OCR Interpretation


New Orleans Republican. [volume] (New Orleans, La) 1867-1878, December 28, 1872, Image 3

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016555/1872-12-28/ed-1/seq-3/

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States, shall be held by the government of
Austria and Hangary to be American citi
&en&, and shall be treated as suoh.
Reciprocally, eitizeus of the United States
«f America who have resided in the territo
ries of the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy un
toterruptedly at least live years, and during
*uek residence have become naturalized
•Jtizens of the Austro Hungarian Monarchy,
■shall be held by the United States to be
tertizens of the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy,
«nd shall be treated as such.
The declaration of an intention to become
a citizen of the one or the other country has
wot for either party the effect of natural iza
'l'toa.
ARTICLE H.
& naturalized citizen of tpe one party, on
(return to the territory of the other party,
remains liable to trial and punishment for
«n action punishable by the laws of his
original country committed before his emi
gration, saving always the limitation estab
lished by the laws of his original country
»nd any other remission of Liability to pun
ishment.
In particular, a former citizen of the
Austro-Hungarian Monarchy, who, under
the tiist article, is to be held as an American
•itir.en, is liable, to trial and punishment, ac
cording to the laws i f Austro-Hungary, for
non fulfillment of military duty:
l. If he has emigrated, after having
keen drafted at, the time of conscription,
sad thus having become enrolled as a
recruit for service in the standing army.
t. If lie has emigrated while he stood
'a service under the flag, or had a leave
vf absence only for a limited time.
3. If, having a leave of absence for an
unlimited time, or belonging to the reserve
«*• to the militia, he has emigrated after
saving received a call into service, or after
a public proclamation requiring his appear
ance, or after war has broken out.
On the other hand, a former citizen of the
Austro-Hungarian Monarchy naturalized in
the United States, who by or after his
emigration has transgressed the legal pro
visions on military duty by any acts or
omissions oilier than those above enumer
ated in the clauses numbered one, two and
three, can, on his return to his original
wintry, neither he held subsequently to
military service nor remain liable, to trial
and punishment for the non-fulfillment of
ktis military duty.
ARTICLE m.
The convention for the mutual delivery
of criminals, fugitives from justice, eon
eluded on the third of July, 1856, between
®ie government of the United States of
America on the one part and the Austro
Hungarian Monarchy on the other part, as
well as the additional convention, signed
tbe eighth of May, 1848, to the treaty of
•ommeroc and navigation concluded be
tween the said governments on the twenty
seventh of August, 1829, and especially the
stipulations of Article IV. of the said ad
ditional convention concerning the delivery
of the deserters from the ships of war anil
znorohant vessels remain in force without
aha-nge.
AMICUS IT.
The emigrant from the one state, who,
according to Article I. is to be held as a
•Risen of the other state, 6hall not, on his
return to bia original country, be con
strained to resume his former citizenship;
yet if he shall of his own accord re-aoquire
it, and renounce the oitizensliip obtained
by naturalization, such a renunciation is
allowable, and no fixed period of residence
shall be required for the recognition of his
recovery of citizenship in his original coun
ty
ARTICLE V.
The present convention shall go into ef
fect immediately on the exchange of ratifi
cations, and shall continue in force ten
years. It neither party shall have given to
yhe other six months' previous notice of its
Intention then to terminate tne same, it
-ahull further remain in force until the end
of twelve months after either of the con
tracting parties shall have given notice t-o
tbe other of such intention.
ARTICLE VI.
The present convention shall be ratified
by the President of the United States, by
and with the consent of tbe Senate oi the.
United Slates, and by his Majesty the Em
peror of Austria, etc., King of Hungary,
with the constitutional consent of the two
legislatures of the Austro-Hungarian Mon
archy, and the ratifications shall be ex
changed at Vienna within twelve mouths
from the date hereof.
In faith whereof the plenipotentiaries
have signed this convention as well in Ger
man as in English, and have thereto afixed
Ehetr seals.
Done at Vienna the twentieth day of Sep
tember, in the year of our Lord one thous
and eight hundred and seventy, in the nine
ty-fifth year of the Independence of the
United States of America, am! in the twen
ty-second year of the reign of his imperial
and royal Apostolic Majesty.
JOHN JAY.
BE USX.
And whereas the said convention has
been duly ratified on both parts, and the
ifcspooti ve ratifications of the same were ex
banged at Vienna, on the fourteenth day
of July, 1871, by John Jay, Envoy Extraor
dinary and Minister Plenipotentiary of the
United States, and Count Frederick Ferdi
nand de Beust, Minister for Foreign Affairs
•f the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy, etc.,
oo the part of their respective governments:
Now, therefore, be it known that I,
Ulysses 8. Grant, President of the United
States of Amerioa, have oansed the said
-sonvention to be made public, to the end
♦hat the same, and every clause and article
thereof, may be observed and fulfilled with
good faitli by the United States and the citi
zens thereof.
In witness whereof, I have hereunto set
my hand and caused the seal of the United
States to be affixed.
Done at the city of Washington this first
das of August, in the year of our Lord one
thousand eight hundred and seventv-que,
unci of the Independence of the United
yttttes of America the ninety-sixth.
U. S. GRANT.
By the President:
Ua.mii.ton Fish, Secretary ol State.
of
A PROCLAMATION.
»r THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES
OF AMERICA.
Treaty between the United States of Amer
ica and the Kingdom of Italy. Commerce
and navigation. Signed February 2C,
1ST; ratified April 29, 1871; ratifications
exchanged November 18,1871; proclaimed
November 23, 1871.
Whereas, A treaty of commerce and
savigatiou between the United States of
America and his majesty the King of Italy
was concluded and signed by their respec
tive plenipotentiaries, at the city of Flo
ee-nce, on the twenty-sixth day of February,
•no thousand eight hundred and seventy
one, which treaty, being in the English and
Italian languages, is word for word as fol
low*
Treaty of commerce and navigation he.
tween the United States and the KiEgdom
of Italy.
