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The Detroit times. [volume] (Detroit, Mich.) 1903-1920, January 09, 1908, LAST EDITION, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016689/1908-01-09/ed-1/seq-1/

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All . Here—
And All Clean
EIGHTH YEAR, NO. 87.
SLASHES THROAT
. OF SISTER ANO'
SELFJIES
ynTEMPTED MURDER AND SUI
CIDE BY VERNON L. NETTLE-
TbN, HARDWARE DEALER OF
COLDWATER, MICH.
COLDWATER, Mich., Jan. 9. (Spe
cial.) —Vernon I* .Nettleton, aged 48.
senior member of the hardware firm
of V. L. Nettlet<jn & Cos., at an early
hour this morning In an insane fury,
attacked his slater, Ida, first shooting
• at her and missing, then stashing her
nock and his own with a razor, until
it broke and finally ending hts own
life with u butcher knife. Miss Net
tleton is still alive, but in a critical
condition.
Nettleton knocked on his sister's
door before daylight.
“I would like to have you give me
some morphine, so 1 can get some
Bleep,” he is said to have ('ailed to
her through the door.
When she unlocked- the door, Net.-
tleton quickly fired three- successive
* shots at her from a revolver, each bill
let going wild. Seeing he had missed,
he seized her and madly slashed her
throat and his own. till the razor snap
ped. Probably believing his slater
dead, hJ» then got a butcher knife and
hacked at his bleeding throat until
he fell dead.
Nettleton was a bachelor. He and
his sister lived alone in' their fine
mansion.
Insanity from loss of sleep, caused
hy Urorry over business affairs, la as
signed as the cause of his deed.
bbokeTtTrbws
HIMSELF UNDER
SUBWAYJARS
WILLIAM BOURKE NEVIN OF NEW
yorht had lost heavily in
FINANCIAL BLUMP AND WAS
l »Lt

. NICW YORK. Jan. 9.—William
Staurke Nevln, a former member «1
the stock exchange, who had lost heav-
Jly recently in the financial slump,
I Jumped in front of a southbound sub
way train at the Seventy-nlnth-st. sta
—JR®Today AffiT"wna instantly kilted:
There were two score men and wom
en on the station platform at the time
and as most of them saw the man
plunge in front of the oncoming train
, women screamed. The motorman ap
piled his air brake, but when the
train was brought to a halt It was
found that Nevin’s body had been de
capitated and both legs ground off by
the wheels of the forward car.
Four of the cars had passed over the
suicide's body. It was lifted to the
station platform and then taken In a
patrol wagon to the West Slxty
elghth-st. police station. A card on
the body gave the name and address,
156 West Seventy-elghth-st. Two po
licemen went to the house, but when
they told his wife, Mrs. Georgina Ne
•vln, of her husband’s suicide, she col
lapsed.
Until two years ago Nevln was the
floor member of the stock exchange of
Houghtaling & Cos., Nassau-st.
Nevln had been 111 of some nervous
disorder recently. He had been In the
hand** of his physician.
•GLAZIER PARTNERSHIP
; DISSOLVED BY COURT
LANSING, Mich., Jap. 9.—Circuit
Judge Wlest has Issued an order dis
solving the partnership of Frank P.
Glazier and G. H. Gay In the Commer
cial bank of StockbrWgo and appoint
ed W. J. Dancer permanent receiver.
There la $30,000 in cash In the hank
and part of It will be used to declare
the first dividend In about three
months to the 450 depositors. They
■will realize about 40 cents on the dol
lar, One note was given by Mrs. Gift
tier for $25,000 and two of $5,000 each
by Qlazler’s son and daughter.
THE WEATHER
Delrult tad tlrialtri Thursday sight
fairi Friday, cloudy, probabU Himi
rlaag tr uipcralurci fresh to brisk
aouthwe»terly salads.
