OCR Interpretation


The Princeton union. [volume] (Princeton, Minn.) 1876-1976, September 12, 1901, Image 3

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016758/1901-09-12/ed-1/seq-3/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 3

Great Northern Railway.
ST. PAUL, MINNEAPOLIS, PRINCETON
AND SANDSTONE.
Le. St. Paul.
Ar. Minneapolis.
Le. Anoka
Ar. El River....
Le. PRINCETON.
Milaca Mora
Ar. Sandstone
GOING WEST.
GOING EAST.Tuesday, Thursday & Saturday.
Le. Milaca
PRINCETON ElkRiver
Ar. Anoka
All goods delivered free anywhere in Princeton
PRINCETON
Market Report
Wheat, No. 1. Northern,
Rye, Oats, Buckwheat,
Beans, (good)
Hay,
Corn, Potatoes
w^^iSmgsmm~
GOING BAST. Ex. Sun.
6:00 a. in.
6:50 a. m.
7:25 a.m.
7:53 a.
8:35 a. m.
8:59 a.m.
9:40 a. m.
10:05 a. m.
Le. Sandstone
Mora Milaca
PRINCETON..
Ar. Elk Kiver
Le. Anoka
Ar. Minneapolis.
Ar. St. Paul
4:45 p. m.
5:10 p.m.
5:35 p. m.
6:10 p. m.
6:52 p. m.
7:20 p. in.
7:54 p. m.
9:10 p. m.
ST. CLOUD TRAINS.
GOING WEST.
Le. Milaca 9:40a.m.
Bridgeman 9:46a.m.
Ar. St. Cloud 10:45a.m.
GOING EAST.
Le. St.Cloud 3:25p.m.
Bridgeman 4:23 p. m.
Ar, Milaca 4:35 p. m.
These trains connect at St. Cloud with trains
Nos. 1 and 3.
WAY FREIGHT.
11:10 a.m.
12:25 p.m.
2:30 p.m.
4:10 p.m.
GOING WEST.Monday, Wednesday & Friday.
Le. Anoka
ElkRiver...
PRINCETON.
Ar. Milaca
9:40 a. m.
10:30 a. m.
12:25 p. m.
2:00 p.m.
MILLE LACS COUNTY.
TOWN CLERKS.
Bogus BrookHenry Gustaf son Princeton
BorgholmJ. B. Heron Bock
GreenhushChas. E Slater .Princeton
Isle HarborOtto A. Haggberg Isle
MilacaOle Larson Milaca
MiloR. N. Atkinson Foreston
PrincetonErnest Sellhorn Princeton
BobbinsWillie Anderson Vineland
South HarborT. Norton Cove
East SideGeo. W. Freer Opstead
OnamiaBenjamin Cotton Onamia
PageL. D. Chamberlain Page
VILLAGE RECORDERS.
J. M. Neumann ..Foreston
J. W. Goulding Princeton
R. W. Hissam Milaca
NEIGHBORING TOWNS.
BaldwinL. Berry Princeton
Blue HillThomas E. Brown Princeton
Spencer BrookG. C. Smith. ..Spencer Brook
Wy anettOle Peterson Wyanett
LivoniaChas. E. Swanson Lake Freemont
PRIC ES or THE
Princeton Roller Mills anl Elevator.
Wheat, per bnehel
Corn, Oate,
$.58
.30
RETAIL.
Vestal, per sack
Flour, (100 per cent) per eack
Banner, per sack
Ground Feed, per cwt
Coarse Meal, per cwt
Middlings Shorts, per cwt
Bran, per cwt
$2.00
J.90
1.50 1.15 1.15
.95 .90
.70
$ 58
43 30
50
1 60
5 50
45 60
[email protected]
FRATERNAL -:-IiODGE
N O. 92, A & A M.
Regular communications, 3d and 4th
Wednesday of each month.
A. A. CASWELL, W. M.
W M. COBDINEB, Sec'y.
