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The Detroit times. [volume] (Detroit, Mich.) 1903-1920, January 13, 1917, AFTERNOON EDITION, Image 1

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SE V K NTEKNTH YEAR. NO. 92.
27 REPORTED KILLED IN NEW [I
SHELL BLAST; PLOT IS SCENTED
MISER, IN WARLIKE PROCLAMATION,
DEFIES HIS ENEMIES; SAYS ALLIES
FIGHT FOR ENSLAVEMEHT OF EUROPE
“Glorious Victories” of
Teutons Prove Foes
Must Fail
SAYS GOD WILL
AID JUST CAUSE
Subjects Ready for Any
Sacrifice, Ruler
Declares
AMSTERDAM, Jan. 13—Ger
man editorial comment today
was practically unanimous in
the belief that the Allies' note
has blocked all chance for peace
at present.
AMSTERDAM. Jan 13.—The Al
lies’ purpose to crush Germany and
wnalave Europe Is now made clear:
»u» as they hav* failed In 30 month*
>f bloody war and "unscrupulous
*eononilo" fighting to accomplish
itibjutratlnn of the Central powers,
to will their future efforts fall.
KaHrr Wilhelm thus summed up
lis belief of the Entente powers*
joMtinn In a "proclamation to the
German people" Issued today. In it
i« declared his people were "ready
'or all sacrifices." and asserted his
wnfldence in “fuM victory over all
he enemies’ btrt for power and
■age for d* struct ion ’’
The proclamation reads;
“Our enemlea ha\e dropped the
nask Af'*r refu r : peace with
ifom and hyiWKTItP al words of love
'or peace and humanity. they now,
n reply 'me to the 1 ntt*-d Statee.
isve cone beyond that and admit
ed their lust of conquest. the base
le*.- of e ,oi hls enhaneed hy ralum
lions i <rtion-.
“Th» Ir aim is—the crushing of
tern my dl-momberment of the
Allied iTeutons > powers and en
(lavement of the freedom of Eu
rope •n'* *'*e m is under the same
roke that free ‘ with gnashing
eeth, i n<w end n inr
' “But w h it m 30 Tnon'hs' of blond
est figM n” and unserupuloiis ecn
lomlc w 1 r tb«-> cou'd not achieve,
hey v ll’ also fall to areompllsh In
he future
“Our rl rlnus victories and th“
«( onl nitfil ott I’ngr Kltf I
Kussj.-r. ‘••' i red I)«*\il."
Who W s Assassinated
■ y I IhmL*
lowtcegy hasputinl
I (jlrijiifv Its-* put In. alh'd ih*’ "Sa
■red D'-.i' 'f It ■«.' whose influ-
Inre ever the r»*yht f.unilv. pnrtlcu
lorly the (patin i he* ame *d>noxl
liis. was quietly assassinated by
■•vcral r Istives of the rxnr and
ligh o" « :\| • He was «ine of those
■ rang* * • died characters who
lav* fl , i) thru all Russian his
liry It i ut|n had gained such
Inwer ov r the royal family that H
9as fear* and he would interfere serl
liisly with eondiirt off the war.
It hdv rate he interfere*! with offl
Inis of such Importance that th"
Itissian police f» nr to prosecute the
Ir n w ho i tiled hint
Ikrn In llflr.lt X Ul» Mt. I Irm'.i,
m* world-renowned "D.ith rity.”—Ad.
MAY ASK
ARREST OF
COAL MEN
Corporation Counsel
Makes Private Probe
of Fuel Shortage
FINDS MANY CARS
ARE BEING HELD
Investigation Was Or
dered by Mayor
Marx Jan. 1
While Detroit sufferers from an
acute coal shortage and deliveries
arc curtailed during the cold wave,
hundreds of cars of coal are held
Ctltfdde the city hy Detroit spectjlat
err, for a Mill higher price.
This condition was uncovered hy
Harry J, IMngemnn. corporation
counsel .in a *>*-ret municipal in
vestigation. which was computed
Friday, and may lead to criminal ac
tion.
The investigation was ordered bv
Mayor Marx. Jan i. af ♦ t a confer
en< e with Dlngeman on the coal
.-hortage. end it has disclosed hat,
am late a* Monday, there were 200
curs of coal in Detroit and Windsor
yards held on "he Id ‘ orders from
brokers anu other Detroiter* to
whom they wer- consigned.
