HOWARD, SIMMONS k CO., Contractors.
St. Charles street, corner Union, New Orleans
Witness enr hands at New Orleans, Lontslans
this thirteenth day of May, ISIS.
H. PERALTA.
ADAM GIFFBN
Commissioners.
BEWARE OF BOGU8 LOTTERIES. anil
1 prize of
prize of
1 prize of
1 prize of
I prize of
i 1 Drize of
J jprtj^of
1 prize of
1 prize of
STATE
LOTTERY
JJOC181ANA
0 O M P A H T. .
Incorporated August 11, 1861.
CHARLES T. HOWARD................PRESIDENT.
SINGLE NUMBER LOTTERY.
SPLENDID SCHEME—ONLY 10,000 NUMBERS.
Capital Prize............820.000.
CLANS G.
TO BR DRAWN AT NEW ORLEANS O*
Saturday, May 18, 1822.
HOWARD. SIMMONS fc CO., Contractors.
SCHEME;
20.000 Numbers—Tickers Only 820,
1 prize of 050,030 is......................„.05o ooc
1 prize of 30,000 is........................ 3u,0C0
1 prize of > 0,000 is........................ to ono
1 prize of 10,000 is........................ 10,000
1 prize of 9,000 is........................ 9,000
1 prize of 8,000 it..................... 1,000
1 prize of 1,000 1s................. 1,000
1 prize of 6,000 it........................ t.ooc
l prize of 5,000 it........................ 5,000
1 prize of 4,000 it............... 4,000
1 prize of 3,000 it...................... 3.000
1 prize of 1,000 is............. 1.000
1 prize of 1,000
1 prize of 1,000
1 prize of 1,000
1 prize of 1,000
1 prize of 1,000
' ' ' 1,000
1,000
1,000
1,000
1,000
1,000
1.000 I
1.000 !•
prize of 1,000
1 prize oi 1,000
1 prize of 1,000
1 prize of 1,000
1 prize of 1,000
1 prize of 1,000
1 prize of 1,000
1 prize of 1,000
1 prize of 1,000
1 prize of 1,000
1 prize of 1,000
1 prize of 1,000,
50 prizes ef 500 are.................. 45,000
311 prizes of >00 are.......... 53,400
36 Approximation prizes.................... 13,600
440 prizes, amounttru; to....................BM0.40S
Whole Tickets, $*; shares to proportion.
Prizes payable without deduction.
Orders to be addressed to
CHARLES T. H'WABD,
Lock box 692, Postoffice. New Orleans.
Sand poztofflne money order, or register your 1st
tar
BMKSANDBANKINQ^
"Y£ONEY LOANED
Of ZI.L
MARKETABLE STOCKS OR SECURITIES.
Commercial paper wanted by
L. B. MOREL,
myl2 3t No. 35tfe Carondelet street.
C 11RCULAR LETTER?* OF CREDIT,
J available in all parts of Europe, issued upon
Londen by the STATE NATIONAL BANK, Nos. 31
and 33 Camp street.
my9 lm CHARLES L. C. DUPUY, Cashier.
BUSINESS OHANQES.
N OTICE.-THE PARTNERSHIP HERETOFORE
existing between Thomas K M. Smith and
Patrick Donnelly is dissolved from this day. Either
party will receipt for moneys doe by the former
concern of Smith k Donnelly.
Mat 9,1872.
P. DONNELLY'.
niylO 3t
T HE LAW PARTNERSHIP HERETOFORE
existing between us under the name of Case
k Rouse is this day dissolved.
CHARLES CASE,
J. D. RoUSE.
New Orlraxs, May 8, 1872. mylO 6t
D issolution of pahtnership.
By common consent, the partnership hereto
fore existing between the undersigned under the
name and style of C. H. Mouton k Co. has been
and is dissolved. The procuration or power of
attorney given to Mr. George Darby by the said
C. H. Monton k Co. is hereby revoked and cancel
ed, 'and C. H Mouton is charged with the liquida
tion of the affairs of said partnership.
valery coco.
C. H. MOUTON.
New Orleans, April 29. 1872. ap30 lm
D issolution of partnkrship.
The firm heretofore existing, composed of
the undersigned, and doing business under the
name and style of H. I. MULLAN St CO., is hereby
dissolved by limitation. Each partner has au
thority to sign in liquidation.
HENRY J. MULL IN,
CHARLES W. Hl'SSELL,
JOHN E. RUSSELL.
New Orleans, May 7,1812.