Lower Mlehlgaai Fair toulghl, prob
ably followed by ah ow rm or mow hur
ries Friday| rlslag temperaturei winds
ulklftlng to southerly aad larrcaslug,
UOt RLI TEIII'KR ATDRKS.
taw 1# lO a. m 16
fa. 14 II a. m 10
*a. m 14 It noon ill
• a. m in 1 p. nt 03
Oae year ago todayi Nailmnm tem
perature. 2*| minimum. 16» mesa, 22 1
partly cloudy with trace of saow dur
ing the early aioralug.
pua rose at 7iOO a. m. Sun sets at
dtltt p. m.
hKITIIKR I’OKDITIO**.
The storm area Is movlna down the
■«. I.swreuee valley. I dlsturhnaee Is
eeatral over Vfaultoha this morning and
Is spreadlag eastward Into the lake
region. Saow has occurred la the lake
region and east to the coast durian the
last 34 hours. Oeuerally fair weather
prevails this mnralag over the upper
lake region, central valleys aad west
era states. There has been a general
fall la the temperature over the lake
region, central valleys, east to the coast
and sooth to the gulf. It Is rlslag
west of the Mississippi river.
Fair weather Is Indicated for this
section to sight follow eg by Increasing
eloodlacSs and probably some saow
Friday. Tbr temperstnre will rise
alowly aad go above freeslag
Friday.
The winds ig the take region are
fresh to hr*sk southwest to northwest.
Alexander, t'urhruttns so Moans
9 - ■ u ■■ i ■ mass ■ .
Huslarss-llke Frlatlag. No fuss and
BO feathers. Tlio plain, neat kind, that
looks rvglU Timas Fainting Cap it
yohn R.-st Phono 14»l
Uimits
Hobby Steals His
Wife’s Divorce Bill
From Court Files
So angry was Charles Harris when
he learned that his wife, Athta. had
started suit fdr divorce, that he vislt-
the county clerk's office, asked for
the privilege of reading, her bill, and
then, wnen the clerk’s back was turn
ed, disappeared with the document. A
warrant will be issued charging him
with theft.
Harris Is a man of about 50 years
of age. He wears an artificial foot,
but his lameness did not prevent him
getting away from the county build
ing so quickly that he eluded the
clerk who went in search of him.
The fact that the bill was stolen will
not affect hts wife’s case, but It will
be necessary for her attorney to make
out another bill.
MAN TnFSISTER
"STUNG” BT AN
ETE-DOCTOR
“PHONY" PHYBICt AN MAKES
LOVE TO GIRL AND GETS
BROTHER TO CASH WORTHLESS
*
CHECK.
. $
If anyone encounters a bald-headed
man-of about 40 years, with two
prominent gold teeth, and passing as
“Dr.” Solomon Price, an eye special
ist, he will confer a great favor on
Albert Schuraltz and his sister, Vile,
both of No. 309 Montcalm-st. east, by
handing him over to a policeman, Tho
probabilities are, however, that "Dr.’’
Price Is far from Detroit at the pres
ent moment. As u result of his dis
appearance, last Monday, Mr. Schu
raitz is out of pocket SSO and the
marriage of, the “doctor” and Miss
Vite Schuraltz, which was scheduled
to take place in two weeks, has been
indefinitely postponed.
It was two weeks ago Monday that
the Schuraltz family, which consists
of an aged mother, two sous and the
daughter, Vite, made the acquaintance
of the smooth "Dr." Price. He was la
search of a boardiug place and the
Schurultzs readily consented to take
him In. The "doctor” posed as u man
of aifiuence and exhibited a roll of
t>ms that would almost fill a hat, \nd
which, he said, contained $3,000.
"Dr.’’ Price at once took a "shine’’
to the daughter, Vite, who Is 26 years
old and pretty. His attentions were
TeMjirocatod. It wus, apparently, a
case of love at first sight. The doc
tor, It is said, pr*H>osed that they g**t
married right away, but Vite wanted
time to prepare her troussenn so iho
event was postponed for a couple of
weeks.
