OCR Interpretation


The Detroit times. [volume] (Detroit, Mich.) 1903-1920, November 25, 1913, AFTERNOON EDITION, Image 1

Image and text provided by Central Michigan University, Clark Historical Library

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016689/1913-11-25/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

PERFECT AUTUMN DAY DAWNS FOR WHITE HOUSE WEDDING—GUESTS ARRIVE BY SOOH
THE WEATHER
Yt’B*l>A4 Mt.HT 441) WNDKKIUIAV
I'4«RTTI.KD, I’HOBAMLV KAIKt
WAMMKH TI EMIAA 4IUHT.
FOURTEENTH YEAR. NO. 48.
POLICE ARE POWERLESS TO
CHECK ITALIAN KILLINGS
THEY SAY; TWO MORE SLAIN
Officers Admit They Can’t
—Fathom the Fends That Pi—
vide the Local Colony Into
Blood-Thristy Camps
SALVATORE BROTHERS
ARE LATEST VICTIMS
f i ' "
Sawed-Off Shotgun Snuffs Out
Lives of Pair While on Way
Home
Two Italian gun men, each with a
•awed-off shotgun in his baud, stepped
out from between two houses oQ Mul
lett-st., near Rivard, at 5 o'clock. Mon
day afternoon, as Vito and Salvatore
Adamo, brothers, were on their way
to their home at No. 486 Viharaplain*
st., and each picked a victim, Vito fall
ing with 14 buckshot in his body,
while Salvatore received 13 of the big
pellets.
The two victims staggered out
the middle of the road and fell, dying.
Both died soon after, in St. Marj’V
hospital.
Police and a swarm of detectives,
rushed to the scene, found one shot
gun. with only one barrel fired, in a
dagon at the rear of No. 154 Mul
lett-st.
Detectives Bolone and Itoggers pick
ed up Frank Moneco, 26 years old. of
No. 323 Congress-st. east, as a stispl
clous person. They Bay that he is a
‘'bad" Italian.
The police are helpless, in the face
of the slaughter being wrought among
the ffattan gang men, and they admit
it. frankly. They know that all of
the sawed-off shot Runs, which have
so recently sprung Into u»e In the
Italian colony, are roaring In a war of
extermination among Italian gang
sters, but to sort out the origin of the
feud, and the alignment of the differ
ed gangs, they are powerless.
Vito Adamo was recently tried for
(Continued on !*•»«*■ Kl«ht).
DETROifITUDENT
MAY GO TO OXFORD
i
U. of D. Man One of Five to
Qualify in Rhodes Scholar
ship Examination
ANN ARBOR. Mich.. Nov. 25 (Spe
cial) —F. J. Kennedy, of Detroit, a
student at the University of Detroit,
student at the University of Michigan,
was one of the five men who qualified
in the Rhodes scholarship examina
tions. recently held In this city. The
other men are: R. Kroodsam and I*
Hekhuis. of Hope college; W. W. Ren
nie, of Hillsdale college, and S. P.
Cook, of Alma college.
From this number one man will be
selected to receive the 15*13 scholar
ship at Oxford. The committee which
will make the choice will meet some
time In December, and is composed of
Chief Justice James H. Steere. state
supreme court; President Harry 11.
Hutchins. University of Michigan:
Dean John 11. Eftlnger. University of
Michigan: President B. W. Anthony,
Adrian college, and President Samuel
Dickey, Albion college.
None of the University of Michigan
students who took the examinations
qualified in the finals.
IB Jr
BHia
|g* •<
|k; \ a T
[MORGAN BANKS
HOLD MORE THAN
$22,000000,000
Brandeis, in Attack on Money
Trust, Tells of Huge Power
Wielded by Syndicate
INFLUENCE EXTENDS
THROUGH ALL CENTERS
America Cannot Have Greatest
Good for Greatest Number
Under Rule of Gold
“WORE MONEY TRYST" FACTS
"Tfc» members st J. P. Morgan
anil eompaay, nad tbe directors of
tbelr controlled trust compuale*
nud ol the First National and
National C'ltr bank to tret her hold
341 director* hip* In 112 corpora
tions, havlas son regale resource*,
or capitalisation of 232400.000,000.