The United States of America and his
majesty the King of Italy, desiring to ex
tend aud facilitate the relations of com
merce and navigation between tho two
countries, have determined to conclude a
treaty for that purpose, and have named as
their respective plenipotentiaries: Tho
United States of Amerioa. George Perkins
Marsh, their Envoy Extraordinary and Min
ister Plenipotentiary near his msjesty the
King of Italy; and his majesty the King of
Italy, the Noble Emilio Visconti Vi uo.-ta,
Grand Cordon of his Orders of the Saints
Maurice and Lazarus, and of the Crown of
Italy, Deputy in Parliament, and his ^Min
ister Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs;
aud the said' plenipotentiaries haying ex
changed their full powers, found in good
and One form, have oonoluded and signed
the following articles:
ARTICLE .
There shall be between the territories of
the high contracting parties a reciprocal
liberty of commerce and navigation.
Italian citizens in the United States, and
titizons of the United States in Italy, shall
mutually have liberty to enter with their
ships and cargoes all the ports of the United
States and of Italy respectively, which may
be open to foreign commerce. They 6hall
also have liberty to sojourn and reside in
ail parts whatever of said territories. They
sliail enjoy, respectively, within the States
and possessions of each party, the same
rights, privileges, favors, immunities and
exemptions for their commerce and naviga
tion as the natives of the oountry wherein
they reside, without paying other or higher
duties or charges than are paid by tbe na
tives, on condition of their submitting to
the laws and ordinances there prevailing.
War vessels of the two powers shall re
ceive in their respective ports the treatment
of those of the most fa vored cations.
ARTICLE II.
The citizens of each of the high contraet
mg parties shall have liberty to travel in
the States and territories of the other, to
carry on trade, wholesale and retail, to hire
and occupy houses and warehouses, to em
ploy agents of them choice, and generally
to do any thing incident to or necessary for
trade, upon tlxe same terms as the natives
of the country, submitting themselves to
the Laws there established.
ARTICLE IIL
The citizens of each of the high contracting
parties shall receive, in the States and terri
toriee ot the other, the most constant protec
tion and security tor their persons and
property, and shall enjoy in this respect
the same rights and privileges as are or
shall be granted to the natives, on their sub
mitting themselves to the conditions im
posed upon the natives.
They shall, however be exempt in their
respective territories f rom compulsory mil
itary service, either on land or sea, in the
regular forces, or in the national guard, or
in the, militia They shall likewise be exempt
from any judicial or municipal office, and
from any contribution whatever, in kind
or in money, to be levied ic compensation
for personal services.
ARTICLE IV.
The citizens of neither of the contracting
parties shall bo liable, in the States or Ter
ritories of the other, to any embargo, nor
shall they be detained with their vessels,
cargoes, merchandise, or effects, for any
military expedition, nor for any public or
private purpose whatsoever, without allow
ing to those interested a sufficient indemni
fication previously agreed upon when pos
sible.
ARTICLE T.
The high contracting parties agree that
whatever kind of produce, manufactures, or
merchandise of any foreign oountry can be
from time to time lawfully imported into
the United States, in their own vessels,
stay also be imported in Italian vessels;
that no other or higher duties upon the
tonnage of the vessel or her cargo shall be
levied and collected, whether the imports
tion be marie in vessels of the one country
or of the other; and, in like manner, that
whatsoever kind of produce, manutactures,
or merchandise of any foreign country can
be from time to time lawfully imported into
Italy in its own vessels, may be also im
ported in vessels ©f the United States, and
that no higher or other duties upon the ton
nage of the vessel of her cargo shall be
levied and collected, whether the importa
tion be made in vessels- of the one oountry
or of the other; and they further agree that
whatever may be lawfully exported and re
exported from the one oountry, in its own
vessels, to any foreign country, may in the
like manner be exported or re-exported in
the vessels of the other country, and the
same bounties, duties, and drawbacks, shall
be allowed and collected, whether such ex
portation or re-exportation be made in ves
sels ot tne vniwMi mates or of Italy.
ARTICLE VI.
No higher of other duties shall be imposed
on the importation into the United States
of auy articles, the produce or manufactures
of Italy, and no higher or other duties shall
be imposed on the importation into Italy of
any articles, the prodnoc or manufactures
of the United States, than are or shall be
payable on the iike articles, being the pro
duce or the manufactures of any other for
eign country; nor shall any other or higher
duties or charges be imposed, in either of
the two countries, on the exportation of any
articles to the United States or to Italy, re
spectively, than suoh as are payable on the
exportation of tbe like articles to any for
eign country; nor shall any prohibition bo
imposed on the importation or the exporta
tion of any articles, the produce or manu
factures of the United States or of Italy, to
or from the territories of the United States,
or to or from the territories of Italy, which
shall not equally extend to all other nations.
ARTICLE VII,
Vessels of the United 8tates arriving at a
f ort of Italy and, reciprocally, vessels of
taly arriving at a port of the United
States may proceed to any other port of
the same country, and may there discharge
such part of their original cargoes as may
not have been discharged at the port where
they first arrived. It is, however, mater
s'ood and agreed that nothing contained in
this article shall apply to the coastwise
navigation, which each of the two contract
ing parties reserves exclusively to itself.
ARTICLE VIII.
The following shall be exempt from pay
ing tonnage, anchorage and clearance
duties in the respective ports :
1. Vessels entering iu ballast and leav
ing again in ballast from whatever port
they may come.
2. Vessels passing from a port of either of
the two states into one or more ports of the
•same state, therein to discharge a part or
all of their cargo, or take in or complete
their cargo, whenever they shall furnish
proof of having already paid the aforesaid
duties.
3. Loaded vessels entering a port either
voluntarily or forced from stress of weath
er, and leaving it without having disposed
of the whole or part of their cargoes, or
having therein completed their cargoes.
No vessel of the one country, which may
be compelled to enter a port of the other,
shall be regarded as engaging in trade if it
merely breaks bulk for repairs, transfers
her cargo to another vessel on account of
unseawortliiness, purchases stores, or sells
damaged goods tor re-exportation. It is,
however, understood that all portions of
such damaged goods destined to be sold for
internal consumption shall be liable to the
payment of custom dues.
ARTICLE IX.
When any vessel belonging .to the citizens
of either of tbe contracting parties shall be
wrecked, foundered, or shall softer any
damage, on the coasts or within the do
minions of the other, there shall be given
to it all assistance and protection in the
same manner which is usual and oustomary
with the vessels of the nation where the
damage happens, jiermitting them to un
load the said vessel, it necessary, of its
merchandise aud effects, and to reload the
same, or part thereof, paying no duties
whatsoever but suoh as shall be due upon
the articles left fur consumption.