Dlngeman turned ever his data to
Mayor Marx, and som« tune Sat
urday '.he executive will determine
vhnt course to follow The corpora
tion counsel recommend'd that the
tesiilt* of the Investigation Ik- turn
ed over to the prosecuting attorney's
office, and expressed willlngnt .is to
assist In a criminal action.
In a report of visits "of municipal
iiivestloraton<_JUJL_the Michigan <>n
tral freight cards in Windsor and
the Grand Trunk and Michigan <>n
tral freight yards in Detroit, the
tnrpoitithn Counsel's report says:
“All tracks were congested with
loaded coal rnrs. Mr. Campbell, gen
« rnl yantmastrr of the Michigan
Central In Wind-nr, raid there were
lots of cars loaded with coni for De
troit but that the Michigan Central
had no orders where the Detroit
people wait'd them sent “
Dingeman’s report says that the
practice Is to hold the cars until the
yanlmaster gels instructions to
ship them out and that the demur
rage charges are paid in I*troll
The report says that on Monday
nnd Tuesday of the present week,
municipal investigators found iu the
Grand Trunk yards In east Detroit,
ID ears of coal for Detroit lab* led
“hold " The head ear checker told
the investigators that some of the
ear? hnd b*en In the yards for two
weeks, nnd that when th"y were
irnt to the consign*«• they were re
turnd with orders to hold. The
ram** checker said that on Grand
Trunk sidings at the Seven and
Nine-mile roads, there ar*> mo cars
of coal for Detroit held up
The municipal investigation was
mdepenih nt of the lederal eonl in
(|Ulry, the result of which will r.«.i bo
kn*iwn until the Jury reports Jar.. 25'
The Jurors completed their work
end return* and to their homes sev* rsl
days ago.
THIRTY-SECOND
LEAVES BORDER
JANUARY 18
RAN ANTONIO. Tex.. Jan 13,-r
The Thirty-second Michigan infnn
try and Michigan Brigade headquar
ters will leave El Paso for For*
Wayne, Detroit, on Jan 18. II was
Announced at Gen Cunston's head
quarters last night.
| Prlstl.g—lkr glaln neat kln4—Hurt
Ila H(lt —-Tin'. J.k Hr,).—Hit. ttM.
DETROIT TIMES
HEW PEACE
PRY SOUOHY
BY WILSON
Hopes To Find Ground
For Continued
Mediation
SECRECY TO
SHROUD MOVES
Submarine Bogey Once
More Looms In
Washington
By ROBERT J RENDER.
{titaff Correspondent United Press.)
WASHINGTON. Jan. IS.—The
next move of the United States to
wards continuing peace negotiations
is In the process of formation today.
After a conference with his cab
n**t yesterday, at which the Wntente
reply to his first note was dis
cussed In detail and after a long
talk with Col House, confidential
adviser, President Wilson has be
gun laying the groundwork for fur
ther mediatory negotiations.
These, it is understood. must
necess"ri'y be high’y confidential
for a time.
Those Immed'ately in the presi
dent's councils say the time for
open communication which must of
necessity include much bombas'
for "home consum'd!* n" and to win
the sympathy of neutrals, has
passed. If any headway Is to be
made now’, it must be developed
♦hru sect*•* channels, they bel'eve.
It is deemed likely hy some that
the president will be given bis first
cue if he does not already possess
advices from Ambassa
dor-ffr’-ard hy Von Bcthmann Holl
wee in an address before the relrh
stse on the Entente terms.
What the president Is looking for
Is some common ground on which
the Entente demands and Teuton
concessions square sufficiently to
give him a basis for effectual work
In the meantime, the submarine
bogey again looms ns a prod to
American efforts for peace. Re
ports from abroad, confirmed to a
larger extent in German circles
here. Indicate that If there Is no
pearr now Germany will push her
warfare on a larger nnd more re
lentlesa srale.
Ambassador von Rernstorff. how
ever. assured that there will he no
further violation* of the “principles"
which Germany has agreed to.
CONFIDENCE
MEN GET $l,lOO
saloonkeeper Is Victim of Old
(lame, Friday; Police
Seek Trio
Three confidence men entered the
saloon of Walter Marlejewakl, No
’«Ht Harper-ave., at 9 o’clock Friday
morning, and shaking a chest that
ihry said contained gold and Jewelry
«f great price, offer* and It ns security
for ihc loan of $l,lOO with which to
open a tailor shop. The saloonkeep
er was only allowed a glance Into
li he chest of "glittering jewels." hut
was satisfied. After giving the m**n
slo** from his till he drew s7uo from
th* bank and handed It over to them,
and pnn a closer examination of the
fonlenlH of the chert, following the
departure of the men. he nearly suf
sered hn attack of heart trouble.
