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The Detroit times. [volume] (Detroit, Mich.) 1903-1920, January 21, 1909, LAST EDITION, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016689/1909-01-21/ed-2/seq-1/

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READ THE ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE TIMES’ GREAT PRIZE VOTING CONTEST ON PAQE 6
No Tainted Ads.
NINTH YEAR, NO. 97.
SIXTY-SIX DEAD IN
CHICAGO CHID
DISASTER
STATE'S ATTORNEY WILL DETER
MINE RESPONSIBILITY FOR STU
PENDOUS LOSS OF LIFE—47
BODIES RECOVERED.
CHICAGO, Jan. 21.—Search for
more victim* of the terrible crib Are
oleaster. from which 47 bodies have
already boon recovered, was continueJ
today. The crew of the tug T. T. Mor
-jrd and a city lire boHt early began
to drag the lake In the belief that at
1.-’ast ten nun perished In the water,
i. is thought that several other bodies
May be found In the rulfls.
Sllty-Btx is the lat* st llgure given to
day, as the number of victims of the
..oiocaust that wiped out the “Inter
mediate'* cr»b two miles ofT Seventy
i ;ird-si.
The estimate of the total toll of
Cv7 victims was made by a careful sum
mary of thg list of employes and the
l.st o f missing. It Is believed that
lae number may even jo Increased.
Coroner Hoffman touay impaneled a
,ury end ordered a lug held in readi
’.less to lake the members to the crib.
’State's Attorney Waynian also entered
i >e investigation, and declared that he
would Inaugurate an official probe to
determine responsibility for the stu
p ndous loss ot life
Pathetic scenes were enacted around
t;ie undertaking rooms, where hun
dreds of relatives and friends of men
believed to have been among the holo
. oust victims pleaded with unyielding
policemen for an opportunity to view
the charred torsos in canvas bags,
‘i nere was not one of the bodies, how
ever. In any way recognizable and the
police refused to permit the ghastly
s.ght to bo viewed.
Husband Is Safe.
One woman who had mourned he
husband for lost and was comforted by
J.is return today, whs Mrs. James
Walsh. He had been employed on the
Intermediate crib and yesterday morn
.ng left his home hs usual for work.
Outside the house, however, he deter
mined that he was tired of his Job, and
instead of going to his mid-lake ti.sk,
he went to Hammond, Ind., and ther*
secured another position. He did not
u-turn until today.
The victims were blown to pieces by
exploding powder, burned to deuth by
tae resuitant Are or drowned in the
icy waters of Lake Michigan. They ,
were employed In a submarine tunnel \
at the wooden crib, a mile and a half
i-nni shore. The crib was und in the
construction of anew submarine wa
ter tunnel connecting with the south ,
side shore of the city.
Owing to the difficulty experienced
by small craft In icaching the crib (
uiiring the winter, most of the work- |
i ’.er. employed on the work, particular- |
lv those who had no families, slept in
temporary bunks at the crib. It was
; i s t as these men had been awakened
jor the day s work that the explosion
und subsequent Are caused the pande
monium which resulted in the great
1 )*» of life.
As nearly as the investigators havo
t een able to ascertain the explosion ,
hud Its origin In a powder house of
i mail dimensions, situated about* 100
yards from the crib structure proper,
. but at the same time being a part
of the general structure built ou found- '
. tions resting on the bottom of the ,
lake at this point. In this outhouse, •
the George W. Jackson Cos. stored trom
time to time, Just enough powder anti
dynamite for urgent "tse In the work
iff constructing the water tunnel and
in some manner, not yet known, the ;
explosives were put Into ac tion.
Workman Gives Alarm.
The dull detonation, muffled as It
was by the crunching of floating lco
against the crib and the atmosphere
laden with heavy fog. simply
moused # the attention of the work
men, according to survivors, and It
was not until the heat of the flames
p.r.d the stifling smoke penetrated the
M>-called • living room” of the crib and
the tunnel beneath the waters of the
lake that the full Import of the dis
aster dnwned upon the workmen, cut
off from quick succor.