ARTICLE x.
Vessete of either of the eon trading par
ties shall have liberty, within the territories
and dominions of tne other, to complete
their crew, in order to oontiuue their voy
age, with sailors articled in the oountry,
provided they submit to the local regula
tions and their enrollment be voluntary.
ARTICLE XI.
All ships, merchandise, and effects belong
ing to the citizens of one of the contracting
parties, which may be captured by pirates,
whether within the limits of its jurisdiction
or on the high seas, and may be carried or
found in the rivers, roads, bays, ports or
domaius of the other, shall be delivered tip
to tbe owners, they proving, in due and
proper form, their rights before the com
petent tribunals ; it being well understood
that the claim should be made within the
term of one year, by the parties themselves,
their attorneys, or agents of the respective
governments.
ARTICLE XIL
The high contracting par ties agree that,
in the unfortunate event of a war between
them, the private property of their respect
ive citizens and subjects, with tho exeep
tion oi'contraband of war. shall be exempt
from capture or seizure, on the high seas or
elsewhere, by the ar ced vessels or by the
military forces of either party; it being un
derstood that this exemption shall not ex
tend to vessels and their cargoes which may
attempt to enter a port blockaded by the
naval ioroes of either party.
ARTICLE XIII.
The high contracting parties having
agreed that a state of war between one of
them and a third power shall not, except in
cases of blockade and contraband of war,
affect the neutral oommerco of tbe other,
and being desirous of removing every un
certainty which may hitherto have arisen
respecting that whioh, upon principles ©f
fairness and justice, ought to constitute a
legal blockade, they hereby expressly de
clare that suoh places only shall be consid
ered blockaded as shall be aotualiy Invest
e I by naval forces capable of preventing
tbe entry of neutrals, aud so stationed as
to create an evident danger on their part to
attempt it.
ARTICLE XIV.
And whereas it frequently happens that
vessels sail for a port or place belonging to
an enemy without knowing the same is be
seiged, blockaded, or invested, it is agreed
that every vessel so circumstanced may be
turned away from such port or place, but
shall not be detained, nor shall any part of
her cargo, if not contraband of war, be con
fiscated, unless, alter a warning of such
blockade-or investment from an officer com
inanding a vessel of the blockading forces,
by an indorsement of such officer on the
papers of the vessel, mentioning the date
and the lattitude and longitude where such
indorsement was made, she shall again at
tempt to enter; but she shall be permitted
to go to any other port or place she shall
think proper. Nop shall any vessel of either,
that may have entered into such port before
tbe same was aotualiy beseiged, blockaded,
or invested by the other, be restrained from
quitting such place with her cargo, nor,
if found therein after ths reduction and
surrender, shall such vessel or her
cargo be liable to confiscation, but they
shall be restored to the owners thereof; and
it any vessel, having thus entered any por
before the blockade took place, shall take
on board a cargo after the blockade be es
tablished, she shall be subject to being
warned by the blookadiug forces to return
to the port blockaded and discharge the
said cargo, and if, alter receiving the said
warning, the vessel shall persist in goin t
ont with the cargo, she shall be liable to
the same oonsequenoes as a vessel attempt
ing to enter a blockaded port after being
warned off by the blockading fora*.
article xv.
The liberty of navigation and commerce
secured to neutrals by the stipulations-of
this treaty shall extend to ail kinds of mer
chandise, excepting those orsly which are
distinguished by the name of contraband of
war. And, in order to remove all causes of
doubt and misunderstanding upon this sub
jeet, the contracting parties expressly agree
and declare that the following articles, and
no others, shall be considered as compre
hended under this denomination :
1. Cannons, mortars, howitzers, swivels
blunderbusses, muskets, tusees, rifles, car
bines, pistols, pikes, swords, sabres, lanc<
spears, halberds, bombs, grenades, powder,
matches, balls, and all other things belong
ing to, and expressly manufactured for, the
use of these arms.
2. Infantry belts, implements of war and
defensive weapons, clothe* out or made up
in a military form and for a military use.
3. Cavalry belts, war saddles and bol
sters.
4. And generally all kinds of arms and
instruments of iron, steel, brass, and cop
per, or of any o-thef materials manufac
tured, prepared, and tomne-4 expressly
make war by sea or land.
article xvt.
ft shall tie lawful for the citizens of the
United States, and for the subjects of the
Kingdom of Italy, to sail with their ships
with all manner of liberty and security, no
distinction being made who are the pro
prietors of the merchandise laden thereon,
from any port to the places of those who
now are, or hereafter shall be, at enmity
with either of the contracting parties, ft
shall likewise be lawful for the citizen*
aforesaid to sail with the ships and mer
chandise before mentioned, and to trade
with the same liberty and security from the
places, ports, and havens of those who are
enemies of both or either party without any
opposition or disturbance whatever, not
only directly from tho places of the enemy
before mentioned to neutral places, but also
from one place belonging to an enemy to an
other place belonging to an enemy, whether
they be under the jurisdiction of one power
or under several; and it is hereby stipulated
that free ships shall also give freedom to
goods, and that everything shall be deemed
to be free and exempt from capture which
shall be found on board the ships belonging
to the tytizens of either of the contracting
parties," although the whole lading or any
part thereof should appertain to the ene
mies of the other, contraband goods being
always excepted. It is also agreed, iu like
manner, that the same liberty be extended
to persons who are on board of a free ship;
and they shall not be taken out of that free
hip unless they are officers or soldiers, and
in the actual service of the enemy; pro
vided, however, and it is hereby agreed,
that the stipulations in this article con
tained, declaring that the flag shall cover
the property, shall be understood as apply
ing to those powers only who recognize this
principle, but if either of the two contract
iug parlies shall be at war with a third, and
the other neutral, the flag of the neutral
shall cover the property of enemies whose
governments acknowledge this principle,
and not of others.
ARTICLE XVI*.
All vessels sailing under the flag of the
United States, and tarnished with such pa
pers as their laws require, shall be regarded
iu Italy as vessels of the United States, and,
reciprocally, all vessels sailing under the
flag of Italy, and furnished with the papers
which the laws of Italy require, shall be
regarded in tho United States i» Italian
vessels.
article xvni.
