OCR Interpretation


New Orleans Republican. [volume] (New Orleans, La) 1867-1878, May 15, 1872, Image 1

Image and text provided by Louisiana State University; Baton Rouge, LA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016555/1872-05-15/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

NEW ORLEANS REPUBLICAN.
SINGLE COPIES; TEN CENTS.
OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE STATE OF
LOUISIANA.
TERMS! $16 00 PER ANNUM.
VOLUME VI—NO. 31,
NEW ORLEANS, WEDNESDAY, MAY 15 ,
1872.
WHOLE NUMBER 1561.
— AMUSEMENTS.
yARMTIES THEATRE.
1*0018 MARIOTTI..........................Manager
A. G. CAMBRIDGE...............Business Manager
SIGNOR BOLIVAR............Leader of Orchestra
ENGAGEMENT EXTRAORDINARY!
ITALIAN OPERA,
FOR A SEASON OF FIVE GRAND OPBRA8.
The ITALIAN OPERA TROOPE will present a
genes of Operas, in the following succession
WEDNESDAY", May 15—Donizetti's grand tragic
opera of LOCIA DI LAMMERMOOE, with the
following great caste:
LOCIA.....Mine. EUGENIA BELLINI DE MARIOTTI
Alica..}................................M me. Boudro
Edyardo.......................Signor Pietro Baccei
Aston................................Signor G. Reina
Arthur............................Signor L. Jourdau
Ramioudo.............................Signor Dubose
Normando..........................Signor G. Paolini
Full Chorus and Orchestra.
Musical Director..................Signor G. Nicolao
THURSDAY, May 16-Verdi's sparkling opera of
LA TRaVIATA, with Mme. Elena Corani as
Violetta Valere.
SATURDAY, May 18—Grand Matinee. The Opera of
LUCIA DI LAMMERMOOR (by request).
8UNDAY, May 19—The chef-d'ouvre of Bellini's
NORMA, with both prirna donnas, Mme. Elena
Corani as Norma, and Mme. Eugenia B. De
Mariotti as Adalgisa.
TUESDAY", May 21—Verdi's great opera of IL TRO
VATORK, with Signor Pietra Baccei as Manrico.
Box Office open daily from 10 A. M. until 4 P. M.
PRICES OF ADMISSION—Private Boxpb, admitting
eight persons, $10. $15 and $20; Season
Tickets $9 lor the five opera nights; general
admission $2; gallery 75 cent* No extra
charge for reserved sea's.
my!2 4t
j^CADEMY OF M USIC .
D. BIDWELL..............Proprietor and Manager
Wednesday, May IS.
LAST NIGHT OF
THE BLACK CROOK,
To jnake way for other novelties.
The HERNANDEZ TROUPE in an entire change
Of specialties
GRAND MATINEE Saturday Noon. my 15
gT. CHARLES THEATRE.
BEN DkBAR ..............................Proprietor.
GEORGE RYER.....................Stage Manager.
Wednesday, May 15, and Every Evening
nnd Saturday Matinees.
Dion Boucicault's Beautiful Drama entitled
THE OCTOROON;
OR, LIFE IN LOUISIANA.
ISABEL FREEMAN as............Zoe, the OctOTOon
GEORGE CLARKE as................George Peyton
The type of a Southern Gentleman.
WITH THE FULL COMPANY OF THE VARIETIES
THEATRE.
Box sheet now open. my!5 It
JpETK C'HAMPETRK
AT
CARROLLTON GARDENS,
Commencing Tuesday Evening, May 14,
For the benefit of
EMANUEL CHURCH, SIXTH DISTRICT.
COMMITTEE OF MANAGEMENT
Mrs. L. BOWERS,
Mrs. GEORGE G. GARNER,
Mrs. WILLIAM CHAFFE,
Mrs. B. B. SIMMES,
Mrs. 8. SEYMOUR,
Mrs. HARRIS,
Mrs. H. H. HANSEL
Sirs. T. B. BODLEY,
Mrs. BISBKE,
Mrs. FETLI8,
Mrs. H. E. SHROPSHIRE,
Mrs. B. J. WEST. mylO 5t
B
MISCELLANEOUS.
OI DRO'S RESTAURANT,
AT THE LAKE END OF THE PONTCHARTRAIN
RAILWAY.
Is Now Open for the Seanon,
Having been refitted and furnished. The best of
n ines and ail delicacies. Prices liberal.
' my5 3m
s l
UGAR-CURED HAMS AT 10 CENTS.
Sugar-cured HAMS at 121£ cents, at retail.
10,000 pounds Sugar-cored HAMS at 10 and 12
cents.
■ 10,000 pounds BREAKFAST BACON at 10 cents.
■ 5,000 pounds GREEN SHOULDERS at 6 cents.
' , Also, 500 McCLELLAN SADDLES at $5 each, for
■ sale at S. B. CHURCHILL'S,
■ No. 40 Magazine street, between Natchez and
Gravier streets, under St. James Hotel.
apn ly __
■ <52*? A AND S«5 -WILLCOX a GIBBS'
tpOU SEWING MACHINE, always in order
and ready to sew, to run by hand or foot
Recommended by the medical faculty as the only
one fit for delicate ladies to use, on account of its
lightness. First class machines of all kinds are
offered for sale. The New Domestic Sewing Ma
chine is made on an entirely new principle. A
large assortment of ladies' ready made suits al
ways on hand, of all colors and styles, manufac
tured on our celebrated sewing machines.
del6 ly M. S. HEDRICK. No. 103 Canal street.
jyOTICK..............................NOTICE.
M1 RAMO N,
Dealer in AH Kinds of Furniture.
NOS. 99.101 and 103 CHARTRE8 STREET, New Or
leans.
Has constantly on hand an assortment of
Cottage Bedsteads (extra make, with four-inch
posts), with teasters, $12.