"The Morgan Arm, with two New
lorh city bank*, tbe National City
and tbe Flrat National, eonstltnto
tbe Inner groat* of the money trust.
“Amorleo, tvhlcb seeks" the
greatest good to tbe greatest num
ber. --cannot be content with condi
tion* thaf fit uub the hero, the
niHrtyr and the slave."
NBW YORK, Nov. 26. —“The huge
sum of $22,000,000,000 is not large
enough to include all the corporations
to which the ‘influence’ of the three
allies (J. P. Morgan a Cos., and the
National City and First National
banks) extends," says Ixnils D. Bran
d Ms. In the second of a series of ar
ticles on the money trust, which will
appear in Harper's Weekly tomorrow,
under the caption. “How the Combin
ers Combine."
"The leading exploits is in com
bination of J. P. Morgan & C 0..”
Brandeis says, "having now been
known; but the part played by them
was not fully disclosed until Samuel
Untermyer developed the facts be
fore the Piijo committee.
"Among the sllles. two New York
banks, the National City and the First
National stand preeminent. They
constitute, with the Morgan Arm. the
Inner group of the money trust. Each
of the two banks, like Morgan & Cos.,
has huge resources 'Each of the two
banks, like J. Morgan St Cos., is dom
inated by a genius in combination.
I nthe National City Is James Still
man : 1 nthe First National. George F.
Baker.
"The Ptijo committee finds that the
(ContfnneU on I’siif Right)
LOWER INSURANCE
RATES FOR AUTOS
NEW YORK. Nov. 26.—Automobile
Insurance Is 16 per cent cheaper, to
day. as a result of a reduction* an
nounced by the eastern conference of
insurance companies. A million and
a half cars In the United States are
affected.
The Bride
JIMII WOODROW WILSON
me*
JURY CHALLENGE
DISMISSED BY
JUDGEPHELAN
Court Makes Sweeping Decision
Against Glimnan Defense on
Every Point Raised
OLD COLLUSION CHARGE
QUICKLY DISPOSED OF
Task of Selecting Panel to Try
Alleged Grafting Aldermen
* Ordered Continued
The third challenge of the re
corder’s court Jury army, made by at
torneys for Aid. Glinnan, alleged
grafter, waa dismissed by Judge
Phelan, in a decision handed down,
Tuesday morning, and the work of
selecting a Jury to try Glinnan, waa
continued. The court’s decision fol
low!: _
’’Paragraph# i, 2,3, 4,5, 6. 9, 10, 1L
12. 13. 14. 16, 17. 18. and 19 contain
charges relating to the conduct and
acts of the board of Jury commission
ers in compiling a list of Jurors for
this court for the year ending with the
May term. 1914 I And these charges
to be wholly unsupported by the evi
dence, but on the contrary find the
fact to be that said commissioners
have discharged their duty In a oom
mend&ble manner -and in compliance
with the requirements of the statute.
•Paragraph 16 alleges collusion be
tween the prosecuting attorney and
the boafd of Jury commission era m
dividing the city into districts in an
unlawful manner. 1 find nothing un
lawful or improper in their act* in
this regard.
"Paragraph* 7 and 8 refer to the
manner in which names were deter
rained, selected, listed, returned, plac.
(Continue* M Png> Wight)
THE WEATHER
Detroit an* vtokltyi. Twooday sight
and Wad seed ay ooovttled, probably
ralai warmer Taoodny algktt moderate
to brisk aontbweaterty triads.
Lower Mlchlgaai Partly Heady la
aerth, n meet tied la soath portions
Tuesday night nad Wednesday | prob
ably rain | wanner Tuesday algbt la
east and eeatral portions.
