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The Detroit times. [volume] (Detroit, Mich.) 1903-1920, May 16, 1912, AFTERNOON EDITION, Image 8

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Page Eight
OARING MICHIGAN Mil
! TURNS MINDANAO MO
MEN MTS GOOD CITIZENS
R. A. Gilmore Was Partner in
Hotel in Wolverine State
14 Years Ago
NOW DEPUTY GOVERNOR
Tames 10,000 Cannibals and Is
Going Back To Philippine
Islands For More
MINDANAO
Is the largest—4l.s6S square
mi lee —of tbs I.SSS Philippine Isl
ands, and has the highest moun
tain peak. Mt. Apo. 10.312 feet up.
Some of its tribes are Moham
medan and speak Maglndanao.
Christian tribes In the north
ad east speak Blsayan, the
rhest of the Philippine lan
guages.
'The pagan mountain tribes, In
cluding the Diva Vaon. have
many different dialects and re
ligions of their own.
Coffee and rice are the prin
cipal products.
■jfifKtanao Is a trifle larger than
Peaftsylvanla.
SAN ' FRANCISCO. May 16
How'd you like, to be the only white
man in a Philippine Jungle, surround
ed by jungle beasts, snakes and In
sects. and 10,000 wild men?
That la the Job R. A. Gilmore, first
lieutenant of the Philippine scouts
tackled two years ago. Now he's
back in the United States on a fur
lough, but will soon return to his Job
of taming cannibals. He was the
first white man to go into the wild
district of Mindanao and stay. Two
Dthera attempted the work, but one
died immediately, and another after a
few weeks went violently insane as
t result of the harrowing experience
and the isolation.
Fourteen years ago Gilmore was
a porter in a Michigan hotel. To
day be is deputy governor and tribal
Justice in the district of Davao in the
laland of Mindanao, the sole law
maker, executive head and Judiciary
of the district.
Entering the army in 1899 he
worked up to his present commission
and in 1910 was sent into the interior
of Mindanao to civilize the wild men.
With a little band of native scouts
Gilmore tramped 126 miles through
the Jungle and over mountain and
established camp among savages who
had never seen a white man before.
He at once began to gather these
savages from the mountains into
groups, naming a native as a captain
over each gtoup. They were taught
to till the soil, their weapons were
taken from them, and an effort to civ
ilize them was made. Today 10,000
of these wild people are gathered to
gether Into 40 practically self gov
fining villages, tribal warfare has
’based and slavery is abolished.
j“The Diva Vaon tribe is the most
it yaga,” aays Lieut. Gilmore. "This
tribe has ‘began!, * whose sole quail
Stick to
The Old Habits
If you are perfectly well.
: iff if not, Change
BJL v
?T, , (See any fault in that philosophy?)
\ Thousands continue to “coddle” old habits such as
coffee and tea drinking; refusing to believe their aches
and ills are largely due to caffeine poisoning. (Caffeine
is the drug in coffee and tea.)
• But thousands are awakening to the truth about
coffee and tea, and changing to
POSTUM
It is made of wheat, and is a rich, palatable food
drink—free from caffeine or any other drug.
If you appreciate health and the full enjoyment of
physical and mental power, a ten days’ trial will show
“ There's a Reason”
.i& •' X-jt. tju-A •- A *■» •** if
Read letter to right.
For quick, convenient serving, try
INSTANT POSTUM
■mss?
tftauipjwtm 1 .
j ;
j i
REGULAR POSTUM—ISc size INSTANT POSTUM— 3Oc tin
Mkes 25 cups; 25c siae by UrOCerS makes 45 to 50 cups; 50c tin
makes 50 cups. makes 90 to 100 cups.
DDr*. • ;r ■
“There's a Reason" for Postum
, Pontum Cereal Company, Limited, Battle Creek, Michigan.
FORMER MICHIGAN MAN IN MINDANAO COSTUME
flcatloD for their title is proof that
they have killed half a hundred hu
man beings and eaten their livers.
These savages eat only the livers,
tearing them from the body as soon
os life is extinct.
“Now these ‘begani’ are all dis
armed and live peaceably. The great
est difficulty is in settling disputes
over the sale of women.
“Fathers sell their daughters for
a certain number of pigs or chick
ens, payable on the installment plan.
Frequently a father sells the same
daughter to three or four different
tribesmen. This makes trouble!
They have no written language and
3 MINUTES—ONE DEATH. / WASTE OF-
L CON
-1 DAY—4BO DEATHS. / CyjVJP'flON $1,000,000,000
1 YEAR—I72,BOO DEATHS. I \ EVERY YEAR.
It is eichr to prevent consumption —
hard to c|k« It
“A carsleea spitter with a little
cough is worse than a careless shoot
er with a big revolver.”
It is better to sleep in fresh air
than in a fresh grave.
Fresh air costs nothing; it costs
much time and money to get well
when you have consumption.
This is regular Postum in
concentrated form nothing
added.
Made in the cup—no boiling
—ready to serve instantly.
Postum made right —is
now served at most hotels, res
taurants, lunch rooms, soda
fountains, etc.
