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The Detroit times. [volume] (Detroit, Mich.) 1903-1920, December 24, 1914, FINAL EDITION, Image 7

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Anybody Can Manage Boxers It They Are
Masters of Half a Dozen Professions
Lichenstein, Who Bosses Jimmy
dabby, Tells of Manager's
Qualiliications
Uraey I Jchtensteln, manager of
Jimmy Clabby, middleweight chump,
believes say man cau become a suc
cessful handler of professional light
ers if he is endowed with the fol*
lowing qualifications;
U) must be a lawyer.
▲ll managers, he says, must be
abls to draw up articles that give
his fighter the benefit.
(t) He must be physician and
nurse.
Mishaps call for first aid attentions
frequently.
(8) He must be a good publicity
agent
Knowledge of how to reach the
various news agencies and close touch
with sport writers t »e country over
Is essential, says Lichtenstein.
(4) Conversational ability.
He must be resourceful aud bright
at repartee at the ringside and able
to make an address when called upon.
(6) Must be walking fight encycloj
pedia.
The successful promoter must be
familiar with pugilistic records, ec
Precedent Likely
To Make Trouble
In placing Maurice E. McLoughlin
Ahead of R. Norris Williams in the
Ranking list of the U. S. Uwn Ten
iils Association the committee has
*et a precedent which doubtless will
influence the framers of the list in
future years. Not in the history of
ihe sport in this country has the na
ional champion been subordinated to
he man he conquered. Yet no one
•areß to quarrel with the committee
>ver its action. Mclxiughlin is eon
eded to be the greatest exponent o!'
ennis in the world. Even the British
icknowledge this to be so. But the
act remains that the national cham
donship no longer is to be regarded
yj conclusive evidence of the quality
if the winner, it has been rightly
aid that the national tournament is
lot the deciding factor in rating the
dayers and the upshot of the matter
nay be some stormy times in the fu
ure.
VIRGINIA LOSES TWO
REAL GRIDIRON STARS
The University of Virginia, which
ion a place on the Harvard football
Ichedule for next fall by Its splendid
Ihowing in 1914, will lose two of its
Itrongest gridiron performers by
The Home, The Church and The School
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LARNEY LIGHTEN STEIN.
centrlcities of fighters, and familiar
with the rating of small town pro
moters who are apt to promise great
things with no power to fulfill them.
(6) A forecaster.
Ability to anticipate every content-
graduation next spring. Mayer, half
hack. and (Touch, quarterback, are the
men who have played their last col
lege football. Both are among the
finest football players ever produced
lit the south, and they were frequently
mentioned .last fall as all Arporican
material.
YOUNG SHUGRUE IS
INSURED FOR $20,000
Young Shugrue, whom Freddy
Welvh thinks is a coming champion,
has been insured against accidents by
liis manager ior tin- sum of $20,000
ShUgroe will fight Charley White at
New York, Dec. 29, and a victory will
mark him as n top notcher and one of
the country’s leading drawing cards.
CANADIAN FORD PLANT
SHOWS tifl&AH PROFIT
The Ford Motor Cos., Ltd., of Walk
erville, Canada, turned over r profit of
$2,022,490.00 for the year ended Oct.
31, 1914. according to the annual re
port just made public. The dominion
profits figure nearly 200 p»*r rent of
capital stock, with $1,924,747.04 ac
credited to tne nome office and $97,-
749.02 to the company’s branches.
The company Is capitalized at $1,000,-
000 with $1,804,840.30 surplus. The
report shows cash on hand and In
bank, $1,267,032.35.
Drtrail( Time** Jtib I’rlntlnit Depart
ment.in 4 620.
THE DETROIT TIMES. THURSDAY. DECEMBER 24, 1914.
Telling Boxer He's Getting Old,
Hardest Task of All,
He Says
plated coup of opposing managers
aud tricks of present-day brainy box
ers.
A New’ Yorker by birth and train
ing, Idchtensteln played semi-profes
sional bull as a youngster and also
was an amateur boxer. He says he
never "amounted to a tinker’s dam
as a fighter." During his career as
fight manager he has handled the af
fairs of over 200 pugilists.
"In the ring," he says, "a boxer
must do his own thinking. There is
no use talking to him, but you can
occasionally signal him with your
hands as I do with Clabby, telling
him when to take it easy and when to
come fast. Between rounds boys of
the Clabby type need little handling,
but there are one hundred and one
things to which the manager cau turn
his bund.
"Thp hardest thing I have ever un
dertaken with boxers is to tell them
that they are getting too old and too
slow for the ring. They always re
sent that. You’ve got to let them
know Indirectly. Then if they won’t
take your tip It is useless to advise
them further.’’
BOLD ATTEMPT TO
ROB STORE FAILS
Walter Shanley, 21 years old, of
Syracuse, N. Y., and Hkrry Keller, 21.
who says he lives In Kalamazoo, were
captured, Wednesday afternoon, after
a bold daylight robbery lu the store
of Hughes £: Hatcher, No. 333 Wood
ward ave.
The young men had announced that
they wanted to buy some furnishing
goods, ami were examining shirts,
neckties and other goods, when they
suddenly grabbed uu armful apiece
and bolted for the door, pursued by
Lester Hat her aud Fred A. Hughes.
The two thieves hailed a passing
automobile, but the driver refused to
take them in, and they were soon
overhauled by the store proprietors.
They gave battle, but Patrolman Role
ert Evans hurried to the scene and
arrested Shanley and Keller, who hud
thrown away much of their plunder
as they ran. but still had several ties
and gloves, some alleged to have been
stolen from other stores.