The police are how looking for the
i confidence men. The "eold" piece*
l were brass checks and the jewelry
was faJte.
SATURDAY, JANUARY 13, 1917.
Delegates to Mexican Constitutional Congress
Taking Oath; Carranga Reading His Message
f " .""".GjiJfff '. .
£ - 1T...- -il
■ ' *—* *?'*■:■ '§§
■ 1,1,1 ■ w« fc--.•:•••;.<-i*
1i i jll
■r ‘ftfir nmiii mu t£jj-
M ■v* s •• * v • • 1 'aj: ; w .-> . ■■
IH/ * ■
# fIL My „wt
J' Y i
uk Bwß
l . -id- 3
I3WA TO JOIN
BONE ORY RA*.K&
Another State To Take Advan
tage of Webb-Kenyon
Law Decision
DES MOINES. la.. Jan. 13. —Blllr
prohibiting personal shipments of
liquor and barring liquor advertise
ments of any kind within the lim
its of the state are before the lowa
legislature today The measures
were introduced. Senator Whitmore.
th*dr author. stat*d. because the
Webb-K* nyon law made their en
fercement possible. Kni'roads and
express rompanies would h*- guilty
of a misdemeanor, by these Mils, if
surh common carriers brought
liquor into lowa The only man
ner in which the average person
could obtain liquor would be by «
visit to wet territory and be would
be limited on re-entering the state
to two quarts of whisky and on**
ease of beer.
MAN HELD FOR
SIMONJULLING
Columbus Police To Question
Suspect On Totel
Tragedy
COLUMBUS, 0.. Jan. 13 Colum
bus police today left for Hunting
ton. lnd , where Weldon 11. Wells
of Kansas City, was arrested early
today on an embezzlement charge
made in Kansas City.
Wells Is wanted for Investigation
In conectlon with the killing of
Mona S'mon, whose body was found
mutilated in the New iVshler hotel
here yesterday m*on;~
One reunrt here early today wn
that Wells had offered to come to
Columbus to give himself up to the
police
DRIVE'? HURT
WHEN ENGINE
HITS AUTO
Frank New-art. 43 years old, of
No. 3f»B MrDnngall ave . was badly
bruised and the truck wh.ch he w»*>
driving, demolished when the ni\*
rhino was struck hy a freight *n
glne on the Grand Belt line a:
Charlevoix ave. late Friday after
noon The machine was owned by
Lepke 4 Peterquln, No. 824 Gratin'
ave. Newart was taken horn*.
Del gates to the Mexican Consti
tutional congress in Queretaro are
here shown taking the oath of of
-9
flee. The lower picture shows Gen.
Carranxa reading his message to
them. They are at work framing a
constitution, which they say will be
enforced when adopted by the
people.
VOLIVA DICTUM
BANISHES SPECS
Zion City Autograt Says They
They Shouldn't Re Worn
l T nder 10
CHICAGO, Jan 13 Vanity’ Van
Ity! All is vanity!"
Thus mused Wilbur Glenn Vollvi*
as he sit in his study at Zion City
Boys with tortoise shell glasses nnd
girls with loud shoes were passing
beneath his window.
Then he Issued h's nine millionth
commandment, to-wlt:
"Thou shalt not wear glasses, tin
loss thou art past the age of 4'*, or
thine eyesight hath grown exceed
ingly dim ”
And so. with one stroke of his
omnipotent pen, the ruler put the
crimp In the oculist department of
the Zion City apothecary. But he
left one loophole. If any uofortu
nate and faithful follower of the
shepherd will convince him person
ally that his optic nerve is out of
order, he may procure and wear
glasses under a special dispensa
tion.
DANES BELIEVE
PEACE IS NEARER
Fighting Spirit Has Died
Down in Den
mark
COPENHAGEN, Jan. 13 In spite
of ihe character of the belligerents’
notes there Ls belief in Danish flip
’omatle circles that peace Is nearer
The popular sentiment In ivnmark
too, appears to have changed since
September. Then the Ikincs were
willing to fight at the drop of a
hat. They are still strongly anti-
German. hut speculation as to I»en
mark Joining forces with (he En
tente has now ceased.
