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The Detroit times. [volume] (Detroit, Mich.) 1903-1920, May 03, 1913, AFTERNOON EDITION, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016689/1913-05-03/ed-1/seq-1/

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FEDERAL LAW MAY DEFEA T STA TE’S RIGHTS IN PENDING ANTI-JAP LEGIMiAWSi
THE WEATHER •
• ATI KIM) \H.HT %Ml Nt'NP.%% I \-
MM*n.»:il, I'MOH \ HI, | SHOW Kit*.
THIRTEENTH YEAR, NO. 18 5.
CALIFORNIA BUSINESS MEN
OPEN CAMPAIGN TO DEFER
OPERATION OF JAP BILL
Assembly to Complete Favora
ble Action on Measure Next
Week, After Which Gov.
Johnson Will Sign It
MARSHALL FINDS JOKER
IN IMMIGRATION LAWS
Hints It Is Possible for Brown
Men to Become Full-
Fledged Citizens
SACMKNTO. Cal., May 3 Follow-
Ing the pannage by the state senate
of the amended Webb anti-alien land
owning bill at 12:45 a. m., and the
conceded probable passage by the as
sembly, chambers of commerce and
buaineaa interests throughout Califor
nia are already prepuring to invoke
the referendum in the hope of delay
ing the operation of the law until the
general election of 1914.
The upper house put the measure
through after 10 hours debate by a
\ote of 30 to 2. A single Republican
.and one Democrat opposed the act,
< artwright, on the minority side, and
Wright, Republican. The remaining
nine l>etnocratH ignored the advice ot
Secretary Bryan and supported the
measure alter it had been amended to
~ermlt "ineligible aliens" to lease lund
for periods of three years, but not to
icnew such Ir.ises
It is admitted on all sides that the
lower house will push the measure
through rapidly when it reaches it
next week and Gov. Johnson will im
mediately sign It.
Violent factional disputes, overshad
owing the merits of the bill Itself,
marked the closing scenes of the de
bate in the senate. Shanahan. Demo
(rat, offered an amendment to pro
\ ide that, after agricultural land has
been leased to one alien for ti three
year term, it may not he re-released
to an alien He spoke in favor of his
amendment, declaring the Webb meas
ure. with the leasing amendment
adopted earlier in the day, gave aliens
t radically perpetual control of the
land the? wished to occupy. Tils
amendment, was voted down
Other Democrats characterized the
! ill as a "sham measure." which did
not accomplish the purpose for which
it w-as introduced, ihe minority, how
ever. voted for the measure on the
final roll call, declaring they were
pledged to anti-alien legislation and
would therefore he compelled to to
support the Webb bill. Several Pro
gressives. who also supported the bill
on the final roll call, admitted that
they did not believe it was sufficiently
drastic.
Secretary Bryan was present during
the debate. He had succeeded earlier
in the day In securing delay in the
m nate s action on the bill and for a
time there appeared to be a change
that the administration's fbrees might
develop dissentlon This was indicat
ed when there was a division on the
majority side oved the three-year leas
ing amendment, offered yesterday by
(Continued on page tea).
FRENSDORF FAVORS
TARIFF ON WOOL
Tells Michigan Dealers* Associa
tion That His Attitude Has
Been Misrepresented
Edward Frensdorf told the Michigan
Wool Dealers' association, in the Hotel
Cadillac, Friday afternoon, that his at
titude on the wool tariff before the
congressional committee on ways and
tudans had been misrepresented, and
that he had favored a 15 per cent du’y
on wool and 50 per cent on woolen
manufactures, not for free wool.
"The tariff should he hig# enough
for American manufacturers to meet
foreign competition on an equal
basis," he said. "Asa wool-grower,
however, I realize that it is likely that
we shall have free wool, and we Hhall
probably have to make prices on the
world basis. If we cannot find a mar
ket In this country, because of a cur
tailment of manufacture, we shall
have to export. The high price of
lamb and mutton all over the world
seems to indicate a shortage of wool,
and I do not look for lower prices on
loreign wools."