Solid Walnut one-fourth Marble Bureaus. $20.
Solid Walnut Portable Armoirs, with two draw
ers in bottom, $20.
Victoria Bedroom Sets, in Walnut, Mahogany and
Imitation Rosewood, ten pieces. $ 120.
Spring Mattresses made to order, $25 and $30.
Parlor Sets, in Walnut, Maliogauy and Imitation
Boee wood, ten pieces, at very moderate prices.
Also, an assortment of Looking-Glasses at moder
te prices. felo ly
MACHINERY.
gUAKESPEAR FOUNDRY,
Girod Street, Between Baronne and Dry.
ades Streets, New Orleans.
Joseph A. Shakespear, A. Smith, S. Swoop.
SHAKESPEAR, SMITH tc CO.,
(Successors to Geddee, Shakespear & Co.),
IRON AND BRASS FOUNDERS AND MACHINISTS,
manufacture every variety of Steam Engines, Sugar
Mills, Centrifugal Machines, Saw Mills, Draining
Machines. Mill and Gin Gearing and Grate Bars,
Store Fronts, Columns, Ventilators and Sash
Weights.
Blacksmith work of all kinds. ap27 ly
JJOVELTY IRON WORKS,
Corner of Dclord and New Levee street*,
WILLIAM GOLDING, PROPRIETOR.
mh!My_—___________________
ARMSTRONG'S FOUNDRY
AND BOILER MANUFACTORY,
Corner of Erato and New Levee streets,
NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA.
W. J. J. Armstrong, Manager.
Manufacturer of Vertical and Horizontal Steam
Engines, Sugar Mills, Draining Machines Saw Mills
Cotton Screws and Gearing, Iron Columns and
Pronts of Buildings, Furnace Mouths, Grate Bars,
Bone Black, Bevivifiers, Gas Retorts, Railroad
Frogs, etc.; Low Pressure, Locomotive Flue and
Cylinder Boilers of all kinds, Filters, Juice Boxes
and Clarifiers, etc. 1*31 ly
J S. SIMONDM dt CO.
Nos* *19 Canal, 9 Crossman and 4 Frool
Streets.
DKAZJZBS IN
hardware.
IRON AND SHIP CHANDLERY.
Nalls and Castings, Hoop, Sheet and Bar Iron,
Manila and Tarred Cordage, Sail Duck, Plows,
Shovels and 8pades, Sheet Copper and Zino,
Anchors and Chains, Axes and Hoes, Lead Pips
nnd Sheet Lead, Paints and Oils, Blocks and Oars.
( INDIA RUBBER BELTING,
Hose. Packing, sod all supplies necessary #M
Railroads, Steamships, Plantations, etc.
Agents for the new patent
' 'Self-Lubrlcatlng Packing."
OOP?Si. TIN t SHEET SON AND GAS WOR KB*
SS pe ly
1,500,000 C,B "®
ALWAYS ON HAND.
REAL HAVANA TOBACCO
Of Every Variety of Brand, Manufactured and
for sale by
GEORGE ALCES'
PREMIUM CIGAR MANUFACTORY,
No. 185 Rampart Street (below Canal, j
ap2 3m
LOTTERIES.
RAWING OF THE LOUISIANA
STATE LOTTERY FOB MAY 14, 1873.
CLASS 115.
1 a 3 4 5 6 7 8 91 10 11 12 :* 14
28 65 57 7 62 2 49 *9 li' 35 77 ! 51 31 I —
The above drawings are published In all the prin
cipal papers, and are drawn in pnblio daily at tbs
rooms of the company.
Information furnished and prizes cashed by
HOWARD, SIMMONS t CO.. Contractors.
St. Charles street, comer Union. New Orleans.
Witness eur hands at New Orleans, Louisiana
this fourteenth day of May, 1872.
H. PERALTA,
ADAM UIFPKN.
Commissioners.
BRWAR3 OV BOGUS LOTTERIES. »p?t
j^OCiSlANA STATIC LOTTERY
COMPANY.
Incorporated August 17,1868.
CHARLES T. HOWARD................PRESIDENT.
SINGLE NUMBER LOTTERY.
SPLENDID SCHEME-ONLY *0.000 NUMB IBS,
Capital Prize............850.000.
CLASS G.
TO BE DRAWN AT NEW ORLEANS ON
Saturday, May IS, 1875*.
HOWARD, SIMMONS fc OO., Contractor*.
SCHEME:
5*0.000 Numbers—Tioketa Only 85*0.
I prize of 050,000 1a........................050000
1 prize of 30,000 is,
1 prize of 10,000 ia.
1 prize of 10,000 is,
' " ' 9,000 is.,........
8.000 ia..........
7.000 is..........
6.000 is..........
5.000 is..........
4.000 ia....
1 prize of
1 prize of
1 prize of
1 prize of
l prize of
1 prize ef
1 prize of
3,000 is.....
1 prize of 2,000 is..
1 prize of
1 prize of
1 prise of
1 prize of
1 prize of
1 prize of
1 prize of
1 prize of
1 prize of
1 prize of
I prize of
1 prise of
1 prize of
1 prize of
1 prize o:
1 prize of
1 prize of
1 prize of
1 prize of
1 prize of
1 prize of
1 prize of
1 prize of
1 prize of
1 prize of
60 prizes ef
30.000
*0 000
10.000
9.000
8.000
7.000
5.000
5.000
4.000
3.000
2.000
1,000
1,000
1,000
1,000
1,000
1,000
1,000
1,000
1,000
1,000
1,000
1.000 I
1.000 Sam.23,544
1.000 j
Loco
1 , 0*0 I
1.000 j
i,oco !
1.000 i
1.000
i,ooo!
1.000
Loco j
1.000 !