One of the workmen, with a cooler
head than his fellows, abandoned the
thoutlng and frantic men on the crib
j latform and made his way through
the smoke to a little enclosure In
which was a telephone that com
municated with the shore station. The
drowsy attendant on shore was
brought into action by a violent ring
ing of the telephone bell, and this was
the raessnge that set on foot the work
of reacue.
•‘The crib Is on Are. For God’s sake
rend help at once or we will be burn
ed alive. The tug"
At this point communication ceased
and, through the fog, an occasional
burst of flame and an unmistakable
odor of smoke made It known to the
watchers on shore that the telephone
message was In earnest.
The tug T. T. Morford, In charge of
Capt. Johnson, had forced its prow
earlier In the morning to an anchor
nge within a abort distance of the im-
I»erlled crib, and this boat wan the
flrat to get Into the work of rescuing
the fremied workmen. The Ice made
1t impossible for the tug to reach the
Improvised pier, but a small boat was
placed in aervlce to carry
to the ateamsr and to rescue those
who had plunged into the waters of
the lake rather than face the flames,
which were raging on the crib stric
ture.
WATER POWEfTSoARD
ASKS FOR U. S. EXPERT
LANOINO, Mich., Jan. 21. (Spe
cial.)—The special investigating com
mittee on the water power has wired
the United State# department of agrl
culture to vend an expert at once to
aid la the work.
&he $ droit Utilities
Heads Committee
Investigation Local
Traction Problem
m
'. '-Bl ‘
iIV-V'
ii« \\ k w. gnnv.
Tfela ui’lUkDUkiu bualueMM muu Ima
In-on iiiififilnioualy (i’li-i-lril etui Ir uni n
ol I lie “Commit Ire of Ml" (but *>lll
cuilriiDir to rvolvo u Molutlon of l»r
--trolt’a trurtlon problem.
SMALLER SCHOOL
! BOARD FAVORED
FOR DETROIT
CITIZENS BELIEVE THAT SYSTEM
OF FEWER INSPECTORS, ELECT
ED AT LARGE, WOULD ELIMIN
ATE MANY EVILS OF PRESENT.
Sentiment for a smaller school
: board, the members of which shall 1 e
elected at lurge Instead of ward rep
resentatives, is very strong with many
citizens who have given the matter
thought. Comparison is generally
made between the troubles and fac
tional spirit of the present board and
'the harmonious action of the smaller
commissions handling other municipal
matters such as the fire commission
and water board.
Mayor Itreitmeyer does not feel In
clined to take sides In the matter Just
at present
i 'There are other matters up now
hikl I would rather wait for a time be
fore discussing this,” he said Thurs
day morning.
"I am certainly in favor of a smaller
board.” said Secretary E. R. Schreiter,
of the council committee, emphatically.
"It would be much better than the
present plan. 1 honestly think that
a goodly proportion of our school in
spectors are unfit to sit In a board of
education. We could adopt some plan
by which the membership of a smaller
board would be distributed over the
!city so that there could not be the ob
jection thut they all come from the
First and Second wards. We should
' have a change, however.”
”1 favor a small board as being more
I competent to pass on school matters.”
says Attorney Clyde I. Webster. "Such 1
a body would attract the services of
| the best men In the community.
| ‘Without casting any reflection on
any particular member of the present
I board —for some wards are very well
! represented—l would favor a change
in the board to a smaller body,” says
I Paul C. Renaud. There would he im
| provement, 1 am sure, in getting rid
jof the petty matters of patronage and
ward politics that now have so much
' effect.”
Howard C. Heck, who had an oppor
tunity as deputy controller to study
( the hoard of education methods, favors
Ia different board although he does not
outline any definite plan except that
a smaller and more compact board of
the best talent available should be
! chosen.
WILLETT WILL
NOT BECUSUREO
WASHINGTON, Jan. 21. —No resolu
tion of censure will be returned
against Rep. Willett, of New York,
for his speech In the house last week,
In which he severely criticized the
president.