In order to prevent all kinds of disorder
in the visiting and examination of the ships
and cargoes of both the contracting parties
on the high seas, they have agreed, mutu
ally, that whenever a vtastd of war shall
meet with a vessel not of war of the other
contracting party, the first shall remain at a
convenient distance, and may 6end its boat,
with two or three men only, in order to
exeoute the said examination of tho papers,
concerning tho owners hip and cargo of the
vessel, without causing tho least extortion,
violence or ill treatment; and it is expressly
agreed that the unarmed party shall in no
ease be required to go on board the examin
ing vossel for the purpose of exhibiting his
papers, or for any other purjirise whatever
ARTICLE XIX.
It is agreed that the stipulations oon<ained
iu the present treaty, relative to the visit
ing and examining of a vessel, shall apply
omy to those which sail without a convoy;
and when said vessels shall be under con
voy the verbal declaration of the com
mander of the convoy, on his word of honor,
that the vessels under his protection belong
to the nation whose flag he oanies, aud
when bound to an enemy's porl; that they
have no contraband goods on board, shah
be sufficient.
ARTICLE XX,
In order effectnally to provide for the
security of the citizens and subjects of the
contracting parties, it is agreed between
them that all commanders ot ships ot
war of each party, respectively, shall be
strictly enjoined to forbear from doing any
damage to, or committing any outrage
agaiuat, the citizens or subjects of the
other, or against their vessels or property;
and if^he said commanders shall act con
trary to this stipulation, they shall be se
verely punished, and made answerable in
their persons aud estates for tho satisfaction
and reparation of said damages, of what
ever nature they may bo.
ARTICLE XXI.
If by any fatality, which ©an not he ex
pected, and which may God avert, the two
contracting parties should be engaged iu a
war with each other, they have agreed and
do agree, now for then, that there shall be
allowed the term of six months to the mer
chants residing on the coasts and in the
ports oi each other, and the term of one
year to those who dwell in the interior, to
arrange their business and transport their
effects wherever they picase, with the safe
conduct necessary to protect them and their
property, until they arrive at the porta des
ignated for tin ir embarkation. And sli wo
men and chiidi>n, scholars of every faculty,
cultivators of the earth, artisans, mechan
ios, manufacturers, and fi.-kennrn, unarmed
and inha itiog the unfortified towns, villa
ges, or places, and, in gem ral, all others
whose occupations are for the common sub
sistence and benefit of mankind, shall be
allowed to continue fair respective employ
ments and shad not be molested in their
persons, Qor shall their goods or houses he
burnt or otherwise destroyed, nor their
flelds wasted by the armed force of the
belligerent in whose power, by the events
of war, they may happ-n to fall; but, if it
be necessary that anything should be taken
from them for the u.-e of such belligerent,
the same shall be paid for al a reasonable
price.
And it is declared that neither the pre
tence that war dissolves treaties, nor any
other whatever, shall be considered as an
nulling or suspending this «rtaolo; but, pg
! the contrary, that tlie state of war
precisely that for which it is provided, and
during which its provisions are to be sacred
ly observed as the most acknowledged obli
gations in the law of nations.
ARTICLE XXIL
The citizens of each of the conkractin
parties shall have power to dispose ef their
personal goods within the jurisdiction of
the other, bv sale, donation, testament, or
otherwise, and their representatives, being
citizens ot the other party, shall succeed to
their personal goods, whether by testament
or ab intesiato, and they may take {losses
siou thereof, either by themselves or others
acting for them, ami dispose of them at
their will, paying such dues only as the in
habitants of the country wherein suoh
goods are shall be subject to pay in like
cases.
As fop the ease of real estate, the citizens
and subjects of the two contracting parties
shall be treated on tbe footing of the tuost
favored nation.
ARTICLE XXIIL
Tha citizens of either party shall have
free access to the courts ol justice, in order
to maintain and defend their own rights
without any other conditions, restrictions
or taxes than such as are imposed upon the
natives. They shall, therefore, be free to
employ, in defense of their rights, such ad
vocates, solicitors, notaries, agents, and fac
tors as they may judge proper, in ail their
trials at law; aud such citizens or agents
shall have free opportunity to lie present at
the decisions and sentences of the tribunals
in all cases which may concern them, and
likewise at the taking of all examinations
and evidences which may be exhibited in
the said trials.
ARTICLE xxir.
The United States of America and tho
Kingdom of Italy mutually engage not to
grant any particular favor to other Rations,
in respect to commerce and navigation,
which shall not immediately become com
mon to tho other party, w ho shall enjoy the
same freely, it tho concession was freely
made, or on allow ing the same compensa
tion if the ooneessiou wa* eouditionaL
ARTICLE XXV.
The present treaty shall continue in force
for five year* from the day of the exchange
of the ratification.-; and if, twelve months
befor the expiration of that period, neither
of the high contracting parties shall have
announced to the oilier, by an official noti
fication, its intention to terminate tbe said
treaty, it shall remain obligatory on both
parties one year beyond that time, and so on
until the expiration of the twelve months,
which will follow a siuiriar notification,
whatever may be the time wheu such noli
fioutiop shall he given.
RETICLE
The present treaty shall be approved and
ratified by his Majesty the King of Italy,
and by the President of tho United States,
by aud with the advice and oonesnt of the
Senate thereof, and the ratifications shall
be exchanged at Washington within twelve
months from the date hereof, or sooner if
possible.
Iu faith whereof fhe plenipotentiaries of
tho contracting parties have signed the
present treaty iu duplicate, in the English
and Italian languages, and thereto affixed
their respective seals.
Done at Florence, thus twenty-sixth day
of February, in the year of our Lord one
thousand eight hundred pud seventy-one.
GEORGE P. MARSH.
VISCONTI VENOSTA.
Aad whereas the said treaty has been
duly ratified on both parts, and the re
spective ratifications of the same w ere ex
changed at Washington on the eighteenth
instant:
Now, therefore, be it known that I, Ulya
ses S. Grunt, President of the United States
f America, have caused the said treaty to
he made public, to the end that the same,
and every clause and article thereof, may
he observed and fulfilled with good faith by
the United States and the citizens thereof.
In testimony whereof I have hereunto
t my hand, and caused the seal of the
United States to bo affixed.
