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The Detroit times. [volume] (Detroit, Mich.) 1903-1920, March 27, 1917, NOON EXTRA, Image 4

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THE GIRL YOU MARRY
Pfm aany vui turn for -j v
>At trot tk# »*oh v“ VO
frti to eom N.
008 if Um laundry mc
knot MkoMrrMl In port 1 V \/i
I Sift Übl# Moo** in ■ pub f,v V\V
nod five tfe« rwMiM i
r aped greeting: or she may
•at the wash on the line her
wad do a sob specialty after
you can prophesy your own
yOung man Woeful waste
The Confessions of a Wife
Hate Is The Height Os Selfishness.
I id Paula suddenly
reached this pan of
you ever study the
, mao who has once
who comas to bate
loved ms. but he
l and that was the
is rather queer. Mar
a who are perfectly
rise can hate so un
I hare sometimes
cause lore- real lore
a selfless attribute
he moat selfish thine
ta can cultivate
on had many reasons
In the first place. I
▼alas Mon of my char
tad shown him there
the work! who could
m I had made p
rhkfh he though
as a type and I mi
and « sharp scene siM;
efore he should <o:* I
imi«*al. That a; r
a hate me. a
Lmv Ernes’* *H'
est the comian.N. in
the showahop Ernc«*t
renes." 80 much of
Lawton do that Toni
t to It in his aewsps
e spoke especially o'
Mowing roe to finish
ltd tfils made Ernt-st
loos.
ar-ao ou nav* been romplstnlnf '<>
flar reporter lover!’ be biased at
ta as I patted him on my way to
gy/dressing room one night I did
At notice the insult, but cb. Mar-
W. H came over me with such force
►whs' if I hxd not found him out!
Dial If I. instead of Maud, bad been
Kand had found out boa to
was!
le. 1 early lear»ed-1n fact I
earned right then and there
aarrteges are not made in
that the sacrament of mar
one of our tradition*. It I*
t thing Margie wm n a
> this copriuslon ’PI i ■
laace as hsd come *o me.
> this tiro* 1 h*d only rv. • r
[Display in Schram’s Store Is
flight to Gladden Women’s Eyes;
F Place Thronged By Shoppers
|P (hr mtdflt of a profusion of
BSSIy spring bloaaom*. baskets of
||p|aa M&t by buslaes* weU-wl*h-
PS, pin «u sager buying of new
B|o MtU and bats Saturday In
kgtfsm'R. No Sl4 Woodward ave,
h» lataot addition to Detroit’* mod
uli stop* dealing in apparel for wo
9ba building ta new thro out and
■glatas three Boor* devoted to mll-
Dlvy. suit* and aktrts, ooata and
MM. Altho all of the carpet* and
EjtftlaMat* for the new store were
Ml M place for the formal openina
HgMrday there wan every aatur
IMS that the shop will be one of
Mfhed attrnctlveoe** with an airy,
■Mrful brigbtne** about U. and
ivippy aoavenience for the shopper.
r lit irst floor Is devoted to mil
iMST with trtaaaaeo and uo trim no and
LgS M liberal dlaplav, h\n<lAom*-
blMafs of all kinds for the
satoeted to be trimmed to the
Hkar'S Individual taate, and with
Kars. wins* feather*. embroider*
■Ksdtd omameut. and ike rkri
E add trlasniln* that so plr
■MmI) adorn the aprtn« hat of
rp» sat* floor offer* #vervthm* in
KCWy of itrve apparel from plain
fiand walking dreaaea to the fliif
■msM eoat»»m«# and the chotr
IVmH riot he. i*K.r mi mn
endured with eheer, or duty done
with many a tsar
It always pays to reduce the coat
of living at any price; better pay
the washwoman so much she cant
afford to forget
intimately of the married ttfe of my
bearcat father end mother. la a
\ague way. 1 bad known that some
of my mother's society friends had
been divorced. My little mother,
however, waa so scandalised by
them aha never mentioned them to
me.
