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The Aberdeen examiner. [volume] (Aberdeen, Miss.) 1866-current, August 11, 1922, Image 3

Image and text provided by Mississippi Department of Archives and History

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016734/1922-08-11/ed-1/seq-3/

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in corn at practically no cost at all, ' and timber cruising for the Berg 'this county the Tombigbee River,
mill, and also has had experience in , the Buttahatchie River, McKinley
floating logs down the Tombigbee , Creek, Suquatoncha Creek, -Sickles
and tributaries. No one in the coun- Creek, Ray Creek, Morgan Creek,
ty is better qualified to tell of the : Wolf Creek, James CrreK, Weaver's
fish and game to be found here. Creek, ami Town Creek.
"My experience as a sportman in Our species if i-un.e fish coi.m.-u
Monroe County began in 1&70 of Lake Trout. Big Mouth B.k-,
ni'j.-e than half a century ago, and I Snxl! Mcath Bas.y, Saiu.on Trout.
Pastures on the Farm of Hon. James E. Evans in the North-East Mis?. Trairie Section N'.iar Aberdeen.
tiiiiiiiriititiii!i:iiiiiiEiitiiiiiiifii(iiiiiiiiiiii!TJiiifiii:EiiiiiiiitiiiiiriiiiiEfiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiTiriiiiit!iifiiiitiiititi!itittii(fiiiiiMiiiiii
I How to make a Pasture in the Prairie Belt of
North-East Mississippi
and furnish from one to two tons of
beans per acre which are best har
vested by letting the cattle graze
them in winter time. Cow peas,
soy beans, vetch, com, oat?', wheat,
EVERYTHING, grows and does well.
Fifty to a hundred do;lars will
; make either an artesian well, or
i puiT.p well, anywhere. l ie: ty of th
best water on earth, for man or
j Least.
; Caule do better hirj than any pLu'e
i I kr.ow of, and are r.-markabiy free
i from disease. Tuberculosis amonu
catt'e is almost unknown. Out of
! thousands of herds tested, less, than
j one per cent showed signs of re
action. Dairymen here do not need
; warn barr.s. Frank John.-on.
w.: n t
of the
in ihe
te.l
,or:h and
u.- of v.
brother . -po
: wh.t
nun of
ve have
R..ck Bu.
1'eri.h. ('!
Whit
i pie.
I.-iir
On uur ea.-t
our si.-'.er stiiti
J.iue
in I'er'
f t-jr f.
I;.-,
h, ;
r.'ii:'
'ieer
The
en (.'a'
Jit
FISH AND GAME IN MONROE CO.
Hi
5! Jlonroe County's rivers ant:
1 r.vm.;.U B.V. i ..K, ,,!...,
ii:i:iTi:iiTiiiiiii:i:iiiiiiiii;iiiiiiiiiifiiiifiiiiitiiiiitiiiii!iiifiiiiiitiii:iii:iiiiiiiiiiifiiiii(iiiiiiiiici!iii!i:iiifiii;i!ittii!iitiiiififiiMr i ' ' ' '. ' ', ,
. spe-Mes of the linnv tribe '
I know of no country or section of of leaves to stems is great; thus been crazed too closely to be cut for i rep-csented wh!l nuail
jh iiat oo uuvo iiuuii. vy i u 1 1 i j , cum vmi w.. .vn.ii1JS y, i mtna. eats an-l even 'l.'er ar
belt of East Mississippi And if a 1 pasture fair days in rebruary and i Think of the dairying pis il.il ties
little thought and attention be given March. And from April first t.U tho , of a country that gra e three hea l of
the subject, the result will be grati-l first of August it is a hard matter to
fying. i graze enough stock on pasture to
In the first place, all varieties of , keep it cropped close. I have cut a
legumes grow well here; each in its
season, and in addition Kentucky
blue grass, wild rye, red top, orchard
grass, Johnson grass, paspallum, and
last but not least comes the founda
tion of all permanent pastures, Ber
muda grass.
The first thing to be considered is
a good tubitantial hog-proof fence;
the next, a bountiful supply of fresh
water, along with a few scattered
shade trees.
On or about the first of Septem
ber, the surface of a pasture should
be well agitated; then sow on the
Bermuda sod, as well as other lands,
a mixture of white clover, red clov
er, hairy vetch, crimson clover, black
medic, burr clover, Kentucky blue
grass, and, in fact, a mixture of all
the legumes you can combine, with
all the grasses mentioned above.
Keep stock off until it gets a start,
and of course, for the first year be
careful, as the pasture is in the mak
ing. Each Spring let grasses get
a good start before letting stock on
pasture, so the land will be kept well
covered, and the evaporation is not
comparably as great as where it is
grazed closely, and surface exposed.
Do not be afraid of grasses getting
coarse and tough, as legumes are air
feeding plants; therefore, the ratio