A resolution protesting against the
?»roposed wool schedule was tabled on
the argument that protests from Mich
igan at this time will do no good. Her
man Flint, of Brown & Adams, wool
dealers of Roston, said that the price
of Michigan wool on a free trade basis
would be about 22 cents. Ie ff er«from
a number of mills Indicated, however,
that the price would be nearer 2"
cents. Several Michigan buyers stated
that they are paying as much ns ever
for wool, and that they did not think
that competition with the world sujv
ply will make much difference In
prlcea.
COUNTESS SLAIN: CLAIMED
TO HAVE BEEN ACCIDENT
LONDON. May 3. —The Countes* of
Tottenham waa found shot to death
early today In the woods near Oorlne
She bad been hunting, and the family
stated that her death was occidental.
rgßXfrn twvnt
(••lent at tto w«m Oerdrew. Pitfall
the week-eats wttfc a aoed-ttme-purty
at the UtHffit. Tfc# wayae will «•«♦»-
tlatf Ha Ittftof psrtlM throughout
lha uroath mt Mag.
0% gjetroit uues
LABOR BENEFITS
BY LAWS PASSED
IN LAST SESSION
Most Important Measure Is That
Regulating Private Employ
ment Agencies
ATTEMPTS TO WEAKEN
54-HOUR LAW FAIL
Rep. Flowers Given Credit for
Blocking Move—Ogg Fath
ered Important Bill
“The passage'of the hill for the li
censing, bonding and regulation of pri
vate employment agencies was the
most important enactment of the leg
islative session, as far as the depart
ment of labor is concerned.” said
Deputy State Labor Commissioner
John W. Smith, discussing the laws
affecting the department of labor,
passed by the last legislature.
"At the present time there is no
state law in Michigan affecting or
regulating private employment agen
cies. This bill, Introduced by Sena
tor James, was drafted by the labor
department from laws in force in Ok
lahoma. Missouri, Illinois and the Dis
trict of Columbia. It requires agen
cies to file a bond of SI,OOO to insure
compliance with the law; a license fee
of $25. except in Detroit, where it is
SIOO, and limits the amount of the
registration fee which the agency can
charge to one dollar.
"The department of labor helped to
keep intact the so-called 54-hour law.
i We tried to have restaurants, general
business offices, telegraph offices and
telephone companies A/jsp#d under the
operation of mr'law'. bnt it was soon
seen that we would have a Agltt to,
keep the law from being weakened. A
i determined attempt was made to ex
(C'oatluned ou Page Tea)
MISSION FAILED,
PEOPLE AROUSED
Such Is the MHnner in Which
Pres .Wilson Views New
Jersey Trip

WASHINGTON, May 3.—Satisfied
with his trip to his home, state, al-;
though he is understood to he con
vinced that his efforts failed to change
I he situation. President Wilson re* |
turned lo the capital today and plung- i
ed Into his accumulated mall. He had j
few’ important callers scheduled for to- !
day. but planned to analyze the Call i
lornia-Japaneee situation that he I
might be able to take any action nee* I
eesary.
The president believes that his trip j
to New Jersey has failed to unite the j
Democratic legislators on a Jury re
form bill that will meet the views of
the people. But his position was that
hr had started the fight for the plan
and that It would have been cowardly
if he had failed to take the stump In
person for his own views. He Insist
ed today that no matter what, the out
come lie had done his part.
MARKET OPENS
QUIET AND LOW
•* t—*
NEW TO-RK, May 3—The stock
market opened quiet and lower.
IMMIGRATION TO REACH
H,GH MARK THIS year
NEW YORK. May 3.—lndications i
that the high wafer mark of immigra- !
tion through this port will be reached
this year are contained in April
( figures showing that 108.980 aliens en
, tered New York during the month.
, The increase over April, 1912. was 33,-
1 531, and the totals for the four
; months beginning Jan. 1, show the
i entry of 268.087 immigrants as com
pared with 202,977 in the correspond
;ing period of 1912, or an increase of
I 65,090.
Tin; heather
For Detroit noil «lrln|f)i *Mturdor
alKlif and »nndo> unsettled, probable
• bovver*! moderate brisk soutberlr
»»lad*. '
For loner Mlelil B aai Nbonera and
thanderstorm*! cooler.