“Knowing nothing about marriage,
rxcept the romantic notions and
fairytale theories I had evolved
thru the reading of many novels, 1
had never realised the awful Im
portance of the step until I saw that
look of hate on Ernest's face. Up
tc that time. If I thought of mar
rtage at ail, I had pictured it aa a
glorified courtship under the aua
pices and legality of the ri'irch and
ctate. 1 never tho’ight of the re
>po®.-<ibility 1 would be taking on
myself or the terrible uncertainty
which surrounds every marriage.
*Oh Xtarfftr., I «4** It -mold be
i ;m,>re upon ail mothers that it
* h e. taken kin In- to give their
i .ugh - r »imi pre»< ion ( ha* life Is
hii‘l .» u ! * op <>f existence In
Sr.hl('i < rr• r h*»* much sin and
o;vo*a - jn») b* all about them.
ih« » u-r om< huv to escape it all.
“I think. Mcrglc, I truly loved Br
ne ♦ Union I know 1 would have
tried my b*\- to ha e been a good
wife to him. To me for a Mine h»
whs the superman What would I
have done it I h«d been able to and
had married him? Would a mar
nepe of this kind bes sacrament?
“Margie, don't you think we ven
erate words- we sentimental Ameri
cans—and let the realities slip by
us?
"We won’t face fads People of
today often say they don l believe
In fairies, hut their whole existence
U> passed in telling fairy tales to
someone else ands cowardly ae
ccptance of sentimentality which is
not only maudlin but moat perui
| cious
“Mind, Margie, no ons loves the
I ideal more than I, but It must be the
really beautiful that contains the
good that Moethe talks about, not the
foolishly annexed opinion of some
one who In turn has annexed a
ihowy fantasy.” «
uing riot in the new modea and the
more brilliant the bue the more op
to date la the costume ffor the
omnipresent blouse and skirt, which
•Lyle of dressing has taken on
a new |ea«e of life the Srhr«un store
slm«« some attractive model* in
*klrt« These *vre of the plain or
-fn.-ay*’ order, the rich silk and
i-*tin. or *!te gay ,»lald ,tnd *tr>i>e.
arilh • very rone* Table material
used in the making.
The gowns and trork* sp'. top
coats which fill the third floor of
the new store offer a wide variety in
style and selection There are the
natty serge dresses the dressier
Georgette crepes, silks and satins,
and the new weaves whoae names
are legion and as curious as those
of Pullman cars With the separate
skirt and plain or fancy blouse so
tnu<h in favor, the top <o*t la a
neceaaarv adjunct, and the Bchram
stock affod!* a fine selection along
conservative or eitreme style lines
The Schratn store Is under the
capable management of Ben Bosley,
formerly of Chicago, whose business
connections in Detroit in the la at
year or two have won for him a wide
r< quamtano
Children Cry
rO* FLETCHER S
CASTO R I A
One Woman s Story
•Y CAROLYN BRECMBR.
Chapter XLII.
Never since the night that I hid
ta his office cloeet had I tried to
spy upon Robert. I had never
ceased to feel ashamed of myself
When a woman begins to apy upon
her kushrnd It is almost sure proof
that her faith In him is going, and
much of her own pride
Several times after Robert had
remained out all night I made frw
quent visits at his office, fearing my
•mptrkas would find Justlllcailaw
Neither my shame nor my pr»d«
kept me sway Several times I had
met lira either Just leav
ing the office or going In aa I left
Then I would go hums and shut
myself In my room I would walk
the floor my hands Icy. my heart
throbbing 1 Imagined Robert, al
ways so cool sad reoerved making
love to this beautiful woman Bit
ter thoughts would surge thru me.
sud I would fling myself on my
couch and sob and moan until I
could lie quiet no longer, then I
would take up again my frantic
pacing
Naturally neither my health nor
mv looks were Improved by theae
hysterical spells 1 lost my color,
sad my syes looked swollen and
weary
‘'Aren't you feeling well?" Hob
art asked one morning after I had
•pent a sleepless night. He had not
coroe la until after 1 o’clock. I
had pretended to be aaleep, hut. in
truth, had not closed my eyes nil
night long.
