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The Detroit times. [volume] (Detroit, Mich.) 1903-1920, June 26, 1912, AFTERNOON EDITION, Image 5

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■IISOI IS ANSWER TO
I HOSEVEIT'S THIRD fARTV,
I m Ml jm WORLD
■lones; and Sincere G. 0. I*. Fro-
I greasives Could Conscien
■ tioualy Vote for Him
■DEPENDS ON BALTIMORE
• ■ -
If Reactionary is Nominated
I Roosevelt Plan Will Be
■ « _ Vital Element
■ NEW YORK. Juue 25—The World,
li its leading editorial, declares that
l/oodrow Wilson 1h the answer to
Iff. Roosevelt s third party. It says:
■ "If Gov. Wilson is notniauted at
■lAltiniorc, honest and sincere Repub
■ can progressives will have a caiull
latu for presidtut for whom they can
■onsclentiously vote and through
■ horn they caa voice their protest
■gainst Republican reaction. There
I ould then he uo legitimate Held for
■ir. Roosevelt’s third party, and Its
■ leathers would be confined to Mr.
I oosevelt's personal followers.
■' “But If the Democratic convention
■ owinates a reactionary or a weak
■ regressive who Uoes not measure up
■J this crisis, Mr. Roosevelts party
I v -linmutllately become a. vltnl eie-_
I tent lu American politics. It w ill
■pine into existence in response to an
I resistible demand, aud will do prac*
I cully as much damage to the Demo-
I rats as to the Republicans.
I “To name a so-called conservative
It Baltimore—the kind of candidate
l)'autman\ aud Wall-ut. are scheming
ibr—is merely to divide the cojisefva-
I'.vu vote with Mr. Tuft. That vote is
lot large enough to elect one presl-
I ent. aud it would make a pitiful
liiowiug if divided between two caudl-
I ate*. To nominate u progressive of
luo hack politician type is to insult
Ipe intelligence of thoughtful Rule-
I endeuts aud to convict the Deuio-
Itic party of false pretenses in the
I yes of all independent voturs.
“The situation at Baltimore is so
Imple that there can be no excuse
jr the convention's going astray.
f “The Democratic politicians who
re bragging that, t%ith the Republl
an party split, anybody ran win, are
,<ols who are drunk with their own
ally. Anybody cannot win. This is
year in which only somebody con
urely win, aud he must be a real
■omebody, not an imitation gome
jOdy. **
“If the Baltimore convention blund
ers there will be no such dramatic act
/f secession as that which took place
it Chicago; hut tens of thousands of
isappointed Democrats will Instantly
,egln to seek means of registering
Jaelr • resentment, und Theodore
ioosevelt will naturally be the club
jia? they seize upon.
' “l,et there be no delusions about
dr. Roosovelt’s being dead politically.
Ivo a third party candidate appealing
an electorate disgusted with both
artles. he would have quite a differ
•nt status from that which he would
iold as a third-term candidate of the
Itepubllcnn party. He would at last
fie a real Independent. He would at
Hast have proved that he had the cour
age of his convictions. The spectacle
t.f such a inan battling single-handed
•.gainst the bosses and reactionaries
I>f both parties would make a power
ful Impression upon the mind of the
leverage American. Even if he were
Beaten he would be aide to take over
the discredited Republican machine
Utter election and nominate himself
/igain in 15HH.
• “Let Baltimore remember this.
Roosevelt isnt was only scotched at
Chicago. If it Is destroyed, It rousL be
destroyed at Baltimore. Every con
liberation of political intelligence,
political strategy and political eom
tr.ou sense counsels the nomination of
(\Voodrow Wilson for president. Will
frhe Democratic National convention
arise to its great opportunity?
f-- ■
, Treiik Kbssewskl, Bit year* olil, of
So Z'jC t.ehrmh'ct., wtt* run tl«»wn by
,i Mt. Clemens chi* at Gratiot and .Jo
"•eph Campiiu-ave*., lute Monday night.
