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The Princeton union. [volume] (Princeton, Minn.) 1876-1976, December 01, 1892, Image 1

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016758/1892-12-01/ed-1/seq-1/

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R. C, DUNN, Publisher.
VOLUME XVI.
FRANK HENSE, President.
$ S. HETTERSON, Cashier.
WhlTMORE,
President
9 Paf9
ZE'rlxa.cetcix,
snoei
VI
Post Office Building,
tWfa,
&iXi-J'L,
"".BI'M'^ ni^iiil nwwtpiiiiiii in in w i i I i
PRINCETON. MINNESOTA.
4: IDIIEIIECX'OIEIS
FRANK HENSE, T. H. CALEY, CHAS. KEITH,
N. E. JESMER, S. S. PETTERSON.
CORRESPONDENTS: Geimama Bank, of St. Paul Chase National Bank,
of New York
L. BRADY,
PRINCETON, MINNESOTA.
(Incorporated.)
CAPITAL PAID UP,
AUTHORIZED CAPITAL,
A General Banking Business Transacted.
Loans Made on Approved Security.
Of "Wild and Improved Land to Sell on Terms to Suit Purchaser,
We Help You to Make it so by Selling, until
ALL OUR
5 ^.a. MjliAAA^j
AT GREATLY-
A Call for Investigation.
You are on the Committee.
s5urocerxes?
Boots, Shoes
Call at the Post Office Store. I will Sell for the
Everything in the Boot and Shoe Line, all Clothing, Sheeting, Ging-
hams, Prints, Crash, Groceries, Tinware, Hardware, Etc. You
Never will Buy so Cheap again. Call and See Goods and get Prices.
They will Surprise You.
m,, ^^kyi^^A^Mkf^k^^ irj
T. H. CAIEY, Vice President.
H. NEWBERT, Ass't Cashier
Vice President.
Interest Paid on Time Deposits.
Special Attention Given to Good Investments.
EY TO LOAN ON APPROVED SECURITY.
A EATON,
Cashier
$30,000
$100,000
Foreign and Domestic Exchange.
COEREbPOXJJENl'S- First National Bank, Minneapolis, Minn. The Na-
tional Bank oi the Republic, N Y.
2V1TCHO..
9
Princeton, Minn.
Princeton Minn.,
H. NEWBERT Prop
Free 'Bus From anil To all Trains.
SPECIAL ACCOMMODATIONS FO
TRAVELING SALESMEN AN
TRANSIENT GUESTS.
The Commercal Hotel is First Class in all Its up
pomtmente, mid the Aim of the Management
is to make the Guets Comfortable
When yon visit Princeton Stop at
the Commercial Hotel
IRTH STAR HI
PRINCETON, MINN.
Groceries, Flour, Boots,
SHOES NOTIONS
Dry Goods, Crockery, Glassware
Carpets by Sample.
PRICES TH1~ LOWEST!
R. D. BYERS
Mam Street, Prmceton
Boot and Shoe Store
-ON-
North Main St., Princeton, Minn.
AN IMMENSE STOCK OF
BOOTS AND SHOES DI-
RECT FROM THE
FACTORY.
PRINCETON, MILLE LACS COUNTY, MINNESOTA, THURSDAY, DEC. 1, 1892.
HOTELS PROFESSIONAL CARDS.
E, BARKER, Proprietor.
This excellent Hotel is centrallj located, is un
cqniied thib section of the State The
Tii\eliiig Public will here hnd a
tirst Glass Sample Room
An Excellent Table, Good Beds
And Well Furnished Rooms,
ALSO GOOD STABLING ACCOMMODATIONS
C. TxlKBOX M. I
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON.
Graduate of Bellevue College and Randall's Is
land Hospital, New York City
-S Pension Examining Surgeon.
ni.rt,D
N,
Milnca,
E,
!en to Pay!WIes
I want the Public to Understand that I can Sell
Men and Youths' Boots and Shoes, Ladies and
Children's Footwear at Figures that Cannot be
Discounted in Pimceton
ESTBoots and Shoes Made to
Order as Heretofore and I Al
ways aim to Please Custom
ers. All kinds of Repairing
Neatl and Promptly Executed.
SOLOMON LONG,
North Mam Street, Princeton, Minn.
MILAGA ADVERTISEMENTS
WHEN YOU WANT
-GO TO THE-
WILL BOUCK, Prop.,
Milaca, Minn.
-A FULL LINK OF
Staple & Fancy Groceries,
PROVISIONS,
Salt Meats, Fish, Etc.,
Which we will Sell 5 per cent. Lower than
Anyone EIBB.
JK^gT Fresh Fruits, Candies,
Notions and ^Everything Usually
Kept in a First Class Grocery.
S
1
gtore
OfllL- Ove. Pioneer Dru
Princeton,
pHAKLE S KEITH,
Ii BKADY,
if
1
Minn.
COONEY, M. D.,
DOCTOR OF MEDICINE AND SUR-
GERY.
