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The Detroit times. [volume] (Detroit, Mich.) 1903-1920, July 03, 1917, NOON, Image 1

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Entente Plans Offensive On All Fronts
We're at War—
Time <h precious in wartime.
The compact Times saves your time.
No wasteful wordiness.
Nothing but worth while news.
SEVENTEENTH YEAR. NO. 239.
100 NEGROES KILLED; 500 ]
INJURED RY E. ST. LOUIS MOB
COME-BACK BY RUSSIANS
PAVES WAY 101 GENERAL
ADVANCE AGAINST EMMY
Combined Drive Plan
ned This Spring May
Be Carried Out
GERMAN HOSTS IN
TIGHT PLACE
Face Bitter Fight On
Every Front In
Europe
LONDON, July 3.—Simultaneous
resumption of all allied offensives,
now that Russia has at last started
tn to "do her tut" was expected here
tod.iy. I'etrograd dispatches detail
ed no abatoment in the Galician at
tack today, with General BrusUofTs
troops, fired with their initial suc
cesses, continuing to gain ground.
Back in the winter the allied plans
had railed for a synchronous offen
sive campaign in the spring, to be
WAged on the western, northern.
Italian and Macedonian fronts The
HindenburK "strategic retreat" on
the western front hastened the Brit
ish and French attack. Then came
the Russian revolution and fotal In
action of the Russian troops Italy
started her offensive on ftme and in
Macedonia Gen Serrail began a di
version in powerful force, fjertnany
was busy defending her lines on
every front except Russia And be
cause she waged a clever campaign
of fraternization and of separate
peace on the Russian front, Ger
many was able to weather the offen
sives If Russia had done her part
then. German> might have been
compelled to relinquish great tracts,
for sheer lack of men and of muni
tions lo tight simultaneously all her
attackers.
From now on. military experts
pointed out today, Germany cannot
weaken her Russian lines to stiffen
up yielding sections on other fronts,
as she has done. She must guard
against penetration on every side.
But what was of vastly greater
satisfaction here than the mere fact
that Russia has started an offensive,
was the realizatlo.i that thia time
It is an army imbued with full
knowledge of the principles of He
rnocracy for which the Allies are
fighting that is participating for Rus
sia. It is no longer an army to be
disposed of according to the whims
of an Imperial autocrat. Every man
in the ranks now knows exactly what
he Is fighting for. realizes Russia
must win to hold her and
can be counted on, for this reason,
ms trebly effective in fighting.
CHECKS MOVE
TO GIVE CHADSEY
MORE POWER
The dissenting vote of Inspector
Frank H Alfred at the first meeting
of the new school board Monday
noon defeated a movement to place
Dr. Charles K. Chadsey. superintend
ent of schools. In charge of both the
educational and the business branch
es of the school system. Mr. Al
fred said he did not question the
ability of Pr. Chadsey. but he be
lleved the task of conducting all the
affairs of the board was too much
for one man Mr. Alfred and Dr.
John S Hall were named as a com
mittee to obtain bids for 36,000 tons
of coal which will be needed next
winter and to generally Investigate
conditions obtaining In the fuel mar
ket.
Man Injured in Safety Zone.
As he stepped from a street car
at Owen and Oakland-aves. late Mon
day night, Samuel Traebmon, 32
vear* old. No. 73 Delmar-ave., was
knocked to the pavement by an auto
.nobtle The driver did not stop his
Tar, hut orocerded up the street
after dragging Traebmon several
feet and running over one of his
leg-. Traebmon was taken to Re
ceiving hospital in a police auto
Physicians say his condition is seri
ous. The police have the license
nupiiHr of ihe automobile.
I'rlaOna—tk« plain neat king— -that
•a rl*h»—■Time. Jek Pa ft—Main Ml.
POLICE AID LATE,
SAYS FIRE CHIEF
Martin Bishop, chief of the Ham
tramck fire department, haa demand
ed that Police Chief Barney Whelan
investigate his complaint that the
police department waa negligent in
answering an emergency call to re
move a badly burned child to a hos
pital.