Instant Postum is put up in
air-tight tins and
Lieut. K. A. Gllaorr (Maiding) In na
tive niatumr. a belle us the tribe aad
tnu tribesmen In full panoply of war.
their records are kept by knots in
hemp.
“Supplies are brought to the camp
Every three minutes someone dies
of consumption in this country; every
day 480 die; every year 1172.800.
Consumption costs us a billion dol
lars a year.
Prevention is always better than
eure—especially Is it better in the
treatment of consumption.
Consumption can be cured, hut it
HARD TO_LEARN.
Takra Hard Eiprrlfafe to Track Pcopl*
soar Truth*.
Many people jeer at the Idea that
coffee causes the aches and alls they
suffer from; and often such people
will go on for years sticking steadfast
ly to the coffee and suffering month
in and month out but maintaining
“Coffee doesn’t hurt me." (Tea is Just
as injurious as coffee because it con
tains caffeine, the drug in coffee.)
A lady says:
“I did not learn the real truth until
I made the change, but I can now
positively state that the headaches I
had for about seventeen years were
caused by drinking coffee, for when
I changed and gave up coffee and
used Postum in its place I experi
enced entire relief. I have not been
troubled with headaches since I be
gan Postum.
"This, in brief, has been my experi
ence on the coffee question. Among
my friends I have seen many other
wonderful instances of the power of
this food drink when used in place of
the drug drink, coffee.
“Among my friends there are those
who tell me of relief from kidney
trouble, neuralgia and eczema by leav
ing off coffee and using Postum and
I have even known it to eaSe rheu
matic pains in limbs.
“I really believe these statements
f6r since I quit coffee and use Postum,
I never seem to have an ache or pain
and I would not dare go back to coffee
again.
“Not only myself but my family use
Poßtum exclusively and we think there
is no hot beverage that can take its
place. Nearly seven years’ steady use
of Postum convinces me i know what
1 am talking about when I say it is
food as well as drink and most valu
able to build up the system.” Name
given by Poatum Cos., Battle Creek.
Mich.
Ix>ok for the little book, “The Rosd
to Wellville,” in pkgs.
ippl!? j
THE DETROIT TIMES: .. . MAY .. IDI2
every three months, so four times a
year Lieut. Gilmore takes a band of
wild men 125 miles to get supplies,
the journey being made entirely on
loot. So dangerous is the road that
a day’s delay In the arrival in town
is the signal for great alarm among
the officers and friends. So difficult
!s the journey that not Infrequently
Lieut. Gilmore has reached the town
with torn and bleeding feet.
“There are still many thousands
more of these wild men in the island.”
cays Gilmore. “When we get them
into groups we teach them English,
so that the work for those who come
later will be much less difficult."
takes a long time. It’s a big Job. But
It’s no Job at all to keep from having
consumption.
Tou simply have to be careful —to
be clean and live rationally.
The Great White Plague spreads |
by the transmission of a minute germ
through careless spitting, bv common
drinking cups, by putting fingers In
fected with the germs In the mouth,
etc.
To ward off this dread disease you
must practice scrupulous personal
cleanliness. Don’t drink from a cup
that other folks use. Always wash
your hands before eating. Never put
your finger in your mouth.
Never work or sleep In a room
where there is no fresh air.
Remember that above all other
things in this regard. For folks who
get plenty of fresh air don’t often get
consumption. Fresh air is the best
tuberculosis antitoxin in the world.
Open your window wide when
you go to bed at night. Insist on
having good ventilation in your shop
or ycur office. Kick if the ventila
tion is poor. Ts It is not Improved
throw up your joh. It's better to be
out of a Job a while than to have con
sumption and be unable to work.
Live sensibly. Tat plain and
wholesome food, and plenty of it
Get eight hours of Bleep every night.
Then, If you do get consumption In
spite of all these precautions, simply
become more careful still in these re
gards—sleep more, out of doors or
with windows wide open; rest more
and eat more.
For there you get the four thing*
that, taken together, will cure con
sumption If it hasn’t gone too far.
SLEEP, FRESH AIR, REST.
GOOD FOOD.
And remember that you are a dan
ger to society if you have consump
tion and take care accordingly. Al
ways spit Into a special cup or a nap
kin that can be burned. Don't use
a public drinking cup, or dishes that
other foiks may use. Hold a hand
kerchief before your face when you
cough.
Ghost Talk.
Aunt Caroline came running into the
dining room, her kinky hair on end.
“Missus." she gasped, “I done met
a ghost out dar by de well.”
“You must have been mistaken,
Caroline,” said the lady of the house.
“There aren’t any bucli things as
ghosts.”
Aunt Caroline drew herself up
haughtily.
”Dey ain’t, ain’t dey? Well, what
would you say if I tole you this un
done spoke to me? Yessum, I heered
him.”
“Why. whAt did he gay?”
“Say." sniffed the dusky mistress of
the meals, "how you specs I know? I
neber learned dose here daid lang
wictaes.”—Chicago Journal.
Lawn
"She flevi the coop."