For the Taper Lakesi Brink to mod
erately high aontkweat to northwest
winds i generally fair la north, naoet
tled la sooth portion Tuesday night
and Wednesday i somewhat colder
Wednesday la north portion.
Southwest and northwest storm
narataga ordered for npper lakes ea
rrpt extreme ooath portion.
For the Lower Lakes* Brink winds
mostly south and ooath west! Increas
ing cloudiness and warmer tonights
Wednesday a a nettled, pro ho My rain
oa Brie.
Small eraft warning Indicated 12 a.
m. for tnereaslag ooath and ooath west
wlado ht coming moderately stress
tl.fs afternoon and tonight. \
Oae year Sgo today t Highest tem
perature. Mi lowest. 22 1 meOa. 22i
eloady weather.
10,000 ON STRIKE
1H SCHENECTADY
SCHENECTADY, N. Y.. Nov. 26
Te nthousand workers In tha shop*
of tha General Electric Cos. here
walked eut at 9:80 this moraine. The
shops were to crippled that they were
Immediately shut down. There waa
m disorder.
TUESDAY. NOVEMBER 25, 1913.
NOTHING DOIN’
“I NEVER HAD A
CHANCE,” SAYS
MRS. WAKEFIELD
Woman Sentenced to Die for the
Slaying of Hue bind. Declares
Her Innocence
SAYS SHE KNEW NOTHING
OF BRUTAL CRIME j
Young Mother Hopes Efforts of
Connecticut Women May Move
Pardon Board
By ALICE ROHE,
(BtafY Correspondent.)
HARTFORD, Conn., Nov. > 25.—*1
never knew until they put me in
prison that women folks had any
rights. I’ve learned a lot of things
that make life seem different than it
did before they said they were going
to hang me.”
Mrs. Bessie Wakefield, "the woman
who never had a chance.” the woman
upon whom 12 men Jurors, and a man
judge fastened the sentence of being
"hanged by the neck until you are
dead," for the slaying of her hus
band, breathed into her mother's ears
; for the first time yesterday that awak
ened consciousneee of the woman she
might have bees. Her arms about
| her mother’s neck, this 24-year-old
'child of poverty, reared in lgnoranoa,
I betrayed and married in same, and
j degradation, poured forth the hope
,that through her own sex at last some
iray of help may yet come into her
Hie.
j Mrs. Wakefield was convicted of
I having assisted Jim Plew In the kill
ing of her husband, largely on Plew’t
testimony.
"I know now that I never had a
chance," said Bessie Wakefield, yes
terday, in the first interview granted
anyone wince her conviction. The
mingled Joy and grief of seeing her
own flesh and blood had left her
more keenly interested in the future.
"It wasn’t until the women of the
state began to try and save me that
I realised what my life had been. My
one hope now is that they will Inter
est the board of pardons.
"Yon know 1 am Innocent,'' sho
cried, holding on to her mother's
hand. And to the mother, who. Hko
herself, ha* been a product of poverty
and Ignorance, ehe told again the
story of the man she thought might
nave her from the unbearable suffer
ings of her married life.
Plew tried to save himself at mv
expense. That’s why I’m here He
plsnned everything. I never knew
until It was all over. I had never
been In a court room. 1 was so afraid.
I’ve been afraid for seven years, first
of Will (her husband), then of Jim
(Plew), then of everybody."
ARnntA sibasom oprm*.
fcecord season «f dancing starts to
night MsmiWoth On*-Btep and Tango
Party. America’* Finest Ballroom
Adv. *
Robert Oakmans announces
tbe removal of his office from
58 Home Bank Bldg.. to 506-507
Moffat Bldg.—Adv.
Baked Qaeda aad Afros Sals Bay. 22.
f Hsian Avs. Baptist Church—Adv.