Dorothy Cooksey. 6 years old. was
burned whtle playing with matches
Monday afternoon in her home, No.
7 Anderson ave
Bishop declares he wilted two
hours for the police ambulance.
At Samaritan hospital, Tuesday
morning, it was said that the child
was dying.
CLOTURETO
BE USED 111
FOODJIGHT
Chamberlain To Put
Senators On Record
By Vote
WET-DRY FIGHT
STILL RAGING
Each Side Accuses the
Other of Delaying
Measure
BY ROBERT J. BENDER
( Staff Correaponden*. "titled Rreaa. )
WASHINGTON, July 3.—With the
"wet” and "dry” fight growing in
bitterness and the shadow of the
new cloture rule over the chamber,
the senate resumed debate on the
food bill at 11 o’clock today.
The usually mtld tactics of Sena
tor Chamberlatn, In charge of the
hill, have given way to a sharper
generalship His aides, friends of
the food bill on both sides of the
senate, are buckling on their arma
ment prepared to use vigorous ef
forts to shatter any attempted fili
buster.
Chnmberlain said early today that
he is going to have a record vote
on a limited debate rule "for the
benefit of the country." The vote
probably will come Thursday.
Meantime conferences went on
while the senate talked on amend
ments to the food bill. If It Is seen
that no cloture can possibly be
adopted until after the "dry” amend
ment to the measure Is disposed of.
it Is likely an effort will be made
to vote on that amendment very
soon Both "wets” and "drys" today
were charging each other with be
ing responsible for delaying passage
of the food bill.
WAR TAX BILL
COMPLETED
WASHINGTON, July 3—The big
war tax bill, raising $1,670,000,000,
wss completed by the senate finance
committee last night, and will be
reported today. In the last minutes
of discussion excess profits were
given another Jolt, $18,000,000 more
from this source being levied.
THE WEATHER
Detr.lt **A rleleltyi Ta**G*r nlgkl
M*d W>4nf*A«r tetri m market
•hnnge I* temperuturei m.derute
w eaferl v eUG*.
Unrr Mlrhlff**! Weir Tweeter
Night eat Wedue.d.ri little eh.uge
la ItaftfSlWk
DETROIT TIMES
His Sensational Cartoons Will Appear in
This Space Beginning Thursday , July 5
What Theodore Roosevelt Says of Raemaekera:
wE HAS LEFT a record which will last for many centuries- which, mayhap, will last as long as the writ-
I—l ten record of the crimes it illustrates. He draws evil with the rugged strength of Hogarth, and in
Jt J. the same spirit of vehement protest and anger. Ha draws sorrow and suffering with all of Hogarth's
depth of sympathy, and often with a touch of tenderness and refinement that was necessarily lacking
in the work of the great eighteenth-century humorist. His pictures should be. studied everywhere. Doubtless
they would do most good In Germany; but with the exception of Germany the country that needs them most
Is our own."
AIR EXPRESS TO
FOLLOW WAR
Company Ready To Start Ser
vice When Machines
Are Available
WASHINGTON, July 3—Commer
cial aeroplsnes, operated fiy Uncle
Sam. promise to be a development
of the war.
A provision was added to the
Sheppard-Hulhert $630,000,000 air
craft hill today urging government
control of a great licet of commer
cial planes to carry mall and ex
press packages at rates slightly high
er than the railroads demand. Con
gressman Hulbert told the senate
military sub-committee, a group of
New Yorkers have completed plans
for a system of commercial plane#
to operate between New York and
Chicago. They cannot get motors
now so the plan is being held up
A rousing resolution of loyalty to
the United States has been pre
pared for adoption by the Polish
Falcons of Wisconsin, In state con
venlion today at Menaaha.
TUESDAY, JULY 3, 1917.
ASKS INSURANCE
FOR SOLDIERS
Heads of Big Companies Meet
To Discuss War
Problems
WASHINGTON. July 3.—Death
and disability insurance for Ameri
can soldiers and sailors were advo
cated by Secretary McAdoo in open
ing a conference of about 100 Insur
ance leaders this afternoon. He said
the men had a right to It.