Tho AnnutJ Miracle
< ► ♦
“Funny thing about miracles. None
of them ever happens in our time.
They all occurred in biblical days,
observed the agnostic.
But is he quite right? Are not
miracles happening all the time? Let s
take a look about us right now in
tins bright May weather.
•Come." says Spring, talking to the
little blind roots, snuggling down lu
the brown earth, “Come, wuke up,
sleepy-heuds! Get to work'
“But we are cold,” say the roots.
“I’ll send you my golden sunshine,
says Spring.
-But we are thirsty!” object the
roots.
. “i’ll send you my silver rains,” says
the gentle task-mistress.
And what with the warmth and
moisture and the balmy airs, the
miracle 16 wrought. Down there un
der the earth those wonderful al
chemists. the roots begin work, la
boring with the same materials, each
picks and chooses those things that
it needs. And one accomplishes the
miracle of a violet’s blue. And an
other the sweet miracle of a roses
grace und flush and fragrance. And
another the Jaunty yellow of a Jon
quil.
Miracles? In what man-made dyc
vats are we achieving such colors. In
what laboratories are we creating
such wonderful perfumes? There are
miracles all the time if we but have
eyes to see and hearts to under
stand.
THE PIPER.
I will take my pipes and go now. for
the bees upon the sill
Are of the summer that is
coming from the r^ars;
T will take my pipes and go now. for
the little mountain rill
Is pleading with the bagpipes in
tender, crooning bars.
I will go o’er hills and valleys and
through fields of ripening rye;
And the linnet, and the throstle,
and the bittern in the sedge.
TVIII hush their throats and listen as
the piper passes by.
On the great long road of silver
that
ends at the world's edge.
I will take irv pipes and go now. for
the sandflower on the dunes
Is a weary of the sobbing of the
great white sea,
And Is asking for the piper with his
basketful of tunes,
To play the merry lilting that sets
all hearts free.
I will take my pines and go now. and i
God go with you all.
And keep all sorrows from you and
the dark hearts’ load.
I will take my pipes and go now, for
I fear the summer call.
And you’ll hear my pipes a-singing
as I pass along the road.
- Donn Byrne, in Harpers Maga
zine.
Some people go through life wait
ing for a chance to get even with
somebody else.
It Isn’t the good time a woman has
; that counts with her; it’s the telling
of It.
CASTOR IA
For Infants and Children,
The Kind You Han Always Bought
Bears the
Signature of L*laJ c /^&CcJU&<
THE BOOK THAT SHOWS UNCLE SAM AT WORK
See Coupon Elsewhere in this Issue
After Housecleaning—
Why Not a Piano in Your Home?
ft ft Cash, with your application for Mem-
I ,Ull bership in the Story & Clark Piano
I ■■■■■ Club will place a full size new guaran-
I ■■■ teed piano in your home at once.
Pay Balance SI.OO a Week or $4 a Month
To nil who take advantage of thin unusual offer and become mem
bers of the M’OHV <1 CLAKK I'lano Club. It Is agreed that pla.no Is io
be sent to their home at once and the one-year FrtElS MUSIC LK3-
St>NS to commence as soon as piano Is delivered In house. It la also
understood that If the piano is not satisfactory In every way. the
same can be returned and deposit will be refunded.
All club members have the privilege of selecting ANY OTHKR FI
AM) or FLAY Fit-I*l lAO In our wnrerooms and receive same great In
ducements, namely, a saving of sllß as well as full term music lessons
free.
Bring in Your Application at Once
IF YOU CANNOT CALL. BKND APPLICATION AS FOLLOWS BY MAIL:
I hereby make application for membership in the Story & Clark
Pluno Club.
name:
ADDRESS . D.T.
If Inconvenient to mall cash deposit, sign application and send
without money.
Story & Clark Piano Cos.
.33-35 Grand River Ave., Detroit.
OI’FA HATt'HD IT EVENING® t'NTIL IO O’CLOCK.
Your own
! ,
much to do with your success In dealing with business visitors.
You will find scores and scores of (’hairs here that answer these re
quirements. The utmost comfort and attractiveness —and high qual
ity materials, are features of every style. We have five complete
makes of Office Furniture —which makes choosing delightful for you.
Gregory, Mayer £? Til om Q o.
PRINTERS—STATIONERS—OFFICE OUTFITTERS.
ENGRAVERS—EMBOSSERS.
Main 5246. City 2684. Woodward and Congress.
FULL YEAR TERM MUSIC
Lessons Given Free .
Eli hr r la >our home or la oar
School of Hualc.
A $250 PIANO WILL
COST YOU $132
AS A CLUB MEMBER
Thin Plaao Would Coot gkAO If
Uought Through a Dealer
la the (tegular Way.
SAVE sllß
Chair
—should be first of all as comfortable as
possible—for just the same as a bad chair is
a hindrance in your work, so is a good chair
helpful. When you consider that you Bpend
one-third of your time in your office chair —
and that during this time you must accomp
lish enough to provide for »he rest of the
time —you realize its importance.
Then, too, your chair should be attractive,
as the general appearance of your office has

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