Shanley was identified by Itetectlve
Charles Carmody as a man arrested
here for shoplifting last September,
under the name of Stanley Nuse.
U. S. AND BRITAIN
COMPLETE 100
YEARS OF PEACE
Original Flans For Banquet In
Ghent Fail Because of War—
Greetings Issued
TWO COMMITTEES
ISSUE STATEMENTS
Suitable Exercises Will Com
memorate Ratification by U.
S. of Ghent Treaty
NEW YORK, Deo. 24.—The people
of the United States and Great Brit
ain will observe today the one hun
dredth anniversary of the signing of
the Treaty of Ghent, by reminding
themselves that the day marks a cen
tury of peace among English-speaking
nations.
• The original plans called for a
series of celebrations in this coun
try and across the water. It was to
have begun in Ghent Christmas eve
with a banquet tendered by the burg
omaster to GO representatives of the
United States, Go Englishmen and 60
Canadians in the hall where the
treaty wus signed, but this was upset
by the fact that the ancient Belgian
city ncnv r is occupied by the Germans,
with whom England is at war.
To mark the day, the American
committee and the British commit
tee, which have been arranging for
tho peace ceutenury, issued commun
ications for simultaneous publication
this morning in the newspapers in
England and the United States.
Tiie British statement expresses the
hope that "the disarmed frontier be
tween the United Btates and Canada
may long continue as ait example to
the world of the safe defense of
mutual respect and trust in the af
fairs of nations," and prays that "the
peace between the British and Amer
ican democracies which has so long
endured may never be broken.’’
The British peace centenary com
mittee has purchased Sulgrave Man
or, the ancestral home of George
Washington in England, which was
to be presented to she American
people. This and other features of
the celebration are to be postponed
until after the war.
Tho American committee, notwith
standing the war, purposes to carry
out in part its original Intention to
celebrate the peace centenary, and
in a communication Issued last night
over the signature of a number of
widely-known citizens, urges suitable
commemoration of the ratification of
the treaty by the United States,
Win a Box or a Pair of Seats In the Garrick
For “The Third Party” by Solving This Puzzle
*
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A photograph ihowing a scene from “The Third Party,” which come* ic ..it Gkuricx theater next week, haa
been chopped up for you to piece together. Some of the piece* were printed Wednesday; more will come to you
in tomorrow'* edition. There will be three installment* of the pieces in all. For the first correct solution The
Time* will give a box of six seat* for the opening performance, Monday night, and for the next 10 correct solu
tions a pair of orchestra seats for Monday night, and for the next 10, a pair of orchestra seats for Tuesday
night’s performance. Save the pieces until you have all three installments and then hurry your solution to The
Times, with your name and address plainly written. The winners will be announced in Saturday’s last edition
and an order for tickets mailed the successful contestants.
which followed immediately upon the
arrival of its draft, in February, 1814.
The dates specified are Feb. 14, for
exercises in churches of all denomi
nations; Feb. 17 and 18, for formal
addresses at the capitals of the re
spective states, and Feb. 22 for exer
cises in the schools.
LAD, MANGLED BY TRAIN,
DIES WITHIN FEW HOURS
Leo Maraszewsky, of No. 352 Tlll
man-ave., the 10-year-old boy who fell
Here are three nation-savintf institutions that The Detroit
Time* will continue to stand for staunchly in its
Fine New Home of Clean Journalism
73, 75, 77 Bagley Avenue, Between Grand River and Cass, in the
new business heart of Detroit, beginning with the new year, 1915
The Home, The Church and The School
The sacred and vital interests of all three will be con
served in news, editorial and advertising columns.
By What The Times Prints
By What The Times Refuses to Print
If you want a wholesome newspaper that will serve you
with all the news that is worth while, and help you in the
bringing up of your children in the way that they should go.
mail the attached order to The Times, or call up Main 4520.
At the same time do
The Times the service
of indicating: which of
its policies you would
like to see it take over
to its new home on
Bagley * ave., January
Ist, and which of its
policies you would like
to see it leave behind,
in order to more faith
fully promote the in
terest of the Home,
the Church and the
School.
under a train at Huchanau-st. and the
railroad, Wednesday afternoon, died
in Providence hospital, several houra
later, from hia injuries.
The lad’s right arm was crushed off
at the shoulder, hia left arm was man
gled, and be was injured about the
body.
The boy had been sent to the meat
market by hia mother, and had board
ed a passing freight train to make
the trip.
Benumbed by the cold, he fell from
the train as he attempted to alight,
and rolled under the wheels.
For the Home, the Church, the School
THE TIMES, IMi*. r - r - , - n -, rrn
Detroit
You may deliver Michigan’! Cleanest Newspaper by carrier at
the address below until further orders, for 25 cents per nsaath.
I would like to hav * you take to your new homo. •* *—-• •»•»«#
'/
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I would like to have you leave In your old homo (^M^M „
mo a aaaa aw ww a4 owe • ew w a aw ww a•• •*• •
To Remain Class C.
SAOINAW. Mich., Dec. 24.—The
South Michigan league will remain in
Claes C, it has been decided, rather
than jump to Class B for the sake
of the larger receipts from drafts.
Smaller salary limit is the reason.
Just imagine the feelings of those
Philadelphiarrs who have named their
children for Connie Mack.
This 1b the “prospects are bright"
season for the ball clubs, but what a
lot of them need is less outlook and
more team.
Page Seven

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