McAdoo said the government had
no ready plans for war Insurance
of Its fighting men. He indicated
that it must be done either by the
government or by voluntary co
operation between the private life
insurance companies.
He said President Wilson was per
sonally deeply concerned in seeing
some such plan worked out.
A two-day celebration is to be
opened today at Klamath Falls,
Ore., in honor of the completion
and opening of the new Htrahorn
railroad, which will open up a
large section of central Oregon.
LIQUOR ADS
NOW BARRED
*'Wet” Publications Can No
Longer Be Sent Thru
Mails To Dry States
Thomas F. Cashln. acting postmas
ter, has put a ban on all liquor ad
vertlsing going thru the mails to
dry states. This is in accordance
with the new law that went into
effect on July 1. making it- illegal to
ship alcoholic drinks Into a dr\
state or matter advertising such
liquors. Publications carrying liquor
"ads” come under the order and
liquor dealers have been notified ao
have publishers letter* circu
lars soliciting Customers for liquor
In dry states are barred as Well. In
fact, the postoffice department will
do Its best to keep residents of dry
states In complete Ignorance of the
fact that there is anything strong
to drink in existence.
Expert broncho busters from ail
over the west are to gather today
at Laa Vegas, N M„ to compete for
prises at the annual reunion and
carnival of cowboy a.
“BLACK BELT” BURNED TO GROUND;
WOMEN AND YOUNG GIRLS KICK ABC
BEAT BODIES OF DYING VICTIMS
EXEMPTION
RULES FIXED
BY WILSON
President Names
Those Who May
Stay At Home
WABHTWOTON. July 3—President
Wilson, Monday. Issued his procla
mation naming the classes of men
exempt from army service and pro
vidlng rules for the selection ot
those who will form the first “uni
versal service” array.
Those eligible to exemption are:
Officers of the United States and
of the several states.
Regularly ordained minister* and
students of divinity, preparing for
the ministry May 18. 1917.
Persons already In the armed
forces of the United States.
Allen enemies and all other aliens
who have not taken out their first
papers.
County and municipal officers and
customs house clerks.
Persons employed in transmission
ot United States mslls.
Workmen In armories, gun fac
tories, arsenals and navy yards.
Steamship pilots and mariners
actually employed.
(a) —Any man-led man whose
wife or child is dependent upon
him; (b)— Any son of a widow de
pendent upon him; (c) —Son of
aged or Infirm parent or parents
dependent. upon him; (and) —Father
of a motherless child or children
under 16 years of age dependent
upon him; (e)-—Brother of a child
or children under 16 years of age
who has or have neither father nor
mother and he is or are dependent
upon him.
Members of well-organized re
ligious sects, organized or existing
May 18. 1917, whose creed forbids
its members to participate tn war.
Moral deficients. (This class In
eludes criminals).
"Tha successful operation of this
law snd of these regulations* says
the president’s statement, "depends
necessarily upon the loyalty, pa
triotism and Justice of the members
of the boards to whom its operation
is committed and I admonish every'
member of every local board and of
every district board of review that
their duty to their country requires
an impartial and fearless perform
ance of the delicate and difficult
duties intrusted to them.”
Upon organizing, the local boards
will take over from the registration
boards all registration cards, which
they will number serially and list
for posting to public view.
Then, after having been advised
of the method by which the order
of liability for service shall he de
termined and of the quota to be
drawn from its territory (minus
credits for enlistments In the Na
tional Ouard or regular army), each
hoard will prepare a list of persons
designated for rervlce in the order
of their liability, post the list, klve
it to the press and within three
days send notice to each designated
persons by mail.
Physical Examination First.
As the men so notified appear, the
goards first will make a physical
examination in accordance with ape
clal regulations to be provided, bear
ing In mind that ail persons accept
ed by them will be reexamined by
army surgeons. If the physical ex
amination la passed successfully,
then comes the question of exemp
tlon.