PRINCETON LODGE,
NO. 93, of
Regular meetings every Tuesday eve
ning at 8 o'clock.
A. A. CASWELL, C. C.
C. W. VANWORMEB, K. R. & S.
O. M.
Tent No. 17.
Regular meetings every Thurs
day evening at 8 o'clock, in the
Maccabee hall.
FRANK PETERSO N, Com.
N. M. NELSON. R. K.
Hebron Encampment.
No. 42,1.0. O.F.
Meetings, 2nd and 4th Mondays
at 8 o'clock M.
M. C. SAUSSER, C. P.
D. W. SPAULDING, S. W.
Jos CRAIG, Scribe.
PRINCETON LODGE
NO. 208,1. O O.F.
Regular meetings every Friday evening at 7:30
o'clock. O. B. NEWTON, N. G.
H. H. BATES, R. Sec.
PRINCETON CAMP, W A.,
No. 4032.
Regular meeting every fourth Thursday even
ing of each month, at 8:00, in the hall over post
office. Visiting members cordially invited.
H. E. WHITE, V. C.
A. H. SMIT H, Clerk.
ESPEY LODGE,
No. 193, A O. U. W
Regular meetings every
rst and third Monday even
of each month in the
hall over postofflce.
A. C. SMIT H, M. W.
CUTLE R. Rec.
COUCHKILLER
@8(OU&HS:(OLDS
PREVENTS
All Druggiits, 25c.. 50c., and $1.00. Prepared only by
Dr. 8etb Arnold. Med. Corp., Wooniocket, R. JL
C. A. Jack, the druggist.
*i Don't waste
Money
on poor Cigars.
Btiy Cigars
3 with the above E
trademadiprmied
i^ in red on their label. tA
$ Be sure of your
moneys worth.
If your dealer hasnY
Winecke I DoerrCigars
Ask some dealer
that has.
HE HAS CURED THOUSANDS
Given up to die.
Next regular professional visit to
PRINCETON,
A Commercial Hotel,
Friday, Sept. 20
Returning every month. Consult
him while the opportunity
is at hand
DR. DOR AN has no superior in diagnosing
and treating diseases and deformities. He will
give 50 for any ease that he cannot tell the
disease and where located in five minutes.
All curable medical and surgical diseases,
acute and chronic catarrh, and special diseases
of the eye, ear, Rose and throat, lung disease,
early consumption, bronchitis bronchial ca
tarrh, constitutional catarrh, dyspepsia, sick
headache, stomach and bowel troubles, rheu
matism, neuralgia, sciatica. Bright's disease,
diabetes, kidney, liver, bladder, prostatic and
female'diseases, dizziness, nervousness, indi
gestion, obesity, interrupted nutricion, slow
growth in children, and all wasting disease in
adults. Many cases of deafness, ringing in the
ears, loss of eyesight, cataract, cross eyes, etc.,
that have been improperly treated or neglected
can be easily restored. Deformities, club feet,
curvature of the spine, disease of the brain,
paralysis, epilepsy, heart disease, dropsy,
swelling of the limbs, stricture, open sores,
pain in the bones, granular enlargements and
all long-standing diseases properly treated.
Young, middle-aged and old, single or married
men and all who suffer from lost manhood,
nervous debility, spermatorrhoea, seminal
losses, sexual decay, failing memory, weak
eyes, stunted development, lack of energy, im
poverished blood, pimples,impediments to mar
riage: also blood and skin diseases, syphillis,
eruptions, hair falling, bone pains, swellings,
sore throat, ulcers, effects of mercury, kidney
and bladder troubles, weak back, burning
urine, passing urine too often, gonorrhoea,
gleet, stricture, receive searching treatment,
prompt relief and cure for life.