Minister Maurice Francis Egan.
dei*n of the diplomatic colony here,
and for 10 years a confidante of op
posing groups in Denmark, sails on
Feb 8 for Washington on a two
months' vacation. Asa result of
his observations he may be able to
Impart to President Wilson some
valuable information as to a fur
ther -means for projecting peace dis
cussions, altho definite negotiations
now- seem Impossible until the
spring offensives.
Try *l«r Wdiklnt t*e t,k Maa««-
fhaafttl ■.■nn4o f•. gain MM. - AA
SECOND MUNITIONS EXPLOSION IN
48 HOURS WRECKS DUPONT PLANT AT
POMPTO.I LAKES; 4 STATES SHAKER
HOLLANDS’
DISCHAROE
IS UPHELD
Merit Board Finds In
spector Guilty of
Insubordination
LATTER’S CHARGES
NOT CONSIDERED
Investigation of De
partment of Buildings
To Continue
Friday evening, after having
been In session two afternoons on
the ease, the civil service commis
sion found that the building com
mission was right, in dtarharglng
Harry Hollands, an inspector, for
the good of the service. Hollands
had appealed to the civil service
body, asserting that he was wrong
fully dismissed. The charges were
insubordination and misconduct.
Immediately after the verdict was
rendered Hollands and his attorney,
John G. Cross, of James H. Pound’s
office, announced that they would
take their case to the circuit court
and seek to have the building com
mission and the civil serviea com
mission reversed.
Hol'ands had declared that he was
"fired” because he would not wink
at violations of the building rode
even on the orders of Chief- Inspec
tor Dupont, his superior. He has
made charges that men in the build
Ing department wpre "fixed” by
builders so that they could construct
hulldings in violation of the code.
He declared that he would not over
look these infractions of the law
nnd that he was dismissed because
he would not be a tool of those who
wished to favor builders and con
tractors.
Says Bad Work Is Passed
Asa result of his activities one
builder has been arrested and will
be tried on Jan. 19 on the charge of
offering Hollands a bribe to pass
work that did not come up to speci
fications. Hollands declared that
much of the work going up at pres
ent is contrary to the specifications
called for In the building code and
he frankly admitted that he had fre
quent clashes with Chief Inspector
Dupont because he insisted upon
complaining when he found Infrac
tions of the law. To thta ext*nt he
admitted his Insubordination, but
excused It on the ground that he
followed the building code to tfe let
ter nnd would follow it despite or
ders of his superiors.
The civil service commission
(CnnllnitfA on Pa*e Flvo)
STOEPEL WILL
LEAVES ESTATE TO
WIDOW AND SONS
The will of the late Frederick C.
Stoepel was filed Friday morning
for probate. Hla property Is divided
among his widow. Mrs. Anna R.
Sfoepel, and his two sons, F*red 8.
and R’llnh Stoepel. Judge IMrfee
appointed Ralph Stoepel temporary
administrator The estate |* val
ued at upwards of SIOO,OOO.
Mrs Stoepel, the widow; W C.
Stoepel, a brother, and Frank E.
Robson are the trustees of the es
tate. which. It ts directed, shall hr
he’d in trust for five years. I>ur ng
this time a yearly Ineome of $7,f»00
Is to be given Mrs Stoepel. To his
sister Minnie, he leaves slfi,ooo life
i Insurance. The sons are to receive
Incomes of $2,500 (lending the dis
tribution of the property.
Because of the advancement of
$20,000 to 1-Ted S Stoepel, It is di
reefed that this shall be deducted
on the apportionment of the prop
erty.
AFTERNOON EDITION
CITY PAYS
LAST HONOR
TO KEATING
Funeral of Council
President Held In
St Aloysius
OFFICIALS ACT
AS PALLBEARERS
Thurch Is Packed With
Friends and Former
Associates
»* ■ e
Detroit paid its final tribute Satur
day morning to Maurice J. Keating,
alderman from the Fourth ward sot
1 years, who died Wednesday after
noon, a few hour* after he hail
elected president of the common
council.
rity and county o rials, and
hundreds of other friends, filled St.
Aloysius church u-h**n the services
were begun, shortly aftr 9.30
o'clock. The flower laden casket was
taken from the Keating home. No.
205 Glndstone-avr., at 9 o'rlock, and
followed to the church by a short
procession of automobiles contain
ing the lnte council president’s child
ren and close relatives, and the ac
tive pallbearer*.
Traffic was stopped by the police
on Wanbington-Mvd. while the
church services were being held. The
Rev. Ernest Van Dyke conducted the
mass and preached thp funeral ser
mon.