15-YEAR-OLDGIRL
NOT FEAZED BY
BOLDGUN-MAN
Little Restaurant Cashier Ig
nores Robber’s Command to
“Throw Up Your Hands”
STRUGGLES WITH HIM
AFTER HE GETS CASH
Joined by Chef, She Chases Foot
pad Along Street Till He
Escapes in Darkness
Anna Quinlan, the 15-year-old daugh
ter of John Quinlan, proprietor of the
Orillia restaurant, No. 196 Michlgan
ave., isn’t a bit afraid of a "stick-up"
man. She says she will slap the face
of the next one she catches prowling
around her father* restaurant.
Shortly after 2 o’clock. Tuesday
morning, a young man with his hat
pulled far down over his eyes, enter
ed the Orillia restaurant and ordered
Anna, who was acting as cashier, to
throw up her hands. Did Anna faint
or scream? Well, not this time.
"I won’t throw up my hand*, and
you had better get right out of here,”
was what Anna said.
Then she felt something pressing
against her side. She looked down
and saw that It waa a big revolver.
"Htajd up yer hands. *kid. and avoid
trtjjioie*!’ again commanded the bold
gun man. Anna continued to remon
strate. and kept her back presse'l
against the £ash register drew.
The "stlek-np man, evidently an
amateur, was undecided for a minute
what to do. Then he raised the barrel
of the gun until it waa on a level
with Anna’s pretty face.
"Now * beat it or I’ll damage your
complexion,” he said, and, finally,
Anna wilted. The thug pushed her
away from the cash drawer, grabbei
several Mile and made a dash for the
door. In front of the cigar counter he
dropped a stb bill. As he atooped to
pick It up, Anna rushed from behind
the counter like a flash and grabbed
him by the collar.
"Give me back that money.” sh*»
cried, but the robber shook her off
and rsn out of the restaurant. He ran
west on Mlchigan-ave. and turned
north on Thlrd-st. Jack McKay, chef
In the restaurant, heard Anna* cry
a* she struggled to recover the money
from the robber. He dashed Into the
restaurant with a long bread knife in
his hand Just as the robber slammed
the door behind him.
"He just robbed the till,” explained
Anna pointing in the direction of the
fast retreating figure. "Come on."
The two gave chase to the robber
They saw- him turn tip Thlrd-st. and
started In pursuit.
♦ , .
STOCK MARKET
OPENS ACTIVE
NEW YORK. Nov. 25.—The stock
market ojened active.
SCOTCH PLAIN’S, N. J.—Cold *to
rage turkey put 50 people to the bad
at a woman’s auxiliary supper But
the ptomaines didn’t kill any.
ARCADIA TVBKiJT DAB CRN
Wednesday eve. Firsts and • ’srnlrst.
Thursday afternoon. mstlnu Thursday
I tvs., Chrysanthemum Festival. —Adv
THE CLEAN NEWSPAPER
VILLA PURSUES HUERTASI
TROOPS SOUTHWARD, TAKINi
MANY PRISONERS-100 SLAW
WEDDING DAY- f
DAWNS FAIR
IN CAPITAL
■■■■ ■■
Weather Experts Predict Sun
shine for White House Bride
—City is on Qui Vive
GUESTS POURING IN
ON EVERY TRAIN
All is Now in Readiness for the
Ceremony in the East Room
at 4:30
WASHINGTON, Nov. -25.—Hearts
of a nation turned today to the White
House as the hour approached for
the nuptials of Miss Jessie Wilson,
second daughter of the president,
and Francta Bowes Sayre. One of
Washington’s most perfect autumn
days dawned for the event.
"Parly rising’’ was the order at
Ihe White House this morning. The
bride and her family, with a few
house guests, breakfasted at 9
o’clock, and soon afterw’ard a stream
of automobiles and carriages bear
ing relatives of the bride and groom
began coming to the gleaming whits
portico of the executive mansion.
Little remained to be done today
in preparation for the ceremony at
4:80 o’clock this afternoon.
Little else than the wedding is be
ing talked of in the national capital
tonight, and with favored guests ar
riving on every train, the excite
ment islble at the White House is
communicated to the population.
Large delegations of the Cousins’
club of the Wilson and Sayre clans,
arrive at the hotels every hour.