Monday the eye doctor asked
Albert' Schuraltz to cash a check for
SSO on the Cltzens Savings bank, ac
cording to Albert’s story, explaining
that he had deposited the $3,000 in
that bank. He wanted she cash to
buy- a present for his fiancee, he said.
Albert readily accommoted him.
In return for the favor, "Dr.'* Price
offered to take Albert in the country
and show him how to peddle in the
rural districts. As Albert wub out
of work he Jumped at the opportunity
and no time was lost In putting the
plan Into effect. Hastily coileating
a supply of stationery and other small
articles, Albert and the "doctor’’ took
u train for the interior.
Clarkstou, Mich., was their destin
ation, but when they reached this
station Albert says the doctor decided
to go on to Durand. At the doctor’s
suggestion, however, Schuraltz got off
at Clarkston and proceeded to cover
the territory between that village and
Durand, where he was to rejoin the
doctor by arrangement. Arrived in
Durand "I)r.” Price was nowhere to
be found, and Albert then recalled
that the doctor had taken his trunk
along, when they left Detroit. At his
friend's suggestion, Albert had taken
no money with him and found him
self several miles from home with only
a nickel in his trousers. He got busy
with his peddling outfit and when he
had earned enough to buy a ticket'
for Detroit departed on the Grot
train.
He already had suspicions concern
ing the doctor and these were con
firmed when he presented the chock
to the Citzens Savings bank Thurs
day morning and found there were no
funds to the credit of "Dr.’’ Price.
Albert at once reported the matter
to the police and gave them a good
description of the missing man.
GIVEN DIVORCE FROM
HIS ACTRESS WIFE
William K. Hamlin, whoa*; wife,
Pearl Smith Hamlin, deserted him sev
eral years ago toHake up a career on
the stage, was granted a divorce by
Judge Brooke, Thursday morning. The
husband testified that he had not
seen his wife since she became a
footllght favorite, but he knew she
was prospering as she had purchased
a home for her aged parents In Oen
eva, Ohio, where she Bpends her sum
mers. «
Orange Burrell was given a decree
of divorce from his wife, Bessie, on
the grounds of desertion. y
ONE DIES IN $50,000
FIRE IN ELKHART
ELKHART, Ind., Jan. 9—A ffW.ODO
Are caused by ah explosion in the
I.ake Shore roundhouse today,
resulted In the death of a young man
named Shonenberger, the destruction
«rs the pease tiger engine roundhouse,
the damage of th« freight house and
injury to Hi engines which will have
to undergo repairs' before
they.egn be placed In service again.
A diplomat Is a man with an ax to
grind who get# another man to tun
the grindstone and makes him believe
he hi being entertatned.— OtitcajTO
Newa
SLAIN WOMAN'S
BOOT CLAIMED
BT_SON
WILLIAM POBT TAKES CHARGE
OF REMAINS OF MRS. WELCH—
SUSPICION STILL POINTS VERY
STRONGLY TO DANIEL SCOTT.
Albert Goodall, of Sarnia. OnL, for
merly a roomer in the place kept by
Mrs. Cornelia Welch, found murdered
Tuesday afternoon, was brought to
police headquarters late Wednesday
night, but was released Thursday
morning, after being questioned by
Chief of Detectives McDonnell and
Assistant Prosecutor Grose. Dan Scott, j
the expressman who is looked upon
as the lover of the dead woman, and
who has been in custody since shortly !
after the finding of the body, con- |
tlnues to be the center of attention in '
police headquarters, and the police !
are bending every effort to fasten the'
crime ou him Scott was again put
through the sweating process Thu
day morning, but the results of the
inquisition, if there were any, have
not been made known.
"I have nothing to say,” was all that
Capt. McDonnell would vouchsafe
when he left his office at noon.
"Have you secured any information
that tends to strengthen the case
against Scott?" was asked.
"The case is certainly no weaker."
was the reply.
Albert OtrodnH was arrested oti Dec.