‘Yet. n little tired, that's all.” I
replied.
”1 have been doing fairly well of
late, I think you better get Martha
back. The house and the children
are too much for you. I gusea He
•poke kindly and the tears were
very near, but I forced them back
I would not err before Robert
“I don’t know that I can get her
sew.” I told him “She must hnve
a place ”
”Oet someone else then, and
taha more exercise, outdoor axer
da* You’re not looking up to the
mark at all. You are too youag
to look so worn.”
I flnlt like arreaming at him that
•either Martha nor any one save
hisseelf eouM make me look differ
•ntly. It wasn’t freak air I needed ,
It waa freedom from the torture
caused by my insane Jealousy
“I will see what I can do." 1 re
plied simply
Tfc» J. I*. HsSsm (
All Women Want New Easter Suits and
Here Is a Real Opportunity
Six of the Season’s Newest Models-Thoroughly High Grade Suits-Finely Tailored-in the Best Materials, to Be
.Sold at Special Prices ($18.50, $25 and $35) This Week in the Newly Enlarged Fashion Salons
w
Model No. 1
Black and white check.
ffngUsh-looklng suit, rather
Norfolk In line. Tightly belt
ed. Slot seams- -a very girl
ish suit. $25.
THE suits only arrived day before yesterday (Saturday). So you see
they are perfectly new —the last suit-word of fashion. This is
very important as a swift and sudden style change has happened
in suits. Quite a different style has come out. Much plainer suits
than the earlier styles are now the vogue.
There are six different models of these suits, and we (through
the maker’s co-operation) will offer them to the clientele of the
Hudson Fashion Salons at three very astonishing prices 418.50, $25
and $35.
A few months before the thought
of having Martha book, or some
ons tc help me would hava delight
•and me, but now 1 felt no elation.
• imply relief that I should not be
so much with Matilda, who was
very observing, and who. I was
sure, often wondered why my eyes
were so red, sod why I remained
by myself so much.
1 had made the reeolve to esteal
my acquaintance, to go out more
oftsa Bat I waa so miserable I
hadn't the heart. 1 bad even failed
to vtett either Myrtle or the Carle
tons for some time And I dared
not see Mrs Mulhany. Her kindly
questioning would surely compel a
confidence I did not wish to five
What a contradictory creature a
woman is Ws blow hot and we
blow cold, ws are extremaly happy
or extremely unhappy.
I picked up the morniag paper
after Robert left and the first thing
which caught my aye waa a rather
sensational heading saying that Mrs.
Pet#r Lawson's case for divorce
would come up that day. and that
Robert Drayton was her lawyer. It
also stated that he had previously
refused to act for Mr. Lawson
I rushed upstairs and dressed for
the street In ths dark tailor gown
1 usually wore, and covered my hat
and fare with a thick veil. I would
go to court. I would hear my hus
band plead for this woman whom
I waa positive he would like to put
ta my place.
When I went tn the court room
eras filled The Judge, a young man.
had a look of energy combined with
keenness, and kindliness His face
had none of the oold sternness we
usually associate with judgue
There was a look of human alert
nees. and honesty about him His
deep, rich voice held a sympathetic
note when he spoke, giving one con
fidence that he would do what was
right tn aa far aa he saw it
’lmweon versus Uwion, aa ac
tion for absolute divorce.” read the
clerk from his desk
“My client brings s counter nr
tioa: " a lawyer seated near the rail
said.
''Let the rase as called proceed!"
the Judge said calmly. Then to
Mrs. Lawson, who was seated be
side Robert: "Madam, are you the
plaintiff?"