Dr. Harry aOrfleld, son of the for
mer-irrdiHdanL. and president of Wil
liam* college, is a notable guest who
arrived today. Mr. Sayre is to he
Dr. Garfield’s secretary at Williams
college after the honeymoon Is over.
The honeymoon plans still remain
concealed. Rumor varies from Ber
muda. Old Windsor Forgo, Church
town, Pa., to Mr. Sayre’s Montana
ranch. It is said that only the young
couple are In the secret and that
their going away plans are a mys
tery to the president and Mrs. Wil
son themselves.
While the newspapers have furn
ished gorgeous Paris gowns for Miss
Wilson’s trousseau, she ha«? had
manv of them made here in Wash
ington by Mrs. Ella Coombs, a Ne
gro modiste, whose dresmaking skill
has won her many society leaders
as patrons.
and Sunday Dinner—Si.
Uaff Roma. John R. and Adams— -AdS
For patewta trademark* sea
Bortkol * Bortfcol, ST West Coo^rraa-
BolaMa.Hk* Prlotlo*. No fuss and
no’ feathers. The plain, neat kind that
looks right. Tlsi*a Mstiss Cos.. 1«
John n.-st. Phone Main 14M.
. -=3^jsisß^B
AFTERNOON EDITIOi
Seven-Hour Battle Bdow J—W#!
Results In Capture -of
Federal Trains and Quia* 1 |
tity of Supplies j
——— , <
FIRING LINE EXTENDS
FOR TWENTY MILISI
Greatest Fight on Mexican Soil *
Since 1848—Seventeen Thon- fj
sand Engaged
EL PABO, Texas, Nov. 25, I
After a long lull, beginning at 8 A
a. m., during which both side* |
Improved their positions, the bat*
tie of Tierra Blanca was resumed,
at 6 a. m, today. Villa took the
offensive, training hie artillery on
a federal train whioh the federate
surrounded during the night. •
Fighting wae general all along |
the line.
EL PASO, Texas, Nov. 26.—Hav-
Ing repulsed the Mexican federal
forces of Generals Salasar and Or
ozco, Ge. “Pancho” Villa’s constitu
tionalists forces early today were
following up their advantage gain
ed In the battle of Tierra ttamh
last night. They continued to har
rass the Huertista troops In their re
treat southward, taking prleoaeta
and seizing ammunition and onp
plies.
Ah the result of the eevon-hoM*-
battle, which began at 5 p. m. yes
terday. 15 miles below Junres, Villa
captured two federal trains, a num
ber of prisoners and a quantity of
supplies. Early today It was esti
mated that his losses were 100 dead
and 200 wounded. That the federal
slain will greatly exceed the rebel
lose, is stated at Juares. although It
is impossible to get any accurate
figures.
The battle line extended along a*
front of 20 miles and at many points
where the fighting was
reports of casualties are as yet un*
available. * : „ _
The greatest number of men that
has engaged In a battla on Mexican
soil since 1848 participated . whea
the engagement began. Villa**
forces number 7.500, and It la esti
mated the federals have 9,600. The
battle line extended from Bauche, on
the west. In a semi-circle, to Zara
goza, near the Rio Grande, on tha
east, with the center at Tierra Blaar
ca. on the Mexican Central railroad.
The engagement opened near Tier
ra Blanca when federal# fired upon
Villa’s main body as It approached
there. Then followed a lull, the fed
erals awaiting reinforcements. At 8
o’cloek both aides opened with artil
lery at Tierra Blanca and an hoar
later Villa’s troops attacked. In 16
minutes the fighting was in progress
along the whole line.
From the outset the fighting wag
desperate, according to the storied
of wounded federals and rebate
brought into Juares during tho
night. In some placet the troop*
were so close that they fought with
clubbed rifles, hand to hand. Dar
ing the early stages Villa merely de
(Coatlnaed e> Paare Eight).
The Bridegroom
»oy«» •ayre,
ONE CIIM

xml | txt