•ml Is In St- Mary's hospital In a eritl
al condition His left hand was s»-v
---e(| hi* It-ft shoulder crushed and he
.was badly bruise i about the head and

ITALIAN GIRLS LESERT
ORGAN AND DISAPPEAR
philomena valenty.
l Btarting out from their home at
y 0 699 Klopelle-st., last Friday morn
lug, with a big street piano a Ith
which to grind out nickels and pen
nies for the family treasury, Philo
mena and Em'l> Valenty. aged 15 and
16 years, respectively, failed to re
turn home, and the police have been
teked to make a nation-wide search
lor them . , , _ ~
A letter addressed Folice head*
quarters,” was received by the au
thorltics. Saturday morning, having
been dropped In a letter box by the
Jwo runaway g"l»- ....
in the letter, th*y asked the police
to notif' their roethe* that they and
run away becgui* *he scolded tbt-m
too nurlr -r-
The hand organ, they said, would be
found In » livery stable where they
RIRIRI OF EKPRESS
OFfICE IS REVEALED
Police Make Public News of
$l,lOO Theft of Money Or
ders in Dearborn
The theft of American Express Cos.
money orders to the value of $l,lOO
from the Dearborn office, on May 28,
lust, has Just been revealed by tbe
local police, following disclosures
that Detroit was the headquartera of
the man who has tho money order
blanks in his possession.
Detectives Baker aud Horrlgan
have been on the trail of tbe man
for several days, but have been un
able to catch up with him, aud are
satisfied that be hue made bis “get
aw’ay.”
A few days ago. Baird. North &
Cos., a Jewelry firm of Providence, R.
1., received an order for SOS w’orth
of Jew’elry, und two American Ex
press money orders, stamped “not
j over $50,“ and filled In for SSO and
| $4 5 respectively, were enclosed. The
i Jewelry was to be shipped to a cer
tain address in Detroit, which the po
lice are withholding, and were to be
consigned to “J. W. Slmpsou.”
The money orders reached the ex
press company's New* York uuditing
, office so quickly, from the nearby
#lty of Providence, that the Jewelry
j tiim was able to recall its shipment
j fmm the local office, on. learning; tiiht
I the money orders were u part of the
i Dearborn robbery plunder.
Word was Immediately sent to the
Detroit police, hut It was then too
iaie to get the man.
Inquiry at the address indicated, re
vealed that a “J. W. Simpson” had
rented a room there during the last
of May, hut left soon afterward, say
ing that he would he away for three
or four days. The following Satur
day, a hoy called at the house, and
notified the landlady that Mr. Simp
son was delayed, but for her to hold
, any packages that came for him, sub
j Jcct to his call or order.
On Monday, packages started to ar
i rive. There was $22 worth of goods
| from the Hudson store; S3O worth
j Horn the Traver-Bird store, and S3O
worth from Sol Berman's clothing
house. In each case, the police
learned, one of the stolen money or
der blanks had been used to pay for
the goods.
The woman accepted the packages,
never suspecting anything wrong, and
|on Monday night, a boy came and in
j formed her that Mr. Simpson had
l sent him after the packages, to be
j taken to the Hotel Brunswick. She
, turned the packages over to the boy
without question.
“Simpson" didn’t return to the
rooming house, though the detectives
watched for him for several days.
The police issue a warning to all
persons to be.on the lookout for the
stolen money order blanks.
ASSOCIATED CHARITIES
LETS MISS DUPONT GO
Acting on a recommendation of Soc
retary Udell, tne executive commit
tee of the Associated Charities has
dispensed with the services o Miss
Margaret Dupont, who was acting
secretary of the organization after
the resignation of J. B. Williams,
some months ago, and until the ap
pointment of Mr. Udell, a few weeks
ago. Mr. Udell explained to. The
Times, Tuesday morning, that he made
Ihe recommendation on the belief
that the leaving of Miss Dupont would
be beneficial to the association, lie
said he had no fault to And with her
work, hut merely considered It advis
able to let her go in the course of his
r» organization of the working staff.
The grand Trunk railroad has an
nounced that it will provide through
merchandise cars from Saginaw to
Port Huron. Detroit, Battle Creek.
Grand Rapids. Grand Haven. Muske
gon and intervening points In accord
ance with the request of the Saginaw’
Board of Trade. This arrangement
will grearlv facilitate deliveries from
FUginuw to various points in the state.
Ilii«1nr»«-lll(f Printing. No fuss and
no feathers. The plain, neat kind that
looks right Times Printing Cos.. IS
John n -*t. Fh Main 14 98 or City 33*5
< hCw >: l
v t
< "»*l*v* V* «■
* y,#VV\. , • *
w
EMILY VALENTY.
had left It Friday evening. Barn men
in a stable on State st., near Cans
ave., soon notified the police that two
little Italian girls had left a big piano
organ there, Friday evening, usking
to he allowed to leave It there over
night.