Graduate of the College of Plijsicmns and Sur
geons, and Cook Co Hospital, Chicago
Office Up Stairs Town-end Block, Opposite Cit
izens State Bank Residence SoSle's noose
MaiaStreei, Pimceton
M. COOK,M.D.,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON.
Ill
Gr ^4
at
Medical College, Chicago,
Bennet
Minn
ATTORNEY AT LAW
No 3 Fust Sheet West,
PiiViceton, Minn
/^HAS. A DICKEY,
LAWYER,
NOTARY PUBLIC AND CONVEYANCER
rf Over Pet Ofhce
Mam Street, Prmceton, Mmn
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
Omce in Brady'L Building
Mam Stieet, Trinceton, Minn
J,
A ROSS,
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
Over Post Office.
Mam Street, Princeton, Minn
LYNCH, D.,
DENTIST.
Makes Regnlai Visits to Prmceton Every 60 Dajs.
Home Office, Monticello, Minn.
A WHITING,
VETERINARY SURGEON & DENTIST
Member ^Veterinary Depaitment University of
"Minnesota
Residence, Taylois Falls, Minn
BUSINESS CARDS,
I VERY AN SALE STABLE,
S.LIBBY, PROP.
Teams, with or without Drivers, day ormgh.
at very reasonable rates
Princeton,
B.NEWTON,
UCK & PRATT'S
Minn.
GENERAL MERCHANT.
Is Gomg Out of Business and no Hnmbng
Everything will be soldw belocost
North Mam Street, Princeton, Minn.
E,
A ROSS,
Dealer in Read}-Made
COFFINS, CASKETS AND BURIAL
SUITS.
ALSO AGENT FOR O BFRCHER'S MARBLE WOKKS.
Washington Av6 Princeton, Minn
OLD RELIABLE MEAT MARKET
the place to get Choice Fresh and Salt Meats
deal the Best and oar puces are teasonable.
Opposite Staich Factory
Princeton Minn.
/CRAWFORD & CHAPMAN,
PRINCETON BARBER SHOP AND
BATH ROOMS
Hot and Cold Water Baths
Main Street, Princeton
"W"EW MEAT MARKET.
Having bought the Meat and provision Store
lately occupied by O Newton, i am prepared
to furnish the citizens ot Pimceton with meat of
all kinds, game and fibh in their season I shall
endeavor to suit all my customeis "Once a cus
tomer, ah\ ays a customer A shaie of your pat
ronage is respectfully solicited Yours to please,
W SPAtJLDING
E.
MARK,
AUCTIONEER
Long experience Alv\ aj successful
Give me a trial.
Princeton, Mmn
W1L NEELY'S
Harness Sho
Townsend'e Block, First Street,
IS THE PLACE TO BUY
Singleand DoubleHarness
SADDLES, WHIPS,
Robes, Blankets,, Etc.
B^" Repairing Neatly and
Promptly Executed.
HOOSIER VANDALS.
The Desecrat the Grave
of Unio Soldiers in Sev-
era Indian a Ceme-
teries.
The Dastardly Deed Was
Done by People Wh Were
Celebrating Cleveland's
Election.
There are dark places in Hoos
ierdom. Last year rancorous cop-
perheads in a school district of that
State refused to permit a patriotic
schoolma'am to fly the flag of her
country in front of the school
house where she was teaching in
fact the pole was cut down and
the flag torn into shreds. A
nights after election, while
Democrats were celebrating
great victory of their party,
few
the the
sev
eral cemeteries were entered and
the tombstones over the graves of
Union soldiers were daubed with
led paint and otherwise disfigured.
It was not the work of drunken
rowdies, for none but the graves
of soldiers were desecrated and the
operations of the cowardly ghouls
were not confined to one cemetery.
The Pioneer Press editorially re-
fers to the Hoosier hyenas in the
following scorching language.
THE SLIME O THE SERPENT.
The old saying that not every Demo
crat is a horsethief, but that every
horsethief is a Democrat conveyed, un
der an hyperbole, a truth that is illus
trated by the desecration of the graves
of Union soldiers in the State of In
diana. I is true that there are plenty
of Democrats whose blood will boil as
readily as that of Republicans^ when
they hear of this infamy but it is also
true that in the Democratic party only
could agents for such a crime be "found.
W are_apt to forget, wkea we-hear the
patriotic speeches of Democratic lead
ers, and acknowledge the high charac
ter of Democrats prominent in public
life, many of whom were formerly Re
publicans, what the substratum of that
party really is. W are blamed when
we remember it and told that, to re
call the acts and words of the vile and
shameful men who during the war
were as vindictive in their hatred of
the Union as they were cowardly in
their unwillingness to go to the front
and fight, is to '-wave the bloody
shirt." Ye that element is there.
And it is not in the South, where men
wear their enmities openly and royally,
and are staunch as friend or foe, but in
the foul and stagnant pools of the
North, where the copperhead breeds,
that we find the Democrat, who trail
the slime of the serpent o\e their
partj, and forbid us to forget that its
fangs are as venomous as of old.