The sj)ecial committee held another
bm«Ub| today, ud dec!dad that in
case any action U recommended they
can only ask that the speech be ex
punged from the recoid. Tile house
rules do not permit them to return a
resolution of censure of Mr. Willett.
It Is thought now that the committee
will make Its report the first of uext
I week.
SUBURBAN ’PHONE
COMPANY FORMED
The Inter-Gount.v Telephone Cos., an
organisation of Northvlllo men formed
for the purpose of eonstruetlng a tele
! phonb lino In Wayne county, filed ar
ticles jf Incorporation Thursday morn
ing The company Is capitalised at
tlO.nno. all of which has been paid in.
Clement C. Yerkes, Louie 8. Babbitt
end Robert C. Yerkes hold lflrt shares
of slock each, and Frank Thompson
, and Frank A. Irvins bold one share
I each.
POSTAL SAVINGS
BILL WILL BE
DEFEATED
BANKERS AND ADVOCATES OF
CURRENCY REFORM OPPOSE
I
SYSTEM—STATESMEN SAY IT IS
STEP TOWARD PATERNALISM.
WASHINGTON, Jan. 21. —Unless
some unexpected power or InAuence
may come up to the help of the uuvo
! cute* of u postal savings bank system
thut meuaure will be defeated again,
; like the parcels post bill, the bill to
increase the pay of steamships fur
transportation of United States malls
and other measures of equal import
ance, buys Win. E. Curtis In a dis
patch to the Chicago Record-Herald.
Congress will appropriate $20,000,-
000 for buttle ships and torpedo boats
without hesitation, hut not one cent
for the encouragement of the com
merce which those battle ships are
intended to protect. The price of one
battle ship would build a Aeet of
merchant vessels thut would furnish
sufficient transportation facilities tor
our exporters to Central und South
America, to China and the Philippines,
and contribute to the prosperity of
thousands of manufacturers and mil
lions of farmers wiiose products ure
called for in the other republics of
this continent.
The same successful opposition ap
pears to the parcels post system, by
which farmers and other country peo
ple can trade by mail. Thut come*
chiefly from the country merchant,
who is afraid that customers in his
neighborhood will do their shopping
in the cities through the rural deliv
ery service.
The opposition to the postal savings
hank bill comes from several sources.
First, managers of state and local
banks, who fear they will lose their
depositors; second, from the savings
hanks already established, who fear
their depositors will transfer their ac
counts; third, from people who think
the government ought not to go into
the banking business, and, Anally,
from tli*’ members of the currency
commission, who believe that the en
(Contlnucd on Fas* Five.)
COURT DOUBTS
RADFORD IS ILL
REFUSES TO POSTPONE CASE UN
LESS LEGAL PROOF OF ILL
NESS IS FURNISHED.
When the suit of Henry Meier, of
the firm of Y)onaldson & Meier, archi
tects. against Attorney George \V. Rad
ford, was called In Judge Murphy’s
court Thursday afternoon, it was an
nounced that Mr. Radford was ill and
would not be able to appear.
.Judge Murphy refused to accept the
unsupported word of the attorney who
announced the Illness, and said that
unless legal proof were Introduced
showing that Mr. Radford was unable
tu appear in court, the hearing would
igo on without him.
I Mr. Radford was about the court ap
jparently In the best of health all day
Wednesday, and the announcement of
this Illness was a surprise to those In
terested In the case.
When the heirs of the Oxnard estate,
in the handling of Radford Is
charged with some irregular transac
tions, were seeking to compel an ao
| counting, the hearing was greatly de
layed because of Mr. Radford's ill
! ness.
Several years ago Mr. Meier ob
tained a Judgment for $14,000 in Lu
cerne county. Pa., and he turned the
judgment over to Mr. Radford. Now
he alleges that he has received only
about $3,000 from Radford, and he
asks for an accounting to show what
i became of the balance.