Mrs. Valenty, who is almost dis
tracted over the disappearance of her
two pretty daughters, says that a
well-dressed young man from Chi
cago has been trying for some time
to induce Emily, the elder girl, to
study music under his tutelage, so
that she might go on the stage and
become a great singer.
The mother fears that the two
girls answered the lure, and tracers
have been sent to Chicago by the
local police, who are also looking up
all of the local admirers of the two
pretty Italian girls.
THE DETROIT TIMES: WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 1912.
judge Rim Wishes
ASSOCIATES' CONSENT
Will Not File Brief in Rental
Case Without Permission
From Other Jurists
Judge Hally has Informed the com
mon council that It will he Impossible
'for him to file a brief in the Fort-at.
rental case now pending In the su
preme court, without the consent of
the circuit court.
There has been a strong desire on
the part of the city to obtain the As
sistance of Judge Hally in the litiga
tion, because of his familiarity with
the case which was prepared while
he was corporation counsel, and fcas
argued by hlin In the circuit court.
In his letter Judge Hally expresses
his willingness to assist the city, how
ever, und he lias asked for a copy of
the council resolution, requesting him
to a at. so that he can submit It to
his fellow Judges.
Job PrlntißK Dune Hl K kt. Time.
Print lan Cos.. 15 John R -«*.
Suit Offer
This offer is intended to start you thinking about your sum
mer suit —and to start you looking for it. From the way men
came for them Saturday and yesterday, you’d say it did the
starting all right. You’ll hardly get a better chance at new clothes
this summer. Models just added include the three favorite styles
—Norfolk, English and Business Men’s cuts in cheviots, serges,
tweeds and worsteds. Two and three-piece suits—some skele
ton lined—in blue, gray, tan, brown, hairlines, mottled shades and
all the good ones that are new and fine. Ii suits had a batting
average these would tally close to the 1.000 mark. < >ne of the rea
sons they hit so well is that they were made to sell (T
for S2O to $25. Better start to look at these suits I
tomorrow, hadn't you? They’re marked now A
Prosperous Looking Wash
Vests, $1.65
a
Something about a wash vest makes, you think the ojvner
amounts to something—and they generally do. Here are white
and colored vests which sold at $2.00, $2.50 and $3.00. Sizes are
somewhat broken and (£4 (
they're priced 4) 1 • OO
Second Floor—New Store.
What Do You Want in An Oxford?
Fit, wear, style, quality all through? You must
/be thinking of Fingree shoes, at home in the
I * Men's store. Here are two lasts like that.
V vOkXl Five eyelet dull calf oxiords with full round
high toe and military heel. Looks good and
1 •
Who Is Coming Tomorrow
for a House Dress?
Those of you who get here tomorrow will find much
to Interest them on these tables full of pretty house
dressea.
They're made of very fine lawns and muslinß In dif
ferent colors. One in pink, blue, lavender and yellow,
has a sailor collar, pocket and belt of a darker shady.
Some show plaited and side front effects, some have
round necks with a collar effect and cuffs In a contrast
ing shade. There are floral, figures, plaids, checks and
small designs, too. Although somewhat broken, you’ll
probably find just what you like in your size If you come
soon enough. $2.25 dresses tomorrow at $1.48.
Fourth Floor—Main Htore.
For the June Wash Goods Sale —
These Splendid Materials at Much Below
Regular Prices
Magnificent opportunities are now before the women of this city who
can use pretty, seasonable and durable wash fabrics. The styles and
patterns are as new. clever and pretty as anything produced this season,
and the prices are far below those of the beginning of the season, while
the assortment is now as grand as when the season opined. This list
ought to decide you for tomorrow, although only a few are mentioned
here.
IRISH DIMITIES AT 19c A YARD THAT SHOULD BE 25c AND 30c
There are 200 pieces of these pretty Irish Dimities, all Imported from
their native heath. The best qualities old Irelaud produces are shown
here at the Hudson Store, In the largest rang*' of styles, such as dots,
stripes, floral effects and dark, serviceable shades. By the strictest in
vestigation you’ll find that these have never sold less than 25c to 30c a
yard, while now you may have choice at, per yard, 19c.
