OCR Interpretation


New Orleans Republican. [volume] (New Orleans, La) 1867-1878, September 06, 1872, Image 1

Image and text provided by Louisiana State University; Baton Rouge, LA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016555/1872-09-06/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

NEW ORLEANS REPUBLICAN
9
3IMLE COPIES: TEH CEHT8.
OFFICIAL. JOURNAL OF THE STATE OF LOUISIANA.
TEEMS: $18 00 PEE ANNUM.
VOLUME VI—NO. 123.
NEW ORLEANS, FRIDAY, 'SEPTEMBER 6, 1372.
WHOLE NUMBER 1658.
AMUSEMENTS.
veea
TiALACK OF TRUTH,
AT. TUB
Academy of must®,,
• • Monday, September 0.
^ Box felieet nay open. _
TITIiNEKVA SHALL.__
CONCERT
POU TilK BHNEPIT OP
%lli' WIDOW ANI> ORPHANS OP THE :
WILLIAM L. WATERMAN,
To i«* gicep at. Minerva Hall, Clio street bet
Prytania and St. Charles, . .
t)«i Saturday Evening, September 7, lb?2.
at 8 P. M.
PROGRAMME.
®. Overitire, Piano............................ : -
Robert All I Love (Robert le Diablej Alisa Kelty
3. Tenor Solo............ . ........Mr. A. Davis
a Wailing (Millard..)..................... • ••- --
% When Sparrows Build................Miss Kelty
SECOND PART. ,
1. II Trcvaiorc (duel)......................... .
V II Ksut IV, lea (P.lledu Regiment Mis? KeMv
3. Solo Dans.........................Mr. Bremer
A. Galatliee....................*............. .
5. Return (Millard).....................-VMsa Ke'ty
«i. Tenor Solo............................Mr- Davis
Tin- CENTRAL ASSOCIATION OF SPIHITUAL
ISTS Dave kiutily tendered the ball free <ff charge
for the occasion.
Mr. Woilein has tendered a piano free of charge.
Doors open at iftven. Concert begins at eight.'
Bed td
o-—
^CADEMV OF 3{U»IC.
4. ) IV ID DIDWELL.........Manager and Proprietor.
Opening of the Amusement Campaign for
1872 and 1873.
ONE Yl' KFK ONLY.
Ji. I». DAVIES,
The PREMIER VENT RII.OQUIST OF THE WORLD
in lii« anecdotes and adventures of tlio*
UhriBnicst-of Pliunny Pliolk*,
. .AND
SARGENT,
kmeiica'ri favorite Illusionist, with A Jv'TGHT FN
UA1RV LANO. A delightful entertaium«L.t La
etnictive, moral aud amusing.
Monday, September 0,
REGULAR SEA-SON, with the Academv'a strong
aud efficient Dramatic Company, producing a new
eocictv play, mnisAtion drama and fairy comedy.
First grand MATINKK, SATURDAY, September T.
Dooi i open at 7:15; performance commences at 3
F. M. Box office open at 9 A. M. au29
LOTTERIES."
RAWING OF THE LOUISIANA
STATE LOTTERY FOR SEPTEMBER 5, 1872.
CLASS a 12.
1
'l
3
4 j 5
6
7
* 8
9
lu
11
12
47
IfJ
r,.i
38 I 54
19
28
12
33
41
44
C6
The above drawings are published in the prin
cipal p perB, and art drawn in public daily at the
rooms of the company.
Information furnished and prises cashed bv
HOWARD, SIMMONS' & CO., contractors,
St,. Charles street, corner Union, New Orleans.
W (ness our hands at New Orleans, Louisiana,
this fifth day of September, 4872.
ife PERALTA,
ADAM OIFFKN,
Commissioners.
BEWARE OF 3.0GUS LOTTERIES. _ ap22
jyiUISIANA STATE LOTTERY
COMPANY.
Incorporated August 17, 1868.
SJHA^LKS T. HOWARD................PRESIDENT.
SINGLE NUMBER LOTTERY.
g-TLEXDlD SCHEME—ONLY 20,000 NUMBERS.
Capital I'rlze, 850,000.
Capital I'rlze, 850,000.
CLASS N«,
BE PRAWN AT NEW ORLEANS ON_
.Saturday, September 21, 1872.
HOWARD, SIMMONS i CO., Contractors.
SCHEME :
?0,000 Numbers—Tickets Only 820.
® prize of 4,30,000 is.........................$50,0*36
0 prize of 30,000 is........................ 30.000
20.000 is................ 20,000
10.000 is....................... 10,000
9,OUO is........................ 9,000
Bitot) is.....................• 8,dor
7.000 is................. 7,000
6.000 is........................ 6,000
5.000 is......... 5,000
4.QOO is........................ 4 000
3.000 is........................ 3T>0|)
2.000 is..................2,000
1.000
A prize of
i prize of
1 prize of
1 prize of
3 prize of
T prize of
1 prize of
1 prize of
I prize of
1 prize of
1 prize of
I prize of
1 prize of
1 prize of
1 prize of
1 prize of
1 prize of
1 prize of
3 prize of
I prize of
X prize ef
t prize of
3 prize of
1 prize of
1 prize of
1 prize of
1 prize of
1 prize of
1 prize ot
1 prize of
1 prize of
l prize of
1 prize of
1 prize of
1 prize of
SO prizes of
517 prizes of
1 , 01)0
1.000
1.000
1,000
i ;oeo
1,000
1 MSI
1,000
1,000
1 . 0 - 0
1.000
1,000
1.090
1.000
1 , 110ft
1 000
1 000
1.000
i ,ooo
1,00ft
1 *00
1,000
1,000
1,000
500 aro
200 are
are...................... 25,900
36 Approximation prizes............12,600
J-40 prizes, amounting to........?...........$230,900
Whole tickets. $20; shares In proportion.
Priz. s payable without deduction.'
Orders to be addressed to
CHARLES T. HOWARD, *
Lock box 692, Postofliee, New Orleans.