I
COPS NAS WOMAN
ON A WILD RIDE
■■- ■ ■
BOSTON, Mass.; Jan. 21.—After a
wild ride from New’ York in Hn at
tempt to break the automobile record
to Boston. Mrs. Kenneth P. Otis, of
Cleveland, holder of the automobile
record between Cleveland and Buffalo,
is arraigned In the Watertown court
today (or using chains on her auto
while driving on the metropolitan
parkway Her auto became stalled In
snowdrifts near Springfield und after
being dug out she made good time to
Watertown. There she lost so much
time trying to secure bail that she
gave up the attempt to get u record.
DRUNKEN MAN NOT
SEEN FOR 8 MONTHS
ROYAL OAK, Mich., Jan. 21—M.
J Carlev, of this city, who has recent
ly visited Kansas, says that prohibi
tion Is a distinct success in that state.
The anti-saloon law has not accom
plished all that might be desired, he
says, because the federal government
continues to Issue tax receipts to
liquor dealers and to protect Interstate
shipments of liquor. But there Is lesa
crime in the state since prohibition
obtained and marked progress la no
ticeable In all lines of Industry. A real
estate mamdn Knnsaa City, Kss., said
ho had not soon a drunken man for
eight months. ,
Job Printing done right. Time* Print*
i tan Cos.. II John R-at. Phono 1491
THURSDAY, JANUARY ai, 1909.
SISTERS SPLIT UP
IN DIVORCE SUIT
OF PARENTS
ONE TESTIFIES FOR AGED CORNE
LIUS WEAVER, WHILE OTHER
STANDS BY MOTHER—LATTER
DENIES HUBBY'S CHARGES.
Cornelius Weaver, aged 75, hobbled
i to the stand in Judge Murphy's court,
; Wednesday afternoon, and asked for
Ia divorce from his wife, Henrietta.
( aged 57. He alleges that she left
their home In Nattawa, Mich., cuine
! to Detroit, and opened a rooming
. house of questionable character at No.
i64 Broadway, loiter she engaged In
• the saloon business at No. 313 Mlchl
. gan uve. In partnership with “Billy''
| Ferguson, u bartender, und It was al
; leged that she anti Ferguson lived to
gether. Under cross-examination the
j old man admitted having been mixed
I up in three divorce cases, and having
once settled a breach of promise case,
; but he professed to have forgotten a
charge of a semi-criminal nature
j brought against him by a woman.
Weaver's testimony was corroborat
ed by his daughter, Mrs. Lizzie Mar
j ttu, of No. 64 Duffleld-st., who was
anxious to testify against her mother.
I She admitted going to Oklahoma and
j obtaining a divorce there from her
Arst husband.
John touted as a star wit
ness for the husband, did not respond
to his name, and a deputy sheriff was
sent out to And him. The deputy re
turned with John, but the latter was
in a state of Intoxication which made
It unwise to put him on the witness
stand. st*Judge Murphy sent him over
to the Jail to straighten up.
Injuries sustained by her husband In
a fall from a haystack are alleged by
Mrs. Weaver to be the cause of her
domestic troubles. In the fall Weaver
was Injured about the head, and wms !
helpless for three months. When he |
recovered, his wife said, he had chung- j
ed In his treatment of her, cursed her,
frequently struck her and Anally or
dered her out of their home.
Mrs. Weaver denied the testimony
of her husband and daughter that she
ran a questionable place at No. 64
Broadway, claimed her place was re-!
spectable, and that her daughter, Mrs ,
Martin, who now testifies against her,
was one of her most frequent visit
ors.
“She brought her baby there for me
to care for dozens of times while she
went to the theater and to do shop
ping; she never found any fault with
my place then,” said the mother.
Referring to her daughter's testi
mony that she had spent SI,OOO on a
trip to Oklahoma, Mrs. Weaver denied
spending anywhere near that amount,
and said she went upon being notified
of the fiind of life her daughter, Mrs.
Martin, was leading. This roused Mrs
Martin very much and she whispered
excitedly to her father’s attorney.