It would be impossible of any other
party that it should, man hour of re
joicing and victory, go out systematic
ally and in cold blood to defile the
graves of those who died for their
country. W should like to say that
it would be impossible in any other
State than Indiana, where the craven
Whi te Cap outrages flouiish, and
where the miasma of the native swamp
still keeps pestilential life in the frame
of the traitorous order of war days
known as the Knights of -the Golden
Circle. I is nearly thirty years since
the war was ended. Brave men on
both sides have forgotten their differ
ences. Results are accepted, and allcame
that the most rancorous now desires is
to let oblivion cover the passions of the
time that tried the nation's strength.
But the copperhead will not have it so
His slow, cold poibonous blood has held
the sullen rancor of defeat. Foiled all
those years ago in his attempt to strike
the nation in the rear, he still feels
darkly and blindly about him for a
victim. An now as then, afraid to
face the living, he steals to the church
yard to vent his sploen upon the unre
sisting dead. I is the old legend of
the ghouls come true. Men who cantra
do this, men who only do not-honor the
patriot dead, but who find a hideous
satisfaction in defacing their lowly and
moss-grown monuments are less and
worse than human. These men are
Democrats. They marked their act
distinctly by making it part 'of their
celebration of a great Democratic vic
tory. An the Democratic party,
though as a whole it would scorn such
an act, must bear the odium of those
who have been faithful to it from its
worst estate. All of bitter disloyalty
panaiatta
NUMBER 50.
that lives upon American soil belongs
I with Democracy. It is in the hour of
triumph that the hands which are sul
lied with the blackest deeds are held up
for their reward.
Some of the good Democratic
readers of the UNION may think
the above is rather rough on their
partythat it is a Repub
lican lie. But here is a paragraph
taken from the telegraph columns
of the Democratic St. Paul Globe
of the 24th ult., which tells of fur
ther desecrations.
TOMBSTONES DESTROYED.
TAND4LS
CEMETERIES
DESECRATING
IN INDIANA.
MARTINSVILLE, Ind Nov. 23.The
cemetery north-ol here was discovered
yestevdaj morning to be desecrated
iroie than others. Th tombstones
ovei eveiv soldier's grave in the ceme
tery had been broken to pieces by
means of an ax. Th city marshal re
ceived a telegram last evening from
Pacific Grove, Cal., offering men and
money to aid in the search and prose
cution Other ofieib ha\e been re
ceived, but none will hkelj be accepted
as the houio etei'ans will try to bring
the crimmalo to justice. A large fund
has been contributed for this purpose.
There are many suspects.
THE HUMAN JACKASS
A Defined by the Sarcastic Ed
itor of the "Wheat and Chaff"
Column of the Minneap-
olis Journal.
Besides the human hog, an ani
mal which has been considered in
its different phases ^ogie natural
history articles whi 45c llave ap
peared in this colut^ there is
another cross which it' ?^serving of
mention. The animal now under
discussion is the human jackass.
This species abounds in all parts
of the country, but is generally
found in the big cities where it
roams around at its own sweet will,
jmd brays %b the slightest .excuse^
It strays into business offices
where men are busy, and brays ad
vice at them and wags its ears to
emphasize its remarks while the
victim groans a melancholy ob
ligate to the raucous and strident
tones. It is impervious to hints
and can only be removed with a
club wielded by a vigorous arm.
It is a beast which has no pride in
its ancestry and no hope of pos
terity, but is self-sufficient in its
own generation and can transmit
none of its detestable character-
istics. And that is the only good
thing about it. If it could only
realize that it was a jackass it
might go off and hide itself, but it
regards itself as a sage and a para-
gon of perfection and cannot even
feel its own ears. The only thing
it is good for is to serve as a tar
get for the practice of sarcasm, be
cause the shafts do not penetrate
its hide, and consequently the tar
get remains intact and does not
have to be renewed.
A Chance to Choose.
In the early days of railroads, the
passenger had '-Hobson's Choice1'
11
of
accommodationstake the passenger
coach (such as it was) or walk. Dur
ing the war of the Union, Mr. Pullman
upon the scene and invented
the sleeping car. Still it was "Hob
son's Choice''unless vou paid an ad
ditional charge, and tipped the porter
also. Now it is a fact that there are
many persons, rich enough to buy a
railroad ticket, and intelligent enough
to travel without getting lost, who do
not care to pay extra for either comfort
or luxuriousness. The Burlington
Route was quick to recognize the ex.
istence of this fact4 and it oquips all
its principal passenger trains with re
clining chair cars, and makes no ex
charge to any one for occupying
seats in them. Its morning and even
ing trains between St. Paul and Minne
apolis on the north, and Chicago and
St. Louis on the east and south, carry
these cars. Make a note of it, and ask
your home agent for tickets via the
Burlington Route, or write to W. J.
C. Kenyon, Gen. Pass. Agent, St. Paul,
Minn.
FOR SALE: A good young mare,
weight, 2,400 lbs., cheap. Also a good,
cook stove, nearly new. Inquire of
J. L. BRADY.
ii

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