Bon suspicion of having robbed a
man In Mrs. Welch’s place, but was
released because the alleged victim ,
refused to prosecute. The police were
informed that Goodall was "sore" at
Mrs. Welch because she did not try
to protect him from the officers. When
it was learned that Goodall was In the
city Monday, the day before the mur
der was discovered, the police w r ero
anxious to interview him as to his
business in the city at that time, and
kept the wires hot until they finally
located the man in Port Huron, Wed
nesday night. At their request the
Port Huron authorities held Goodall
until Detective Sullivan arrived.
Goodall told the police that he came
down to Detroit on business concern
ing some real estate and returned ,
Monday night without going near Mrs.
Welch’s place. Capt. McDonnell was
satisfied that he told the truth and
saw no reason for holding him.
—H was reported in headquarters that
Bessie Brown, Albert Goodall’s sweet
heart, and a former Inmate of Mrs.
Welch’s resort, disappeared from her
room at No. 223 Jefforson-ave.. the
ternoon the murder became public,
and had not been seen since. Capt.
McDonnell says, however, that Bessie
Is In the city and that she has already
been questioned by Jiia rueiu _ The.
capfnih did not sec fit to hold her.
Mark Howard, the colored man ar
rested as a suspect late Tuesday
night, was released from custody Wed
nesday.
William Post, a son of Mrs. Welch
hy her first husband, arrived In De
troit Thursday noon from Montpelier,
0., and announced that he would look
after the burial of his mother’s re
mains. Post was considerably broken
up over the tragedy. He Is engaged
In the railroad business, has a respon
sible position and is well thought of
In Montpelier.
Post told the police that ho last
saw his mother In March, when he
came to Detroit on a visit. Mrs.
Welch was then a patient In Red
Cross hospital and promised him that
she would go to Montpelier to live
with him when she recovered. This
promise she failed to keep. At that 1
time, Post says, his mother had about
SSOO In money and Jewels worth sev
eral hundred dollars. He knows sus
pect Dan Scott by sight, having seen
him during one of hts visits to his
mother’s.
Post explained his delay In reaching
here hy saying that he had failed to
receive the telegram sent by Coroner
Parker. The first intimation he re
ceived of hts mother’s tragic death
was when he read of it in a paper.
CQURTMARTIAL OF
HPZZARO^STARTE
ACCUSED LIEUTENANT TRIED
FORT WAYNE—CAPT. GLAS
GOW DEFENDS HIM.
The courtm&rtial In the case of
Lieut. R>**F. Hazzard, who Is charged
with several breaches of army disci
pline. and For whom a civil warrant
on the charge of forgery has been Is
sued, began at Fort Wayne Thursday
afternoon.
Hazzard isd efended by Capt. Glas
gow, of the attlllery, who has come
from Fort Mott, N. J«
Caps. Glasgow said Thursday morn
ing that he had no Idea of the line of
defense to be adopted for Lieut. Haz
zaVd. He had not seen the latter
since they were both serving In the
Eleventh cavalry in the Philippines.
. **l know that garrison life la ex
tremely hard upon some natures,”
said the captain. ‘‘For a man who Is
happily married and comfortably set
tled, life at a post la nut bad. But
! there are men who make the best of
soldiers in the field who rust and go
to pieces when left to the-monotony
of a post fife.”
Juror Dies in Chair.
NEW’ YORK, Jan. 9.—The greatest
excitement broke forth In part I, of
general sessions, where a civil suit
was being heard today, when It was
discovered that Moses Olentck, Juror
No. 2. who was apparently asleep In
f his chfifr tn fh* Jttty tw. wsrtr
The body wire removed id an adjoining
room and the Juror’s relatives were
notified.
' Oak ami »•#!• Vluvrtaa. ItHtrlck,
THURSDAY, JANUARY 9, 1908.
MICHIGAN OEMS.
ANTI-BRYAN AND
FOR JOHNSON
THAT IS THE SENTIMENT AMONG
WAYNE MEMBERS OF THE
PARTY—HARD FIGHT FOR CAM
PAU THIS YEAR.