IT1HE UNDERSIGNED HAVE FORMED, THIS DAY,
JL a partnership for the purpose of carrying on
the general hardware business at the stand of the
late firm ofH. I. MULLAN St CO., No. 52 Canal street,
and Nos. 69 and 71 Common street,under the name
and style of H. I. MULLAN St CO.
HENRY J. MULLAN,
CHARLES HALLO WAY,
JOHN YOUNG. JR.,
_ „ , ANTHONY DOHERTY.
New Orleans, May 7, 1872 my8 13 18
educational.
Jj-ILITARY HIGH SCHOOL,
188 RACE 8TEET, head of Coliseum Place.
T. B. Edwards and Samuel H. Lewis,
Principals.
Will prepare pupils to enter the Louisians State
University or anyother CoUege in America A
Commercial and Primary Denartment attached
Military discipline, with daily drill.
Circulars to be had at the School,
Gresham's. 92 Camp street.
or at James A.
an20 10m
J^KW ORLEANS
CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC,
No. 90 Baronne Street,
Three and one-half blocks from Canal street, five
doors above the Piano House of P. Werlin, ac
cessible from five car lines.
This institution is conducted alter the plan of
the best music schools of Europe. The Board of
Instruction counts among its mimes the most suc
cessful teachers and artists of the highest merit
and reputation. Admitted are beginners of all
ages Irom seven .wars upward; also, advance I
pupils who wish to perfect themselves either at
amateurs, teachers, or professional artists; and
those who wish to resume their studies after a
long interruption.
terms, payable in advance, as follows: For piano
° T ri'U weeks, two lessons weekly, of two
h urs each, $25. For theory (harmony 8 .id com
position). organ, melodeon, vjoliii, violinef j) 0 harp,
flute, guitar, zither, for ten weeks 1 i'„
weekly, of one hour each. *15 Mu',*°'S
for two branches taken together cuona made
Visitors are invited to call 'in , ..___
method of teaching and the progr d ^'A? 688 An?
For references, circulars, parkT of P U P ,1 1 *'
at the Office of the PresiSen cn ' ar8 J itc g' *PP£
— >r ™
THE CITY HALL.
A proposition will shortly be brought
before the City Council to have the street
lamps relettered with names of streets, and
to have the houses of the city renumbered
A citizen made a "return" to the Admin
istrator of Assessments, declaring that he
has no property of any kind, aud that his
occupation is that of a "gentleman." How
little capital it requires now-a-days to be
one!
The above paragraph from the Picayune
reminds us of the fact that in Massachusetts
the custom is, or was, to term him who had
no occupation "a gentleman," and thus it
was that civil and criminal processes were
frequently served on "gentlemen."
The city tax collections last Friday
amounted to $10,721 28, and on Saturday to
$21,199 75. _
The Liberal Republicans in Convention
State Organization Initiated.
In accordance with previous notice, a
large number of the Cincinnati delegates
assembled in the Senate Chamber at noon
yesterday. Hon. G. H. Braugbn was called
to the chair, and a resolution passed look
ing to the immediate organization of the
Liberal Republican party of Louisiana.
From each Congressional district the
Liberals will choose two members, and
Chairman Braugbn was authorized to ap
point ten from the State at large, thus con
stituting a Provisional State Copomittee,
whose duty it will be to call a convention,
and enlist the people actively in the great
cause of Reform. »
Another meeting will be held to-day, at
which it is probable definite arrangements
will be concluded to hold, in this city at an
early day, a grand mass meeting, to ratify
the nominations of Greeley and Brown.
It is evident the Liberal Republican party
is made up of workers.
A Singular Phenomenon.
Last evening about ten o'clock the moon
presented a most singular -appearance. A
clearly defined ring or halo of abont six or
eight diameters of a full moon surrounded
it. Inside of this ring the sky was of a
peculiarly clear blueish green color. The
moon itself was moderately bright, though
there was more radiation of the rays than
is usually the case. The phenomenon was
so different from any ever before observed
lnre that it was a matter of general remark.
It must be noticed here that it was entirely
unlike the common appearance the moon
wears on the approach of rain. The ring
was first seen by a gentleman in our office
who has a superabundance of wigglers for
his limited supply of cistern water. It was
generally voted as the "sign" of a very
small shower at best.
Fires.
A fire broke out about a quarter past ten
o'clock yesterday morning on Marais street,
between Ursulines and St. Philip streets,
which in about two hours consumed nearly
a dozen frame houses on Marais, St. Philip
and Ursulines streets.
The fire department was promptly on the
spot, but all the ordinary fire plugs in the
vicinity proved useless, having no heads to
bear to the supply from the reservoir.
