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The Detroit times. [volume] (Detroit, Mich.) 1903-1920, July 18, 1916, GRISWOLD-ST. EDITION, Image 8

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TUESDAY, JCLt l».
City News in Brief
‘Mar’i la« 4 CtMtrt*
fetaonui’a Military band. Herman
W. Bchmamaa director. rendars
fallowing urcfrtm In f alinnr P*r»
1* tha afternoon, beginning at
gg| ta tb« evening In Clark nark, bv
*Wrt Popham" Hall: over,
gore. *T«>i* tuna'* Carnival. Stlm'>-
Ma; Mkctlon from “The \N “f
the Mia." Herbert; overture On?-'
aua." Owanbach; selection of houth
mrn Plantation Songs. “The Sunny
flouth.” Umps; melodies ri rn
•'Chime* of Normandy.'' Planguette;
~BalutI)’ Amour.” Klgaci grand p<«t-
Murrt. “Mualcnl Joke*.” Hamn; 'Star
Bpangied Danner.”
Mia for divorce were died Wlh
Conafr Clerk Farrell Monday »»y
llaael P. v». David M Inman. I r* ri
v*. Hattie McKlroy. Mary v.« Btenh'
an Chapman. Eva v» Hholemnn
Voile, vanda r*. John I.ean'orics
Ueotenae i W illiam V. Kenned*. 1 .
f. A. medical reacrvc c«>rp«. eon of
Dr. Johnston B. Kenuciy, of t .
City hn» been assigned lo the N'r-’h
Infantry, I'. S. A., at Fort 'Jell.to-i,
Laredo. Tea.
Frank 11. I.eland, HrpiihltcSn candi
date far *overanr, »p*nhinic before
the KI want a club In the H tel •"t'C
ler, Monday noon. f,*r>'ngH- a'tack
ed the practice of ' votes
bv mem be re of the legislature
acored the etafe tax commission
foi its extravagance, and renewed
hie declaration for a state budget
system
Hr*. I'earl W. Pelum. **ke vloped
Irani Niagara Kalla. Ont., with
* John A. Cahill taking her two
ehlldren with her. was deport'd.
Monday, a* tin undeslrahl** al'**n.
Cahill, who denar ted a wife in Nl
tiv.ar.-t Falla. Is scrv.ng u four
ni-*nth« sentence In the Detroit
II >usc of Correction Walter
sIIa.I Heed. :t i-tjMic barge. Mas
also sent bat k to Chatham.
Aa acceantlns 1" bring made In tha
relate of i.iurgr X. Kleteker. of
Alpena, tinder dicr*'** entered last
February by Federal Judge Tuttle.
Th. he.-trIUK I* being held before
William S. Sayres, muster In chan
cery. Unless an appeal Is taken bv
the Fletcher heirs, the accounting
will end a suit that has been in
the courts for half a century. Val
uable lands In and near Alpena
•re Involved In the suit, the value
of the land being approximately
f1.000,000.
la • mans meeting held Maude*
evening. In HI. Andrew's hall, ta
make arrangements for a bazaar to
be held late In October, to raise
funds for the widows and orphans
of the soldiers flrhting In the Al
lies' armies. It was decided to con
tinue the bazaar eight day*, hut
the location was not decided upon.
Special booths and buildings will
be erected, and the affair will be
attempted on the scale of the re
cent similar affair held In New
Tork.. In the audience were rep
resentatives of many different
nations, patriotic societies, frater
nal organisations, churches. etc.,
all of whom were enthusiastic In
support of the proposed bazaar.
W. IL Carnegie presided.
8m example of the damage wrought
by reekless motorists Is Patrolman
I. B. White, who. while on duty at
John R--at. and Bethune-ave.. last
December was struck hv a drunken
motorist whom he attempted to
•top and was dragged nearly 190
feet. Patrolman White suffered a!
fractured right leg thnt ha* not I
mended yet and a number of minor
lajurlea. He visits police head- I
quarters on crutches and says that j
he probably will not he able to re
turn to duty for eight months I
Haapeoter *Tom“ O’Grady fakes a Ist '
of pleasure out of forcing motor- :
tats to observe the Littlefield ordi-J
nance on his dally ride from his
hom» down Woodward-av* t-- i>o- i
lice headquarter*. The genial in-!