Done at the city of Washington this
twenty-third day of November, iu tho year
of our Lord one thousand eight hundred
mid seventy-one, and of the Independence
of the United States of America tho ninety
sixth.
U. S. GRANT.
By the President:
Hamilton Fish.
Secretary of State.
A PROCLAMATION. v
r THE 4'UKSII.iK.NT OF TUB UNITED «TATKB
OF AMERICA.
Convention and protocol between (he United
Slates ol America and Sweden and Nor
way.—Naturalization.—Signed May 26,
1861); ratified December 17, 1870; Ex
changed June 14,1871; proclaimed Janu
ary 12, 1872.
Whereas, A convention and protocol be
tween tho United states of America and his
Majesty the King of Sweden ami Norway
tore concluded and signed by their respec
tive plenipotentiaries, at the city of
Stockholm, on the twenty-sixth day of May,
1809, which convention mid protocol as
amended by the Senate of t he United States,
and being in tho English and Swedish
languages, are word for word as follows:
The President of tho United States of
America and his Majesty the King of
wedon and Norway, led by the wish to
regulate the citizenship of those pets ■
ho emigrate from tho United States
America to Sweden and Norway, and thei;
dependencies and territories, -ami from
Sweden and Norway to the United S ates
of America, have resolved to treat on th,-i
subject, and have for that purpose ap
pointed Plenipotentiaries to conclude soon
ention, that is to say: The President of the
'cited States of Amerioa, Joseph 3. Bart
lett, Minister Resident, and his Majesty the
King of Sweden and Norway, Count Charles
Wachtmeiacer, Minister of (State for Foreign
Affairs; who have agreed to and signed the
following articles;
ARTICLE L
8i I irons of the United States of America
who have resided iu S weden or Norway for
a continuous period of at least rive years,
and during such residence have become and
are lawfully recognized as citizens of Nor
way or Sweden, -hall be held by tho gov
ernment. of tho United Stop's to be Swedish
or Norwegian citizens, aud shall be treated
as such.
Reciprocally, citizens of Sweden or Nor
way who have resided in the United States of
America for a oontiuuous period of at least
five years, and daring such residence have
become naturalized citizens of the United
States, shall be held by the government of
Sweden and Norway to be American oiti
zens, and shall be treated as such.
The declaration of an intention to become
a citizen of the one or the other oountry lias
not lor either party tho effect of citizenship
legally acquired.
ARTICLE EL
A recognized citizen of the one party, on
returning to the territory of tho other, re
mains liablo to trial and punishment for an
action punishable by tne lawn of his
original country- and committed before his
emigration, but not fur the emigration itself,
saving always the 'imitations established
by the laws of his original country and any
other remission of liabii ty to punish meat.
ARTICLE UL
If 3 , citizen of the one party, who has be
come a recognized citizen of the other
party, takes up his abode once more iu his
original country ami applies to lie resioreU
to ius former citizenship, tlm government
of tho last named country i- auth jiiaed to
receive him again os a citizen, on such con
ditions as the said government may think
proper.
ARTICLE rir.
The convention for the mutual delivery
of criminals, fugitives from justl -e, in cer
tain cases, oonci'idi d between the United
Stales on tho one part, and Sweden anti
Norway on the other part, the twenty-first
ot M irck, I860, remains in force without
change.
ARTICLE V,
The present con ren:ion shall go into ef
fect immediately on tin-exchange of ratifi
cations, and shall eon'i title in loioe !or ten
years. If neither party shall have given'
the other six months' previous notice of its
intention then to te.rmmaDe the same, i:
shall further remain in force untd the e- i
of tweive months after either of the con
tracting parties shall have given notice to
the other of suoh intention.
ARTICLE VL
'The present convention shall be SatiSed
by the President, by and with the ativiee
and consent of the Senate of the United
States, and by his Majesty the King of Swe
den and Norway; and' the iatifieations
shall be exchanged at Stockholm within
twenty-four months from the date hereof.
Iu taitk whereof the plenipotentiaries
have signed and sealed this convention.
Stockholm. May 26. 1869.
JOSEPH J. BARTLETT.
PROTOCOL.
DOSE AT STOCKHOLM, MAT 26, 1869.
The undersigned met to-day to sign the
convention agreed upon in conformity with
their respective full powers, relating to the
citizenship of those persons who emi
grate from the Uuited States of America
to Sweden and Norway, and from Sweden
and Norway to the Uuited States of Amer
ica; on which occasion the following ob
servations, more exactly defining aud ex
plaining the contents of this convention,
were entered in the following protocol:
1. Relating to the first aitsele of the con
vention.
It is understood that if a citizen of the
United States of America Las been dis
charged from his American citizenship, or,
on the other side, if a Sw ede or a Nor
wegian has been discharged from his Swed
ish or Norwegian citizenship, in the man
ner legally prescribed by the government
of his original country, and then iu the
other country in a rightful and perfectly
valid manner acquires citizenship, then an
additional five years' residence shall no
longer be required; but a person who has in
that manner been recognized as a citizen ol'
the other country shall, from the moment
thereof, bo held aud treated as a Swedish or
Norwegian citiz. n, and, reciprocally, as a
citi*en of the United States.
2. Relating to tho second article of the
convention.
If a former Swede or Norwegian, who,
under tho first article, is to bo held as an
adopted citizen of the United States of
America, has emigrated after he lias at
tained the age when he becomes liable to
military service, stud returns again to his
origiual country, it is agreed that he re
mains liable to trial and punishment for an
action punishable by the laws of his original
country and committed before his emigra
tion, but not for the aot of emigration it
self, unless thereby have been committed
any punishable fietiou against Sweden or
Norway, or against a Swedish or Norwegian
citi*en, such as non-fulfillment of military
service, or desertion from the military
force or from a ship, saving always the
limitation established by the laws of
the original country, and any other
remission of liability to punishment; and
that he can be held to fulfil, according to
the laws, his military servioe, or the remain
in" part thereof.
3. Relating to' the third ■article of the
convention.
It is further agreed that if a Swede or
Norwegian, who has become a naturalized
itizen of the United States, renews his
residence in Sweden or Norway without the
intent to return to America, he shall be held
by the government ol the United States to
have renounced his American citizenship.
The intent not to return to America may
be held to exist when the person so nut
tiralizod re-ides more than two years in
Sweden or Norway.