About three-quarters of au hour elapsed,
until the towboat Tyler was able to force
the water from the river down the gutters
to the scene, whereby a great loss of prop
erty was cansed which could have been pre
vented if a single reservoir was near at
hand, for the erection of which Chief Engi
neer O'Connor has respectfully petitioned
the Council for two years.
From the confusion which prevailed the
reporter gleaned the following facts. The
following houses have been burned:
House and stable of Mr. Lehmann, No.
220 Marais street; house new and not occu
pied. In the stable, which was rented out,
the fire occurred.
Xo. 218 Marais street, oyster saloon of Mr.
Antoine.
Xo. 222 Marais street, house of Mr. Le
fretts.
Xos. 224-226 Marais street, houses of Mr.
Xoel Bacchus.
No. 191 St. Philip street, house of Mrs.
Regio.
Xo. 189 St. Philip street, house of Mrs. V.
Coligan.
Xo. 185 St. Philip street, house of Mrs. P.
Valentine.
Xo. 183 St. Philip street, house of Mr.
Philip Jaeger.
On Ursulines, the kitchens of the houses of
Mr. Dnbuisson and Mr. Roman were de*
stroyed.
The house of Mr. J. B. Fleitas, on Marais,
was also destroyed, ami the house of Mr.
Dobell was badly damaged.
Mr. Hutchinson, a member of Eagle
steam Engine Company No. 7, fell while
sliding down a ladder, and, it is feared,
broke his leg. He was sent home in a cab.
About four o'clock yesterday morning a
fire was discovered in the rear room of the
one-story frame house No. 157 Toulouse
street, owned by Mr. Hevey, and occupied,
as a house of ill-fame by a woman named
Mary Morrison. The fire was caused by a
lighted candle on a washstand, which was
placed against the wall where some clothes
were hanging, which took fire. It was,
however, quickly extinguished, without
damage.
The one-story frame building No. 158
Marigny, between St. Claude and Marais
streets, owned and occupied by a Mr.
Dodard, was damaged about $400 by fire
about five o'clock Sunday afternoon.
Flames were first seen in a back room. The
family was absent from borne at the time,
and the premises locked up. A policy in
[be Merchants' Insurance Company covers
the ioss. _
The First Greeley Club la the Field.
The employes of the Republican office
have formed an association under the
name of the Greeley Base Ball Club.
They play the first game on Sunday next
at the Park with the Morse Base Ball
Club, corupOBed of the operators of the
Western Union Telegraph Company, No. 57
Camp street. As both clubs are composed
of some really fine players, we expect to
witness a close and exciting contest.
The Temperature.
Mr. Louis Frigerio, No. 50 Chartres street,
reports the weather for the past two days
as follows:
■ 8 A. M. 2 P. M. 6 P. M.
May 12................ 74 82 78
May 13................. 73 83 81
Lowest point daring the night of May
12 , 68 °. _
Of some 780,000 shares of Erie, common
stoek, bat 100,000 are held in America.
Shakespeare Club.
Last evening, at the Varieties Theatre
the popular Shakespeare Club gave their
second performance of the season. The
house was as brilliant as could be, and so
crowded that standing room was at a pre
mium before the commencement of the
play.
The piece chosen for the occasion was
Dion Boucicault's five act drama entitled
"The Long Strike."
The piece, like nearly all the productions
of this author, is what might be termed an
excellent acting play. Boucicault excels in
this respect. All the situations are per
fectly worked up, and the climax of each
act occurs just in the proper place.
It is necessary, however, in producing his
pieces, to fully understand the stage busi
ness incidental to the scene, and unless the
stage manage; is thoroughly posted on the
various situations and points in the play, a
great deal of effect is lost. This was the
case, to some extent, last evening. The
telegraph scene, in the fourth act, which
may be considered the most important and
interesting in tne piece, was very indiffer
ently done, and without any effect. The
cause was solely the want of knowledge of
the situations and business of the charac
ters concerned. The rest of the play was
well dene, and the scenery throughout was
good and appropriate.
Of the acting, we must accord the honors
of the evening to Mr. B. Onorato, who, as
Noah Learoyd, was in every way excellent.
He gave the part an artistic finish that we
could hardly expect from an amateur, and
his earnest, attentive and thorough assimi
lation of the character, particularly in the
scene after the murder, deserves the highest
praise.
Mr. Mullen as Jem Starke seemed some
what out of place. The character was un
suited to him, and lacked vigor of expres
sion.
Mr. Cowen as Readley was very fair in
deed, and spoke his lines clearly and
forcibly.