Those who have had occasion to
come in close contact to the fight that
Is being waged between Newberry
and Stair for that seat as delegate-at
large to the Republican national con
vention. for which those two are con
testing— (If not avowedly so on both
sides, palpably so lu the pitting of
their strength in capturing the party
organization)—appreciate the fact
that it Is a very warm one.
But it promises to pale into a mild
and Insignificant affair in’ comparison
to the feathers that are going to tiy
when It comes time for the Democrats
of Wayne county to choose a member
of their party for a like representation
tn the convention at Denver.
As to just choice of those
Wayne Democrats who do tho real
work in the party will fall, •is un
certain. None of them are committal
on that point, although The Times
finds many of those in the party who
are Its accredited leaders, very posi
tive in their own minds as to who
will licit be the man.
!t doesn’t overtax the thinking parts
to reach the immediate conclusion
that the man whom these represen
tatives of the party have In mind Is
Daniel J. Caiupau, who In the past has,
however, In the face of a like opposi
tion, come out of the fray decidedly
on top.
Mr. Campau, nevertheless, appeal's
to have the real battle of his polit
ical career on his hands In this cam
paign, for his opponents in the party
say they were never before so deter
mined.
A well-known Democrat who never
before has played an active part In
the anti-Campau ranks, Is lined up
against tho state committeeman. This
Democrat expressed himself to -The
Times today like this*..
"It is not going to be the old fight
against Mr. Campau this time. Here
tofore the practice on the part of a
certain party element has been to
line up the rank and file against Cam
pau and fight him until those leaders
have gained the ends they desired and
have luui» satisfied an to their own
particular purpose*, then swing lntp
line for him at the eleventh hour.
"The leadership of Campau Is going
to be vigorously protested this year,
and that opposition Is to be carried to
a finish, with the rank and file of the
party against him.”
Further talk with this party leader
would go to show that Mr. Campau
and his party In this state, or in
Wayne, at least, are hopelessly split
on the issue of William Jennings
Bryan.
And there Is every, reason to believe
that Gov. Johnson Is tho man the
state convention is going to line up
for.
There Is no question where the
Democratic leaders of Detroit and
Wayne county stand. They will not
Indorse Bryan. The delegation to
Denver may go unlnstructed, but John
son Is the man his party In Michigan
wants.
The anti-Bryanltes argue that there
can be no hope of electing a twice
beaten candidate. In the llgh£ °f
Taft’s nomination the second party is
counting on the solid labor vote in the
event of any man friendly to labor’s
Interests other than Bryan being
named as the party’s standard-bearer.
Johnson, for Instance, Detroit and
Wayne county Democrats argue,
could carry every state that Bryan
could, and in New York and New Jer
sey could poll 100,000 votes more
than Bryan. Union labor would* not
feel like going to Bryan because they
would lack confidence.
"A man who bets on a favorite
twice and loses both times, doesn’t
feel much like pinning his hopes to
the same colors' the third time," Is the
way one Democrat expressed himself.
With Mr. Campau out of the run
ning. so far as his party at home 1*
concerned. It becomes a matter of
conjecture as to who will be Wayne's
choice for delegate-at-large to the
Denver meeting. The name of Tim
Tarsney has been mentioned by a
member of the corporation counsel's
office staff, but Mr. Tarsney h*s-not
yet declared himself to this effect.
mm won't
ION FOBJONERESS
•*| am not a candidate for congress,"
ray* Timothy K. Tarsncy. corporation
counsel and former representative from
the Saginaw district.
Furthermore he aver* that ho will
not be a candidate under any circum
stances visible at present. It la prob
able that Tarsney will be succeeded
in hla present .position by P. J. M. Hal
ly. July 1, next, and the congressional
talk arose from the fact that he is a
strong campaigner and. being out of
one place, might be induced to go af
ter another.
To Extend Foreat-ava.