Seud postdliice money order, or register your lei
®zor.
FURNITDRE,
«j^8TABII IIED IN 1810.
* JOSEPH bThU^BABD,
{loner of I'crdi.lo and Rampart Streets,
Has on hand one of the moat complete and best
Selected stocks of Parlor, Bedtoom and Dining
roo-u SetB ever offered in this city.
Also, all descrip ions of low price Furniture for
Splautatiou and family use. All guodepacked with
care and delivered free of charge. auTI 4m
•OTOTLCK...................- *.........NOTICE.
Jl i R A M O N ,
Denier In All Kinds of Furniture.
«OS. 99.101 and I«3 CHARTRES STREET, New ©r
leans.
Has constantly on hand an assortment of
Cottage Bedsteads (extra make, witht. ar-incL
posits), with toasters, $12.
Solid Waiuut one-fourth .Marble flureaus, $20.
Solid Walnut Portable Armoirs, with two draw
isrs in bottom, $20.
Victoria Bedroom Sets, in Walnut, Mahogany an,
Imitation Rosewood, ten pieces, $120.
Spring Mattresses made to order, $25 and $30.
Parlor Sets, in Waiuut. Mahogany aud Imitation
Rosewood, ten pieces, at very moderate prices.
Also, an assortment of Looking-Glasses at moder
ate prices. felO ly
FOR RENT.
house No. H7 Bolivar street, between Gravier
aud Perdido streets, one and a half blocks from the
Common street cars. The hemse contains a double
parlor, six large rooms and three-cabinets; parlor,
two large rooms, one cabinet in front, aud four
laige rooms aud two cabinets rear. The houec sets
hack from the street, with large ya'd, woodliouse,
cistern, aud gas throughout the house. Is In an
excellent nejghborhooa and in good repair., Will
®Je rented low to a good tenant. Apply t»
LOUIS KlyiMKL,
No. 194 Bienville street, corner Franklin.
BM 15t*
F or rent-thk dk.sikabls two-story
rc-,i(ti-ru;e. No. 159 Calliope street; well adapted
for families; conveniently located; terms ruoder
ate. Apply to DAVIS A ERttRKT, No. 27 Commer
ctal place. *ul
Tj'URMSHKD ROOM
Kei-riema.il can be ao- oiu_____________
fumis -ed loom in a small family, in n quiet part of
the oily, by addressing F. H. M„ at this office. 4y6
RESPECTABLE
muu>o-.lawithaneaUy
"PURNISHEI) ROOM'— FOR SINGLE GEN
X tleineu, at No. 110 8t. CharleB street, near La
fayette souare. '
I jlUttMNHKD ROOMS - LAR&K, AIRY
fo l Kfthtlemen, committees or
®t 163 Customhouse street, near the Varie
ties Theatre. Je|
MISCELLANEOUS.
H° !
Arrived on boa I'd the steamer Bismarck a line lot
of HORSES; also, a lot 01 Texas PONIES §nd Ken
\ucicy MULES. The above can be seen at WIL
LIAM KIPPER'S Lexington Sale Stables. No. 137
Baronne street, - au30 3teod
the i'iia :nix house,
9®........' St. Charles street...........
NEXT DOOR TO 'THE ACADEMY OF MUSIC.
TbU well known and popular house of refresh
meat and amusement, having been thoroughly
refitted will open fur the season MONDAY EVEN
ING Septembers, rlio Bowling Saloon has been
fitted up vuth entire new alleys.
ael 6t _D: BID WELL p r0 prb h
fjj'G CAPITALISTS AND PROPERTY
. . HOLDERS.
The undersigned being tile saecially authorized
agents of the owners.of the cotitinuatiou of the
Magazine street railroad call the atiention of capi
talists and property holders generally, and
especially of property owners in Jefferson City and
iiirroliton^xo the opening of subscription lists to
the balance of the capital stock ot' the New Or
leans aud Carrollton Mag.vino Street Dili ini ad
• 'orupany. Plans of the road can be" seen and full
particulars obtained by applying to
' JOSEPH HOEZ..
No. 47 Exchange alley, or to
I). URBAN,
Notary Public aud United States COwm'ssioner,
No. 60 Camp street. au25 t del
JUON COTTON TIES,
AU. APPROVED POPULAR PATENTS.
A rroiv, Anchor, Wallis, Alligator and
Dtioii.
For sale by ail dealers of New Orleans, Mobile
and Memphis. o. BARTLETT A. RAYNE,
auto 1m _ General Age nts.
QFF1CERS AND COMMITTEES
OF WARD CLUBS IN WANT OF BADGES
Would do well to call on the undersigned, as he
has facilities not common to others in the city
Samples and designs constantly on hand at
A. HIMMEL'S SILVERWARE MANUFACTORY,
au3 1m No. 186 Poydras street, New Orleans.
_______________________________
ORSES .........TONIES.........MULES.
s penin g. ..................OPENING. 1
3
Poydras street, New Orleans.
I.
A I'ABAMA LIME, CEMENT, PLASTER.
In store and inr 3ale—
250ft barrels fresh Shelby, Alabama LIME.
2000 barrels fresh Louisville CEMENT.
50ft barrels Rosendaie CEMENT.
500 barrels fresh TV. R. Brown's Newburgh
PLASTER.
By SAMUEL JAMISON Sole Agent,
au9 3m No 69. C-aror.delet street.
TVTfTICE.-SUBSCRIPTION TO THE CAPITAL
L" stock of the New Orleans, Magazine and
Carrollton Railroad Company, running from
Toledano street to the upper line of Magazine
street (say to Carrollton). There has been ob
tamed a privilege of a ferryboat to cross the
passengers over the Mississippi river to New Or
leans, Mobile and Texas railroad depot, so that
ttiis railroad will be the main line for passengers
going to Northern Louisiana, Texas, etc. This
road is already completed from Toledano street
to Joseph street, with limning stock, say two
uiile-, double track, and the extension to Carroll
ton will be completed as soon as possible. The
charter of the company and plan of the road can
he inspected at the office, No. 49 Exchange alley,
between Customhouse and Bienville streets',
where the hooks are also open for subscription and
all information. -J. H. EHRMANN,
au2 2m No. 49 Exchange alley.