Messrs*. Given, Julio and Whitaker as
manufacturers, were good. Mr. Wilson as
Crankshair, barring his dressing as an
American, instead of as an English police
man, was well up in his part; and Mr. Olm
stead as Johnny Reiley. the Irish sailor,
dressed properly and played very well. His
rendition could have been bettered, how
ever, had he been instructed properly, re
garding the business of his scenes. This of
coarse, was not his fault.
Mr. D. C. Johnston, as Moneypenny, the
erratic and eccentric lawyer, was very good
in the third act. His make-up might have
been a little more characteristic, but his
acting, considering he is only an amateur,
deserves praise, and his conception of the
character was very fair. The other gentle
men creditably acquitted themselves in their
various parts. Indeed, taking the perform
ance as a whole, we must say it was unu
sually good; and we have seen the piece
played by professional actors and not done
so well, generally speaking, as it was last
night.
Miss Isabel Freeman played Jane
Learoyd in a most artistic and excellent
^ '
t
, , . .. . . .
manner, looking very prettv and dressing
_____ rri ______.:__________j _____ j
1
correctly. The part is a very good one, and
well suited to Miss Freeman, and we can
,, . , ,
not recollect ever having seen it more beau
,, ,, , . „ ,, , ,
tifully and truthfully played. /
Charming little Miss "D. V." Murdock
had but very little to do as Betsey, but her
popularity with our theatre-goers was fully
shown by the very flattering reception she
received on her appearance. Miss Murdock
should be very proud of her standing with
the public. We never knew of an actress
who was so highly esteemed, or one who
more thoroughly deserved the approbation
that is so generally accorded her; and her
performance last night added lustre to the
general excellence of the entertainment.
We hope the few criticisms we have given
on the performance will not be taken ud_
kindly by the gentlemen referred to. We
know that it is unusual to criticise an ama
teur performance, but as the gentlemen of
the Shakespeare Club give so many per
formances, and as fair, unprejudiced criti
cism is always an assistance to an actor,
professional or otherwise, we give our
remarks for the benefit of the gentle,
men spoken of. We fully believe that
there is talent, and that too of the high
est order, among the gentlemen of the
club, and in our opinion fair criticism will
only add to its development, and to assist
the spirit of emulation which characterizes
all good actors.
First Industrial Exposition—Second Week.
According to the original announcement,
the Southern Exposition will continue open
only until the twentieth instant—one week
longer. It is hoped that it will either be
extended some weeks longer, or continued
for an indefinite period.
Those who do not know the attractions
there can form no idea of the multitudes
who throng the spacious halls evening after
evening, in addition to the great numbers
who just drop in during the day.
In a few days the exterior finish of the
building will be entirely completed; the
rubbish will be removed, the banquettes
fully laid, and then ladies will not, as they
need not now, hesitate about going in.
However, in the meantime the attractions
from day to day become greater and more
tempting, and the goods on exhibition make
a more magnificent show- Jaeger's band
can he heard and all tfie nice things seen
for only twenty-five rents.
Collector Casey was to leave Washington
last Friday or Saturday for New Orleans.
He probably arrived by the midnight train
last night_
The Richland Beacon asks " Who is E.
H. Riddell 1" and says :
How generous and obliging some people
are, especially the Packard Republicans.
They ao not put the different oarishes to
the trouble of electing delegates, but ap
point for them such delegates as they (not
the parishes) want. In fact, the parishes
do not e-cape representation by ignoring a
call for a Republican convention. Thus it
is with Richland. She never elects dele
gates to these conventions, and yet she
never fails to be represented, and the repre
sentative never happens to be an acquaint
ance or to go twice from the same parish,
but is always a stranger to all our citizens,
and as ubiquitous as the element we
breathe.
And now, we have again to ask some of
our friends who the obscure individual is
who represented our parish in the last
Packard Republican convention, and
whether there is any probability of his re
flecting credit upon his constituents (1) or
not
so
the
an
in
his
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RECKONING UP THE MISSISSIPPI.
About one month ago, the Republican,
drawing facts from the Bureau of State
Engineers, foretold there would be "no
high water this year." It was said, "That's
all very well; but the June rise often makes
a flood on its own account." Now there
will be no Jane rise to hurt anybody. The
swamps are reservoirs into which the sur
plus water of the Mississippi runs and
holds. At present these basins are all dry.
The St. Francisville swamps are one hun
dred miles long and forty wide. Besides,
there is the Black river region of Arkansas,
the Tensas valley, and other low and
marshy localities not of much consequence
all are dry land. Were these overflowed,
there might be some reason to apprehend
high water in June. So all the planters in
Louisiana may go to work in as much secur
ity as if their plantations were at Sherman
on the Pacific railroad, ten thousand feet
above the sea, instead of being, as they
are, but a few feet from tide level.