Mrs. Weaver said that she Inherited
$l,lOO, which she gave to her husband
to pay on a mortgage, and she has
never received a cent In return. In
addition her husband collected rent
on property she owned for 20 years.
Mis. Myrtle Wylie, another daugh
ter, now the wife of a department
store manager, takes sides with her
mother. She said she visited often at
No. 64 Broadway, and the character
of the place then was above reproach.
The case was not finished when
court adjourned at noon.
FIVE FARMER!;
ON COOPER JURY
SUPPORTER OF GOV. PATTERSON
IN CONTEST ,AGAINST CAR
MACK IS A JUROR.
NASHVILLE. Tenn., Jan. 21—Ex
cellent progress Is being made In the
selection of a Jury to try the Cooper
Sharpe case. Another Juror was se
cured this morning before 10 o’clock.
This Is J. M. Whitworth, one of the
most prominent farmers In the conn
ty. a man of wealth and Influence. Ho
was Known a:s u supporter of (lov. Pat
terson during the celebrated race be
tween the governor and Senator Car
mack.
Five jurors, who had been secured
by 10 o’clock today were as follows
E M Burks, farmer, G. S I>elgh.
farmer; G. A l,ane, farmer; John Me*
j Pherson, farmer, and James M. Whit
worth, farmer.
13 ARE SAVED FROM
DEATH IN FIRE
NEW YORK, Jan. 21—Thirteen
children and their parents were sav
ed from d*ath, in a fire in the tene
ment house at 916 Rockaway ave .
Brooklyn, today by half a dozen mo
tormen employed by the Brooklyn
Rapid Transit company. The motor
men were on their way to work when
they saw the flames. On the second
floor they rescued Henry Fort, his
wife and their two children, anti David
Zlngold and h!n four youngsters
Then they went to the top floor and
carried out .Morris Hermann, his wife,
who has pneumonia, • and their seven
' children.
_______ __
Newberry in New York.
NEW YORK Jan. 21.—Secretary of
the Navy Newberry inspected th"
Brooklyn navy vaid yesterday. Hu
come to Now York quietly, Intending
to surprise the officials. He was un
able to get aboard the government tug
before the men fired a salute of IT
guns. The preparatory work for the
new hattlesnlp Florida was Inspeeted
I thoroughly.
jnh Printing dons right Time* Print*
1 tag I'o.. II Jonn R -it. Phorn till.
POUNDED BY WIFE
AND HER SISTER;
GETS WARRANTS i
JOSEPH CAVANAUGH EXPLAINS
THAT GALLANTRY PREVENTED
HIM BTRIKING BACK-COURT
ORDERS WOMEN S ARREST.
Justice Jeffries neurly lost his
breath when Joseph Cavanaugh, a big
strapping fellowr with Atlus-like
shoulders and braw’ny arms, as hard
us steel, made application, Thursday
morning against two women, charging
them with assault and buttery. The
women he named were his wife, Mrs.
Mamie Cuvanaugh, and her sister,
Miss Rena Morrow, both of whom live
in Windsor.
“Is this a joke?'* queried Justice
Jeffries.
"Indeed, It's no Joke," returned Cav
annugh. "I mean what 1 say."
“What, a fellow of your strength
assaulted by u woman?"
"Well, your honor, being a gentle
man. I never strike u woman and 1
let them beat ine up to their heart's
content.”
Cavanaugh's gallantry appealed to
the justice and he Issued the warrants
without delay, ordering that the
women be taken Into custody lnsteud
of being merely notified to appear, as
Is usually the case.
Cavanaugh aud his wife are separ
ated. It appeared. A few nights ago,
according to the man’s story, he
caugnt Mrs. Cavanaugh In the eon*
pany of a man friend and ft rather
dramatic scene followed. Asa sequel
to the little episode Mrs. Cavanaugh
and her sister. It Is alleged, visited
Cavanaugh’s room at No. 253 First
st., Wednesday night and gave him a
terrific beating with their fists, pum
moling him until they were exhaust
ed
Cavanaugh also secured a warrant
for the arrest of Forest Beaman, the
man In the case, who rooms at Jeffer
son-ave. and Beaublen-st. Beaman ts
charged with having threatened to
kill Cavanaugh when the two met on
the street following the husband's
recent discovery.