P EOPLE BUYING VVINOO'VWHAUES
complete, and put up for $2, that took the
highest premiums at the fast Louisiana State Fair
1872. over ail competition. The "SOUTHERN
SHADES" have no • rollers, springs, pullers
catches, or brackets., consequently, impossible'to
get out of order. Shades made any size to order.
Awnings and wire screens to order. Orders from
city or country tilled with dispatch. Address or
•call oil the SOUTHERN WINDOW SHADE MiNO
FACTORING. COMPANY, Nos. 22 aud 24 Claiborne
street, between Cana! and Common streets, New
Orleans. N. B.—Country agents wanted. Right to
manufacture for sale. ' iy21 ly
T RETAIL.....
AT RETAIL.
H Cents.
Sugar-cured .Hams at ,10 cents: best at emus.
10.000 pounds best Sugar-cured Hams at 12 % cents
per ponfid.
10.000 pounds Green hams at 8 cents per pound.
'0,000 pounds Green and SmckeiF Shoulders at f
cents. .
Also, 500 McClellan Saddles at $ 1 50 each.
For sale at * S. B. CHURCHILL'S,
No. 40 Magazine street,
Between Natchez and Gravier streets;
aplO ly Under St. James Hotel.
Cg'RO ANIJ Stt5.-WU,t,CUX A GIBBS
ipm.? SEWING MACHINE, always in ordei
and ready to. sew, to run by band or o foot
Recommended by the medical faculty astho only
one fit foT delicate ladies to use, on account of it*
lightness. First class machines of ail kinds arc
offered for sale. The New Dimer tic Sewing Ma*
chine is made on an entirely new principle.- i
largo assortment of ladies' repay made suits a!
ways on hapd, of all colors and styles, manufae
tilled on our celebrated sewing machines.
de!6 ly -M. 8. HEDRICK. No. 103 Canal street
BUSINESS CARDS.
jyiuis SCI1ERCK, JR.,
Agent for the Sale of
WINES AND LIQUOR'S,
will remote to No. 96 Peters street, corner Lafa
yette. Also, agent for tiie celebrated GhRMA.V
TONIC, UN^ER pJRiTZ MAUEN BITTER, i. e. "Our
Fritz" Stomach Bitters. aa30 3t
D.
M'KENOIUCR,
House nm! Ship Plnmfcer, Off®-Fitter, Etc.,
No. 4§4 Magazine street, near the corner of Eace
street, New Orleans.
Dealer in. Plumbing and Gas-Fitting Materials,
Gaa Fixtures etc. * fe27 ly
j^fCHARD BBODK1UCK.,
CISTERN MAKER,
I3'I............. Julia street...........
t,, (Between Camp and Magazine.)
Second hand cisterna always or. hand. All work
guarantee). Lock box No. 36 Mechanics' aud Deal
ers' Exchange. fa25 ly
J) URBAN,
NOTARY PUBLIC AND UNITED STATES COM
MISSIONBR,
Commissioner of the. United States Conrt ot
Claims and Commissioner for the States.
Office No. ttO Camp .Street, Now Oileiinn.
Testimony and depositions taken at short notice.
PassiHirts provided, and Customhouse pai
promptly attended to. d
jpATENTS,
AMERICAN AND FOREIGN,
Solicited by
JENKINS A OLMBTEAD,
Architects and Engineers,
No. 27 Commercial place, New Orleans, Louisiana.
mh!9 ly
B REUSING Sc
(H. Brensing,)
adea. New Orleans.
ERNEST,
(Arthur }. Ernest,)
UPHOLSTERERS AND FURNITURE DEALERS.
Carpets, Mattings and Oil Cloths cleaned and
laid! Furniture covers made td order. All order*
will receive prompt attention* and satisfaction
guaranteed.
No. 240 Julia street, between Baroune and Dry
' -- no8 ly
jyEW ORLEANS STENCIL WORKS
AND MAGIC BATTERY MANUFACTORY.
Sole Agency for the Goidcn Wonder.
GEOHCvE K. TEETZEL & CO.,
No; 145 Gravier street.
Manufacturers of Cotton Brands. Stencil Plates,
Official Seals, Ribbon Stamps. Burning Braadp,
Door Plates, etc, au2 Kiu
p A. MURRAY.
CISTERN MAKER,
No. 101 Magazine Street, between Julio
and St. Joseph Streets.
Cist-drag, Dude to order and repaired. Ml work
warranted! A lot of cisterns. Wiwie of the best
-material aud workmanship, kept constantly on
baud, aud for sale at prices to suit the times. Or
ders promptly atte ded to, ja!3 ly
I N BANKR V PTCY. - PETITIONS AND
Schedules prepared strictly according to
the Bankrupt Law, general orders of the United
States Supreme Court, and rules of the United
States putrict Court, by
JOHN S. CARTER,
At the office of C. 8. Kellogg, Register in Bank
ruptcy, in Customhouse building. de23 ly
J^R. JOHN G. ANGKLL,
DENTAL SURGEON,
Office and residence,
15'J...............Julia Street........... .—15a
NEAR CAMP.
All operations in Operative, Mechanical and Snr
gical DoutiBtry care drily performed. Nitrous oxide
aud Other anesthetics administered. oo*8 ly
INTERESTING SUIT IN THE EIGHTH
DISTRICT COURT.
| Howard & Simmons re. the New Orleans
Picayune. „
Joseph P. Hornor, Esq., attorney for
Howard. Simmons &. Co., Sled a petition in
the Eighth District Court yesterday,' show
ing that the New Orleans Printing and
1 Publishing Company.'an incorporated body,
publishing the Daily Picayune newspaper,
aid, through their lawful agents, Living
ston II. Gardner, Albert Baldwin, J. C.