A month ago those unacquainted with the
dynamics of the river, hearing of the great
falls of snow and the deluge of rains in the
Northwest, were full of predictions of
freshets and inundations. At present they
are all prophets of a dry spell or drouth
This is far more probable. To step aside
from the line of this article, accounts are
coming in of the appearance of locusts,
which devour everything in their way,
while noisome vermin of air, earth aud
water are on the increase everywhere.
Everybody is praying for rain, and "all
signs fail in dry weather." The river is
falling rapidly everywhere along the line of
its sinuous current. There is but nineteen
feet at Cairo, and the difficulties of river
approaches to St. Lonis become more and
more perceptible every day. From all
these facts, all apprehensions of high water
in June may be laid on the shelf until the
signs are favorable.
The levee building has been going on
with great vigor. The work is never done,
for the banks as well as the volume of
water, the bed, the current, the force, the
height of the great river are in a constant
change. No two days finds all of them alike,
and before one can realize the difficulty
that besets our river engineers, he must un
derstand this tact first and appreciate it*
The cause of repairs lies in " caves," where
one sides falls in and the other builds up.
Of late, many of these reconstructions have
been made by individuals directly inter
ested, for which work they have been paid,
and it is the first time in the history of the
State, since the war, this has been done.
Since last November, about one hundred
and seventy-six levees have been bnilt, and
the accounts and estimates of more arrive
every day. A constant vigilance is kept up
by the levee, and it would be hard to find a
spot in the whple line,-including the Ateha
lalaya, Ouachita and Red rivers, not
guarded by levees. What has been done
already nearly reaches two million
yards. F ar as it has been ascertained
the Elton mud bank in Carroll, and the
^ ' Buckridge and Kemp in Tensas, are the
t yprineipal of those that are new, while there
(Is anv quantity of smaller works of this
/[. ,
I kind finished in all directions. We are
I lesting quietly in the city, talking politics,
____ 1 :___. .1, _ J..11 -Ll___ V,.
,.
and growling at the dull times, while out
. .. ....
/ in rho a!Inumn tnw lorAA hnimoro ♦aJI (lira
in the alluvion the levee builders toil like
beavers, and the "big drink" pashes along
with great lorce. While we in the city are
"raising Cain," they are providing to raise
corn, and this, too, unheralded and unan
nounced. The first thing you know some
politician who is "out" of office, wishing to
set on some other politician who is "in,"
will want to know what becomes ot the
people's money. The levee company is
daily making the levees into an unbroken
line, and if they succeed in defending the
lowlands from floods and their conse
quence, their compensation will be cheap.
It is out of the question in a general ar
ticle to specify the work done and its char
acter. In some instances a "pocket" has
been made on the principle "it is cheaper
to go around than go across," as the
stream has made a swamp on the line a
straight cut would be obliged to take. In
other places the levees have been repaired
in a zig-zag shape, but "shape ain't nothing
—the work will tell," to paraphrase an old
saying. The wear and tear which enforces
this construction is estimated at about four
per cent a year. The magnitude of the work
can be guessed at when one is informed
thit there are about 1500 miles to be watched
and to be made into an unbroken wall.
With the levees all built, or in progress
of rapid construction, with no prospect of
an overflow this year, with the promise of a
bountiful harvest in the near future, we,
the people of Louisiana, have great cause
of congratulation.
"Who Shall be Victor?" is the title of
the sequel to "Tlia ^Canceled Will," Miss
E. A. Dupuy's new American novel, pub
lished a short time sinoe by T. B. Peterson
& Brothers, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania;
and from its pages the mystery of Nina
Gordon's origin is learned. These two
books are not conventional novels, but a
transcript of real life as we see it passing
before us. The characters are natural, and
with the exception of the saintly Inez,
possess faults enough to make them very
human. The young girl left to fight her
battle with life is not of the angelic species,
as is usually the case in stories. The
harder qualities of Nina Gordon's nature
are developed by the probation which
would have elevated and purified a more
noble spirit. It is issued in a large duo
decimo volume, and sold by all booksellers
at the low price of $1 75 in cloth or $1 50 in
paper cover; or copies will be sent by mail,
to any place, post-paid, by the publishers,
on receipt of the price of the work in a
letter to them. All of Miss Dupuy's six
books are put up in a neat box, bound in
cloth, full gilt backs, etc., price $10 50,
published in uniform, elegant and durable
style by T. B. Peterson & Brothers, No.