Foreat-ave. will be opened from
Beaufalt-ave. to the city limits. This
wan decided upon by the street open
ing committee of the council Thurs
day morning. The opening will
a route for anew extension of the
Crosxtown line some time to tako
tbe- rapUUy UuiUUng port loir of
the city lying between Mack and Ora
tlot-ave*., and east of Mt. KUlott sve
While the extension is one of the
longest evgr undertaken. It ia expected
~t 0 btt. ft very cheap one, the coat be
’lu* oatlmaled at only fft.WO. Paif*
of the street are already open and
there Is only one butldlng created on
parts left to. open up to maJlft.a
complete thoroughfare.
HERE’S TIM HEALY, WITH HIS
GRIEVANCE AGAINST BRITAIN
, K
',^'
«■ HP' j';>f
I w SI! ■Bn *jP f < >M>. • < *V*-i 3L
wmp4 -■*• ...
a' y y -&1~ <' fofoi&irt^li&if
*' ‘* m* ft* vKb
iwHkli'■
Tluiot li) Heal)', (hr militant Irlah Nationalist M. I*., la thani In thla pic
ture. Hr. Ilral)' la u reeent tnlmlrw dwalarcd that there wia uo help
for lrrlnnd, until ah« la absolutel jr free from Kntflnnd.
“SPANISH LOU” IS
DEAD FROM
~ A JAIL “
FAMOUS MUSKEGON BELDAME
WAS DAUGHTER OF PIRATE
CAPTAtN AND COULD SPEAK
FIVE LANGUAGES.
MUSKEGON, Mich., Jan. 9.—(Spe
cial.) —"Ooodby, boys, my time ha»
come,” murmured poor old "Spanish
Lou,” otherwise known as Agnes Whit
comb, Muskegon’s famous 78-year-old
character, as she lay on the Icy side
walk In Maln-st., where she had fallen,
early today.
In a few momenta she was dead.
Although an habitue of the "Owl
district” for 30 years, nnd an old
timer al the Detroit house of correc
tion, having served 26 terms thetetn,
yet she never forgot to thank the
Judge who sentenced her. ' Spanish
Lou” had served 100 terms In the
county jail, and had been behind the
bars every Christmas, for the last
quarter of a oentury.
She was born In Spanish waters,
the daughter of a Spanish “pirate cap
tain and was educated In a European
convent. She could speak five lan
guages with ease, but after an unfor
tunate runaway marriage, contract'd
In the south, shortly after the close
of the civil war. she drifted north
and acted as an interpreter at Wash
ington, I>. C. Drink caused her down
fall.
UI.C.S. CONDUCTS
FfICTORYCfiMPRIfiI
W. E. FENNO, OF NEW YORK, AD*
DREBBES NOON MEETINGS—
CAN SLING SLANG SOME.
A mating In the 10-days campaign
In the factories now being conducted
under the auspices of the Y. M. C. A.,
was held In the Packard Motor com
pany's works on the Hast Grand Boule
vard Thursday noon, the talk Lolna
given by W. E. Fenno, of New York,
city.
For several years, Mr. Fcnno was a
telegraph operator In the metropolis,
and later was ticket agent In that city
for the Pullman people, but four years
ago he deolded to devdte his Jlme to
the working men of thw-country, and
since then has spoken In coal mines,
engine rooms, and factories of every
lescrlptlon.
Arrangements had been made at the
Packard works for his coming and he
spoke for nearly half an hour from a
bo* In the locker room, the men sur
rounding him. many smoking, but all
giving respectful attention.
Mr. Fenno Is a forceful, maenetlc
talker. Illustrating his points with stor
ies that kept his listeners in good hu
mor. He took "The srmp hen 'nr
his subject, as he said that everything
now in use Is on Its way to the scrap
heap. •In referring to the higher
thing* of Peutm spoke of the
harm a man does himself by swearing,
and said “Some of you here look as
though you could cut loose and burn
up a fellow for fair."
n# aim of a table beer M enioyad
all the moit when you have Htrnh's,
because Jt hr the beat money can buy.
Phone Main ll« for a case.