•pector takes the renter of hU side
•x the streets so that It l* Impos
sible for drivers in the rear to
pass him, and conscientiously
makes the stop six feet behind
every car that stops at s crossing
and sits in his machtne chuckling
While those behind him proceed to
make the air blue with oaths as
well aa lubricating oil.
Vwl CMfa*. ■ Greek llTlag In Pe
trnlt. ba« keen ftrrtl kr Ike (an -
n&dlan immigration authorities to
give up a neven-dollar-a-day Jr.h
in the 'Canadian Bridge Co.'s plant.
At first the Canadian authorities
refused to allow him to draw 17!
that he had coming from the plant.
Insisting that he had no right to
t»e working on the east side of the
border at all. Friends of Coufos
made nn appeal through Mayor
Marx, and Coufos was allowed to
draw his back pay. Coufos will
have to return to Greece and en
ter Canada via a Canadian seaport,
or will have to become a U. S. elt-
Isen before he can hope to get back
os the payroll.
STEAMERS
NEARCRASH
Detroit 111 and Detroit II Just
Mi— Each Other; Former
Cracka Cylinder Head
After narrowly escaping a collision
as ths was departing Monday even
ing, at the foot of Thlrd-ave., the
D. A C. steamer City of Detroit 111.
cracked a cylinder head aa she was
nearing Cleveland, and returned to
Detroit under her own steam. She
might have continued the trip, It
was stated In the D. A C. offices
Tuesday, but there are no facilities
An Buffalo for repairing the cylinder.
The collision was averted when
Captain Simpson, of the Detroit 111..
Mew alarm signals to the captain of
the Detroit 11., which was backing
down from her dock. The Detroit
M. was also backing down making
ready to depart By a quick reversal
of the engines on the Detroit 11.
stopped.
The City of Detroit TIT. will be re
paired in time to depart Wednesday
night as usual.
•A ¥
Montclair, N. J., today will pm
Into effect the commission plan of
government recenily adopted by
vote of the people.
WRISKRV KIIXKD HIH.
And U wilt ruin nr kill any man
that heaps drinking It. Do you want
lu get rid of the drink habit? 1 can
kelp you. 1 waa a victim of drink
•nd waa absolutely and permanently
cured by nn effnctlve, reliable h'>m*»
fem*dy. the formula and rights I
purrnuaed and made within the reach
of every human being burdened wIY-i
the curse of drink. It causes no iU'k.
n<*s nr remaining away from work
• i business. It also build* up and
atroni-then* and tones the system. It
rntrpletely removes all craving, de
sire «*r taste for or need for stimu
lant* of any kind. All alcoholic pni
si i* nt eni e eliminated. N» mat
g, fcr whether you are a periodical,
fcr moderate or occasional drinker or
habitual drunkard 1 can sav« you. If
yvu havf a friend who drinks wri*'-
ks, No one who appeal* to me will
ke overlooked or neglected. All cor-
L. fens and i n~~ conddenlial. 1 can refer
hundreds of peopla rltpt In
KlUsm, you honestly d-slr* to
'fia ’ firefsr free from the rur*.* of
here Is an opportunity y<■ «i
hSKM hOt overlook. Address J M
S#t South Dearborn st . Ch.-
uisßga sUe***hsnr»
x i
The la«t regular meeting of the 41-
leadale . C. T. I . will he held
Wednesdav altern< n. at I o clock.
In the Grand Diver Christian
church. Campaign literature Will
be distributed at this time.
J. K. Wentworth, a former rr»ldrnt
of Michigan sad at one time the
owner of extensive lumber int- r
esfs. la the respondent In a judg
ment rendered jn ;t Chicago court
for Jiif.i 000, for w hich Wentworth
IS liable as guarantor »-f the bonds
of the Great Kssfern !.umber <’<>.,
The suit hrought by George
V Burr J. W V tfx-k anil John L
Si- and lard, who .-on.-tltuted a bond
holders' committee
The prl» liege of ftnerlran clrtsen«klp|
wan one benefit, at least, acquired
bv a woman who came to t' ,
< . r.trv fr >m Germany and mar
ried an American h’ sband. ~he
applied at :nty Clerk Fnrrel’ s
T •• Monday, to inquire If shs
wo ■ t„v» to c fhr-'.igh the “ve
v< ar pat trslixatl n process. having
1 »* h,. r h-ishsn 1 l v fll'orce »n
•-i tm.t »t;on of the law showed I
♦ h it ,he d;d net
The Mlt-hliiitntlrM enlisting for the
t’lntfshura en«'nmptoral **UI he .