306 Chestnut street, Philadelphia, Pennsyl
vania. _
Improved Real Estate in the Second
District at Auction by the Sheriff.—
We call attention to the sales at auction,
to be made this day at noon, at the St.
Louis Auction Exchange, in the basement
rotunda of the St. Louis Hotel, of a lot of
ground with the buildings and improve,
ments thereon, situated at tye corner of
Whit« and Conti streets, Sedond District.
For particulars and terms see advertise
ment.
BY TELEGRAPH.
LATEST NEWS FROM ALL POINTS
THE TREATY OF WASHINGTON
BRITISH AND AMERICAN CORRESPONDENCE
VOORHEES ON THE PRESIDENCY
THE SUCCESSOR OF CASEY
ARRIVAL FROM PERNAMBUCO
YELLOW FEVER ON SHIPBOARD
TRAMWAYS THROUGHOUT PARIS
The Cuban Students Pardoned
CLEMENCY OF THE KING
FIRE IN THE MOUNTAINS
CONGRESS.
Correspomlence Between the United States
and Great Britain—Iu Transmission to
the Senate—Conference Committee on
Burned Whisky—Bridging Rivers—Ex
ecutive Session—Confidential Message—
Another Amnesty Bill-Clark Unseated
—Voorhees on the Presidency.
Washington, May 13.—The President to
day transmitted to the Senate the corres
pondence between the United States aud
Great Britain relative to the treaty of
Washington, accompanied with a brief mes
sage. The envelope bore the word "Confi
dential." A short time after the reception
of the documents the Senate went into exe
cutive session, when they were read. It ap
pears the design of the President was to as
certain the views of the Senate as to a new
article to the treaty withdrawing the claims
for consequential damages from the Ameri
can statement of the case, with the provi
sion, in substance, that whenever England
or the United States shall be at war and tbe
other a neutral the belligerent will
make no complaints for any indirect,
remote, or consequential injuries or losses
resulting from a failure to observe neutral
duties, as it is known that Great Britain
will agree to the proposed new article, and
that both governments are anxious to save
the treaty. By this means it was thought
proper to place the Senate in possession of
all the facts, in order that the executive,
acting upon their advice, might pursue the
negotiation so as to secure the consumma
tion of the treaty in a manner satisfactory
to the two governments. There was a brief
debate after the reading of the documents,
involving the merits of the question.
A motion was made to remove the injunc
tion of secrecy, but this failed, and the
message and documents were then ordered
to be printed in confidence and referred to
the Committee on Foreign Relations. There
is scarcely a question that the Senate will
advise the acceptance of the additional
article to the treaty.
Senate.—A committee of conference has
been ordered upon the House amendment
refunding the taxes upon burned whisky.
Mr. Goldthwaite's bill tor bridging the
rivers emptying into Mobile bay passed.
The election law and deficiency bill were
argued at great length, when the Senate
went into executive session over a message
from the President m.irked "confidential."
House .—In political i-oloquy to-day, after
Mr. Voorhees' speech i.gainst Greeley, sev
eral prominent member.- of the House spoke
briefly, to the effect that the Baltimore con
vention should rule.
Mr. Voorhees himself said that he never
bolted a nomination.
Mr. Butler, of Massachusetts, from the
Judiciary Committee, reported a bill re
moving the political disabili.ies from all
persons who aided the late rebellion, except
Senators and Representatives in 1 he Thirty
sixth and Thirty-seventh Congress, officers
in the judicial, military and naval service of
the United States, and the heads of depart
ments and foreign ministers of the United
States, which was passed.
Mr. Butler reported a bill removing25,000
political disabilities, which was also passed.
Mr. Clark, of Texas, was unseated and
Mr. Giddings sworn in.
Mr. Voorhees, rising to a personal explan
ation, sent to the clerk's desk and had read
a newspaper paragraph from the Washing
ton Bepublican to the effect that he was
baiting and hesitating as to the position he
6houla take on the question of supporting
Mr. Greeley, and that, as his Democratic
colleagues" were all said to be in
favor of Greeley, he was likely to lose
the lavor of the districts where his
voice had so long been potential.
He declared that he did not halt or hesitate;
that he had not baited or hesitated when
he had not more than fourteen Democratic
colleagues in the House, nor did he now.