1,000 I
500 35,000
200 are...................... 63,400
317 prizes of __
36 Approximation prizes.................... 12'6-iO
440 prizes, amounting to....................$ ISO,40?
Whole Tickets, $20- shares in proportion.
Prizes payable without deduction.
Orders to be addressed to
CHARLES T. HOWARD,
Look box 692, Postofflee, New Orleans.
Bend post-office money order, or register your 1 st.
tar.
BABES ACT BANKING.
yjONEY LOANED
OS AT.L
MARKETABLE STOCKS OR SECURITIES.
Commercial paper wanted by
L. B. MOREL.
myl2 3t No. 35F, Carondelet street.
C 1IRCULAR LETTERS OF CREDIT,
> available in all parts of EnroDe. issued upon
London by the STATE NATIONAL BANK. Nos. 31
and 33 Camp street.
my9 lm CHARLES L. C. DUPUY", Cashier. /
BUSINESS CHARGES._
TkTOTICE.— THE PARTNERSHIP HERETOFORE
Xv existing between Thomas E. M. Smith and
Patrick Donnelly is dissolved from this day. Either
party will receipt for moneys due by the former
concern of Smith i. Donnelly.
PI DONNELLY.
Mat 9,1372. rnylO 3t
T HE LAW PARTNERSHIP HERETOFORE
existing between us under the name of Case
4t Rouse is this day dissolved.
CHARLBS CASE,
J. D. ROUSE.
New Orleass, May 8, 1872. mylO 6t
18SOLUTION OF PARTNERSHIP.—
By common consent, the partnership hereto
fore existing between the undersigned under the
name and style of C. H. Mouton k Co. has been
and is dissolved. The procuration or power of
attorney given to Mr. George Darby by the said
and is d ssol
C. H. Monton k Co. is hereby revoked and cancel
ed, and C. H. Mouton is charged with the liquida
tion of the affairs of said partnership.
VALERY COCO.
C. H. MOUTON.
New Orleans, April 29, 1872. _ ap30 lm
1YISSOLUTION OF PARTNERSHIP.—
U TTie firm heretofore existing, composed of
the undersigned, and doing business under the
name and style of H. I. MULLAN k CO., is hereby
dissolved by limitation. Each partner has au
thority to sign in liquidation.
HENRYJ. MULLAN,
CHARLES W. RUSSELL,
JOHN K. RUSSELL.
New Orleans, May 7,1872.
T HE UNDERSIGNED HAVE FORMED, THIS DAY,
a partnership for the purpose of carrying on
the general hardware business at the stand of the
late firm of H. I. MULLAN k CO., No. 52 Canal street,
and Nos. 69 and 71 Common street, under the name
and style of H. I. MULLAN k CO.
HENRY J. MULLAN,
CHAKLES HALLOWAY,
JOHN YOUNG, JR.,
ANTHONY DOHERTY.
New Orleans, May 7, 1872. my8 13 18
M 1
EDUCATIONAL.
[ILITARY HIGH SCHOOL,
188 RACE STEET, head of Coliseum Place.
T. B. Edwards and Samuel H. Lewis,
Principals.
Will prepare pupils to enter the Louisiana State
University, or any other College in America. A
Commercial and Primary Department attached.
Military discipline, with daily drill.
Circulars to be had at the School, or at James A.
Gresham's, 92 Camp street. _ an20 10m
"p^EW ORLEANS
CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC,
, No. 90 Baronne Street,
Three and one-half blocks from Canal street, five
doors above the Piano House of P. Werlin, ac
cessible from five car lines.
This institution is conducted after the plan of
the best music schools of Europe. The Board of
Instruction counts among its names the most suc
cessful teachers and artists of the highest merit
and reputation. Admitted are beginners of all
ages from seven years upward; also advanced
pupils who wish to perfect themselves either as
amateurs, teachers, or professional artists; and
those who wish to resume their studies after |
long interruption.
Terms, payable in advance, as follows: For piano
or voice, for ten weeks, two lessons weekly, of two
weekly, of one hour each, $15. Reductions made
for two branches taken together.
Visitors are invited to call aDd witness the
at tne omce w uic nwimiii, no. uu Baronne
street, or by letter, addressed Portofflee box No.
1596, New Orleans, Louisiana.
THEOPHILUS MASAC.
»u 26 ly President.
Who Shall be his Successor ¥
The excitement among the United States
employes, and the few outside Grant Re
publicans, was at fever-heat yesterday,
The dismissal of Casey for offenses which
for months pa6t has been common talk the
country over, does not wash. Every one
asserts that there is another reason, and the
guesses as to what Grant's real purpose is
are as numerous as the wiseacres, black and
white, who throng the stairway of Mr Mul
lett's granite abomination. "Boss" Packard
thinks the situation, like the Dutchman's
consumptive vrow, "gets no better fast,''and
his few faithful henchmen, who "lived in
the hope of the good time coming,'' when
he would dispense fat offices from the Gov
ernor's office, are downcast and in mourn
ing.
Speculation as to the succession runs
somewhat thusly:
Stock dale is to have it, because he on ly
can Kellogg trust. Kellogg wants to he
Governor, and would like to use the Cus
tomhouse as he did when candidate for
Senator, and as Stockdale was with him
then, he "knows how the old thing works."
S. H. Kennedy is to be appointed beoause
he is not only "old and respectable," but
can carry the Reformers to the support of
Grant.
Charley Dillingham is to have the honor
thrust upon him by his brother-in-law, Sen
ator Matt Carpenter, of Wisconsin. Dil
lingham being lazy and constitutionally op
posed to hard work and unprofitable re
sponsibility, is expected to respectfully de
cline.
The office is to be humbly tendered Sen
ator A. B. Harris, for the purpo°e of effect
ing the long-delayed and much-desired re
union in the Republican party.