tak • let on asp- ial train leav
'nr Detroit A -ust I>. at 5 p m
Information n • the firth and
a'id ort 1 Cat -Sure tn-'sinpmrnt*.
which st«-t \uc l'j and Sept 5.
c;in be o’ • fr -m Fi. A sum
ing organ, .-iini-n.
“Here conies onr eabaret.** said a
is sit re <s In a hotel on l ibrary onrk.
as n hur-'.;--gurdy drew up and be-
L«n to tir.is n 1 Its m»t>i!lls tretnolo
With th* n imber of l->ungers on
I en- '•* • l“-f r- th* hostelrles on
rtown-tnwt - streets, the hurdy
K<irdv mar 1* In favor these day.
and gat ■ go* and bai vast of coin* of
larger dm-uvinstton than proffered
In the residence districts.
( barge, t with conducting fbetr rno ga
in a hnn«e under fasaaltary condi
tions. Y»va Jovl h, "f No jwJ
Franklin—t, Valaf-a M'kllch. of No.
Frank Hr. -st . and Teter Artson.
of No. Tin Frsnklln-s* . were warn
ed and placed on probation, Mon
day Chief Inspector ciarkeri. V
the health department, made the
complaints. He declared th* hous
ing conditions In these plae-e* were
revolting
K perslsteat mnane nearly “get tho
goat" of ant boo* Kloke. a clerk In
the office of the county treasurer.
Monday, popping out of the cash
drawer ever time Klok» opened It
Kloke thought at first that a horde
of mice had descended but an ex
amination of the drawer by Henry
Jacob*, building custodian, showed
that the drawer had been gnawed
through and that the rodent made
Its way back each time.
lingo Kleger died ta his residence.
No. IMS Mendrle-ave.. last Thurs
day In the h-’pe that his son
Frederick W Rieger, a member of
Company A. Thirty-first regiment,
could arrive from El Paso in time
to ntfend the funeral, the body
was held until Monday. Young
Rieger had some difficulty In ob
taining leave of absence, and he
arrived home Monday mcht. Just a
few hours too late for the funeral.
Asthss* Vaco Soto, a Chinese, bnr* In
Hawaii, expects to become s mem
ber of the Michigan bar by vir
tue of American oltixen«hip con
ferred upon all res'-lents of the
island In 1»00. whether or not of
Asiatic parentage Seto received a
degree from the Detroit College of
law at commencement exercises a
few weeks ago. Monday he filed
an application with the state ex
amining board to take the next
examination. For a time he was a
student In the University of Mtch
tgsn. He has helped make hts
way through law school by work
ing In a chop suey restaurant.
Wkrn free Inner detectives went In
the rosin of Jack Chrtoton. •«»•
J >hn Christian. 19 years old. who
was wanted on a burglary charge,
they found not only Christen but
a gold watch valued at IISO and
a safety razor, both of whFh were
identified as the property of John
C. Munn. No. 401 West Orand-blvd.,
whose home was robbed Sunday
night. Chrlston was wanted for
stealing a chest of silver valued at
S4OO from a residence on Hendrle
■t.
W ken Mrs. Geerge Jeennote, es Vs
Ik Reed-pi- applied «• ike Retrolt
I’strtotlc Fund for her weekly re
lief allowance, Monday evening.
Sergt.-MaJ. Sid A F.rwln 'om
municated to her the glad tiding
that her husband. had arrived
home. Erwin had just received a
telephone me*sage from .?• ,*nnote
before his wife r*n< he.j th« arm
ory. Jeannote finally obt:»lne,| hts
discharge under the r.**w wur -le
ftartment ruling permitting th. re
ease of married soldiers with Im
pendent* The Parlotb- f'.elief !•' nd
committee now meets In the arm ry
on Monday. Wednesday and Friday
evenings, between € and 7 o'clock.