If he could ever be tempted to abandon the
principles of his political life, it might have
been then, as to the nominee ot the Cincin
nati convention. YVhoever believed in the
high protective tariff' principles of its chief
man might support him, but he (Voorhees)
would not. Was he expected to support
Mr. Greeley because he had been the
life-long champion of doctrines to which
he (Voorhees) was opposed? Was he
expected, as a Western man representing a
Western laboring constituency that was
ground down by a high protective tariff
monopoly, to support tbe great champion
of protection 1 Was he expected to sup
port a man who had been the most clamor
ous advocate in all the land for that Ku
Klux legislation which had desolated the
homes of the Southern people? If Mr.
Greeley's nomination promised relief to
that blasted and down-trodden section,
there was not much which he (Voorhees)
would not torego to subserve so holy and
so benign a purpose, but Mr. Gre plcy has
been the earnest advocate of the legislation
which had paralyzed and prostrated the
South, and was that the reason why he
should get his support?
lie was told that the present administra
tion had been cruel and unkind to the
South, but the administration bad simply
executed a law which the Cincinnati nom
inee had dictated to Congress. That was
all the difference between them. One. was
the executive officer, acting under his oath
of office to execute the law, and the other
was a man who had no oath on his
conscience in regard to the matter, hut who
. . . , w - —--------------
had urged the passage of this legislation,
1 V T.!..; le ex P^ te(i t0 support Mr. Greeley /
1
because within a recent date he de
sired a_ still further extension of
the President's power to suspend the
writ of habeas corpus all over the
South ? Was he expected to support him
because he was the earnest and urgent ad
vocate of the present force-bayonet election
law, that subjected every voting precinct
of 20,000 people to the supervision, and, m
certain contingencies, to tbe control of the
military? Was he expected to support
him because, two month 3 . agO' "* e f n ^ une
had clamored and urged it (bis great organ)
in favor of a law to place the local election
in the State of New York under federal
control, and. also, in certain contingencies,
under military control? \Vas such a man
fit to receive bis vote for the Presidency ?
Was such a man fit to fall that high
Was that the voice of statesmanship
Which was called tor at this hour? Wan
that tbe reform that had been promised?
Was be to go before the .united sentiment
of the country and appeal to itjin favor of a
man who stood on the record for the "in
alienable right " of a State or of a com
munity to dissolve this Union? Was he, as
a triend of the Southern people, called upon
to vote for aYnan, who, during the entire fall
and winter of I860, wrote with all bis ac
knowledged power m favor of the inalienable
right of any dissatisfied portion of the coun
try to break up the Union and form
another government for themselves? Mr
Greeley had not recanted those opinions*
but on the contrary, in his book on the
American conflict, published in 1864, he
had analyzed them and defined them to
this effect: that if in consultation conven
tion and the like the South still desired;
with any considerable approach to unanim
ity, to separate, it should be allowed to
do so.
Mr. Speer, of Pennsylvania, objected that
Mr. Voorhees' remarks were not in the na
ture of a personal explanation; but the
Speaker overruled the objection, and Mr.
Voorhees proceeded with his speech amid,
great excitement and confusion, which ren
dered much of what he said inaudible at
the reporters' desk. He repeated that Mr.
Greeley, after three years of war, h*d
still held and published the same
sentiments, and they still unreserved.
Was a man fit to be President wl O
stood committed to the doctrine that who
ever desired to dissolve their connection
with the government had the unalienal le
right to do so ? That might commend him
to some people, but it would not when his
subsequent course was called to mind.
Some of the highest men of the South had
told him (Voorhees), with tears in their
eyes, that more than any one thing which
satisfied them that they could have a
separate system and form of government
to suit themselves was the voice of
the then victorious Republican party,
speaking through its acknowledged
organ. And yet when the Southern people
did what this man had told them they had
the inalienable right to do, no wild beast,
hungry for blood, ever screamed at his
prey as he (Greeley) had shouted "On to
Richmond"—to kill every one of them for
doing what he told them they had the in
alienable right to do. That was a solemn
page of history, which could not be revised.
The waters of the ocean could not wash it
out. Mortal man could not gainsay it.
A red sea of blood had not been
enough to satirfy them, but he had also in
sisted upon the confiscation of the homes
and property of tho women and children of
the South.
Others might do as they pleased, but for
him (Vo irhees) and Lis household he would
not do this thing. Parties to be succe-sful
must be banded together on a common prin
ciple—no other combination of men was
worthy success. He wastoid that his party
desired success against this administration.
No one desired it more than himself, but
there was something which was better than
success and greater to the heart than suc
cess. A great man had said it was beter to
be right than,toJbe Presii's t, and so he said
it was better to be right than succeed.
He entered his protest against the at
tempt to transfer the Democrats of the
country to a camp where there was nothing
belonging to them.