• lath tbMf at BMIrUiV
SNOW SENDS KOI
SHOT BUCK IT
HECKERT 3
V -
'COR- CON DELEGATE DECLAREB
AMENDING CONSTITUTION IS
ONLY A MINISTERIAL FUNC
TION—PAW PAW MAN’S TIRADE.
(From a Special Correspondent.)
LANSING, Mich., Jan. 9.—The battle
still rages in the con-con, with the end
not yet In sight. Judge Heckert, of
Paw t’aw. talked at great length
against the Initiative, charged that
lobbyists were goading on delegates
to adopt this dangerous measure; that
Free Sllverltes and Green Packers wo.'e
also talking for this "delusion," a» an
illustration that th«* people are led
astray and that the numerous favor
able petitions came from a •pestifer
ous busybody."
Delegate Snow, of Saginaw, lu a
rousing speech, ridiculed the opposi
tion completely and citing authorities,
proved that amending the constitution
was purely u ministerial function rest-
I ing with the people und not a legisla
tive power and that only congress
could determine when a state violated
the federal constitution.
Snow said he considered H. M.
Campbell’s action unfair in omitting in
his brief the Oregon supreme court de
rision upholding the initiative, saying
that, had it been the reverse, the op
position would have "thrown it in jur
faces from the start of this talk."
The fight will continue this after
noon* with very little prospect of
reaching a vote.
Hemam Hat a New Scheme.
The weight of arguments in the con
con, over the Initiative, yesterday, woa
largely in favor of the proposition. The
battle was renewed by Delegate Uw
ton T. Hemans in a speech that spark
led with oratory and bristled with
cold facts He argued that the Initia
tive should be Incorporated in the n<*w
constitution and maintained that the
measure was the "savior of the pres
ent form of government" and a cure
for political evils. He added that he
would later introduce an amendment
providing that. Instead of circulating
haphazard petitions for, or against
propositions, thdSe should be super
vised by election inspectors, on Axed
days.
Some of the initiative adherents,
who are displeased at Heman's
speeceh. will oppose this plan. «
JOHN R. WALSH DEFENDS
HIS PECULIAR LOANS
CHICAGO, Jan. 9—John R. Walsh,
charged with camdng the collapse
his banking institution and Indicted
Iby the federal grand Jury for mi.v
! applying millions of dollars df the
I banks, took the witness stand In his
'own behalf yesterday In Judge Ander
-1 son’s court. * He created a sensation
in the afternoon by admitting that
1 he made the excessive loans and fa
mous memorandum notes by which
1 17,900,000 was drawn from the bank.
He declared that the loans thus made
were for the best Interest of the
-teak-
Thomas Heads Sugar Trust.
- NEW YORK. Jan. 9—W. B Thom
l as has been elected president of
the American Sugar Refining Cos, AM
but the.vacancy caused by the death
of H. O. Havemeyer. Arthur Donner
has been re-elected vice president and
treasurer, and C, R. Helke haa been
i re-elected secretary.
LAST
EDITION
ONE CENT
6 JURORS THROWN:
OUT ON SECRET
INQUIRIES
NEITHER SIDE IN THAW CA3E
WILL REVEAL WHAT THE DE
TECTIVEB LEARNED ABOUI
TALESMEN.
NEW YORK, Jan. 9—All six of
the provisional Jurors In the Thaw
trial today were formally chal
lenged immediately after the
opening of the afternoon session,
and they left the box, so the back
row was once more cleared.
The state challenged McAdie,
Manning and Thurston, while the
defense challenged Metz, Davison
and DeHart.
All the men thrown out today
went because of inquiries made
by detectives. Neither side would
disclose the nature of the invest!-
, gation that led to the dismissal.
. *
NEW YORK. Jan. If.—Wtrtt *unijor 1 —
ity of anew panel of 100 In court, the)
fourth day of the Thaw- trial started
an did the others, wtth Justice Dow
ling in hiß lilace, long before the
lawyers in the case appeared.