DETROIT STATE
BANKS TO AGAIN
GET POSTAL FUNDS
Detroit state and savings bank*
which were depositories for money
of ihe United States postal favines
oanks before the Federal Re try*
bank act went Into effect, have been
Informed that they will again be eli
gible to receive funds from the poa
tal savings institutions under an act
approved May 18, 1916, after filing
of approved bonds with the treasury
department.
When the government refused to
permit the deposit of postal savings
In Detroit state banks because they
were not In the federal reserve sys
tem, the banks charged that they
were being made the objects of dis
crimination in favor of the national
banks. The modification of the fed
eral reserve act to again permit
state and savings banks to accept
po3tal savings. Is regarded by De
troit bankers as an indication that
tlie course first taken, instead of at
tracting -state banks to membership
in tbe federal reserve system, an
tagonized them.
OFFICERS SEIZE
JUGS OF “RED EYE”
An lleged ''blind pig” operated by
John Catto, 30 years old. No. 712
Woodbridgo-st. r>a t, wan raided.
Monday bight, by l>etectlves Wil
liams and Schrniamky, af*er re
ports were recoivfd bv IJeut. John
Reid that slcknep.- rtid • ven death
followed Indulgence in the liquor
that was old In the place. Ten
Jugs and thr*o bottle* con'alnlng
li'iuor were taken fn n the place by
the officer*, and will te> analy zed
Catlo claims tha' he buy* all the
liquor from reputable wholesalers,
and that there la notb'-ig wrong
with It. lie was hi Id on a clfirgc
of violating the liquor law.
An attendance of “.f-0 delegate* is
exp«cte<t fa Milwaukee today for the
annual convention of the txmn and
Building Association league of Wis
consin.
Alligators do not attain full site
I until nearly 100 years old.
SEATTLE
PAPER IS
DRV NOW
Publisher Who Fought
for Wets “Takes It
All Back”
ADMITS STAND
WAS ALL WRONG
‘Miles of Empty Stores’
Have Failed to Ma
terialize
Forced against Its will, because
of the success of prohibition In
Washington, to espouse the dry
cause, the Seattle Times now come*
out with an editorial In which it ad
mit* that it “fought its damndest”
to save the saloon, but after seeing
prohibition tried for sii months,
takes back All it said in the cam
paign. The editorial, written and
sljgned by the publisher. MaJ Clar
ence Hrettun Blethen. says in part;
"Well, we've had six months of
prohibition, and I can t find those
miles of empty stores. In several
states, three of which are Montana,
California and Missouri, advertise
ments and news articles are appear
In* dally in newspapers, much simi
lar in construction and tone to the
advertisements and arguments
against prohibition which appeared
in the columns of the Times prior
to the ‘dry’ election in Washington
“There isn't so much being said
about the evil effects of prohibition
In Kansas as was said in the adver
tisements that appeared in Seattle.
Perhaps this Is due to the fact that
the men responsible for the ‘wet’
publicity have found out what I
have—that It isn’t safe to base any
arguments against prohibition on
conditions In that state. On the
contrary. I have become convinced
that the results of prohibition in
Kansas are about as powerful argu
ments for the ‘dry* as they could
possibly desire.
“The Times admits it was wrong
when It said, during the campaign
against prohibition, that the en
forcement of the statutes would
mean miles of empty stores In Be
attle, reduced bank clearings, re
duced bank deposits, reduced ren
tals. reduced realty values and gen
eral business depression Six months
ago prohibition went into effect.
None of the dire things prophesied
for the first half of the year 1916
has occurred. On the contrary Se
attle has prospered wonderfully.”
ROOMERS FLEE
IN NIGHTIES
Early Morning Fire Disturbs
Whole Block of Sleepers;
Other Blazes
Roomers in the house at No. 146
Howard-st., owned by Mrs. Ruth
Schreiner, were forced to flea to
| the street in ihelr night clothe*
! •‘hortly after 1 o'clock. Tuesday
! morning, when fire started in the
I kitchen and spread to the floor
! above. Roomers In surrounding
rooming houses were also frightened
out their beds, and fled to the
street. About 1300 damage was
done.