"Yea. your honor." her door voice
responded aa she rose at hla quee
tlon-
Then the attorney of record
spoke
THE HUDSON STORE
Model No. 2
Gabardine ault designed for
women of matronly figure.
Give. Blender line* Large
pocket* fall from belt of ro*f
Navy blue, tan, gray and
black. 925.
This Is a Carefully Planned Sale for Our Customers
DETROIT TIMES
• This ones, your honor, la in the
hands at Mr Drayton Ths plaintiff
requests that Mr I*rayton appear
as trial lawyer
"1 sak for an adjournment, your
honor We haven’t bad the reqal
■lts time for preparation.” said the
attorney for the defense
Chapter XLIII.
To my great disappointment the
case was adjourned for one week
to allow the ether side time to pre
pare. As I hurried from the court
room I almost ran Into Harper
Carleton.
“The disguise isn't good enough.
Mrs Drayton.” he laughed "Too
had the case wasn't tried when you
made the effort to attend court. It
lent every young lawyer's wife
would be Interested enough to do so
—interested tn her husband. 1
mean!”
I knew he was laughing at me.
hut pretended not to notice.
“How in the world did you recog
nise ms thru this thkk veil?** I
asked, as we walked along to
gether.
“No veil could disguise your walk,
or your figure," be answered
’ Then 1 may as well raise It.”
which I did. Just as Peter Lawson
passed us, and gave me a knowing,
insulting look which brought an In
dignant flush to my fare. Why had
be looked at ms llks that? Was It
because I happened to be walking
with Harper Carletoo* Abruptly I
bade him good morning and slipped
Into a store, we were passing Yet
why shonld I have run away from
Harper Carleton? That very mo
ment my husband was probably
alone in hia office with Phyllla
1 .awsou I "Wondered If It would
be possible for me. with my coo
vrntional bringing up. ever to really
do anything to make Robert Jealous
That afternoon Robert came home
unusually sarty He threw himself
Into an saay chair and exclaimed:
"I'm tired tonight I wtah It were
all over." and he stretched his arms
above bis head and yawned lastly.
"What*" I queriedt wondaring
what he meant.
"This divorce caae It is taking
a great deal of my time ”
' Must you go on with It?*'
"Certainly, but Peter lawxon. as
well aa the lawyer he has retained
la a resourceful man and will do al
most anything to gain this salt."
I was so surprised at Robert's
talking of hla affairs even so slight
ly that I couldn’t reply for a mo
ment.
“But you think youll win ft?” I
asked
"I don't think. I know.” he an
■wered "Poor woman, tt is hard
no her’" and I imagined a tender
I
Model No. 3
Copy of a lAnrin ault. Ix>nf
pointed collar, pointed ruff*,
pointed pocket*. Ixvowe boi
plaits, belted at walat. Black
buckle at back. Avery dash
ing ault. 935.
look crossed hla face aa he spoke
of her
Just then the ball rang and
Myrtle Caldwell rushed ta aa she
• ora• times did to see the children
before they went to sleep.
* Hello, good people.” she called
In her cheery way. “Oh. but I’m
cross with you Margaret Drayton'
Why didn’t you let me know you
were going to court this morning?
I should have asked to go along
Alt ho I see by the paper there war
nothing done.”
’No. the caae was adjourned.”
Robert answered, then looked keen
ly at me.
I knew he would disapprove of
my going to court, especially when
he had a divorce case on He waa
v#iy old fashioned about soma
things, and did not at all approvs
of women going to court out of
eurloaity. 1 dreaded to have Myrtle
g< borne I could have shaken her
for mentioning tt. Rut how did she
know? Who told her?
When we were upstairs with the
babies I asked
“Who told you I was at court this
morning **’
"Harper Carleton I had been
marketing and met him He thought
it very nice tn you to be so Inter
ested in Robert’s success "
I flushed. Too well I knew that
Harper bad spoken sarcastically,
even tbo Myrtle hadn't noticed It. I
made no reply, however, and as
dinner wps served as soon aa she
left. Robert said andhing.