Our alphabetical friend, Colonel Parker,
having sacrificed himself to secure for
Grant the "colored element," made a bet
of a white hat that Greeley could not tell a
young carrot from a shark's tooth, and re
ceived an autograpn letter from " Oyster "
Downing, has a dead sure thing on the col
lectorship.
Congressman Sheldon has been offered
the billet, but asks ten days for reflection
and consultation with his friends.
A brand new carpet-bagger from the
West, who is step-son to the brother-in-law
of DenUs great-aunt's niece's uncle's broth
er's wife, is to get the job of running the
Customhouse for Casey, as Arthur runs that
in New York for Tom Murphy.
Packard ought to have it, because he has
ruined himself in Grant's service. But as
he at the same time ruined Grant, so far as
Louisiana is concerned, his chances are
slim.
Common sense and sound judgment would
dictate the appointment of George W. Car
ter, but as thes6 qualifications are not to
found in the White House, the "Keurnal"
has not the ghost of a showing.
Ingraham's friends think he was prema
ture in accepting the surveyorship, but the
President may possibly find some other
colored man willing to serve his country.
But all these speculations and suggestions
which we have endeavored to .epitomize are
idle. Casey is understood to be due here,
it not already arrived, while tlje letter re
questing his resignation only left Washing
ton on Monday night. In this there is evi
dently a trick of some sort, whereof our
brother-in-law knows the secret, and when
he shows his hand we may have another
budget for our readers.
THE CITY' HALL.
Last week the receipts trom levee dues
amounted to $5060 70.
A proposition has been made to publish
monthly the name and salary of every per.
son employed by the city government.
Petroleum oil dealers were in consulta
tion with the Administrator of Police yes
terday on the qnestion of the proper price
to he charged for the storage of petroleum
in a warehouse to be erected for that pur
pose.
There is a popular demand for more
drinking fountains. One gentleman agrees
to he one of fifty to contribute $100 each to
establish free fountains in different sections
of the city.
Southern Patents.
Messrs. Jenkins & Olmstead, solicitors of
American and foreign patents, No. 27 Com
mercial place, officially report to the Re
publican the following complete list of
patents granted Southern inventors for the
week ending May 7, 1872:
Louisiana—Adolph Bouchard, New Or
leans, motive power for sewing machines;
Charles Swett, Martinsville, Mississippi, as
signs to Charles G. Johnson, New Orleans,
bale tie fastening (reissue).
Mississippi—William M. Inge and E. P.
Wheeler, Corinth, car coupling; H. C. Land,
Garlaudville, apparatus for supplying loco -
motive tenders with fuel.
Alabama—L. W. Liles, Roanoke, haling
press; William H. Jones, Henry eounty,
medical compound or ointment.
Tennessee—C. Policy, McMinnville, mole
trap; Joseph Williams, Bean's station, bee
hive.
Georgia—Marcus L. Battle, Bainbridge,
lamp snuffer and extinguisher.
Kentucky—William O. Clough, Lexing
ton, door check; William J. Perkins, Louis
ville, derricks; John Hebden, Louisville,
strengthening steam boilers.
The Varieties Last Night.
The theatrical entertainment at the Va
rieties Theatre last night, under the aus
pices of the Ladies' Benevolent Association
of Louisiana, was, as might have been ex
pected, very largely attended, the object
being to augment the funds to he employed
in completing the Confederate tomb in
Greenwood Cemetery. The Varieties com
pany, with Miss Charlotte Thompson in the
leading role, presented the play of "Victo
rine, or I'll Sleep on It."
After the close of the theatrical enter
tainment there was a grand ball and sup.
per, and the enjoyments lasted till a very
late hour. The proceeds of the entertain,
meats were very satisfactory.
Women are queer. Among the live stock
of Mr. Bates Sparks, of Cumberland county,
Illinois, was a valuable mare which he had
given to Mrs. Bates Sparks, and Mrs. Bates
Sparks taking a notion that Mr. Sparks did
not treat this valuable mare 88 well as he
treated the other horses, armed herself with
an ax and a knife, proceeded to the stable,
and split open the head and cut the throat
of the valuable mare.
The late stockholders of the First Na
tional Bank are requested to meet at the of.
fico of J. S. Whitaker, No. 37 Camp street,
this ereniog at half-past sis o'clock.
LETTER FROM TEXAS*
Texas Htate Fair—Morgan's Railroad and
Steamship 'Line—The Sugar-Bowl for
Greeley—Galveston in 1837 and in
1873—The Houston Fair.
[Special Correspondence of the Republican.]
Galveston, May 13,1872.
According to previous arrangements, I
left New Orleans Sunday morning
to visit the Texas State fair, now being
held in Houston. The morning was clear,
beautiful and refreshing, and as I turned to
bid the Crescent City a tond adieu the sad
ness of parting was partially overcome by
the quiet beauties that surrounded this
great centre of trade on a Sabbath morning.
Punctually at half-past seven Morgan's
ferryboat conveyed the large number of
passengers collected at the ferry landingi
opposite Jackson square, to the Morgan
Texas railroad depot in Algiers. And at
eight o'clock passengers were comfortably
seated in commodious cars, and under way
for Brashear City, where the elegant steam
ship City of Norfolk, Captain Hopkins, was
waiting to receive and convey them to Gal
veston.
We arrived at Brashear City, on Ber
wick's Bay, at twelve o'clock, and at half
past twelve the steamship cut loose from
her moorings, and was steaming through
this most placid arm of the sea direct for
the gulf and Galveston, where we arrived
at seven o'clock this Monday morning.
Everything on th6 Morgan line, under the
excellent management of Charles A. Whit
ney, Esq., moves like eloekwork. The rail
road is in connection with a fleet of fine
steamships, well officered and provided
with all the comforts of life, and renders
travel to Texas, by way ot New Orleans,
an unalloyed pleasure.