Morris, Samuel Henderson, E. H. Summers
Hugh McCloskey, S. Cambon, John Phelps,
T. M. Simmons, Charles B. Singleton and
John ®I. Adams, the board of directors of
said company, induce petitioners to sub
scribe for forty shares in the capital stock
of said company, for wliich'tbey, the peti'
tioners, paid down the sum of $2500 upon
their said forty shares of stock, with the
understanding with the president, secretary
and board of directors that the balance of
the amount of said stock was not to be paid
unless needed and called for by said com
pany: that said company, nor any person
in its behalf, has ever yet called upon peti
tioners for the balance of the amount of
said stock; but said company, its president
and directors, have persistently refused to
recognize petitioners as stockholders, and
refused to all aw them any voice, vote or
privilege as such.
privilege as such.
That conditional upon the petitioner's
signing lor said stock and making said first
payment thereon, it was expressly alipu
iated that the newspapers, or other
publications published by said compa
ny, should not contain any article or
articles prejudicial to the interests of
the Louisiana State Lottery Company of
this city, in which petitioners have, -aud
had at that time, a large interest and own
stock thei'eln to a very large amount, and
that the employes of said printing and pub
lishing company should refrain from attack
ing said Louisiana State Lottery Company
and the petitioners in any of the publica
tions of said company; that this agreement
was ratified by the said board of directors
on two separate occasions, the latter time
by the adoption of the following resolution:
Resolved, That the- Louisiana State Lot
tery is not to be attacked while it conducts
itself properly and keeps within its charter.
That notwithstanding thi3 solemn com
pact, it within the past three months has
been repeatedly violated by the said com
pany. by the publication in the columns of
said Picayune newspaper ot most violent,
and abusive, and false and libelous articles
against tin: Louisiana State Lottery Com
pauy, its managers, agents and stoekhold*
era. This in the face of repeated remon
strances from the petitioners. < '
That at a meeting of the stokholders of
the Printing Company, oil the twenty
seventh of August, 1812, the petitioners
were denied a vote or representation of the
shares belonging to them.
Finally, that said defendants having will
fully aird grossly violated aii of their con
tracts with petitioners: that they have'un
lawfuliy and unjustly obtained from peti
tioners thersum ot $2500 for no consideration
whatever, and unlawfully and unjustly
retain the same from petitioners for their
own benefit and purposes.
Therefore petitioners pray that tlio said
New Orleans Printing aud Publishing' Com
pany, through its president, Dr. D. W.
Btickell, and the aforesaid Livingston H.
Gardner, Albert Baldwin, J. C. Morris, Sam
uel Henderson, E. H. Summers, Hugh Me
Cioakey, S? Cambon, John Phelps, T. M
Simmons, Charles B. Singleton and John
I. Adams, be cited severally to appear
and answer this petition, and that after
due proceedings bad, they be condemned,
hrsolido, to pay to petitioners the sum of
$2500, with;legal interest fron the twelfth
of January, 1872; and that they be further
condemned, in solido, to pay to.petitioners
the further .sum ot $20,000 damages;. and
petitioners pYay for costs and for general
relief.
Fire af Erie.
The American Press Association furnishes
the following information about a destruc
tive fire in Erie, Pennsylvania." 17111011 was
published in this city yesterday morning
The Associated Press, which* cofltracts to
supply the Republican, Times, Picayune
and J>ee with all the news, did not send a
word of this intelligence. A meagre report,
however, appears in the dispatches this
morning. How an event of such impor
tance could escape the alert Associated
Press agents, we do not understand, unless
they were exhausted by the transmission of
Charles O'Conor'o three column letter about 0
free trade, and direct taxation the night
previous. This was what was published
here yesterday morning:
Erie. Pa., September 4, li P. M.— A tor
rilile conflagration broke out here this
evening and is now raging with groat fury.
The two principal hotels, the Reed arid
Elsworth houses, are now in flames and will
be totally destroyed. The following dis
patch was sent to the mayor of Buffalo:
Erie, Pa.. September !, 10:45 P. M.—To
Mayor Brush,- Buffalo:., Send some fire en
gines here immediately.
(Signed) CHARLES M. REED, Mayor.
A reply to the above has been received
saying that a special train will leave Buffalo
atT'once with two steam tire engines fully
Equipped. Tim mayor has also called on
the mayor of Cleveland for aid and engines,
which are now on their way from the latter
city. . . '
Later—41:15 P. M.—The fire ts spreading
rapidly aud there is every probability of a
terrific conflagration. The flames have ex
tended to two buildings across tho street.
The |ire department can offer but little re
sistance to the flames, their hose being
rotten and bursting very rapidly. The ut
most consternation prevails. Thousands of
people are on the spot. Every means pos
sible is being taken to prevent the further
spread of the flames, but with very little
success- The severing of telegraph com
munication is threatened. The tire rages
luriouMv on either side of the wires.
The Temperature.
The thermometer at Louis Frigerio's,
No. 50 Chartres street, yesterday stood as
follows: At 8 A. M., 81°; at 2 P. k, 88°; at
6 P. M., 85L Lowest' point during the
night of September 4, 72- .
George Francis Train registered himself
at the Galt House, Louisville, ns' follows:
"Geo. Francis Train, N. P. A., 1022nd mass
convention delegate from California, Wyo
ming, Nebraska and Illinois." He boasted^
that lie had gi t the nomination there for
President certain, and that the straigh-toufc
convention would put him through like a
prairie on fire. The sergeant-at-arms did
put him through and hustled him out.
Those daja are lost, in which we do no
good; those worse than lost in which we do
evil.
FUSION TICKET RATIFICATION
LIGHT IX LAFAYETTE SQUARE
COLONEL SrENERY SPEAKS
GEORGE A, SHERIDAN FOLLOWS
G0VEKN0E WABM0TH DEFINES
Last evening was set apart for the ratifi
cation of the fusion ticket at Lafayette
squ°are. Hours before the meeting assem
bled the stand had been tastefully deco
rated'. We mean the Liberal stand which
had been erected some months ago. From
the platform to the ground the glorious
stars and stripes extended, and on the
ropes above the platform were the colors
of all nations whose, sons get naturalized
and come with us. The stand was illu
minated with chandeliers from Mr. Flem
ing's house. Over the front of the platform
was a gorgeous arch, illuminated, bearing
the names of Greeley aud Brown, and in
front ot it a transparency lettered " Fusion
Ticket."