JOSEPH J. BARTLETT.
And whereas the said convention and
protocol a$ amended have been duly rati
fied oa both parts, and the respective rati
flontions of the same were exchanged at
Stockholm on the fourteenth day of June,
in tne year one thousand eight hundred
and seventy-on6, by €. C. Andrews, Min
ister Resident ot the Uuited States, and
Count C. Wachtmeister, Minister of State
for Foreign Affairs of his majesty the King
of S weden and Norway;
And whereas the Senate, by their resolu
tion o! the eighth instant (two-thirds of the
Senators present concurring), did advise
and consent to the said exchange, notwitk
standing said exchange whs delayed beyond
the time appointed therefor, and resolved
bnt the said exchange may be regarded as
valid as il it had taken place within the
line mentioned la the resolution of the
Senate on tbe subject, of the ninth of. De
Msiober, 1870:
Now, therefore, be it known that I,
C!y»8!#.S. Grant, President of the United
States of America, have caused the said
convention and protocol to be made public,
to the end that the same, and every clause
and article thereof, may ba observed and.
fulfilled with good faith by the United
States and tho cirizens thereof.
In witness whereof I have herennto set
my hand and caused the sea! of the United
States to be affixed.
Di no at the city of Washington this
twelfth day of January, in the year of our
Lord one thousand eight hundred and
nty two, and of the independence of
the United Slates of America the ninety
sixth.
U. S. GRANT.
By the President:
Hamilton Fisit.
Secretary of State.
A PROCLAMATION.
Bi r raB 'PRESIDENT OF THIS UNITED STATUS
OF AMERICA.
Convention between the United States of
America aud the United Suites of Mexico.
Extension ot the duration of tho Joint
Commin-iun fur Settlement of claims.
Signed April 19, 1871; ratified December
15, 1871; ratifications exchanged Febru
ary 8, 137:1; proclaimed February 8, 1872.
WfiwtKxs, A convention between tbe
united States of America and tho United
States of Mexico was concluded and signed
by their respective plenipotentiaries, at the
city of Mexico,, on the nineteenth day of
April, in tho year of our Lord one thousand
eight hundred and seventy one, for extend
ing the time limited by the convention be
tween the two countries oi the fourth of
July, 1868, for the termination of the pro
ceedings of the joint commission provided
for by the iatier instrument; which conven
tion, being iu the English aud Spanish ian
gmtties, is word for word as follows:
Whereas, A convention was concluded on
the fourth day of July, 1868, between the
Uuited Stall* of America and the United
States of Mexico, for the settlement
of outstanding claims that have origi
nated since tho signing ot tho treaty of
Guadalupe Hidalgo, on the second of Feb
ruary, 1848, by a mixed commission limited
to endure two years and six months from
the day ef the first meeting of tbe commis
sioners; and whereas doubts have arisen as
to the practicability of the business of the
said commission being concluded within
the period assigned:
The ITesident of the United States of
Amerioa and the President of tho Unit'd
States of Mexico aro desirous that the time
originally fixed for the duration of the said
commission should be extended, and to this
end have named plenipotentiaries to agree
upon tho best mode of effecting this object,
that is to say: The President of the Uuited
States of America, Thomas H. Nelson, ac
credited as Envoy Extraordinary and Min
ister Plenipotentiary of tho United States
of Amerioa to the M xiceu Republic; and the
President of the Uuited Slates of Mexico,
Manuel Izpiroz, Chief Clerk and in charge
of the Ministry of Foreign Relations of
tho United States of Mexico; who, alter
having presented their respective powers,
and finding them sufficient anil in dne lortn,
have agreed upon the following articles:
ARTICLE I.
Tbs high contracting parties agree that
the term os-igued in the convention of the
fourth of July, 1868, above referred'to, for
the doration of the said commission, shall
be extended for a time not exceeding i ne
year from the day when fin- functions of the
i commission would terminate according
to the convention referred to, or for a
shorter time if it should be deemed euffi
i.*ct by the commissioners, or the umpire,
ease ot their disagreement.
If is agreed that nothing contained in this
ieie shall in anywise alter or extend 'he
time originally fixed in the said convention
for the presentation of cictuns to the mixed
eommissioa.
xi. title if.
Tho present eon wation shall be ratified,
and too ratification si,,til he exchanged at
Washington, as soon as possible.
In witness whereof the above mentioned
plenipotentiaries have signed the same and
affixed their respective seals.
Done iu the city of .Mexico the nineteenth
day of April, In the year one thousand eight
hundred and seventy one.
THOMAS H. ENLSON,
MANUEL AZPIROZ.
And whereas the said convention has been
duly ratified on both parts, and the respec
tive ratifications of the same have been ex
changed:
Now, therefore, be it known, that I,
Ulysses 8. Grant, President of the United
States of Ameriea, have caused the said
convention to be made public, to the end
that the same, and every clause and article
thereof, may be observed and fulfilled with
good faith by the Uuited States aud tho
citizens thereof.
In testimony whereof I have herennto set
my hand, and caused the seal of the United
States to affixed.
Done at the city of Washington this
eighth day of February, in the year of our
Lord one thousand eight hundred and sev
enty-two, and of the indepehdenoe of the
United States of America the ninety-sixth
„ . . U. 8. GRANT,
By the President:
Hamilton Fish,
Secretary of State.
A PROCLAMATION
BT THE THE KID ENT OF TUB UNITED STATES
OF AMERICA.
Whereas, In my proclamation of the
twelfth day of October, in tho year eight
een hundred and seventy-one, it was recited
that pertain unlawful combinations and
conspiracies existed in certain counties in
the State of South Carolina for the purpose
ot depriving certain portions and olasses of
the people ot that State of the rights, privi
leges anil immunities and nrotection named
in the constitution of the United States and
secured by the act of Congress, approved
April the twentieth, one thousand eight
hundred anil seventy-one, eutitlcd "An act
to enforce the provisions of the fourteenth
amendment to the constitution of tho United
States," and the persons composing suoh
combinations and conspiracies were com
manded to disperse and to retire peaoeably
to their homes within five days from said
date;
And whereas by my proclamation of the
seventeenth day of October, in the year
eighteen hundred aud soventy-one, the priv
ileges of the writ of habeas corpus were
suspended iu the counties named in said
proclamation;
And whereas the oonnty of Marion was
named in said proclamations as one of the
counties in which said unlawful combina
tions and conspiracies for the purposes
aforesaid existed, and in whioh the privi
leges of the writ of habeas corpus was sus
pended;
And whereas it has been ascertained that
in said county of Marion said combinations
and conspiracies do not exist to the extent
recited in suid proclamations;
And whereas it has been ascertained that
unlawful combinations and conspiracies of
the character and to the extent and for the
purposes described in said proclamations
do exist in the county of Union in said
State;
Now, therefore, I, Ulysses 8. Grant, Presi
dent of the United States of America, do
hereby revoke, as to the said county ot Ma
rion, the suspension of the privileges of the
writ of habeas corpus directed *in my said
proclamation of the seventeenth day of Oc
tober, eighteen hnndred aud seventy-one.