Jor Ihr i flier l.skesi Moderate to
brisk south ttlnds v.ltb scualls oa
Michigan and Huron uod Moderate tar
lahlr ttlnds on Superior | unnettled
ttealher tonight and Suadap probable
■ boner* and tbnndr ntorms.
For the l.otter l.nheai Moderate to
brisk sottfh and sonthtteat ttlnds and
fair ttentker followed by shatters and
tb Moderator ms «ate tonight or NsMaf, !
One *e«r n*o today i Highest tetn
peratnre, tlfti lowest. lA| mean, Mt
parti) eloud) weather.
The ana aeta at OdN p. nt. and rises
bandar at 4 X-1 a. m.
The moo a rises at ti2A a. nt. *kada).
PASTOR RUSSELL
DKTROIT HfKHt HOI UK—S F. M„
M IDAV, M% V 4TH. LK TI RR,
"HIWVpV HRI.I. AMD IT IIG A TO* V."
i AiK *™,*™ 0 *mat. race, mo
[ coLitßcmon* (
CURRENCY BILL
WINTER FEATURE
FORCONGRESS
To Introduce Measure Next
Week But Postpone
Action
ADMINISTRATION PLANS
TO GIVE TIME FOR STUDY
Modified Clearing House Scheme
To Be Leading Feature
of Action
WASHINGTON, May 3.—A Demo
cratic administration bill to reform
the banking and currency laws will
be Introduced before the special ses
sion of congress adjourns. It will not
be passed this glimmer but will be the
star feature of the winter session.
This Is President Wilson's currency
legislative program, it was learned to
day, following a conference ot the
currency experts of the senate and
house. It was stated that a special
mpssnge to congress outlining this
policy will soon be made by the presi
dent, probably during the coming
week, after the tariff bill is passed, by
the house and transferred to the
senate.
The administration currency bill is
now’ being polished off by tho leaders
on the banking committees of both
houses. . ime for its introduction
will be set later but It is expected
that the plan of introducing a tenta
tive bill late in the present session
w ill be definitely decided upon.
The main feature of the proposed
bill, it was said, will be a modified
clearing house scheme, with absolute
control by the government Insured.
This feature has been submitted by
Secretary of the Treasury NfrAdoo
for hls approval.
President Wilson’s idea in having
a tentative bill considered this ses
sion, but to await final action until
winter Is to give the country several
months In which to study and criti
cize the proposed enactment. Further
more. the president wants to avoid
all chance of being accused of hasty
consideration of a subject of such
vital importance to the country, to
permit business Interests to become
accustomed to the new tariff and to
show that a reforrrr which the Repub
licans have been considering for a
score of years can be put through Jiy
n Democratic administration with
due deliberation, and yet~withln the
space of a few months.
The president's currency message,
it was said, will be iJmed with the
disposal of the Wilson Underwood
tariff bill in the house, to enable the
lower legislative body to begin Ita
consideration, and also to allow Joint
hearing* hr the senate and house
hanking committees.
Negro's Marriage Annulled
CHICAGO May 2 —The marriage of
lAyaar-old Fmtra Hanson in Niles.
Mich., to George Thompson a
Veg-o. aged 44. was annulled in the
-*reult court here vesterday
OAWCfC AT ARCADIA
Rrer) RrtiUg. Onr l.nvntloa one
Crtsrsnfee. Vet Seblli. -AAr
DOG, DICTATOR, SELECTS ORA MISTRESS
NFTW YORK—Magistrate Marsh de
cided the ownership of "Shep," a col
lie. by,putting Mrs. Morrissey and Mrs.
Maurer on opposite sides of the room
and having them call the dog "Shep*
went to Mrs. Morrissey,
NEW YORK—The line a. ,he li
cense clerk's window was held up an
hour while the agitated clerk arrant*
M mantac• tfm— « ituu*4«
SATURDAY, MAY 3, 1913.
IF THE TREE MUST BE SPARED, GO AFTER THE FUNGI AND DEAD WOOD
ASKED DOCTORS
TO TAKE LIFE
Former Vice Crusader Wished
to Go to Hospital Merely
for “Blind”
CHICAGO, May 3. that
John E. Wayman, former states at
torney and vice crusader, asked
surgeons to take him to the hospital
under the guise of performing an op
eration and there end hla life, either
with a drug or the knife, created a
sensation in political circles today.