After dinner be stopped me aa I
was about to go into the kttchen
for something and said very coldly:
"Why did you go to court this
morning Margaret? You know my
Ideas ato the subject "
"You never tell me anything, and
I wanted to hear for myself.” 1 lame
ly replied
‘ Well, never do It again." he
said sternly. “At least without my
t>enn las lon
Then he pet on his bat and left
the house
The hot tears forced themselves
down my cheeks, and my errand to
the kitchen waa forgotten. I raged
bark and forth, again hurt and
angry Why should I he treated as
s child?
He came In early and brought a
new book that was being much dta
cusaeff.
"Read aloud awhile Margaret,
please. It will rest me."
Tor over an hour I read. At first
I scarcely knew what the word*
were or grasped their meaning Rot
gradually I became Interested, and
sore the gripping story drove mv
miserable thoughts from my mind,
and I was sorry when Robert said
"That will do for tonight. Mar
TfbvbMt Oberrr
* 1 \
Model No. 4
Serge ault for large women
(eotne* la «ite« 44 to 19),
plain In line, but not too
plain Very aktllfully dealgned
by a tailor who design* only
clothe* for large women. $39.
THIS is the kind of a sale that is worth while; worth while to our
customers; worth while to the store. The kind of a sale that
makes the purchasers say of the store: “Well, there is one thins:
about Hudson's; when they give you a special offering, it is some
thing worth getting.”
Women who attend this sale —and there will be hundreds—will
see for themselves what fine suits these are and whether or not they
are worth getting.
Ready Tuesday morning, Third Floor, Main Building.
Fresh from the Gardens
of the finest Tea-producing country in
the world.
"SALADA"
tha *74
Sealed Packets Only.
Try delicloo*. ALACK GREEN or MDCEDb
gsret. We must finish It soon. It’s
a fine Hare you seen Mar
tha? Is she coming?"
“No. she has left town'**
•'Get someone at once. You still
look far from well "
Hunted Man Seeks
Refuge From Police
In Pile of Potatoes
*3
Pet retire George Wilson was on
the point. Sunday. of returning the
warrant for the arrest of Que
back. 1* years Fold, No 144 Belvi
dere-ave, charged with driving
away an automobile not belonging
to him, with the notation "nobody
home '* Then he decided to visit
Resmol
tested
skin treatment
l / H you want to on your akin,
Av // there are plenty of treatments to experiment
_ with. But if yesi want something the value
r N. of which has been prc*r>tn by years and years
• ucc ** use, if you want a treatment that
dcxtvrt prescribe constantly, that you know
l L contains nothing harsh or injurious, you will
. | find it in Reainol Ointment,aided
stops itching uiManitr, snd rare
\ **''■* *° C ' eif * W * y *** ,r#c *
it*rt (>•#• sias t* s<aa
Model No. 5
One of the new "tallor
madea," made with long,
pointed line*, but not belted.
Big aplanhy pocket*. Serge
In navy, gray. $35.
TUESDAY, MARCH 27, 1917.
ths basement. George became great
ly Interested In a pile of potatoes
stored there. He felt of them,
fondled them and sighed He no
ticed that a bushel box, turned up
side down, moved a trifle. Being *
regular “dick.** George investigated
and found Iburled up to his
waist In potatoes using the bushel
box aa a covering.
"W'hat are you doing here?**
asked George.
"Guarding the potatoes," was the
reply.
George blushed somewhat, but let
the insinuation go unchallenged.
Former President Wllllsm H Taft
Is to speak on preparedness at Mem
phis this morning and Is eschduled
for a second address at Uttle Rock
tonight.
“Vrtlf* <• Ik.
k.JI
Model No. «
A mlaaea ault of blue gabar
dine, the aklrt ha* new tri
angle button-down pocket*,
belted coat, looae aide pock
et* attached to belt. 125.

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