And I do hereby command all persons in
said county of Union composing the
unlawful combinations and conspiracies
aloresaid to disperse and to retire peace
ably to their homes within five days
of the date hereof, and to deliver
either to the marshal of the United States
for the district of South Carolina, or to any
of his deputies, or to any military officer of
the United States within said county, nil
arms, ammunition, uniforms, disguises', and
other means and implements used, kept,
possessed, or controlled by them for carry
ing out the unlawful purposes for which
the combinations and conspiracies are or
ganiaed.
In witness whereof I have hereunto set
my hand, aud caused the seal ot the United
States to be affixed.
Done at the city of Washington the third
day of November, in the year of our Lord
one thousand eight hundred and seventy
one, and of the indejieuee of the United
States of Amerioa the ninety-sixth.
U. 8. GRANT.
By fhe President:
Hamilton Fish, Secretary of State.
A PROCLAMATION.
BY Til'S' PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES
OF AMERIOA.
Whereas, By an act of Congress entitled
"An act to enforce the provisions of the
fourteenth amendment to tho constitution
oi'the Uuibd States, and for other pur
poses," approved the twentieth day of
died and seventy-one, power is given to the
President of the United States, when, mhis
judgment, the public safely shall require it,
ot suspend the privileges of the writ of ha
beas corpus in auy State or part of a State,
whenever combinations and conspiracies
exist in such State or part of a State for tho
purpose of depriving any portion or class
of the people of such State of the rights
privileges, immunities, and protection
named in the constitution of tho United
States, and secured by the act of Congress
aforesaid; and whenever such combina°tions
and conspiracies do so obstruct aud hinder
the execution of the laws ef any suohStute,
and of the United States, as to deprive the
people aforesaid of the rights, privileges,
immunities and protection aforesaid, and
do oppose and obstruct the laws of the
United States and their due execution,
•and impede and obstruct the due course
of justice under the same; And when
ever suoh combinations shall bo organized
and armed, and so numerous and powerful
as to be able by violence either to overthrow
or to set at defiance the constituted authori
ties of said State and the United States
within such State; and whenever, by reason
of said causes, tho eonviotion of such offend
ers aud the preservation of the public peace
shall become iu such State or part of a
State impracticable;
And whereas such unlawful combinations
and conspiracies for the purposes aforesaid
are declared by tho act of Congress afore
said to be rebellion against the government
of the United States;
Anil whereas, by said aot of Congress, It
is provided that before the President shall
suspend the privileges of the writ of habeas
corpus ho shall first have made proclama
tion commanding such insurgents to dis
perse;
And whereas on the third day of the
present month of November the Presi
dent of the United States did issue
Ids proclamation, reciting therein, among
other tilings, that such combinatious and
conspiracies did then exist in the county of
Union, in the State of South Carolina, and
commanding thereby all persons composing
such unlawful combinations and conspira
cies to disperse and retire peaceably to their
homes within five days from the date there
of, and to deliver either to the marshal of the
Uuited States for the district of South
Carolina, or to any of his deputies, or
to, any military officer of the United
States within suid county, all arms, ammu
nition, uniforms, disguises, and other
means aud implements used, kept, pus
Kissed or controlled by them for them for
carrying out the unlawful purposes for
which the said combinations aud conspira
cies are organized; •
Aud whereas the insurgents engaged in
such unlawful combinations and conspira
cies within the county aloresaid have not
dispersed and retired peaceably to their re
spective homes, anti have not delivered to
the marshal of the United States, or to any
of his deputies, or to any military officer of
the United States within said county, all
aru.'B, ammunition, uniforms, disguises' and
other means and implements used, kept,
possessed or controlled by them for carry
ing out the unlawful purposes for which
the combinations and conspiracies are or
ganized, as commanded by said proclama
tion, but do still persist in tho unlawful
ombinalions and con-iraoies aforesaid:
Now, therefore, I, Ulysses S. Grant, Presi
dent of the United States of Ameriea, by
virtue of the authority vested in me by the
constitution of the United States and the
aot of Congresa aforesaid, do hereby declare
that, in my judgment, the public safety
especially requires that tbe privileges
of tho writ of habeas corpus he sue
pended, to the end that such rebellion
may be overthrown, and do hereby suspend
the privileges of the writ ol habeas corpus
within the county of Union, in said State
of Smith Carolina, in respect to all persons
arrested by the marshals of the United
States for tho said district of South Caro
lina, or by any of his deputies, or by any
military officer of the United States, or by
any soldier or citizen acting under the or
ders of said marshal deputy or suoh mili
I,
in
of
tary officer within said county, charged
with any violation of the act of Congress
aforesaid during the continuance of suoh
rebellion.
Iu witness whereof I have hereunto set
my hand, aud caused the seal of the United
States to be affixed.
Done at the city of Washington this tenth
day of November, in the year of oar Lord
one thousand eight hundred and seventy
one, and of the independence of the Unite;/
States of Ameriea the ninety-sixth
„ , „ if. S. GRANT.
By the President;
Hamilton Fish, o
Secretary of State.
A PROCLAMATION o
BT Tim TRBSrDENT OF THE UNITED BTATSS*)
OF AMERICA.