Ropes were extended around the speak
ers' stand, and a police detail held there
under the orders of. Sergeant Carlton and
Corporal Barron, of the police force.
At the appointed time the meeting was
called to order by Mr. B, M. Turnbull,, the
chairman of the committee of arrangements,
who introduced Mr. Jules S. Dennis as
president of the meeting.
Quite a number of vice presidents were
also appointed, all of which was ratified by
acclamation.
Colonel Dennis, in assuming the position
of president, addressed the meeting iu a few
brief remarks, thanking them for the honor,
%nd expressing a belief in the success of the
fusion ticket. * 0
Colonel Dennis then introduced Colonel
John McEnery, fusion candidate for Gov
ernor.
He said that, fatigued and travel-soiled,
he spoke to theig under embarrassing cir
cumstances; were bis own inclinations con
sulted he would be under the care of a
physician. The honorable gentleman then
reviewed the political situation, declaring
that he stood now as he did when a few
months since he was put in nomination by
the Democratic convention—not, however:
as its standard-bearer alone, but of all the
conservative parties and people of the
State. He was for sacrificing all prejudices
and partisan feelings for the good of the
State: anil in the fusion of conservative
elements he recognized as binding the most
liberal sentiments which the- nature ot the
agreement imposes. Indeed, any honest
Conservative-must recognize this coalition
as a binding compact. They must accept
wholly and entirely the ticket which con
ciliation and compromise have given to the
people.
At the conclusion of Colonel McEnery's
speech' General George A. Sheridan came
forward, and said that the people assem
bled to-night with feelings of gratitude
gratitude that the shadows were beginning
to drift from about us; that the dawn had
chased away the night, and that the free
people could meet together as fellow-citi
zens; that the bate and distinctions of sec
tions had passed away with the war, and
that the people were determined to have
one canvass, a| least, on their own account.
He felt not only gratified, but proud of this
condition of things. Ha was glad that men
from the North and from the South were
united in restoring the desolated State to
her normal condition of greatness and
power.
power.
General Sheridan then proceeded to de
fine the cause of antagonism between the
Northern and the Southern men- in this
country. It was stimulated by the-stav-at
home here in the South during the war and
the fierce stay-at-home partisan of the
North. These men kept alive animosities
and fired too intensely, the resentments re
maining from the w'ar.
Mr. Ogden then addressed the crowd, ad
vocating the fusion ticket and advisiug con
ciliation and harmony.
Governor Warmoth, amid loud calls and
enthusiastic demonstrations from the au
dience, then came forward.
He said—I confess to you, fellow-citizens,
that I appear before, you -with some embar
rassment. I see in the audience many of
my po.itieal friends, men who have been
identified with me in polities for the last
five years. With many of you I find my
self now differing. Of necessity this causes
me regret; but I appear before you now
not as an.individual, but as the member of
a political-organization upon the success of
which depends the salvation of the State. I
stand here identified with the Libera! party
It is true I am as good a Republican as I
ever was. I yield none of my cherished
political principles, I ask no man to yield
his sentiments.
Bat I am none the less a Liberal. At the
head of the Liberal ticket is a man who has
proved himself well entitled to trnst and
confidence in every relation of life. As a
Confederate soldier he did his duty in the
field, and I, as a Union soldier, shake hands
with him across the ''-bloody chasm." But
I-ain no Democrat. .1 have been charged
with having gone over to them, but it is
not true. I went half way aud they came
the rest. * .
The Governor then discussed the p-rmci-*
pies of the Liberal party, eulogizing the
present movement as one of conciliation
and harmony. I believe "it to be right,
he said, and I propose that my voice shall
be heard -in favor of it in every pariah in
this State. I know that the Democrats
have said a great many hard things about
me; indeed, they have given me a hard deal
for the last four years; but I flatter myself
I have-returried them as good as they sent
But now I propose an -amnesty. I will for
give them and they must forgive me. We
will be quits.
They may say my administration has
been a bad one; but I tell them they are as
much responsible for any evil that has ac
crued as I am. Any way all of ug are now
united in a campaign against Grant. We
have a heavy job on our hands; but we will
do sotfie very hard trying if we fail to de
feat him.
One word personal to myself. I have
been held responsible for certain obnoxious
laws. It is well known that I repeatedly
urged upon the Legislature the repeal of
those laws. They were repealed in a cer
tain sort of fashion, but the alterations
©
made no material change; besides, it would
make way for Grant's eleation laws, and
they will serve us very well iu this emer
gency. Heuce 1 have not signed the
amended laws. 0
The Governor then declared in favor of a
fair election, despite the threatened intirni
datSm of federal bayonets and the advent
of General Phil Sheridan. Ilis position
was now completely defined; so plain, in
deed. tiiat ho thought evenjhe editors of
the Picayune would no longer be in doubt
of it. °
While the speeches were going on at the
mam stand, the clubs from down towa_and
up town began to arrive. First came the
Second \\ ard Liberal Club, some four hun
dred strong, Loaded by Burke and Kelley;
shortly followed the Broom Rangers and
the Johnson Rangers, torehlighied, repre
senting a thousand men; the Frank Blair
Guards, the Forster Rangers, the Fernon
Guards, the Seventh Ward Wide Awakes
and a score of other clubs, not
the least of which were the Seymour
Southrons, which, having been divided
on« the fusion question, hare finally
ftfted. W. E. McDermott was the presi
dent of the Democratic-branch of this club,
and Tom Vizard of the Liberal portion of
it. Phi! Hoffman having declined the mar
shaisbip of the club, Phil Ford has taLec
his place, and^among .the boys of that kind,
fusion means business. But it is needless
for us to name the clubs that marched up
to the square, for they were too many to
claim special recognition. The Frank Biatr
Guards, Forster Rangers, Fernon Guards
and Eleventh'Ward Wide Awakes will ex
cuse us on this ground.