Mr. Roosevelt asked Mr. Voorhees whether
he would support the candidate of the Dem
ocratic convention at Baltimore, whoever
that candidate might be.
Mr. Vooihees replied that he was not in
the habit of voting against Democratic
nominations. He believed that the gentle
man himself would have some difficulty in
answering his own question [laughter]; but
he did not despair of success. His position
was in favor of standing by the principles
of his party, and he would vote for
the man who represented those principles.
He had no fears, however, of what the Bal
timore convention would do; but he could
not vote for a man who spoke of the Demo
cratic party as that to which all the haunts
of debauchery gave nine-tenths of their sup
port. It had been sometimes said that this
nominee had given bail for Jeflerson Davis
when he was in prison; but that was too
narrow a platform for any party to stand
upon. [Laugnter.] It would be most dan
gerous to raise an issue as between the man
who put Mr. Davis in jail and the man who
balled him out. It would not be a safe
issue, and he implored his Southern friends
not to make it. It might provoke a com
parison which would not be favorable to the
nominee of the Cincinnati convention. Mr.
Davis had not been a helpless man; a hun
dred millions of property at the South had
been ready to bail him, and it sometimes
seemed to him (Voorhees) that it was merely
a piece of impertinence on the part of the
nominee of the Cincinnati convention to
offer himself as bail for Mr. Davis. When
Andrew Johnson and Edwin M. Stanton.
Secretary of War, desired and proposed,
"as he knew to bo the fact," to
arrest Robert E. Lee, Joseph E.
Johnson, and other prominent Confederate
officers, there was but one man who could
prevent that thing being done, and that
was the present incumbent of the Presi
dential office. General Grant had stepped
forward and tola them that these men had
given him their parole as soldiers, and that
that parole should be respected. [Applause
from the Republican side of the House 1
If he should be driven to take the stump
and press the claims of Mr. Greeley, he
would find a candidate opposing him who
bad done more and kinder things for
the South than his nominee had done.
Mr. Roosevelt suggested that Mr. Voor
heea had been recently in conference with
President Grant.
Mr. Voorhees said he had not crossed tba
threshold of the White House for three
years, and whoever had made such a state
ment had uttered a vile calumny.
Mr. Roosevelt said he bfcl made the state
ment on information given to him; he had
heard two or three days ago that, such an
interview had taken place.
Mr. \ oorhees—Then the gentleman asso
ciates with men who do not tell the truth:
Mr. Randall asked Mr. Vooihees whether
he would have voted for Judge Davis *nd
advocated his election if he had received
the nomination at Cincinnati 1
Mr. \ oorhees—Judge Davis represents
thmfjS in common with my own views.
Mr. Randall—He is a Republican.
Mr. Voorhees—That is not the point. I
cannot join a combination which represents
nothing that I am for. On great constitu
tional questions Judge Davis stood, in
troublous times, where I stood—in behalf of
the rights and liberties of tbe citizen, while
such men as Greeley were hurrying them in
to the earthquake. "The strong probabilities
are, in my judgment, that if Judge Davis
had been presented by Cincinnati he would
have been accepted "by a majority of the
Democratic party of the country, in that I
maybe mistaken. I am only stating my
own individual opinion. I should have re
garded him with very great favor. It m
quite a different thing whether I should
vote for a Republican who has so much in
common with my own views or for one who
has nothing iu common with them.
Mr. Ranuail— I should not vote tor either
of then# unless they were indorsed by the
Democratic convention.
Mr. Voorhees—That is right. __
Mr. Randall—And I should
„ .... - ------ vote for
either ot them if indorsed bv the Dcnm
cratic convention.
Mr. Bird—I would vote for
if he was indorsed.
Kerr stated that so far as that state
ment in the Republican referred to him it
was simply untrue.
Mr. Niblack repeated the same remark,
adding that nothing but the power of organ
ization would compel him to vote for Mr
Greeley, but tha t whenever the Democratic
partv acted on the question, he would yield
obedience to its action. J
Mr Holman also repudiated the Repub
ficaii * artmie so lar as it referred to him.
He did not propose to forestall the action of
tne Baltimore convention.
w A8HINGTON.
Court of Claims Adjourned—Several Cues
Go Over-Casey and Herwi* Allowed
to Resign—Successor nf Casey.
Washington. May 13.—The Court of
Claims has adjourned until November. Al l
important eases were adiudioated. Several
cases go over at the option of the claimants
because the proefs are incomplete.
Washington, May li—The congressional
committee that was appointed to inreeti
[CPNftNUSD Qlt BIQHXH FAQBj

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