Dr. William K. Mprray, who testi
fied at the Inquest, told the story.
"Mr. Wayman was alone w’hen I
called," said the surgeon. "He seem
ed wrought up to a nervous pitch. I
tried to allay hls alarm, and it was
then that he asked me to take him
to the hospital and kill him."
Dr. Murray declared hls belief that
the former state's attorhey shot him
self. In spite of his testimony, the
coroner’s Jury returned an
verdict.
STRIKE CRIPPLES
SILK INDUSTRY
Prompted by Sympathy, 10,000
Workers Near Paterson,
N. J., Quit Work
PATERSON, N. J., Hay 3.—The
entire sillk industry of northern
New Jersey was paralyzed today fol
lowing the sympathetic strike of
10,000 workers In the millß of the
neighboring Hudson county towns.
The new strike came when leaders
of the Paterson strike learned that
some of th ePaterson mill owners
were having silk made in West Ho
boken. Weehawken. Union Hill,
North Bergen and other neighbor
ing towns.
The Paterson mill owners tried
again today to break the strike by
sending emissaries to the strikers,
promising an adjustment of wages
and other demands if they would
come back to work.
TAXI DRIVER IS HERO
OF SHEA’S CLASS
Harry Jacklin. taxicab driver, of No.
493 Dlx-ave., emulated the example of
Timothy O. Shea, hero of tho rocent
disaster to fire department flyer No
34, w’hirh cost Shea's life, when ho
deliberately sent his taxicab Into the
hrlrk wall of a butcher ahop, to avoid
tunning down a little girl.
Martha Jones, six years old, of No
273 Twentieth-st.. was saved from
provable death hv Jacklin's brave ac
tion.
She was crossing the street nt
Twentieth and Baker-ats., and Jacklin,
dodging two wagons which hid the
iltflp girl from hls view, was unable
t< stop hia machine In time to prevent
striking her, hut he whirled the steer
ing wheel, and as hit taxicab plunged
a right angles into the butcher shop
wall, the fender of the machine just
grared the child, knocking her down,
and inflicting only minor bruises.
The taxk waa badly damaged, and
Jacklin was thrown out, but luckily
escaped with only a few bruises
Stamntopoulos and Antonia Theofllo..
grannakos.
CHIC AOO—Peeved at their poor!
penmanship, Dean Wigmore, of North-j
western university, wants students,
who can’t write clearly refused diplo
mas
CHICAGO —’Because husbands com
ylalnad their trim wore daaelag
NEGRO ATTACKS
GIRL; FLEES AS
HE’S RECOGNIZED
Battle* With 15-Year-Old Freda
Madanes in Her Room Till
She Calls His Name
-THEN PLUNGES THROUGft .
“ WINDOW AND ESCAPES
Victim Says Assailant Is For
mer Tenant in House
Father Owns
Badly seared when he found that
he was recognized by his intended
victim, a Negro, who climbed through
the bedroom window of Freda Mad
anes, aged 15, of No. 69 Napoieon-st.,
dived headlong through the window
and escaped, shortly after l o’clock,
Saturday morning, leaving his coat
and hat on the ground.
The girl told Motorcycle Officer
that she recognized her
assailant as a former tenant In one
of her father’s houses, and that as
she uttered the only name ihat she
knew him by. he quit battling with
her, and plunged through the window’,
in headlong flight.
Miss Madanes was awakened by thp
Negro, who ordered her not to make
a sound or he would kill her. She
struggled with him for a moment and,
she says, recognized hlrn, calling out
his name, and putting him to flight.
Two suspects arrested, Saturday
morning, were released when the girl
tailed to identify either of them.
One of them was arrested because
he was wearing a brand new hat, but.
Miss Dadaues said he was not the man
who attacked her.
GUARD ALFONSO
WHILE IN PARIS
Spanish Ruler to Cement French
Friendship During Com
ing Visit
PARIS, May 3.—Preparations were
begun today for tho coining arrival of
King Alfonso XIII.. of Spain, who will
pay hls first state visit to President
Raymond Poincare. His stay will
cover three days and an elaborate
program of entertainment has been
planned, although the number of in
\nations sent out for various state
functions was limited because of the
recent death of the president's mother.