The crowd of torch-bearers assembling
around the east platform in the square, the
parties thereon finally organized a meeting,
and selected Genei'al John L. Lewis as its
president.
He called upon Mr. Julien Michel, who
briefly addressed the crowd.
Mr. Michel said that he was pleased to
see around him so many of his friends who
wore the badge which he wore. He praised
that stalwart body of men, true represent
atives of Louisiana, and in advocating the
Liberal and fusion movement, pledged
himself and his friends of the Broom
Rangers that-there should hereafter he no
such true friends of the people of Louis*
iana as that club, -no matter what their
color or place of birth.
Mr. Michel's remarks were well received,
and he was followed by Mr. Firmin and
Mr. Lazarus, who reiterated the same
points, and were loudly applauded.
At the main stand, on the conclusion of
Governor Warmoth's remarks, Mr. Percy
Roberts addressed those who remained. He
paid the highest compliments to the Gov
ernor, and indicated how the people of the
State could protect and maintain them
selves by following his advice.
The meefing then adjourned.
Academy of Music.
The raro combination of talent eenrteing
in two performers at the Academy of Music,
Sargent, the illusionist, and Davies the
ventriloquist, has never been equaled bn
the boards of the theatre. Mr. Sargent ap
pears to do numerous things which human
hands can not perform. He cannot take
out of an empty hat five bushels of trunks,
balls, goblets aud paper, but the audience
think ho does, and then the egg, orange
and lemon trick is all a deception. Yet
the pleasure in this ctfse is greater in being
cheated than to cheat-) The ventriloquism
of Mr. Dayies is incomparably better than
any similar exhibition ever witnessed here.
The voices of the little folks are so natural
that it does not seem possible that they all
emanate' from one person. As.a ventrilo
quist Mr. Davies stands unrivaled. We
are glad to notice that the audience is sour
posed largely of ladies, who are delighted
with tho ventriloquial colloquies, aud the
ventriloqual singing. Tho usual perform
ance this evening. To morrow noon, first
matinee of the season.
the
List of Supervisors Appoinicd by
United States Circuit Court.
Assumption—J. B. Whittington, Liberal,
vice A. J. Esheveria.
Bienville-—Dr. D. E. Egan, Democrat.
Calcasieu—B.' F. Shattuck, Republican,
David J. Reid, Democrat.
Cameron—Ursin Primeaux, Democrat.
Catahoula—Lewis Spencer. Democrat.
Concordia—G Spencer Alayo, Democrat.
Caldwell—Jacob Humble, Democrat,
De Soto—J. C. Moncure, Democrat.
Franklin—J. C. Corkern, Democrat.
Lafourche—James White, Democrat.
Orleans—Second ward, George P. Chil
dress, Democrat, vice P. B. Leeds : fourth
ward, S W. Scott, Democrat, vice T. W.
Collena, Jr.; ninth ward, M. J. jfoutz. Demo
crat, vice J. AI. Kinsella: tenth ward, Thomas
AlcLaughlin, Democrat, vice William A.
Weils; eleventh ward, C. L. Pitcher, Demo
crat, vice T. E. Cranmer.
Jefferson (left bank)—Timothy -Kylly, Re
publican; William J. MtCuue, Democrat.
Livingston—E. A. Stearns, Democrat, vice
Simpson Kemp,
Red River—P. E. Roche, Renubliean, vice
A. O. P. Pickens;. C. D. BuHoek, Demo
crat.
Richland—C. II. Brasliear, Democrat.
St. Bernard—Leopold Guichard, Jr., Re
publican; Esteve NunCz, Democrat.
Tangipahoa—James B. Wands, Repub
lican; J. F. Kent, Democrat.
Pointe Coupee—Alcide Bouanchaud, Re-.
publican; M Thompson, Democrat.
Winn—A. C. Banks, Republican; Daniel
Kelly, Democrat.
Louisville and. Portland Canal.
This is a speciaLto the St. Louis Repub
li.can:
Washington, September 2.—Justice Mil
ler, of the United States Supreme Court, in
granting au injunction restraining the Louis
ville and Portland Canal Company from in
terfering with-tne work on the canal, held
that the president and directors of the com
pany were trustees for the benefit of the
United States and of the public in the use
of canals and of the holders of the bonds of
the company contracted tor its enlarge
ment; that bondholders had a lien on the
tolls of the canal- for the security of their
debt aud interest, and that the United
States, in making the appropriation during
the last eession of Congress of $30(3,000, did
not make it a condition that the fol Is should
be reduced to five cents a ton, and it 'they
had, such condition would be void, as
taking private property for public use
without due compensation. Tne judge
therefore enjoined the president and direc
tors from interfering with the progress of
the work, which was for the benefit ot all
parties, and could not affect the bondhoid
ers.
The Attakapas Register says:
Among the colored people of this parish
prevails a general desire fo become prop
erty holders. They should be encouraged.
Sell them small homesteads, and they will
remain stationary, aud the cry for'more
labor will soon become obsolete. If they
are compelled to go from pillar to post
year after year they will be unth;iftv,
careless and wandering laborers,
TELEGRAPH.
LATEST SEWS f ROM ALL FOISTS
ALECK STEPHENS TO GMT
THE E3IPER0RS AT BERLIN
THUNDER STORM IN ENGLAND
PACIFIC MAil STEAMSHIP BURNED
NINETEEN PERSONS PERISH
THE' STRAIGHT-OUT CONVENTION
CHARLES OTOXOR DECLINES
VY LOUISIANA PROTEST
BOLTING FROM THE BOLTERS
STATE CONVENTIONS IN NEW YORK
Liberals ami Democrats Unite
KANSAS REPUBLICAN CONVENTION
Hu EG BY AN AEMED MOB
LOUIS VILLE.