I met on the cars Mr. J. Y. Gilmore, editor
pf the Louisiana Sugar-Ha u l, one of the
very best of our country papers. He was
kind enough to furnish me with a copy o^
his last edition. The Sugar-Bowl is in
dependent in politics, but the last number
comeB out boldly for Greeley for President.
Mr. Gilmore says by some it is thought the
Democratic convention will ratify the
nomination of Sir. Greeley for the purpose
of defeating Grant. But Mr. Gilmore does
not think that probable, inasmuch as
Northern Democrats are always over
estimating their strength. He believes that
every Democratic vote oast for a regular
Democratic nominee in the South will
count for Grant, and, therefore, advises
every Conservative Southern man to vote
for Greeley.
You may rest assured I was surprised to
find Galveston as much of a city as it is.
■When I saw it in 1837 there was but one
house upon the island: now it contains
many handsome houses, and claims, I am
told, to have.a poplation of 30,000. It cer
tainly possesses quite a business air at this
time, and if not washed away by storms or
influences over which the "Island City" can
have no control, it may at some future day
he a city of some magnitude.
I will take the hall-past one o'clock train
for Houston this afternoon, and will write
my next from there, and, perhaps, tell you
something about the fair. N. W.T.
Liberal Republican Organization.
At an adjourned meeting of Liberal Re
publicans, held m the Senate Chamber last
evening, the minutes of the previous meet
ing were adopted, embodying the following
resolutions and proceedings:
WHEREAS, The National Liberal Repub
lican Convention, lately held in the city of
Cincinnati, State of Ohio, have closed their
labors by the nomination of suitable Presi
dential candidates and the adoption of a
platform of principles, as well as an ad
dress to the people ot the United States,
who are appealed to, irrespective of past
politics, for the support of said movement;
and
Whereas, It is essential that steps should
be taken for the successful inauguration of
an organization of the friends of the Cin
cinnati movement in the State of Louisiana,
so as to cause the coalition of all friends of
general reform and constitutional govern
ment, as in opposition to the centralization
and military tendencies of the times, and
otherwise to bring hack the administration
of the government to the better days of the
republic; therefore, be it
Resolved by the Louisiana State Caucus
to the Cincinnati convention, now assem
bled, That the president appoint a provis
ional State central committee of fifteen,
who are empowered to organize the friends
of Greeley and Brown in the respective
parishes of the State, so that measures can
be taken at an early day for the calling of a
State convention to nominate a Presidential
electoral ticket and State officers; and fur
ther, the said committee he and it is hereby
instructed to immediately issue an address
to the people of the State, irrespective of
politics, stating the ylatform of our princi
ples, and asking co-operation of all ele
ments for a successful trinmph of the Cin
cinnati movement at the ensuing Presiden
tial election.
The resolution was adopted with the fol.
lowing amendment:
That the State Central Committee consist
of twenty persons, two to be elected by
the delegates from each congressional dis
trict, and ten at large, to be appointed by
the president ot the meeting. The commit
tee to select its own officers.
On motion the committee was increased
to twenty-oqe members, by the addition of
the Hon. George H. Braughn, the commit
tee to have power to increase their number
if deemed necessary.
On motion, a recess of ten minutes was
taken to allow the delegates to make their
reports; at the expiration of which time the
following reports were made :
First Congressional District—A. Cbalaire,
of Plaquemines ; Octave Rey, of Orleans.
Second Congressional District—J. M. Dirr
hammer and John Lockwood, of Orleans.
Third Congressional District—Elbert
Gantt, of St. Landry; Emerson Bentley, of
St. Mary.
Fourth Congressional District—Duncan
Stewart, of West Feliciana; E. North Cul
lum, of Avoyelles.
Fifth Congressional District—H. H. Har
ris, of Concordia; H. C. Morgan, of More
house.
Speeches were then made by the Hon.
Thomas W. Conway, Judge W. B. Phillips
and Governor Warmoth.
On motion, the meeting adjourned sine
die. G. H. BRAUGHN, President.
P. E. Bechtel, Secretary.
Tlie Industrial Exposition—Eighth Day,
The attendance yesterday and last eve
ning was much improved, even from the
best days previously, and everybody
seemed to revel in enjoyment of the beau
tiful goods, the elegant display of paint
ings, and the exquisite music of Jaeger's
band. Fine Art Hall has, as we predicted
it would, become one of the most popular
resorts in town, and fashionable people go
there. Admission only twenty-five cents.
Musselmen do not regard banging a pun
ishment, death being to them a fatality,
bat mutilation equivalent to damnation,
Nearly every passer-by, should he keep
his ears open, will hear in his daily travels
through the street expressions and sayings
which show how deep or shallow is the
public mind at this time, and upon what
theme that mind is exercised.
"I made three bets in a hoop that Grant
would withdraw." The speaker was a
short, thick-set man, who might be either a
country merchant or a tax collector of one
of the suburban districts. His face showed
exposure to the sun and air, his dress told
of no fastidious tastes.
"In a hoop," repeated one of the party.
He then went on to say what was meant:
"S'pose the Democrats nominate. Old Mor
ton and the rest of that crowd will force
the withdrawal of Grant, for it won't
amount to a row of pins, and will not
please Greeley. S'pose they don't nomi
nate; Grant must be dropped for a man
stronger than Greeley." He was willing to
bet this way. As for the reporter, he
couldn't get at the bottom of the reasoning.
One by one the hearers lett the thick-set
man, and, nobody asking him to take a
drink, he slowly and sadly went away.
Probably the talk about the withdrawal of
Grant was heard on that day last week dis
cussed everywhere but in the papers, and
this ends one of the soundings.