Kxtraordlnarv precautions will be tak
en by the Paris police, as an attempt
ua* made to assassinate King Alfonso
on one of his visits here.
The visit is looked upon as more
than n casual One. in diplomatic elr
rie*. The king of Spain and the pres
ident of France, it la said, will d'seuss
the tna*'er of rlo.-e: rein t lonshtp be
tween tho two countries, the forma
tion or an entente rich us now ex
Ists between France and Kngland
Though virtually partners In the con
trol of Morocco and officially friendly,
relations between France and Spain
up to now have been rather strained
■ "recklessly" In the newest glides, Sat
urday night dances at the fashionable
Onwentaia club have been tabooed.
BOSTON- "Old Halts' rubbed their
eyes in wuudar when they l*»heM
snips hanging in the air over Boston
Hart*>r. The mirage was due to un
usual atmospheric conditions.
NUTi-KY, N, J. —William Braodol
COUNCIL WILL
“STAND PAT” ON
SALOON LIST
Any Attempt to Reopen Report
and Grant More Licenses
Sure to Fail
COURTS MAY BE ASKED TO
MANDAMUS ALDERMEN
Latter Will Rely on taw's Pro
vision Giving Them Right
of Diacri mi nation
The common council will stand pat
on the report of ihe liquor cfcaimit
tee. denying 93 saloon licenses. A de
termined attempt is being made by
several of the decapitated saloon
keepers, backed by the brewery In
terests, to Induce the aldermen to
open up the report and make a num
ber of changes, next Tuesday night.
"There is no fear of the report be
ing opened," said Aid. Harry Dinge
man, chairman of the liquor commit
tee. "The committee hearings were
public and we gave our reasons for
refusing each of the 93 licenses. The
aldermeh showed by their attitude
last Tuesday night that they are
willing to stand hark of the report."
There are three protests for re
hearings on file In the city clerk’s of
fice. Paul Szymanskf, who wants a
license for No. 500 Grandy-ave., filed
the third protest, Friday afternoon.
The liquor committee closed the place
because the police gave it a bad
reputation Szymanski claims to have
bought flip place from Joseph Gajeski
and fitted the saloon up at an expense
of $14,500.
When the petitions are read in the
council meeting, next Tuesday night.
Chairman Dingeman will fight any at
(Coatiittd oa Paso Tea)
BLAME MILITANTS
FORBAD FIRES
Half Million Loss Sustained
When Freight Depot Is
Destroyed
LONDON, May 3.—Two disastrous
flros today were attributed by the po
lice to militant suffragists, because
"Votes for Women" literature was
found scattered about the places.
The freight depot of the Midland
railway at Bradford waa compleiely
destroyed, with a loss of $500,000
About the same time anew wing
built onto the Ashley school, Aber
deen, was burned, with about $2,500
loss
The Bradford depot was fired - mol
taneously in three place* and was
beyond saving when the fire was din
con ered
HKT'rr*: mi c a ct t ' ,,v - mm’n
i 0/\r t. * oii’any
T*hxh T*M>h| «lt
n'liiw* *it t'v» \L: •
postponed bln seif-des i notnn ’* t* ** l 1,1
bad eaten home of hi* w-tfe's eor«e«!
beef and A non*
committed suicide t* «scape turthir,
house cleaning /_ 1
NKW YORK: A nnrd«gs*d mm’
hopped into ti>j?_-Klmh t<r * t » .
station, and identified the artlftcta
leg found In the road where he loet tt
while riding a horse. He didn't know
whan K Call ass.
AFTERNOON EDiTH^
30,00OJIARCa
IN SUFFRAGE]
spectacle
“lAt the Spirit, the Fftitli ||j|
James d'Arc, Lead Ns m? ' I
Battle Cry of Third Aft* 1
nual N. Y. Parade
MEN DISPLAY FAITH
BY JOINING MARCHttdi
•- TH
Inez MilhoUand, Followed bf
“Cavalry” and 35 BraaS
Bands, la Leader
NEW Y’ORK, May 3.—Dame Nature
ami led tuanlly on 30,000 advocates of
woman's suffrage who assembled
around Waahlngton-sq. today for their
third annual parade. It waa a flawless
day, Just the right temperature to
make those 65-cent straw hate with
yellow cockades that every marcher
wore, just as appropriate as fetching.