When the cortege moved from the
church thru the heart of the cite, on
its way to Mt. Elliott cemetery, the
city hall bell tolled the knell that
bespoke the entire city’s sorrow.
The active pall bearers were:
Aid. Charles W. Burton, Albert T.
Allan, John C. Ixnigp and ex-Ald.
Julius I* Krimmel; City Cle*-k Rich
ard IJndsay, Representative James
I) Jerome. Frank J. Navln and
Jacob hi Goes.
The honorary pall bearers were:
Edward E. Kane, George I.ane,
C.»orge Jerome. William E. I,annnnr,
Junies Carmirhael, Robert Oakman.
John H. Johnson, Andtew Healv,
Fire Commissioner William Chit
tenden, Thomas Barium, Sr., Judge
William F. Connolly, Judge P. J.
M, Hally, Judge Alfred J. Murphy.
Judge Edward Command, David E.
Helneman, Charlea A Gadd, Arthur
K Gordon. Roy Coughlin, Vincent. M
Brennan, Harry J. Dingeman and
Edward if. Doyle.
71-2 CENT ECG
IS COMING FAST
Speculators Have Only Fifteen
Million Iveft In
tSoratfe
CHICAGO. Jan. 13.—Eggs at 7 1 ?c
each, before the winter is over. and
7T,c hen frtiit within two week- i~
the forecast of l»r It l-f MeKenzl*
president of the Chicago Poultr
Breeders’ club He says speculators
have only 15,000,000 eggs left i
storage here, with the consumption
averaging 1.000,000 eggs a day.
Eggs sold at ;>H to 06 rents toda>
Potatoes are retailing ;it $-’.4" pet
bushel, the highest in 40 years
I Hard coal ha-* advanced 50 per
cent over last year’s price
j THE WEATHER
Tlefrnlf rr<l i Irln t* »
nit hi anil *nn«ta> piril* oorrim,
prohibit ttlrh miow flnrrtrti r
(onlihl nlih roll) ttato loom al»«nti
lirrii freak nrtlrrlj Hind*.
rOatlif—tk» pt»»B tteaf kind—(h*(
N rlckt—Tlaira Jab Ural—Mala ISM.
IN DETROIT: ONE CENT.
Jerseyites Flee In Panic
As Blast Rocks
Earth
GLARE IS VISIBLE
OVER 100 MILES
Authorities Begin In
vestigation of
Disasters
NEW YORK, Jan. 13—Reports
of a heavy loss of life as a re
sult of the explosion of tons of
powder at the Haskell, N, J.,
Du Pont plant last night were
circulated today In various New
Jersey towns.
A sergeant of the Pompton
Lakes police declared 27 were
killed. He announced his eati
mate after talking with surviv
ing workmen. One of the Cu
Pont company doctors was quot.
ed by the sergeant as saying he
had counted eleven dead.
NEW YORK, Jan. 13.—With the
town of IlabkHl laid in ruins today
from the second giant Jersey muni
tions plant explosion within 4S
hours, Passaic County * Prosecutor
Michael Dunn prepared to lead New
Jersey officials in a thoro invesflgt
tiun to determine whether there was
an organized plot behind the two
disasters.
With an explosion that shook four
states and lit the midnight sky with
a glare that was visible a„« far away
as Albany, 400.000 pounds of smoke
less powd«r at the I)u Pont muni
tions plant, blew up. terrorized the
countryside and started a tiro that
blazed fiercely until early this morn
ing.
Two missing and several InJared
was the only available report from
(Conflnuvd on l-a|r Five)
FIRE IN TEA;
LOSS IS SSOO
Fire in a quantity of tea stored in
the basement of tho rooms at No.
R 23 St. occupied by
I>ouls RlaszokT caused damage esti
mated at SSOO Friday night. The
building is owned by A,lrx. I-empke.
Slight dantage was caused by a
fire in the four-story building occu
pied by the Klmball-Eisenberg com-
I any at No. 210 Jefferson ave. The
building is owned by the Henkel
♦ state.
A blaze in the kitchen ceiling In
the house occupied by Ignatz Drain,
No, 120S Twenty-fifth st.. caused
slight damage.
New ( anal Zone Governor
•* ! >***:*(*»** y ” |
Col. Chester A Hardin* has jus*
been appointed governor of the Pan
ama canal zone by President Wil-
Ison. He was formerly engineer com
missioner of the District of Colum
M». He uow la at work In -Pajuuw*

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