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The Detroit times. [volume] (Detroit, Mich.) 1903-1920, May 06, 1912, AFTERNOON EDITION, Image 10

Image and text provided by Central Michigan University, Clark Historical Library

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016689/1912-05-06/ed-1/seq-10/

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«»• —* w*U and ard of •
5 Fl mmr wRO a circulation of 30.000 that is takon hom« and
K, than to hava that of ana with a clrcu-
that la only tookod a» and thrown Into
Wm% Qwttof^—MAYOß GAYNOR, O W NEW YORK.
WHEN A PROPOSED REFORM CANNOT BE
ARGUED AGAINST FAIRLY, THERE'S MERIT IN II
-I
-f
produce the above cartoon from a western exchange because it presents at a glance, plainly and un
, the unfair and vicious chief argument of those who oppose the recall of judges.
the case of the initiative and referendum, municipal and government ownership, the direct election
States senators and the presidential preference primary, the opposition to the suggested reform against
cartoon is aimed, has had to go outside the bounds of fairness to get an argument against it.
the opposition to any reform is put to these straits, you can make up your mind that there is some
merit to that reform.
utoon which we reproduce is not a good cartoon.
iota good cartoon because in representing that which is impossible and could not be, and in so doing
die weakness of the opposition to the recall of judges.
id a judge sitting upon the bench.
s rendered a decision which has displeased a body of men who have gone and got a rope.
ill my, for example, that he has just put a number of strikers in jail, without a trial by jury, on
i of violating an injunction against pioketing their place of employment and urging, calmly and
dance, the strike breakers to join their ranks.
urns dene only last week right here in Kichigan in a Kalamazoo court.
bribers were young women at that—underpaid workers in a corset factory.
ispieased citizens have put a rope about the judge’s neck, and presumably are about to drag the judge
real tree and there hang him until he is dead.
•call of judges, in other words, is lynch law. »
lynch law is PUNISHMENT WITHOUT A TRIAL OR HEARING, AS WAS ADMINISTERED TO THE
■PUKOIG CHRL FACTORY WORKERS IN KALAMAZOO.
NOWHERE AS YET HAS THERE BEEN AS MUCH AS A SUGGESTION THAT ANY JUDGE COULD, BE
[ RECALLED WITHOUT A HEARING; WITHOUT A DEFENSE, OR AT ANY TIME WITHOUT FIRST A MA
IJORITY VOTE AGAINST HIM IN THE SUBMISSION OF HIS CASE TO THE VOTERS.
HE gets a trial, ALWAYS.
First, let's take the rope from the judge’s neck and put it under his arms, so that he may be yanked
merely from the bench, as any judge found to be notoriously unfair or prejudiced on the side of wealth 01 the
corporations as against the poor man should be treated.
Then let’s go back not so many years ago to a dissenting opinion handed down in the supreme court of
"our own state, just for an illustration.
A Ray City man employed as a switchman by a railroad entering this city, was engaged, while in pursuit ol
Iftpd and butter, in the act of coupling cars.
In a coupling, his foot got caught in an ILLEGAL frog at a switch point.
The law at the designated the use only of frogs in which it would be impossible for one’s foot to get
They picked his remains up under the train and put them in n cracker box and buned them that way.
| This man left a widow and 11 children.
Suit was brought against the railroad company, whose lawyers wanted the judge to decide the case in favor
«f the railroad by taking it from the jury and directing a verdict.
The judge wouldn’t do it, and we wouldn’t want to yank the rope on this judge, would we T
The jury gave the widow left with 11 children a verdict of $15,000.
The railroad company appealed, of course. *
The supreme court sustained the verdict, but not without a dissenting opinion from one jndge.
This jndge took the position that the 12 men who heard the case in the lower court were a bunch of blooming
* idiots and inoompetents, so to speak: at any rate that they were not capable of rendering judgment in a case that
Ringed entirely upon fact; and setting his own individual opinion against the 12, stated that the switchman,