M hbkbas. Satisfactory information hMv
been reseived by tne. through Don Mauri
cio Lopez Roberts, Envoy Extraordinary
f, -punster Plenipotentiary of his majesty®
the Krug of Spain, that the government off
that country has abolished disorimating
tluties heretofore imposed on merchandise
imported from all other countries, except
mg the islands of Cuba and Porto Rico,
into Spain and the adjacent islands, in ves
f®{® of fhe Uuited States, said abolition to
take effect from and after the first dav of
January next;
Now, therefore, I, Ulysses S. Grant, Presi
dent of the United States of Amerioa by
virtue of the authority vested iu me b'v aia
act of Conrress, of the seventh day of 'Jan
uary, 1824, and by an aot in addition there
to, of the twenty-fourth day of Mav, 1828.
do hereby declare and proclaim that'on and
after the said first day of January next, so
long as merchandise imported from any
other oountry, excepting the islands of
Cuba and Porto Rico, into the ports off
Spain and the islands adjacent thereto, in
vessels belonging to citizens of the United
States, shall be exempt from discriminating
uties on merchandise im
ported' into the United States iu Spanish
vessels, excepting from tho islands of Cuba
Ann Porto Kioo, shall b-a discontinued and
abolished.
In testimony whereof I have hereunto
set my hand, and caused the seal of the
United States to be affixed.
Done at the city of Washington this nine
teenth day ot December, in the year of our
Lord one thonsaud eight hundred and sev
enty-one, and of the independence of the
United States of America the ninety-sixth.
i, ,, „ ., A U. S. GRANT.
By the President:
Hamilton Fish, Secretary of Slate.
A PROCLAMATION
BT TUB PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES
OF AMERICA.
Whereas Pursuant to the first section
ot the act ol Congress approved the eleventh
day ot June, one thousand eight hundred
aud sixty-four, entitled " An act to pro-ide
tor the execution of treaties between the
uuited states and foreign nations respect
ing consular jurisdiction over the crews of
vessels of suoh foreign nations in the
waters and ports of the United States," it
ir provided that before that aot shall
effect as to the ships and vessels of any
particular nation having suoh treaty with
the United States, the President of the
United States shall have been satisfied that
similar provisions have been made for the
execution of suoh treaty by tho other con
tracting party, and shall have issued his
proclamation to that effect, declaring that
aot to be iu force as to such nation
And whereas duo inquiry havfag been
made, and a satisfactory answer having
beeu received that similar provisions are inn
force in the United Kingdoms of Sweden
anil Norway:
Now, therefore, bo it known that %
Ulysses S. Grant, President of the United
States of America, do hereby proclaim the
same accordingly.
Doue at the city of Washington this elev
enth day of May, in tha year of our Lord
ono thousand hundred and seventy
two, aud of the independence of the United}
States of America the ninety-sixth.
„ „ .. U. 8. GRATIS.
By the President:
Hamilton Fisn,
Secretary of State.
A PROCLAMATION
BT TUB PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATE*'
OF AMERICA.
t Tho HCt °* Congress approved
June 25, 1868, constituted, on and alter that
date, eight hours a day's work for all labor
ers, workmen, and mechanics pm ployed by
or on behalf of the government of the Uui
ted States;
And whereas, On iho nineteenth day of
May, in tho year one thousand eight hun
dred and sixty-nine, by executive procla
mation, it was directed that from and after
that date no reduction should he made in
the wages paid by the government by the
day to suoh laborers, workmen, and me
chanics on account of suoh roduotiou of the
hours of labor;
And wher. aq It is now represented to m«
that the act of Congress and tho proclama
tion aforesaid have not been strictly ob
served by all officers of the govei nment
having charge of such laborers, workmen
and mechanics;
Now therefore, I, Ulysses S Grant, Presi
of sue United States, do hereby A* r &iB
call attention to the aot of Congress alortv
said, and direct all officers of tile executive
department °7 tho government having
charge of the employment and payment off
laborers, workmen, or mechanics employed
!>V or on behalf of the government of the
united States to make no reduction iu the
wages puid by the government by the day
to such laborers, woikmeu, and mechanic*
on account of the reduction of tho hours of
labor.
In testimony whereof I have hereunto set
my hand and caused the seal of the United
States to bo affixed.
Done at the city of Washington this
eleventh day of May, in the year of our
Lord one thousand eight hundred and sev
enty-two, and of the independence of the
United States the ninety-sixth.
,, t. ., U. S. GRANT.
Isy the President:
Hamilton Fish, Secretary of State. f
A PROCLAMATION
BT THU PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED 8TATEI8
* OF AMERICA.
M here as, The act ef Congress, approved
May 22, 1872, removes all political disabili
ties imposed by tbe third section of the
fonrteenth article of amendments to the
constitution of the United States from ail
lerscns whomsoever, except Senators and
Representatives of the Thirty-sixth and
1 hirty-seventh Congresses aud officer*
the judicial, military, aud naval
service of the United States, heads of
departments, and foreign ministers off
tho United States; and whereas it in
represented to me that there are now peud
ing in' >e several circuit and district court*
oi the United States proceedings by quo
warranto, under the fourteenth section of
the act of Congress approved May 31, 1870
to remove lrora ofHoo cortnin porsong who
are alleged to hold said offices iu violation
of tiie provisions of said article of amend
ment to the constitution of the United
Slates, and also penal prosecutions against
such persons under the fifteenth section of
the act of Congress aforesaid.
Now, therefore, I, Ulysses S. Grant, Pres
ident of the United States, do hereby direct
all district attorneys having < barge of such
proceedings and prosecutions to dismiss
and discontinue the same, except as to per
sons who may be embraced in the excep
tions nam'd in the act oi Congrejs* fiist
above cited.
In testimony whereof, I have hereunto
set my hand and caus< d the seal of the
United States to be affixed.
D.me-at the city of Washington this first
day oi June, iu tin- year of our Lord one
ousand eight hundred aud seventy-two,
tud of the independence of the United
States of America the muety-sixth.
« n T> a u. S. GRANT.
By the President:
Hamilton Fish,
Secretary of State.
It. is omy busy men who have any leisure.
Murat Halstead, one of the most active
and laborious journalists of the West, finds
time to write an article of se,vt n columns
fur the Jiethel Fair Journal , published in
the interests of charity, giving as account
of the early days of newspaper life in Cin
cinnati. It is called "A True Tale, or
1 wenty Years Ago," and contains more wit,
more grace and more Euinteutional infor
mation than a mere man of letters cotrid
have pat into it in a whole summer of idle
ae**.

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