"When I stab anybody with a codfish ball
he'll never git over it." This remark, so
deep in sarcasm, came from one of the
crowd of gamins who pile in on the heels of
a brace ot policemen with a prisoner in tow,
who crowd around the station door which
is usually shut to with a dull clang just as
the prisoner goes in, and who devote the
rest of their time to peeping in at the win
dow or through the prison bars with bs
much eagerness as if the poor prisoner never
was coming out again. He was satisfied
with that remark, and several ether and
younger of his persuasion 'whose sands of
life had scarcely began to run, and whose
chief capital consisted of time whereof they
had more than they knew what to do with
and hence did nothing, looked wonderingly
up at his audacity. The door was opened,
the "rats" scampered, and the bleeding
prisoner "cut all to pieces" one of the peep
ing gentry uttered in a horrified voice, was
left to his reflections of what a sad thing it
is for a man to he the "bottom dog in the
fight." This is also claimed as one of the
soundings, one of the representative scenes
which happen so often people get tired of
having them told at all.
"It was very strange he couldn't find me
to indorse that $10,000 check.'' This from a
jolly old gent, with an apple toddy face,
who quietly told of how he was obliged to
hand in his check for a settlement, and—
"Ha! ha! forgot to indorse it." The teller
wouldn't pay. The holder hunted the
drawer up high and low, and the more he
looked for him the greater grew his rage.
(His own story.) Having gained time, and
made the account good, in walked the jolly
old gent to his office, and (this being on the
next day)—"Indorse it," said he, "certainly.
What a strange oversight I didn't do it
when I handed it over!" He remarked sotto
voce that he was the busiest man on the day
in question ever was seen. This is another
of the soundings.
A babel of cries echo through the dusty
street. Sashes of upper stories are thrown
up, and heads over heads poked out. Front
doors are thrown open, and alley ways dis
gorge throngs of women and children, all
crying out, "Shame! shame!" A crowd of
boys and half grown men rush frantically
down the street, beating as they go along
the fences and dead walls with the stick
each lias in his hand. Far up the street, in
the midst of hootings and whoopings, the
crowd grows denser. Over all rises a pite
ous bleating. "What's the matter?" every
strange voice cries. "The goat catchers are
running off my goats."
" Nefer you mind, my dear." This came
from a shoemaker, who had rushed out of
his shop in apron and hammer, shaking the
latter violently. "Just wait till lection
time—den we fix dese fellers." This hap
pens about three times a week in every
neighborhood where goat's milk is "pro
iuieed," and is very ordinary unless, as one
of the bystanders remarked, " dey takes
'em off in de night—den you tinks its h—
This is one more of the soundings.
" I thought you didn't swear," remarked
a pale-faced and mild young man, who be
longed to that class of men who "part
their hair in the middle."
" Well, I know 'taint right," replied pro
fanity. The mild man bowed his head
meekly. " But yq£ see nothing relieves a
man so much. Sometimes it's like pulling
out an aching tooth." The mild man turned
up his eyes to the skylight of the car in a
manner which seemed to say "Cast not thy
pearls before swine."
"There's no vinegar and sweet oil in the
castor." This was said by one of the lunch
fiends, who, having swallowed his ration of
soup, hash, roast beef, turned his attention
to the salad. The reply of the host, who
stood grandly at the head of the table, was:
■•Don't keep vinegar and sweet oil here—
this is a coffeehouse." Then turning to one
of his steady customers, he said, "Unless
you check these fellows, they'll be asking
for a spring mattress and a Victoria bed."
Served him right.
It is our theory that more wisdom is ut
tered in daily conversation on the streets
in one hour, than is contained in all the
newspapers for a week. How to catoh
them "on the fly " is one of the lost arts.
The views of the people are always news^
but none "of us " ever get hold of them un
less they come through some one of the
prominent men and they lose by it. We
have more soundings on the book which
contain wisdom "chunks of it " and we now
get off into deep water.
Greeley Reform CInb, Third District.
The Greeley Reform Club of the Third
District held a meeting for organization
last night, at the hall on Spain street. The
meeting was called to order by Judge
Sloan aker, when the constitution and by
laws and several resolutions were adopted.
Mr. A. J. Armstrong was elected presi.
dent, having received 106 votes to 99 for W.
C. Kinsella.
The meeting was addressed by Colonel
Walsh and Judge Cullom, and was then
adjourned till Tuesday next, at seven
o'clock, at the same plaoe, closing with three
cheers for' the newly elected president of
the clnb, and three cheers for Greeley and
Brown. The meeting was very enthu
siastic.
BY TELEGRAPH.
LATEST NEWS FROM ALL POINTS
SUPPLEMENTAL ENFORCEMENT BILL
Its Passage in the Senate
MOKE * SLOOPS OF WAR
THE PB0TE0TI0N OF EMIGRANTS
MISSISSIPPI TO THE ATLANTIC
Canal Delegates at Washington
EXPOETS OF SPECIE YESTEBDAY
NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE
GREELEY WITHDRAWS FROM THE TRIBUNE
Wliitelaw Reid His Successor
THE SPANISH INSURGENTS
CONGRESS.
Indian Reservation Policy a Failure—
Kellogg'* Supplemental Enforcement
Bill—It* Passage in the Senate—Ex
citing Discussion—Night Session on
Naval Affairs—Tariff Bill—Ten Sloops
of War—Protection of Emigrants.
Washington, May 14.— Senate. —The bill
? roviding for a district court in the Indian
'erritory was up.
Mr. Nye said that the reservation poli
for Indians was a complete failure. He fa
vored railroads through them, and the
opening of the lands to settlement.
Mr. Kellogg's supplemental enforcement
hill was resumed, and finally passed by
thirty-four to seventeen.
Mr. Thurman, in the course of discussion,
said he thought the hill a fair one, but
would vote against it on principle.