half-ton of hay to the acre in July,
on pastures that have grazed three
head of stock to the acre until time
of cutting.
Anyone that does not feel disposed
to seed their entire pasture down as
I have suggested, vould easily in
crease the acreage in pasturage, by
grazing stock in one p asture during
the day, and another at night, at the
seeding time of these grasses. I have
made splendid pastures in this way.
To complete the season's graz'ng,
there is one grass I want to mention
especially, being a late grass, and
permitting grazing until after frost,
and it is very essential for the com
pleting of the year's operation; that
is Lespedeza, or Japan Clover. I
stock to the acre, that ha 33 inch-i
es of rainfall, well d stri'jutL'd, plen
ty of lime in the soil, g.-owa ahalfa
nicely for hay, and a climate sur
passed by none. It is like the
unturned switch of a huge electric
dynamo, the lacking contact being
intellect and energy.
JAMES E. EVANS.
Ba
4- DAIRYING
IN MONROE COUNTY, MISS.
i- t 4
Northeast Miss'ssippi is the Dairy
Cow's Paradise. More grass is allow
ed to go to waste here than some
dairy sections could raise. Every kind
of grass known grows here. All kinds
of clover red, white sweet alfalfa
also bur clover, which makes a good
have this clover mixed in all my pas- j growth in winter time, and is a na
tures, but try to have a pasture of it tive of this section. Our Bermuda
alone, as well, for August, Septem-i grass, similar to Blue Grass, only it
ber, and October grazing. Trying to ! makes a better sod, and does not die
keep it pure, since being a late clov-i down, like Blue Grass, in middle cf
er, the early clovers are inclined ' summer. Bermuda grass grows all
liikrs
rly ail
hem-,'
ducks,
iir.e; "',o'j
k lit i within
her boundaries.
lhn following account is vritt-n
by Mr. Joe Bolding, one of the pi
oneer sportsmen and fishermen of
Mo.iroe County. Vcr a number of
t-rney, ar.'l the oi -s ii
The w i I Bob Cat ,-jn sti
in the upper rem he . f
Lee, and huntsmen st I!
red fi x and the tTiv f..x
O'Po-sums, and Squ rr
in abundance.
The sport of quail-1'-.'
ceiieiit, as they are h- r
numbers, and traine 1
curc-d. Local fancier? ;
piiirt' r- to eportsmen
United States. The-.' .1
n 1 trained here. Pa.
the v.'arbl-reii'.vtn"! ,r-
a same preserve i.i tbi.
inur .-everal thousands a
Now comes the snort
.1 Tt
'I', es
n..l cat, t.t
and the v.
Mo;
h::a. We jta-.
v v::.iow eat, ti,
'w cat. We ais
. cat, Wvigtiit.
is. A.i of tries
ears lis was engaged in lumbering whiih is simply grar.
of f.
We ha-
in
ha'
1 ri'
l-l
to choke it out. No grass is its su
perior in food value, for when ma
turing, it is as rich as a grain feed.
To strengthen pasture in weak
spots, feed the hay that is cut in the
late Spring, by cleaning out the
mangers and putting fertilizer out
with a distributor any time in Aug
ust. Spots in pastures that have
5
til
'si
through our long summer season,
and every other kind of grass can be
made to grow with it. Our pastures
of Bermuda are as full of white
clover as they can be.
ror winter feeds, some use corn j
silage, although they do not need it. j
Winter grazing of oats, rye, bur j
clover, etc. is very cheap and prac-!
tical. Velvet beans can be planted ! Country Home of
i, ruF si IB-''.Lugt Mm Hi
, vtfi-r ff-?vij-jp
i . -J a
bZff-'-t .jr?Z-i!t i'5;. -
si
I la J-hv' il.-i ??:t v-ll'i
I.. tMmmmAi::m6i:i m
Hon. James E. Evans a pioneer Dairyman and Alfalfa Grower in Monroe County, Mi
"BOOSTERS FOR MONROE COUNTY"
': -'. ,.;w.v-t: . . v ' .. .... . .-
,w,l -WMl,.tVX- i . yr.l$Ci t'iy."ip i-'C'? J
APR. 16, 1922 ABERDEEN ROTARY CLUB VISITS LARGEST ALFALFA FIELD IN THE SOUTH, CONTAINING OVER 600 ACRES NINE MILES FROM ABERDEEN.
Friendship is the great driving power in Rotary.
i
Friendship is the lubricant for the wheels of the
world today.
The restoration of order from existing chaotic
conditions shall be accomplished when we face the
the problem firmly believing in obeying the command
"Love one another."
This spirit of Friendship, which permeates the
the South is predominant in the people of Aberdeen.
Friendship prompts us to invite you to visit and
become a member of our commuity.
ABERDEEN ROTARY CLU
PAUL GRAVES, Pres., KENNETH WISHART, V.-Pres., IRWIN MIMS, Sec, & Treas., BURNS HARRISON, Sg't. at Arms

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