The Straight-Outs—Charles O'Conor De
ciines—!\o Other Nomination Made—
Louisiana Delegation Withdraws—
Bolting from the Bolters—The Louis
iana Document—Adjournment—Blass
Meeting Afterward—Telegram from
John tjuincy Adams.
Locisvillf, September 5.—The positive
refusal of O'Conor to accept the nomina
tion created a profound sensation, but was
applauded behind the ropes. A motion to
clear the gallery was hissed and with
drawn. The president restored order by
refusing to recognize any speaker until all
the delegates resumed their seats.
New York, September 5.—The World's
Louisville special says to-day's programme
is to push Adams up to the first yilace, and
nominate Lyons or Edgerton for YicoT tesi
dent.
LoursviLr.E. September 5.—It is current
talk that if O'Conor persists iu refusing to
stand. Adams takes the first place on the
ticket.
A squabble is progressing over tho Vice
Presidency
Air. Kelly, of Louisiana, road a communi
cation justifying the withdrawal of the Lou
isiana delegation from the convention.
Air. Good left, of Kentucky, offered reso
lutions in effect against any"nomination.
The convention
The convention adjourned without nomi
nating any one in O'Conor's stead.
The following is the communication in
full which was presented by the Louisiana
delegation to the National Democratic Con
vention:
As representatives' of the Democracy of
the State of Louisiana, the solemn duty is
imposed upon us at this moment of votins
unanimously for Charles O'Conor as the
candidate of the Democratio party for
President, and for John QYtincy Adams for
Vice President. o
We believe that we reprosept, so far as
individual opinion can rcpres°ent in the
aggregate of a political body, the true
principles of republican government.
It came on us as t-.n inspiration that
Charles O'Conor and John Quincy Adams
mfoht save, the Republic.
O'Conor has refused to be our standard
bearer. History must record his reasons.
We believe him to be a citizen eminently
pure and devoted to the republican form
of government as contemplated by Jeffer
son and by Jackson, and without ostenta
tion when occasion required heroism iu the
maintenance of those principles.
It is with profound regret that we have
heard epithets applied to him bv members
of this convention, since his absolute de
clination has been made known, which could
only be applied to the basest of men. Hy
pocrisy and cowardice were attributed to
him.
We believe that the last hope of the re
public rested with this convention. To us,
it is a matter of utter indifference whether
Grant or Greeley succeeds.
It is with sad hearts we sec the death of
democratic principles and republican gov
ernment.
Let us pray to God that the impending
revolution may be without bloodshed.
We came here in a spirit of fraternity, and
in that spirit we part from the majority of
you. . ,
The convention, before the denunciations
of O'Conor were uttered, had not, in our
opinion, exhausted all becoming means of
jirovailing on him to ' accept tho distin
guished honor tendered him.
Gentlemen, we leave you with the pain
ful conviction that w r e can not any longer
serve our common country, our State or onr
principles by remaining with you.
I). SCULLY',
E. C. KELLY',
J. II. LAIR,
On behalf of the delegation from Louisiana.
Immediately after the adjournment of
the convention the delegates reassembled
as a mass meeting, with S. J. Bayard, of
New Jersey, in the chair.
Mark Al. Popieroy, Galitrdy Weems, of
Georgia, and others made speeches.
A telegram was read Wbm Atlanta an
nouncing great enthusiasm over the action
of the convention.
1 The following telegram was also read:
• Quincy, Mass., September 12, 1872.
To Colonel Blanton Duncan, Louisville:
I will gladly 6erve as Vice President with
O'Conor, but will accept nothing else.
.O'Conor must positively stand. '
john Quincy adams.
The following is Goodlet's resolution in
full:
Resohed. That it is the sense of this
convention that Charles O'Conor, hav
w fully and heartily approved of
the objects and purposes ot this con
vention, and having been unanimously
nominated for President, and John Quincy
Adams, of Alassachusetts, for Y'iee Presi
dent, that tho delegates of the Democratic
party here assembled are unwilling to
make other nominations in their stead, and
that the Democratic party will give them,
in any event, their undivided support.
The convention refused to allow Duncan
to cast the vote for Maryland and Texas.
Goodlet's resolution was adopted—yeas 554,
nays 30. Alter the usual complimentary
resolutions the convention adjourned sine
die. » *
Another telegram from Charles O'Conor
is said to have been received here, in which
he further reiterates his determination not
to a'eeept the candidacy so-urgently pressed
Upon him.
S"iue delegates still adhere to tho belief
that he Will consent to stand after he shall
have had consultations with the members
of the convention, heard .their arguments
and had time to reflect fully upon the rea
sons why he should accept.
Others are despondent, and now feel con
vinced thaUO'Conor's sensitive nature is so
adverse to the rough and tumble of poli
ties—so shocking from its ciamors and
calumnies. It is also stated that in tele
grams already sent by him to the conven
tion are expressions of a mind unalterably
made up. ®
The committee of eight, appointed by the j
convention to inform Charles ©'Conor and |
L Q. Adams of their nomination, will nice*
aa early day in New Y'ork.
SYRACUSE,
Democratic,*'"!. Conventions- Di
vision of the Offices— Nominations for
Governor aud Congressman at Large.
_Fn.3t Dispatch.]
Syracuse, September 5.— it ; s trne ftrn n_
understood that the conference commiuees
o, the Democratio and Liberal parties have
agreed upon a division of offices, the Libe
rals to have Lieutenant Governor and pris
on inspector: the balance of the State
:spector,
ticket to be Democratic.
* [Second Dispatch.]
Si RACtrsE. September 5.—The Democratic
State Convention nominated Mr. Kernan
lor Governor and S. S. Cox for Con»resa
man at targe.
WASIU\GTOiN.
Aleck Stephens on ihe Ka-Klux Prison
ers at Aiimuy—Letter to President
Grant—Reduction ol Spanish Customs
Fines.