CHORUS LADY
WINKS AT MAN
GROWS “SASBT" WHEN "CALLED”
AND NOW POLICE ARE ON
HER TRAIL.
Until Friday night, Miss Jerry Mel
ville, a rather prepossessing brunette
with a very breezy manner (she hul's
from Chicago) was a “chorus lady"
with the Ilizzy lzz> company, now
playing In the Lyceum theater, at SIH
per. Today the lady Is out of a Job,
and, what is worse, a police officer Is
on her trail with a warrant charging
her with disturbing the peace.
It all happened during the first act
of Busy Izzy, Wednesday* evening. Miss
Jerry did a foolish thing. At least,
tlat’s what they say. She winked at a
Sian In the audience as she tripped
ftast the footlights In one of her mer
riest flings. The stage manager, Ar
thur Montgomery, caught her ut it and
"called" her.
“And If you do It aguln. I’ll fin a
you,” he said heartlessly.
That aroused Miss Jerry’s Ire, and
what she said to the stage manager
was a-plentv, say those who had ears
to heat Miss Jerry got the hook, then
and there, which only made matters
worse, and Mr. Montgomery, It Is said.
Anally resorted to drastic measures
and forcibly ejected the fractious
chorus lady from the wings It will
be threshed out in court Friday.
JUNKET TRIP
BEGINS FEB. 1.
LANSING. Mich., Jan. 21.—The
junket committee of both branches of
th** legislature has fixed Feb. 1 ns the j
starting time of the visit to state in- ■
stltutlons The special water power!
investigating committees are added,
also sergeant fit arms of each house. ,
Wives of the members are Included
A special car will be chartered and
the party will go dir*ct to Marquette*
from Grand Rapids, returning via Chi
cago.. There will he 60 in the party.
| THE WEATHER, j
Detroit nml » lelnll y i I horsitny night
nml Krliln), cloud), uoarttlrd vt.nther.
prnltnhl) Hull* *in»« Uurrlr»t cooler to
night | light t*» modcrgte uorllierl)
n lints.
l.nnrr Wlchlg-ini or •mot*
Sit r rlcs nml cooler tonight | KrlilN),
fulrj moilcrnl • north to nortlicnst
-- itnl*.
not iti.% i r.tirr.it tii hk*.
it n. m I” «. iii It
7 i. m as ii ii. iii ia
Mn. m a* 12 noon ir,
It n, in 4o I p m to
One yenr ngo today* Maximum froi
perntore, l.* t minimum. .141 menu, till
elotol' (it'll trnee of ruin.
*llll r«»» r. 1 *l:7*l n. m., nml net* nt
4 iaa p. m.
tlreimlrr, I mhrrlla*. 2*l Monroe.
Among the fnvomMy kiiown table
| Peers. Slroh’s stands pre-eminent ns
the s'* dote standard of excellence.
Phone Mnln 114 for a case.
An entomologist has figured out
that, to make a pound of clover honey,
r be** must make S.7iVmu)o trips be
tween the blossoms and the hive.
W. R. Hears! Says War
Is Near in California
p— 1=— armtsm. ... ui-ji
WSSSSSS*
Win. It. th«- Ne« York pub
llah«*r, ■mnida h not* ol mrnluK re
garding Ihc poMlbllltf of nar b*-
t«**n the I ulted Mtnl*» and Japan
mb a result of the proponed autl-
Japaneae lewlalatlou In California.
U. S. AND CANADIAN
VESSELAAEN WILL
ACT IN CONCERT
WILL UNITE IN EFFORTS TO SE
CURE IMPROVEMENTS IN GREAT
LAKES WATERWAYS OPEN
SHOP POLICY REAFFIRMED.