35c TISSUE VOILES IN THE JUNE SALE AT 15c A YARD
Tissue Voiles with embroidered figures. That alone should make them
popular with every woman who follows the prevailing styles. In addition
these voiles are beautiful, and we show them In blues, pinks, greens,
tans and In a delectable array of novelty effects. They are 30 Inches wide
and the texture Is of the most admirable quality. Always sold at 35c a
yard. Our June Hale price is 16c.
THESE VERY BELECT SILK AND COTTON FABRICS WERE 25c AND
29c. NOW 15c.
A big reduction, that. But Summer Is the time to sell them, and we
don't care to keep them In stock until another season, although they w ill
no doubt be Just as popular then. They are of a mixture of cotton and
silk, and that means beauty combined with durability and elegant laun
dering qualities. 160 pieces of plain and Jacquard weaves to choose
from, 37 Inches wide, and a big line of colors to choose from. And these
will make dresses and gowns that are exquisite for both street and even
ing wear. Well worth 26c and 29c a yard. June Sale price, per yard, 15c.
BORDERED PONGEEB, EXCELLENT AT 29c A YARD, ARE NOW
ONLY 19c.
White grounds—also natural linen shades. That is enough to Interest
every woman—then go on to tell her that some-of these pongee* come
with dot effects, with Persian borders, and she Is more than Interested.
It’s an excellent variety to choose from. This quality sfdla regularly at
29c a yard. Our June Sale price Is, choice, 19c.
BATIBTEB, SO MUCH IN FAVOR. AND WORTH 12»/ 2 AND 15 <h NOW
10c A YARD
There Is nothing recent In the word Batiste, for it is a standard In wash
materials. But there Is a difference in the patterns and the quality.
Hudson quality—the beat there is—takes care of that part.
As for the designs, we offer in these all the most recent
novelty weaves, floral effects, side hand patterns, stripes
and dots. The colors and their various combinations are
cxqulsltelv attractive and lend a note of Joy ro the glory of
summer apparel. Sold regularly at 12V*e and 15c the yard.
Sale price, 10c.
Second Floor —Main Store.
THE HUDSON STOKI
An Unusual Men’s Summer
wears well. This is J 1203,
price $4.00.
Another five eyelet ox
ford ; this time a tan. Eng
lish last, military heel —
looks like a custom shoe
and costs at least a dollar
less. J 1262, price $4.00,
Men’* New Store.
TEACHER REFUSES NEW
JOB WITH SALARY BOOST
Mis* Frances Hurdle, principal of
the Goldberg school, apparently
likes contentment better than money.
She was offered the prln< Ipalship of
the Tappan school at an increased
salary. but requested to be left
where ahe la. explaining that she
preferred the surroundings of the
Goldberg school. The teachers' com
mittee, of the Board of Education,
in a meeting, Mopday afternoon,
granted Jier wishes, by transferring
H. W. Miller, of the Williams school,
to the Tappan in her place.
No mention wus made of the rase
of Prof. J. F. Thomas, principal cf
the Washington Normal school,
whose reappointment was held up
for two weeks In the last meeting of
the board, at the request of Inspec
tor Small, who said he wanted to In
vestigate reports to the effect that
Mr. Thomas lacked efficiency.
Elizabeth Grant, physical Instruc
tor. a graduate of Wellesley J Mary
D. Torr, University of Michigan, and
Miss Henrietta Grossman. Smith col
lege. were recommended for the
eligible teaching list and Lola Jef
fries and Ellen McHenry, both of
U. of M., were approved as substi
tutes.
CLAIMS MSB t'OßifD FOR
TM MB ILIEGAUY
State Counsel at Shields' Hear
ing Says They Were Carried
on Assessors' Roll
1 —
LANSING. Muli., June 25.— When
the bearing op*D(d thi» morning on
the chargt s preferred against Tax
Commissioner Robert H. Shields, of
Houghton, Attorney John Shields an
nounced that Shields would tile an
auswer to the charges later. Fred P.
Rurtless, secretary of the state lax
commission, wus called to the Btand
and was examined by Roger I. YYykcs,
who has been retained us special
counsel by Gov. Osborn. For the first
time since he was injured, three
months ago, Gov. Osborn appeared at
the exec utlve office this morning.