Counsel for the defense announced
that Edna Goodrich, who It Is said,
Introduced Evelyn Nesblt to Stanford
White,*had made herself liable to coart
action, ay destroying a subpena call
ing Ihm as a'wlttt**** While she
entering a carriage of Nat Goodwin's
at the stage entrance of the Grand
opera house. Miss Goodrich was hand
ed a subpena by one of the Thaw
detectives. She is Mr. Goodwin's
leading lady.
It Is reported that the actress show
ed her disapproval of the summons
by tearing the paper to pieces end
throwing it at the sleuth.
Mrs. Evelyn Nesblt Thaw came Into
the ootirt room alone a few minutes
after her husband had taken his sea*
within the enclosure.
The first talesman of the new pane),
Henry K. Spalding, was allowed to
go, because of his fixed opinion.
More Fines Imposed.
More fines of $250 each were im
posed on delinquent talesmen. Almost
a score of men called failed to re
spond. This brought the total amount
levied by the court up to almost $20,-
000.
Trank Manning, an insurance brek
er at No. 11 East Twenty-fourth-«L
and residing at 96 Lexlngton-ave..
proved acceptable to the prosecution.
Mr. Manning said that he had no
feeling against a defense of Insanity.
Mr. Ijttleton also accepted him after
he said he was a widower with one
child. Mr. Manning then took seat No.
10. tie way noCßworn In.
Mr. Manning is about 45 years old
and looks like a substantial business
man.
Mrs. Thaw looked almost lonesome
In the "Thaw row," for she sat alone
In the chair almost an hour.
Thr.w burled himself reading his
morning mall. Several letters . In
which he found Interest he sent to his
wife.
Occasionally he put the letter* aside
and talked earnestly with his attorney.
He made notes on the margins of sev
eral legal papers he carried in his port
folio.
David lx)wonthal, a lace manufac
tuier, was the eighth man called to
day. ■ He went because of his opinion.
Carl Rlneschled, a chemist, suited
Jerome. He hnd read the accounts of
the Arst trial and the shooting and
told Littleton that he hud a Axed opin
ion. This eliminated him.
Alexander Doyle, a sculptor, told
Jerome that he knew White, but be
lieved he could act as an impartial
Juror.
Charles H. Thurston, a bookkeeper,
suited Jerome. Thurston said he was
sure that he could lay his opinion
aside. When he told Mr. Littleton he
would accept insanity as a defense
Thaw signaled to his wife. She
nodded, with the result that Thurston
was directed to take seat No. 11. He
was not sworn. He Is married.
George W. Cary, Juror No. 3. halted
the proceedings while he went to the
(CoutlaiMMl Iwnlh fsc«.t
GIGS BACK ON
HIS CONFESSION
ALLEGED FOOTPAD BAYS HE
MADE ADMISSIONS TO DODGE
SWEATBOX SESSIONS.
Robert Cole, the Negro held respon
sible by the police for a number of
recent holdups of women, repudiated
his aweatbox “confession" on the wit
ness stand in Judge Phelan's court,
a here he was on trial Thursday morn
ing. on the charge of asaaulting and
robbbing Mrs. Martha Oruenwald. Cole
said the officers told him that unless
he confessed they would bring in r.o
less than 15 women to identify him
and would prosecute him on 15 differ
ent complaint.*, They djd bring In
erafy womeu. all shook tboir I
heads/ Cole suid. except Mm. Oruen-
wald, who was positive he waa th>*
man who had held her up. He OnaMy
told the detective*, he averred. :hat
he would own up to everything Jug
to have the thing over with and It sjffej
i!n>n announced that he had c ' Q IME§
ett.
Cole admitted that he had senrwßH
long term In the Columbus
tfary for shooting a man. but dSftNPP
he put in a year in a Vlrf/oiS'prlflML
The case will go to the Jury daring
thr afternoon ~ -v -
DONALD HENDERSON OIES.
K A LAM A ZOO. Mich. Jan *
aid C. Henderson. founder of the Ana r
gnu Qatette, died In the lUt* aifßWtj
here Wela*aAkf morning

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