; A favorite resort for tramps wa*
destroyed, Monday afternoon, when
flames swept a brick barn at the
rear of J. Adolpji Krug's violin More
No. 14 East lAfayet’e ave The Arr
is believed to have beep *»ar*ed by
someone who wh* sleeping in the
straw that covered the floor of the
place. Albert John, a romn*-r in
the house in front of the t,arn. said
he saw a man run from 'he bu.ldins:
immediately after the flre started
Firemen practically demolished
the building after 'he flre was put
out, tearing the she*t Iron side-*
from the gfrueture and battering the
place w\»h their axes it is said
that the board of health has attempt
c-d several times to have the place
cleaned out. Fire ha* started in
the building twice before.
Firemen were called ou* In the
downtown district twice, within five
minutes, Monday afternoon, to -mall
fires. A blazing awning in front o'
the Ste. rialre hotel was the cause
of the first alarm. W. r. Osby.
chief engineer of the hotel, had the
blaze nearly out by the time flre
men arrived
A fire which started in some tar
pots on ihe tenth fhior of the new
I-a'er building. No .17 Broadway
forced firemen to climb the io
stories with extinguishers to *top
Ihe flames.
r| nr AGO James Mlllln. 27. took
his motVr In a taxi to Chicago’#
new municipal pier "I'm going to
swim out to that crib.” he said.
Jumped In. waved his hand and
sank.
Mexico today will observe th*
forty fourth anniv»r«arv of ihe death
of ihe patriot J<uirez.
Australia has fixed the price of
flour at 854.75 a ton.
DETROIT TIMES
SPEED DP
IN PASSING
TROLLEYS
Motorists Try In This
Way to Avoid
Stopping
PRACTICE IS
DANGEROUS
Littlefield Ordinance Is
Now Strictly En
forced by Police
Violations of the IJttlefleld ordl
nance requiring automobiles to stop
six feet behind a standing street
car. were the exception on Wood
ward «ive , Tuesday morning Com
ratssioner Gillespie had traffic offi
cere stationed along the avenue to
compel the rigid observance of th*
ordinance provisions.
Several Wood*ard-ave traffic offi
cere above Adams ave. reported
Tuesday morning, that the motor
isfe almost generally are obeying th*'
six-foot law. although many are rr*
atlng a more serious menace than
crowding pedestrians at the inter
sections by speeding up to pass
street cars before they come to a
halt. Ry speeding past the sDe**t
car when it l* approaching a safety
tone, motorists find they can avoid
shifting gears. It is a dangerous
practice, however, and the polio* 1
will have to put a stop to It ts the>
want to make the IJttlefleld ordi
nance effective as a safety measure
“Wait until w-e atari riding out
motorcycles again,” said a motor
cycle officer on traffic duty. “The«c
‘rustlers’ are the fellows w* will g«
after first It is a dangerous prao
tlce to speed across a street Inter
section, and It is criminal to do r
when the safety zone* are loaded
with pedestrians Two fellow* were
beating it. Monday, and one driver
cut right through the safety zone
so that he could pull ahead of tfh
fellow **
The automobile traffic on parallel
streets. Cas«-ave and John R.-st , is
gradually increasing in volume a?
enforcement of the TJttlfleld ordi
nance! becomes more rigid Bome
repair work is being done in Cass
ave at the present time, and motor
Ist* are making use of Second ave
EDISON CO. TO
ERECT OFFICE
BUILDING
The Detroit Edison Co.’t gross
revenue for June wa? $716,740 13 an
Increase of 32.3 per cent compared
with June. 1915, commercial electric
revenues for the month amounting
to $603.480 83, were an increase of
30.9 per cent. To*al operating and
non-operating expenses, including
depreciation allowance of $60,730.
were $480,543 59. an increase of
31.8 per cent, leaving net Income oi
$236,196.54, a gain of 33.3 per cent
Interest deductions were $85.410 94
«>r 2 5 per cent less than In June
last year, and the balance remain
ing from net income was $150,785 60,
a gain of 68.6 per cent.
For the six months ending June
30. the company's gross revenue was
$4 850.260.22, an Increase of 30 per
cent, while the net Income for the
half-year period showed a gain of
47 9 per cent.
At the termination of its lease on
the central office building, the Edi
son company will exercise an option
it hold* on a piece of proper'y
owned by the James K Srrlpp* es
tate Th* property has a frontage
of 70 fee* on Washington-blvd , and
is ’-allied at $315.0C0 The Edi«on
company will remodel *he four-story
building on 'he property.