Swarming the streets on all aides
of the square were determined, aerl- -
ous women, filled with the aplrltof the
final marching orders sent oat from
headquarters—orders that gave the
best possible insight into the pprpoa#
and character es the demonstration,
“Let the spirit, the faith of Jeanne
d'Arc. lead ua on," was the keynote of
the final message aent by the leaders
to the various gathering places.
No laughing or talking In the ranks,
and, above all, no noda, waving hand#
or other greetings to relative# fuM
f lends on the sidewalks or In jm
grandstand were other orders
to show how serious was the occasion.
It was to be a determined, silent
host, sweeping up Flfth-ave., an army
calculated to impree* the great crowds
of spectators with its determination to
have a vote in 1915.
Twenty-four handsome young wo
men on horseback, at dashing as say
cavalry captains, were 'assigned to
lead the great procession. Their cap
tain —and therefore the individual
leader of the whole parade—-was Mtsa
Inet Mulholland.
Just behind Miss HUholland’s troop
of fair cavalry the first of the SI hnaaa
bands was stationed Than uaftif'pi'
officers of the National American Wo
man Suffrage association, and the Na
tional Congressional committee, of the
association, followed by representa
tives of the nine states, and Alaska,
where suffrage is established. Bach
cf these delegates carried an Ameri
can flag and a shield bearing the name
of her state and waa gowned In white
with a laurel crown and gold stars in
her hair.
Next in line were delegations of real
women voters from the nine states,
and the non-suffrage states followed in
order of their nearness to victory. Ah*
other large section was the woman's
political union, followed by the “Army
of the Hudson.” little band of ‘•hik
ers," led by ‘‘General” Rosalie Jonae
on their famous tramp to Washington.
The woman suffrage party, a huge
section with delegations from every
district and borough or greater New
York, was next in line, followed by
the College league, with girls from
all the great eastern college#; the
"Equal Franchise society, the New
York State Woman Suffrage associa
tion, and, last of all, the Men's league,
with a cavalry brigade of lte own.
The parade was to start from Wash
ington-sq., promptly at 3 o'clock to the
sound of a bugle blown by the ffcir
Miss Milholland. The line of march
was straight up Flfth-ave. to the Plasa,
where half a dozen speakers* stands
were erected on all sides and address*
cs for the cause were to be delivered
by promlnnt suffrage leaders.
END CONSPIRACY
CASES TODAY
Alleged Grafting New York Po
lice Officials Tttack “Squeal
er's” Confession
NEW Y’ORK, May 3.—The defense
lu the trial of former Police Inspect
ors Denis Sweeney. James E. Thomp
son. John J. Murtha, and James Ei
Hussey, charged with conspiring to
defeat Justice in connection with the
police graft investigations, ass ex
pected to close today
The quartet of distinguished attor
neys handling the defense plumed to
center the greater part of their stack
on the testimony of former Captain
i Thomas \V. \N alsh, whose confessions
of graft and c\ Hence against the de
fendants sic Mil'vnrks of the prosecu
tions cases
;
1 Governor Interrupts Death Penalty.
WHEELING. W. Va. May 3.—As
j John .Medley, colored, and John Hit,
convtriad of the killing o( a man ami
\omin respectively were kneeling in
A final prayer before bein*; executed
la c yesterday. Warden lb own re
scued a >eiegrSu from Gov, f.l,if field,
commuting Medley‘a death sentence
to life imprisonment and granting Hit
it rtsy of execution for 30 da.s.
PASTOR RFSSELL
nKi Hoi r nrcß t hoi sty—a p,
SI MM I. W4V 4TH. 1.R4T1 ntk
••hkwkv mf.i.i. \\n pi nr.iToaf?
xi i. im »rrn. *v.\rn rnKK, 10
I « Oi l H« I'IOV
Mtyel.TV SIGHT
at tonight All tit:
nl.l and new flan daac*4 tH* beet
mure m Michigan Thr w«ru wRI.
continue tta dancing pasties during that
-month of May i'l’.a r’..^
yKlkSw < WmT^^£
ONB ClNTi^

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