W ashington, September 5.—Alexander
H. Stephens, vice president of the Southern
Confederacy, has addressed a letter to the
1 resident, deploring, in this enlightened age,
the retention, at Albany, of the prisoners
convicted under the Ku-Klux law. He pro
ceeds, at much length, to give his opinion
on .he Subject, aud believing that the pun
ishment already suffered has condoned to
some extent tor past offenses, earnestly en
treats tne President to extend to all the ex
ecutive clemency prayed for by Gerritt
bmnh m the cafe of three, and further rec
ommended by the chief of the secret service
division.
Ihe magnanimityof such an exorcise of
the pardoning power, now that the govern
ment ua8 shown.itself capable of suppress
ing al. kinds of disorders iu the ouoe insur
re £- l ? n , ary ®.fol ea ; would be akin to that
which has heretofore recommended general
amnestv.
Tho State department? has received ia
Iorination from Alinister Sickles to the
effect that the Secretary of the Spanish
Tieaeury has authorized the customs
a p^ « r '*^ 08 * :0 re< luce to $2 the amount
ot nna that may be imposed on
masters of vessels for mere irregularities of
form or expression not affecting the
purpose of the document that may bo
found on ships' manifests, and that the
numerous reclamations pending on the
twenty-sixth of Alay laBt, the date of this
regulation, have been decided in conformity
therewith. With respect to port dues, the
parties interested, in conjunction with the
•merchants and shippers at Barcelona, have
their remedy at law, by which they may
seek exemption from the charges.
NEW YORK,
Monetary—Signor Mario Arrived—Soils of
the Adams—Greeley Goins to Cincin
nati—Ne-,v President of Northern Pncl
■lie.
Nkw Y'ork, September 5.—Arrived—
Steamers Ariadne, Regulator and Greece.
Arrived out—Australia.
Sixes of 188! 11516; five-twenties of 1862,
114; 1864, 114; 1.865, 114%; now m%{
1867, 113Vi;. 1868, 113%; new fives 111; ten
forties 108. Tennessee sixes 73%; new
73%: Y'irginjasixes 47, new 51, consols 50,
deferred 15; Louisiana sixes 50, new 45,
levee sixes 60, eights 70; Alabama eights 82,
fives 56; Georgia sixes 70, sevens 85; North
Carolinas 32; new 20 K, special tax II;
South Carolinas 50, new 23, April and Oc
tober 21.
Signor Mario, the celebrated tenor who
is to appear with - Patti, arrived bv the
steamer Russia yesterday.
0 John Quincy and Charles Francis, sons
of Charles Francis Adams, met here last
night, a nd proceeded to Boston. The latter
came on a yachting expedition; the former
came from the West.
Greeley is going to visit Cincinnati after
the, Maine election.
John Gregory Smith has resigned the
presidency of the Northern Pacific railroad,
and George YV. Cass, recently president ot
the Pittsburg, Fort Wayne and Chicago
line, has been elected to succeed him.
POREIGN.
Congress of International Society—Ad
miration of Heroism—French Common*
ists and Condemned Criminals—Thun
der Storm—Severnl Lives Lost-Spnn
s«h Loan from Paris Bankers—PaclSc
Mail Stenmship Burned in Japan
Nineteen Lives Lost-Mormon Ilmi
grqr.ts from England — Grand Duke
Atexi-t.
The Hague, Septembers, Evening.—The
congress of the -International Society held
their first public sitting this morning.
A resolution was introduced expressing
in the name of the w orking classes ef the
world the admiration for the heroism of tho
champions who have fallen in the battles
for the people's rights, and the greeting
with tho hope of freedom to all the people
Still in chains.
The resolution, was unanimously adopted.
The president of the congress, in a violent
speech, denounced General Troehu as a
traitor to bis country, and .called Jules
Favre a wretch.
The report that the congress had refused
to verify the credentials of twelve delegates
from New York is not confirmed.
A largo number of French Communists
have been attracted hither by the'meeting
of the general congress of' tho Interna
tionals. It is stated, also, that a number otP
condemned criminals are present incognito.
London, September 5.—A heavy thunder
storm occurred yesterday at Bolton, Lan
cashire, causing the loss of severar lives
and doing much damage to crops.
. The Telegraph says that the general arbi
tration has reached no definite decision.
Paris, September 5.—There was no popu
lar demonstration here over the anniver
sary of the declaration of the republic.
Troops are kept under arms as a precau
tionary measure.
There is no indication of any C'ariist move
ment on the frontiers of Spain.
Carlists are leaving for Switzerland and
North France.
The Spanish government is negotiating
for a loan of 500,000,000 franca from Paris
backers.
Nagasaki, Japan, August31.—The Pacific
Mail steamship America arrived here on
the morning of the twenty-fourth instant.
At eleven o'clock .the same night tho freight
deck took fire, and immediately the whole
ship was enveloped in flames, defying all
efforts to extinguish them.
The vessel burned all night and was
totally destroyed, together with the Hong
Kong mails, freight, and passengers' and
officers' luggage. The rapid progress of
the fire forced all hands to jump into the
water, there not being time even to lower
the boats.
Six CbinauTen were burned or drowned,
and ten, Chinamen, the engineers, store
keeper, steerage* watchman and cook are
missing. The treasure which was on board
will be recovered. The cause of the fire is.
unknown.
London. September 5.—A special dispatch
by telegraph from Nagasaki, Japan, says:
Nineteen lives were lost by the burning of
the steanrthip America.
London, September 5.—A dispatch from,
The Hague to the Daily Nevis says: Tho
verification of credential's by the C'ongresst
of Internatiofials has been concluded.
Twelve delegates from New York, adher
ents of" the VVoodhuil free love sections,
were refused scats in the Congress after- au
animated discussion of their claims.
The steamship Minnesota, which sailed
from" Liverpool for New York yesterday,
took ouf 600 Mormon emegrants "for L'tah,
the majority of them were Scandinavians.
The steamship Glamorgan, the pioneer
vessel of the new steam line between Car
diff and New York, was launched at Rem.
frew, Scotland, yesterday. The chriatenip g
r Gft>NTINCtl> OX EIGHTS FAQ8.1

xml | txt