The discussion was quite exciting over
the various amendments, aud indicated
hopelessness of amnesty this session.
The deficiency bill was resumed. It is
thought both Morrill's amendment and the
House substitute will be dropped, leaving
the matter in static quo.
Mr. Scott called up the bill extending to
March 4, 1873, the extraordinary powers of
the President under the Ku-Klux bill. No
action.
The Senate is in session to-night on naval
affairs.
House. —A conference committee was or
dered on the naval appropriation bill.
Consideration of the tariff' question was
resumed
Mr. Buckley, of Alabama, moved to ex
cept cotton machinery as an amendment to
the section affecting iron and iron manu
factures. Adoped.
The motion that watches and articles of
ornament be excluded from the general re
duction was carried.
The House Committee on Naval Affairs
have agreed upon a report in favor of the
construction of ten sloops-of-war.
The Senate Committee on Foreign Rela
tions held a meeting to-day, on the subject
of an additional article to the treaty of
Washington, but came to no conclusion.
The committee meets again to-morrow.
The opinion of the Senate has not yet de
veloped itself, although the measure, as an
administration proposition will, it is thought,
be ratified.
The President has sent a message to
Congress, advising federal regulations for
the protection of emigrants.
The House to-night passed a bill, fixing
the first Monday of November for choosing
electors for President and Vice President in
1872. in Louisiana ; also a bill for the relief
of the sureties of S. F. Marks, late post
master at New Orleans, providing for the
release of each surety on his paying an
aliquot part of the defalcation.
There seems to be a misapprehension in
some quarters respecting the precise char
acter of the question before the Senate with
reference to the treaty ot W'ashington.
Although inquiry has not resulted in obtain
ing full particulars on the subject, it can be
stated that the submission ot the new ar
ticle to the Senate is with a view of obtain
ing the opinion of that body upon it to guide
the President in his formal action in the ne
gotiation. In other words, it is not now
before the Senate for ratification.
This new article was originally submitted
to the United States by Great Britain in a
form somewhat different from that in which
it is now presented. She wanted the claims
for consequential damages altogether with
drawn, not being willing to admit the prin
ciple. On the other hand, while our gov
ernment did not press any moneyed consid
eration for such claims, it desired that the
question as to their admissibility should be
settled by the Geneva tribunal, and there
fore refused to withdraw them, believing
they were properly in the case.
Both parties thus maintaining their re
spective positions, the treaty Was, even last
week, in danger of failure, as it is known
Great Britain meditated withdrawing from
the arbitration, but by means of telegraphic
communication the two governments were
able to arrive at a satisfactory conclusion
on the differences in this way, namely:
Great Britain maintains that the claims for
consequential damages were not included
in the treaty, and therefore she doee not
admit the principle of asking such damages
received by a belligerent owing to the ab
sence of duo diligence in the performance
of neutral obligations.
The United States maintaining that the
claims for consequential damages were in
cluded in the treaty, hut accept the latter
declaration for a guide for our future con
duct, and, therefore, will not make any claim
before the Genva tribunal for consequential
damages—such is understood to he the sub
stance of the proposed new article—although
there has not been any general expression
as to the result. The opinion obtains that
the Senate will favorably advise the Pres
ident in the premises.
WASHINGTON.
Canal from the Mississippi to the Atlan
tic—Delegates at Washington.
Washington, May 14—Delegates from
Western and Southern cities arrived in this
city last night, representing the interest of
the Atlantic and Western Canal, whioh is
to open water communication between the
Mississippi river and the Atlantic ocean. A
meeting of the delegates to-day was at
tended by several Senators and Representa
tives in Congress from those States. Ed
ward Anderson, of Alabama, was chairman
of the meeting, and Colonel Capers, of
Georgia, secretary. The delegation will
call upon the President in a body to-mor
row and present an address.
NEW YORK.
Specie Exported-Stor* Exchange Officers
Installed— Musicians' National Asso
ciation-Interference of Government
Bands-Doctor Howard—iMr. Greeley's
Withdrawal from the Tribune— Trot
ting Races—Chamber of Commerce on
the Treaty— Liberal Republican Or
gaoization«
New York, May 14.—The steamer Hansa
to-day took $700,000 in specie.
The new officers of the Stock Exchange
were installed to-day. President King and
Chairman Wheelock made addresses. The
board voted a service of silver plate to ex
President Clark.
The annual meeting of the Musician*' Na
ter triennially.
The Secretary of th* Navy was memorial
ized to prevent government bands from in
terfering with the business of musicians.
Abt was received by the meeting.
A letter from Cadiz says : Dr. Howard
suffered considerably on the voyage from
Cuba, being loaded with heavy chains, but
upou the request of American officials, at
Cadiz, the irons were removed.
' The action of Congress relative to hia
case had not then reached Dr. Howard, nor
the Spanish officials at Cadiz.
There were five trotting races at the
Fleetwood Park yesterday:
First—Won by Frank in three heats;
best time 3:06.
Second—Won by Belle Jones in five heats;
best time 2:54*1%.
Third— Wod by George M. Patchen in
four heats; best time 2:58.
Fourth—Won by Starlight in four heats ;
best time 2:43%.
Fifth—Won by David in two heats; best
time 2:55.
The Tribune of to-morrow publishes the
following card:
"The Tribune has ceased to be a party
organ, but the unexpected nomination of
its editor at Cincinnati seems to involve it
in new embarrassments. All must be
aware that the position of a journalist, who
is at the same time a candidate, is at best
irksome and difficult; that he is fettered in
action and restrained in criticism by the
knowledge that whatever he may say or do
is closely scanned by thousands eager to
find in it what may be so interpreted as to
annoy and perplex those who are support
ing him as a candidate, and to whom his
shackled condition will not permit him to
be serviceable.