Vessel men of the United States and
of Cunadu will unite their efforts hero
after to get Improvements in the wa
terways along the greut lakes. The
presence of Dominion delegates In the
meeting of the Lake Carriers thin
week has brought up several matters
111 which the vessel Interests of the
two countries can act together.
On request of Capt. Leonard, of To
ronto, to the Lake Carriers, Thursday
morning, adopted u memorial to the
Dominion authorities along with the
memorial of the Canadian marine In
terests, asking for certain improve
ments in the waterways, in the mut
ter of grain carrying, the two assoc ia
tltjfls nre also drawing together, the
question of a uniform hill of lading
being discussed Thursday morning, al
though without definite action.
President Livingstone was author
ized to appoint a committee from tho
Lake Carriers to attend tho meeting
of the Dominion Marine association to
further the working understanding of
the two bodies, und will name tho com
mittee later.
Tho mooting date of the Lnke Car
riers whs changed to the third Thurs
day in January. Resolutions of coin
-1 mendation were adopted relative to
the thorough and accurate methods or
tho United States lake survey under
MaJ. Kellar.
A resolution was adopted again urg
Ing congress to pension members of
the life saving croewtj who are Injured
or grow old in the service. The gov
ernment ts nlso asked to expend $30,-
000 for vapor lamps In Mghhousea and
to replace ordinary gas buoys with
(ContluuHl on l*ai*c Fi*«*.)
NO MONEY FOR
COMMITTEE OF 50
There la muc h rotation among the
aldermen and others in the city hall as
to where the money In to come from to
finance the expenses of the ‘commit
tee of 50.” The city’* contingency
fun da have been low for more than a
yeai and there Is nothing available In
the funds which are usaully drawn
upon for unexpected expense*.
The legal aspect of the matter,
whether the council has power to ap* !
proprinte money for the use of a bod.,
which is merely voluntary and not cre
ated according to any law, will be tip
to the city’s legal department as soon
as any bills come In.
•*lt Is a verv grave question as to
the legality,” remarked Controller
I -oremus
INTERFERES WITH FOOD
INSPECTOR; FINED $25
John Hart, of the Hart butter store
on Mlchlgarteuve., was found guilty In
Justice Stein’s court, Thursday of ob
structing John 11 Harron, a state food
inspector, who went to the store for
a sample of a certain grade of butter
Hart was advertising He was lined
$j. r » with the option of ”>o duvs.
E. J.. Croxton. charged wit : practic
ing veterinary medicine without b' ing
registered, was found guilt > and lined
slo. Joseph Hawkins, of the -state vVt
erinary board, was the eomplaluatit.
DRUG CLERKS FINED
FOR VIOLATING LAW
Five of the 11 druggists and drug
i lerks reretit lv eoniplaiued against b>
State Inspector Frank L. Hendersou
lor violating the stHU* phnrmaty law
were found guilty hii 1 b> .lusti' <
Stein, Thursday morning 11.
Young was the onlv proprietor pres
cut He paid a Hue of $v Charles
Freeman. Donald M< Hain, \\ alter I’a
geau nnd J. K. O'Rourke, clerks. e,», h
}<ald a line of $lO The alternative
was fixed at 80 davs’ Imprisonment
, The defendants in most Instances.
11 leaded ignorance of the law.
LAST
EDITION
ONE CENT
JAPANESE ARE AN
ENEMY WITHIN
OUR CATES
—FOHMF.K MAYOR PHELAJf.
JAPANESE WILL DESTROY CALI
FORNIA IF IMMIGRATION 18 NOT
STOPPED—NATION MUST GIVI
ASSISTANCE TO CALIFORNIA.
WASHINGTON, Jan. 21.— Great In
terest was created here today by the
publication of a telegram from Will
iam Randolph Hearst. at San Francls
eo. In which he calls attention to the
imminent dauger from the presence
of Japuuese in California and the pos
sibility of war with Japan aa a result
of the action of the California legisla
ture in taking measures to protect the
state from Japanese immigration and
curtailing the privileges of the Japan
ese now In this country. California
senators and congressmen as well aa
representative Ban Francisco business
men now lu Washington for the pur
pose of appearing before the publlo
lands committee in the matter of the
Hetch-Hetchy grant were equally em
phatic In expressing their approval of
Mr. Hearst's views.