s (WHOSE FOOT GOT CAUGHT IN AN ILLEGAL SWITCH, remember,) met death THROUGH HIS OWN CARE
OBSNESS !
How about giving the rope a yank in the case of a judge of this kind in the interest of widows with 11 chil
dt«a when the breadwinner hms been taken away through the criminal negligence of n big corporation employer?
'■ l '■■■■
It mist be taken into consideration always, however, that even a judge of this kind couldn’t be unseated until
“ tile people ad so decided by their votes, which isn’t exactly lynch law, to our way of thinking.
By a majority vote he might be sustained.
There is provided for even this kind of a judge, it would appear, safeguards that are not for switchman
running the risk of illegal switches and not for widows with 11 children dependent upon ONE for bread for
12 souths.
There arc arguments against the recall of judges. )
It is a drastic step to contemplate, not to be taken tso suddenly.
It la a question that should be well considered and intelligently discussed between citixens.
But let’s be fair about it.
Fhinr, at least, in opposition to it than resort to the silly argument presented in the cartoon.
Where Do Heron Come From?
Aft analysis of the Carnegie hero
■■fell commission's report dated Jan
Tilt 1112. shows these figures on the
tttftl number of swards made since the
Opnd became operative April 15, 1904.
EjMpbtnl number of awards 583
Awarded to wage workers 406
I Awarded to students and school
■fectoye
Awarded to business men 33
Awarded to professional men.. 21
Awarded to women and girls . . 31
’ Jt Is doubtless true that the notably
[ptvps proportion of awards to wage
Mortars Wgs due mainly to the fact
h f|bat they are engaged in the hazardous
Rpceupatlona which give more frequent
‘ opportunity for the display of hero
tint the fact remains that when th.>
■mprtuaity prose. the men of the din
y Mfall brigade were not found want.
\ hWt yfejra ready to make the su-
T
From Another Point of View
Catch any? That so? Neither did wa.
• • • •
Being another movement and its purpose “Boats for men."
• • • •
May is presented, alto, with a fine opportunity to product some April
showers.
• e • e
Quite to the contrary, that corset workers' strike is somewhat long
drawn out.
• • • #
In Tiger parlance, those flooded district! down Soqth are getting the
worst of the breaks. *
e • • • •
China wants to borrow $300,00(K000. So far at we ore concerned,
we Just paid our meat bill.
• • • • •
And that California woman of 104 who is going to cast her vote for
Taft is old enough to know better.
* * « •
Furthermore, the Progressive Democrat who would support ‘Champ
Clark would fish for catfish with dog biscuit.
• • • •
In selecting Roosevelt and Wilson delegates, Texas Is about the first
state to show itself both wise and consistent.
;*• • • •
Extemporaneous remarks are such as might be made by a man when
a Urge pickerel has gone with his line—that la to say. right off the reel.
Editorial Page of The Detroit Times
PHONE MAIN 3412 or CITY 2141-X
And on Sunday —CREST 145.
Or Write a Postal for a Ticket, Good on Our
»
SPECIAL FREE
GUEST CAR
TO THE
W oodward Ave. Chicken and Fruit
“LITTLE FARMS”
(9-Mile Road, with 1,800 feet frontage on Woodward
Ave., 40 minutes from City Hall. Fare 10c.)
THIS GREAT SALE WILL OPEN
Wednesday, May Bth
■ - - - i‘- ;• -his - 1 — 1 wrnimm&c=a*Mmm=sammammmam
• 9 •
No “Little Farms’* sold until then. First come, fii»t chance.
Our first guest car leaves the Congress Street side of the
Ford Building by special arrangement made with the D. U.
R. This car will make two trips each day, and 4 on Sunday
for 10 days during this special sale. Cars leave week days:
9A. M. and 2 P. M.;
1:30 and 3P. M. As we can only carry so many on each
trip, you should apply early.
REMEMBER—
Prices $249 UP
We promise if you phone or write your address for Free
Guest Tickets, that we will not send anyone to call on you
or trouble you:
Name
i
Address
Phone
. LITTLE FARMS
LAND COMPANY, Inc
Geo. S. Shaffner, Sec.
Office with
WALTER PIPER
406 Penobscot Bldg., 37 Fort St.

Main 3412, City 2141-X Member Detroit Real Estate Board
Monday. May 6,
1912

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