"Bettie,” said a mother to her
four-year-old daughter. "did you
peel your apple as 1 told you to be
fore eating ItT'
Surgeon-Genera! Ia
Preparing Army of Doctors
GB.V WILLIAM C. UOHGAS
Gen. William C. U»rf**. *«rt**n
geurrat «f (hr United States army.
Is charged with tk* tank of devel
oping a force of at least 4A.000
physicians and agrgeona for sir
service. The medlral branch a«»w
includes lean than (V.OOO men. In
addition, he must develop a large
enlisted personnel for the medlrnl
department af the army.
LICENSE ALL
DRIVERS, SAYS
H. L. BROWNELL
H. L. Brownell, manager of the
Detroit Bafety league, commenting
upon the automobile death toll In
Detroit, declares that nothing short
of licensed drivers only, a traffic
court, rigid enforcement of present
ordinances, new laws similar to
those in New York state, and more
co-operation between courts and po
lice department, will hold in check
Detroit's auto mortality.
"Eighty persons have been killed
by automobiles In Detroit so far this
year, and the real summer auto
pleasure riding has not really start
ed,” said Mr Brownell. “In the reg
ulation of all drivers there will be
more room for the decent driver to
operate his car and more general
safety, t’lear the streets of the
drivers who menace life every time
they sit at the wheel and there will
be few accidents and probably no
casualties.”
Queen of England Plays With the Baby
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Or m nrfftt %UH I# • lM*ft*lti»l at H th* %u+*n *t Ka»laa4
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tknka am ate la atewa Itiac la tkl* fk«t*flrakk.
NOON
IN DETROIT: ONE CENT.
Troops Helpless Until
Reinforcements Are
Sent To City
BLACKS SMOKED 1
OUT AND SHOTS
»l ■ HI. I. I ■ I I ■ % .
Town Now Under Mar*
tial Law With Sol
diers In Control
BAST ST. LOUIS, lIL. July
Tha nut roae today on a city flat*
Rwapt and running with blood. .
One hundred Negroes warn Lriltlft
ed dead and more than 500 sari
Injured as the result of one g|
wweat race Hots fas the Hr
the country, which followed tirt,
killing by Negroes of Detect!ra Ssg» -
geant Coppedge yesterday.
The city waa under martial
today and the soldiers are bsllataS
to have the situation in hand.
Property loss from Urea, whldS*
were started simultaneously in and
dozen sections of the city short]#!
sfter 6 o’clock last night was saw*
mated at. 91.500,000.
“I believe the worst is over,** Cola
S O. Tripp, personal represent*®?#
of Gov. Lowden, in command of th»l
eight companies of the Illlhoia Noe
tionsl Guard pstroling the city, toidl
the United Press at an early ho« 0
today. "The mob seems to ha?W
spent itself. Fighting has dwindled:
to desultory firing in different parts
of the city and most of the fired
have burned out.”
Only two whites were killed. D»*i
tectlve Sergeant Coppedge killed hf*
a Negro mob at 11 a. m.. Monday,
and Win. Keyser, a hardware map*
chant, are known dead, though a
score are badly wounded in hoapt* l
tala.
The rioting wss at its height
tween 6 o clock and midnight. JL 1
United Press correspondent count*’
ed the bodies of seven Negroea
lying in the streets within a blocK
of the Intersection of the town'd*
main business thorofares at 7:3f*
o’clock
One Negro was hanged to a port!
a half block from the comer whlla J
s squad of 25 militiamen looked oa*
helplessly. j
The mob at R o'clock numbered'
about 10,000 persons, authorities ea*‘
tlinated. The Jrtty was virtually
under martial law, after the fran
tic pleas from Mayor Mollman*
whose life was several times threat
ened, A few minutes after t
o'clock two new companies of milß>
tla from Shelbvvllle and Kfflnghint
arrived. The men were met at thw
station by motor vans and hurtled
to the riot district.
leaping from the vans they de*
ployed and started up the street la
<C«nVlna*<o «>n Pec* Three)

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