Former Mayor James D. Phelan
said: "I believe that the situation In
California Is very grave and that the
Atlantic fleet should have remained
hi Pacific wuters. The navy should be
increased and a great fleet, as large
a8 that of Japan, should permanently
remain in the Pacific. Hawaii Is the
key to the Pacific. It is now overrun
with Japanese fighting men. It should
be made by fortifications the Pacific
Gibraltar. In California and In Ha
waii we have today an enemy within
our gates. The Japanese will destroy
California If the immigration la not
Immediately stopped and the right to
own land restricted. California la
bidding for a desirable Immigration
and the Japanese keep It out. As
long ns the fleet Is not In the Pacific
1 think it unwise at this time for the
[California legislature to act, but- the
nation must give us assurances that
no more Japanese shall Invade Cali
fornia.
"Their coming Is none the less an
invasion because they come under
treaty rights The next treaty must
recognise the fact that racial differ
ences make the Japanese a menace to
our peace, safety and prosperity. It
Is simply a question of self-preserva
tion with the Californians. lam sure
that the poople of the east will accept
our Judgment on this question. Ha
waii has fallen Into the hands of the
Japanese; California is In grave
danger. What step shall be next 1
would say that the Japanese In field,
in shop and In store have driven the
white man out of business and that
we cannot live side by Bide with the
Japanese snd exist. We speak for the
white race and for American Institu
tions based upon Intelligence and pat
riotism when we demand that thi#
question be settled and settled now."
Rep. Engelbrlght said: “You can
say for me that Mr. Hearat has tha
facts down right. The situation as ha
describes It Is correct I haven't seen
the San Francisco papers yet, and am
not exactly familiar with the sltuar
tion In the legislature In regard to
the so-called anti-Japanese bills.”
Senator Flint said: “I do not car*
t«> give an expression for publication
touching upon conditions In Califor
nia as they relate to the Japanese
question. The conditions at this time
are too chaotic to call for public ex
pression. Mr. Hearst is well acquaint
ed with conditions on the coast and
undoubtedly Is well informed snd
knows whereof he speaks."
It Is reported that the greater part.
If not all of the California congres
sional delegation has been asked to
meet the president today for the pur
pose of discussing the present Japan
ese situation In California.
Perkins,Says Station
Warships on Pacific
WASHINGTON, Jan. 21.—President
Roosevelt talked cautiously today with
his congressional visitors about the
Japanese Ciilifdriila situation. He said
h** thought nothing before congress
now is of half the Importance as this
serious problem. | The president talked
v\ Ith great deliberation and care, rec
(Conllniirrt no I'acr Klgkt.)
henryTorTbuys
TEN m FARM
Henry Ford, of the Ford Motor Cos.,
has purchased the Ten Eyck farm of
f>oo acres out Michigan ave . in River
Rouge.
AGED MAN ASKS
$5,000 FOR BEATING
I.co ll< llund. a non of Detective Hoi
lan 1 Is deft ndunt in a suit being
1 heard by Judge Mandell. In whten
Itehjamtn F t’lark asks la.uOu for in*
uric-, he alleged he sustained when
Holland beat him up in his yard on
Sunday Aug ■». ISWT. Holland is a
vtalwart young man, and Clark 1*
1 Iderly and feeble.
The troubl* occurred when Jesse
Clark, a son of the‘plaintiff, threw a
lull with whl h Holland had been
nl:t\iie- from Ids yard into the street.
Tlii angered Holland, mid It Is cl4ld|~
• and he knocked young Clark down;
when the father came to his son s aid.
he was also handled roughly.
\n arsenic smelter at Everett.
Wash., makes enough of the oolson
ea h week to kill every man. woman
and child in the western hemisphere.

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