"The undersigned, therefore, withdraws
absolutely from the conduct of the Tribune,
and henceforth, ontil further notice, exer
cises no control or supervision over its
columns.
"HORACE GREELEY."
The editorial management of the Tribune
falls on Whitelaw Reid.
A special meeting of the Chamber ef
Commerce will be held to-morrow, to give
expression to their views relative to the ad
ditional article to the treaty of Washington.
The Liberal Republican State committee
to-day adopted measures for organization
in all the counties on a uniform plan, and
appointed an executive committee.
The striking carpenters received great ac
cessions to-day, including all men from the
shops in Gauzevoorst street, where an at
tack was talked of yesterday. The bosses
have refused a final answer to the men un
til after to-morrow night's meeting.
The bricklayers will strike next Monday
unless allowed four dollars for a day's work
(eight hours).
The Broad street office of Woodhull Sc.
Clafiin closed—reported by the sheriff.
Money closed firm at 7 per cent on call
loans. 'Sterling exchange 109% ©109%.
Gold active, closing strong at 114® 114%.
Governments steady; new fives 111%; sixes
of 1881 118%; five-twenties of 1862, 113%;
1664, 113*4; 1865. 113%, new issues 115%;
1867, 116%; 1868, 116%: ten-forties 111%.
State bonds steady; Tennessee, old 70%; new
71; Virginias, 50; new 59; Louisianas, old 59;
new 55%; levee sixes 67; eights 76; Alabama
eights 88, fives 66; Georgia sixes <0: sevens
89; North Carolinas, old 36, new 20%; South.
Carolinas, old 45. new 35%.
FOREIGN.
Government Troops and Carlists—Insur
gents in Bilboa—Whitsuntide Holiday—
Parliament Adjourned—Consequential
Damages.
Madrid, May 14.—Fifteen thousand gov
ernment troops are now concentrated in the
department of Biscay. Opposed to them
are 7000 Carlists, who'adopt the Fabian pol
icy. The Carlist leaders who escaped into
France have been arrested and returned by
the French authorities.
Paris, May 14.—Reports have been re
ceived from Carlist sources that the insur
f ents have occupied Bilboa. Don Carlos
as entered Biscay, and the Carlists are
masters of three Basque provinces. An im
portant engagement is expected in Biscay -
London, May 14.—Parliament has ad
ourned for the usual Whitsuntide holiday.
e House of Lords will reassemble on the
thirty-first instant, and the House of Com
mons on the twenty-seventh.
Most of the London journals this morning
devote much space in tneir editorial columns
10 remarks upon the explanations regard
ing indirect claims and the position of the
English government made in the House of
Lords last night by Earl Granville and in
the House of Commons by Mr. Gladstone.
The journals approve the negotiations
now proceeding, hut doubt concurrence in
them by the United States Senate.
Paris, May 14.—Subscriptions to the
amount of 300,000 francs have been re
ceived here for the sufferers by the erup
tions of Vesuvius.
The Constitutionnel says three more de
partments will soon he evacuated by the
Germans.
Marshal Bazaine was placed under arrest
this morning.
Copenhagen, May 14.—A schooner,
which arrived to-day from Iceland, reports
a series of violent earthquake shocks at
Hasvick on the sixteenth, seventeenth and
eighteenth of April. Twenty houses were
destroyed, and several persons injured, but
no lives lost.
MISCELLANEOUS.
Keating of Giddings— 1 Texas State Fair
Capsized by a Water Spout—Lexington
Races—Strike among Michigan Miner*
—The Hnston Libel Suit—Church Inves
tigation of the Charges—Senator Ferry
Re-elected—Big Nose Canal Break
Mobile Tribune for Greeley and Brown
—Round Trip Tickets to Philadelphia—
Methodist Conierence at Brooklyn
Funeral of Buchanan Reid—Death of
a South Carolina Nullifier.
Galveston, May 14.—The seating of
Giddings has given great joy in this city
and throughout this section of tho State. A
grand jollification meeting in which every
body is invited to participate, will be held
at Brenham on Monday next. Minute guns
have been fired there in honor of the event,
and all are wild with joy.
The third annual State Fair now being
held at Houston, is largely attended. Every
portion ot the State is well represented.
The schooner Xiphias, bound from Gal
veston to Orange, encountered a water
spout on the morning of the ninth instant,
off Sabine, and was capsized. The vessel is
a total loss. No lives lost.
Lexington. May 14.—The attendance at
the races to-day was very large. The grand
stand, capable of seating twenty five hun
dred people, and another with capacity for
fifteen hundred more, were insufficient to
afford even standing room for those present.
Weather tine.
First Race —Phftnix Hotel stake; mile
heats for three year olds, $50 entrance, p. p.;
$250 added, resulted as follows :
Planetarium................................... I |
Florence.............. 1 ........................2 2
Knight of Anderson...........................3 dia
Time—1:45, 1:46*4.
Second Race —Mile and a quarter dash.
Club purse $150. Won by Frogtown beat
ing Spendthrift, Moilie Cad, Elsie May
Viley, Minnie Lee and Oceanioa—same
order. Time—2:09%. This time is believed
to be the fastest on record for a mile and
a quarter dash. In the pools Frogtown and
Moilie Cad were the favorites.
Detroit. May 14.—A special dispatch
from Houghton states that the strike is
general at Calumet, Hecla, Schoolcraft, ,
Quincy and Pembrick mines, including
about 2000 men. The ringleaders at Calu
met and Hecla mines were arrested, but tho
mob rescued them.
Baltimore, May 14.—In the Supreme
Court this morning, counsel for the Rev.
L. D. Huston filed a declaration in the libel
suit brought by Huston against tho proprie
tors of the Baltimore American, laying
damages at $100,000.
The committee appointed by the Church
[wirrunnu? on ember paokj

xml | txt