W. Frank Kuox was in the execu
tive parlor and there were a number
of spectators on hand when the hear
ing opened. From the records of the
Special! A Sale of Discontinued
Nemo Corsets
Because some of the sizes are missing or because they lack the very
newest features of the later models these Nemo corsets are marked less
to close out quickly. Regular and sale prices are given, as well as the
number of each size. Note the Solid Service Special, a special Nemo Just
brought, out. These values are bo unusual that only an early call will
guarantee you the desired model. Here is the list:
NO. SIZES AND NUMBER OF PAIRS. Reg.* Sale '
Price Price
999 .. .. 2.. 2 2 77 $lO $5.00
622 .... 1 3 9 4 1 .... 1 5 $3.50
523 7 15 9 4 1 5 $3.50
405 1 2 2 2 4 $3.00
403 .... 1 1 1 1 2 .. *1 .. .. 4 $3.00
625 1 1 .. .. 1 .. 5 $3.50
320 1 1 1 .. 2 .. 3 $2.50
408 2 2 4 . $3.00
603 2 2 1 '5 $2.00
352 ~. 2 1 3.50 $2.00
356 2 2 3.5 U $2.00
SOLID SERVICE, all sizes. 18 to 3<» 2 00 $1.50
Fourth Floor—Main Store.
The tables given up to low priced
muslinwear surprise many of our
patrons every day. There are so
many different styles, the quality is
so line and the trimmings so beauti
ful that It is no wonder women are
so pleased.
Combinations and gowns, for in
stance, for hh small a price as 77c.
All sorts of gowns, combinations,
princess slips and skirts, finely inane
and variously trimmed with laces,
ribbons and embroideries at 95c, $1.48
and $1.98.
Corset Covers and drawers with
dainty lace and embroidery trimming.
At 25c, 50c and upwards.
Os course there are better qualities
—and many of them, too —from $1.98
up to the highest point and at all the
between price*.
Fourth Floor—Main Store.
/ /teQ.£iJ£u&ori (?
§/ TWO BIG STORES IN ONE
THE HUDSON STORE
The June Sale
Brings You Some
Fine Low-Priced
Muslinwear
vW
0 rauLp
v TV
Tax Commission Secretary Hurtle**
showed that ‘Commissioner Shields
bad not been •present when certain
meetings were held at which, it is
claimed, his presence was required
Attorney Shields declared that the
governor's attorney was wauderlug
lrotn the charges, but Wykes de
clared that he was prepared to sub
stantiate the accusations from the rec
ords of the commission.
Roger Wykes brought out the fact
that special fleldmen had been carried
on the payroll of the state board of
assessors when they were really doing
work for the tax commission. The
state law limits the number of em
p'oyes of the tax commission, and
Wykes claims the additional m*»u
vv»*re placed pi the assessors’ pavroll
iti order to evade the laws.
Wykes further alleged that for a
time while George l.ord was secretary
of the state commission the reports
relative to the valuation of corpora
tions were missing from the records.
Secretary Hurtles* declared that thes©
records were missing after l»rd left
the commission. It was also shown
that bunk stock had not been assessed
with any degree of regularity. In one
instance it was pointed out that stock
assessed at sll3 by the state board
had been assessed at S4O by the local
officers. Senator Michael Morlarty, of
Crystal Falls Is In the city and ex-
Here’s a Woman’s Suit
Surprise at $8.95 I
Anr) the surprise will be a pleasant one for you who think j
$8.95 too little to pay for a suit. Tan arid gray ftiixtmcd 1
materials which predominate. Every suit is well made, of*good
spring style and the materials are of the quality which brought
sls and $16.50 earlier in the season. It pays to act when you
can get a suit like these for $8.95.
Irish Linen Waists, Hand--
Embroidered, $2.95
Every waist-of these few is real Irish linen, every one is em-|
broidered by hand in some of the most beautiful patterns
ever saw and finely tailored. Prices were $4, $4-5° an( l $5 now
$-•95-
Girls’ $2.50 Wash Dresses, $1.50
This is one group of a fine collection of girls' dresses in per-*
cale, chambray and gingham. All sizes from 6 to 14 are
very prettily made. Sj.oo and $2.50 dresses are going now at
$1.50.
Third Floor—Main Store.
Outing Hats Will Go Fast at the
New Prices
Yes, prices are revised again on
summer hats specially for outings.
You know that even Detroit's Great
est Millinery Store will have a hard
time keeping up stocks now, so
come early to be sure. Tomorrow’s
li>t includes these:
Ratine. Duck. Pique, Corduroy and out
ing hats in all the popular styles.