Plan* have also b**n prepared for
a nine story office building for th*
Edison company, to cos? about s2*.n,
bOO. Work will not. be star'ed on
the new b•' ding tin'll sometime
next year The company *>•-» ns the
• ntlre west end of the biork fr*ir.t
ing on Second ave , between Beech
and West Elizabeth st*
TO TRANSFER
GUARDSMEN
SAN ANTONIO. T.’,, J,,| r n _
Eight thousand National Guardsmen
now stationed ■* Laredo will be
transferred to ether border points
because citizen- of that place ob
jert*>d to sanitary conditions In the
militia ramps
Enforced Savings pe ™ n r, wh / > nr '' not
1 hat Pay 5% disposition, find pro-
J toction against their
own mi ort.com in a plan that requires a fixed
sum to I** laid n*ide each month. This is just
wh< ro our y t* mafic Savings Plan fits in. Come
in today and talk it over.
M*no> (Th? Rational Sloan Sc
~n tfmiratmgtrt (f mnpanu
Estate 120-21 Harwell Bldg., Detroit*
OCKAN _
CUN A R D
Nf:w \ O It K I.IVERI'OOI,
hAXONTA SAT, Jfl.Y JI.M'M
run VTFfiA SAT . JCLT Jl, S KM
• - SCO imp M
•TI'SF' A VTA ... PAT. ATM 1-» NOOX
MXOMA SAT.AI’O JUf'M
•I'm I.!\ rponl and Ulaigow
M.W \ OIIK-KAI.HOI TM—I.OSfIMIA
IANNOVIA SAT , Al’<». », sl’ M
ANI'ANIA ... HAT. AIM il. 6 PM.
I A f.A T’NIA HAT . AIM H.H'M
71 SfAlf.af., >»»« Tark.nr l.o#a| Asia.
Anyone can tell you why
he take* THE TIMEB
without stopping
to think. If you
«ic? to think
you'll
take it
To laaur. Victor auebty. *>»m
look (or the hmoui trademark.
"Hi* Maatrr ■ Voica” It to am
.vary Victrola and rvary Vlcto*
Record It to tha only way ta
..nuin. Vlctralaa US
Victor Kavocd*.
77ie
chosen instrument
of the world*s
greatest artists
The instrument which plays the greatest music is the instal
ment you want in your home! Consider the quality and char
acter of the music which an instrument brings you, and you
have applied to it the vital test.
The Victrola is great because its music is great. It is in mil
lions of homes the world over because it takes into these homes
all that is best in every branch of music and entertainment.
The artists who create Victor music are the greatest artists
in the world. The Victrola tone is the true and faithful tone of
the singer’s voice and the master’s instrument. It is for this
reason that the Victrola is the chosen instrument of practically
every artist famous in the world of opera, instrumental music,
sacred music, band music, dance music, vaudeville and enter
tainment.
Go today to a Victor dealer’s and listen to this instrument
for yourself. Hear Caruso or Melba or Elman or Harry Lauder
or Sousa’s Band on the Victrola.
Victors and Victrola* —$10 to S4OO.
Victor Talking Machine Cos., Camden, N. J.
Important warning. Victor Record, can be aafely and .atlefectorflr played only with
Victor /Voed/.» or Tmngtfnm Slyl u« on Victor, or Vlctrolaa. Victor Record, cannot bo
•alaly played ao machlnaa with Jeweled ar other reproducing point..
Now Victor Roc or da diataaotralad at ail daal.ra m lb. ZB tb ot oack M*ik
Victrola
iki's MASrtRS h>h^v4|
|. p. NORTON
INDEPENDENT
UNDERTAKER
It Is a great comfort to the bereaved to know that tho
Funeral arrangements are in the hands of an experienced
undertaker. It is also satisfaction to know that the funeral,
conducted in an elegant, dignified manner, will be moderately
priced.
I Have No Extras. No Exceptions
I Have No Branch Stores
I am as near you in point of service as your nearest
undertaker.
S3O: ft Beautiful Casket 's3o
I. P. NORTON
Detroit's Independent Undertaker
Phone Grand 5968. 761 Michigan Avc. Phone Grand 1467.
vwh XVI me V
Vtotrola XW oUatric, »2SO W
Mkoparaitto
PAGE 8

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