Foulards
Pure silk foulards in 1912 designs and colors—the out of the ordinary
kinds—qualities dependable In wear—distinctive in style—selected as
sortments to choose from. Special, per yard, 59c.
Clearance Sale
Os special lot Bordure foulards—new colors—best 4
qualities, $2.50 and $2.00 values to be cleared at, per yard, SI.OO.
Satins
In all silk quality—bright and lustrous —even thread—desirable for
foundation and combination purposes—One yard wide. Special, per
yard, 75c.
Special Lot
Foulard and novelty silk* In a range of designs and colors —qualities
very desirable. Special, per yard, 39c.
Novelty Silks
Bargain tables filled with novelty silks and satins In stripe designs—
selected color assortment. Special, per yard, 38c.
Silk Remnants
We have assembled a special lot of silk remnants —and place same on
sale at exactly the regular prices.
S^lf-Jacquards
All silk surah effect with self-colored Jacquard design— exceptional
quality. Full color assortment. Spe< ial. per yard. 50c.
Second Floor —Main Store.
Come Now for Home Needs
This is a representative list of home furnishings for nos. and If it fai *
to Include anv of your present wants, make sure you'll find the article
Itself in our complete basement. The chances are that you 11 be able to
suve something tomorrow, too. ....
Illinois Refrigerator, round eorner style, white lined $1- value. $7.98.
Automatic Refrigerators with sanitary water cooler, liquid porcelain
lined. Ice capacity 7.** lbs., $28.50. . ,
14-ln«h Lawn Mower with best crucible steel blades, brass bearings.
self-sharpennlg. $2.50.
Hall Bearing Lawn Mower. 4 blades, lfi-lneh size, improved style,
Mrs. Potts’ Sad Irons, nickel plated style. Cast aluminized tops, sl—>
' a .Mldget r Clothed 'Vashers. unexcelled for washing chi hi ream clothe*.
THE HUDSON STORE
Special at 89c, 98c and
$1.50.
Blazer Stripe Hats, the
newest hat U New York.
Special, 98c.
"White Chip Hats, me
dium size styles; very
good for flower trimming.
Worth $2.98, choice $1.98.
Panama Hats, variety of styles In medium and large
shapes. Worth $9.50, choice $5.00.
Burnt color Chip Hats, all the late summer styles.
Worth $3.98. choice 98c.
Sailor Hats; ready to wear; trimmed with ribbon
bands. Worth $1.98, choice 49c and 98c.
Untrimmed Hats, In chip, mllan and hair braids; aa*
sorted styles. Worth to $2.98, choice 98c.
* Fourth Floor —Both Stores.
4 June Silks Now Spell
Opportunity
And you’ll agree they spell it in big letters when yon *
see some of the June Sale offerings lu the da) light
store tomorrow.
Slights dented. Regular $1 '>o value at 25C7
Hand-made and decorated Japanese Baskets, covered
and open style* For sewing, gloves, handkerchiefs, etc.
Worth shc and 25c, at 25c end 10c.
Ideal Fire less Cookers have ad\aneed the culinary art
R* a wonderful way. The practical demonstration by sn
expert concludes tomorrow evening. You 4 bet tar -COM.
before then, __
... Tkifimit ftota
p*cts to testify trelstltfT to tha con
vivial habits of the accused tax com
n.rdoaer. The hearing will not be
concluded before tomorrow.
KONGAL IS SENT TO
IONIA REFORMATORY
Joseph Kongsl. who was found
guilty of ehooting his brother John
through the leg during a quarrel In
a buggy, was sentenced by Judge
Codd, Tuesday morning, to from one
to two years in the lonia reformatory.
Following Fungal's sentence the
case of Harry Spinks was taken up.
Splnka Is chaged with assault with
Intent to do great bodily harm. It be
ing claimed that he struck Charles
Klett over the head with a club on
the night of May 17. 1912. Klett is
a farmer residing near Dearborn. He
had refused Spinks a ride early in
the evening, aud it is the theory of
the prosecution that Spinks was after
revenge. '
With a Twist of the Wrist.
"Yes, sir," said the expert account
ent, who had spent a week in lookfhg
over the books. “I have found the key
to your financial difficulties at last.”
"Then there's nothing to do, I sup
pose." sighed the despondent mer
chant, "but go wind up my affairs.”—
Chicago Tribune.
Page Five

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