Cancer's, Tumors, Goiter, Fistula, Piles
varicocele and enlarged glands with the sub
cutaneous injection method, absolutely with
out pain and without the loss of a drop of
blood, is one of his own discoveries, and is the
most really scientific and certainly sure cure of
the nineteenth century. No incurable cases
taken. Consultation to those interested, $1.00-
R. RBA & Co.,
Minneapolis. Minn. Louisville, Ky.
QGAR
MODELS'oTMERiT
5 ^0 OAR
PRE-EMINENTLY POPULAR
IN THE GREAT NORTH WEST
W S CONRAD
SOLE DISTRIBUTOR
ST.PAUL. MINNEAPOLIS.
^Ssffl*
W^E ^BINCBTO:^^
i
srase*.
EMMA GOLDMAN, HIGH PRIEST-
ESS OF ANARCHY, CAUGHT
IN CHICAGOO.
~W
Disclaims Any Knowledge of Czolgosz'
Crime 'and Asserts That Violence Is
Not a Teaching of AnarchyWar-
rant Served Charging Her With Con-
spiracy to Murder the President and.
.the Prisoner Is Locked Up.
Chicago, Sept. 11.Emma Goldman,
the high priestess of anarchy, whose
speeches turned to fire the brain of
Leon Czolgosz, the v/ould-be assassin
of the president, was arrested here
shortly before noon.
Her manner was defiant as 'she was
led into the office of the chief of po
lice, but she disclaimed all knowledge
of Czolgosz and his crime, save that
she admitted having met him here
July 12.
"Do you know that your words are
what Czolgosz claims stirred him, to
shoot the president she "was asked.
"I do not I never advocated vio
lence. I scarcely knew the man. I
was leaving for Rochester, via Buffalo,
when Czolgosz had a few words with
me. He said he had heard me lecture
at some memorial hall in Cleveland
last May and that he wanted to know
me. He said he knew I was in Chi
cago and looked me up. I scarcely re
member anything about him, save that
his complexion was light."
"Then hew do you know that this
man is the one who tried to kill the
president?"
"Oh," with a shrug of the shoulders.
"I guessed that from what the news
papers say."
"What did you think when you
heard that an attempt to kill the presi
dent had been made?" the woman was
asked. With a wave of her hand and
another shrug of the shoulders she an
swered disdainfully:
"I thought: Oh! the fool!"
A Discourse on Anarchy.
The prisoner's manner thus far had
been growing more and more excited,
although she made an evident effort
to control herself. In this she finally
succeeded and launched into a dis
course of the teachings of anarchy.
She declared that anarchy did not
teach men to do the act which has
made Czolgosz despised and hated the
world over. "We work against the
system and education is our watch-
word," she said.
"It was early last July when I came
to Chicago to visit the Isaaks family,"
she continued, in answer to interroga
tions concerning her movements re
cently. "On the night of July 12 Mr.
Isaaks was out of the housl. The bell
rang and I went to the door. The
man who I learn through the newspa
pers was Czolgosz stood there. He
said he. wanted to see me. I was
-ab.out.~to-.catch-th Nickle Plate train
as I and Mr. Isaaks' daughter were
about to go to Rochester. He went
to the Rock Island depot with us, but
I was so busy taking leave of my
friends that I scarcely noticed him. It
was not a time when one would want
to make new friends. At the depot I
had the few words with him of which
I have told. That was all there ever
was between us.
"I am an anarchista student of
sociology, but nothing I ever said to
Leon Czolgosz knowingly would have
led him to do the act which startled
everybody Friday."
"Not even in your lectures?" put
in a reporter. "He says your words
set his brain on fire."
Did the Deed Unaided.
"Am I accountable because some
cracked brained person put a wrong
construction on my words? Leon
Czolgosz, I am convinced, planned the
deed unaided and entirely alone.
There are no anarchist ring which
would help him. There may be an
archists who would murder, but there
are also men in every walk of life who
sometimes feel the impulse to kill. I
do not know surely, but I think Czol
gosz was one of those downtrodden
men who see all the misery which the
rich inflict upon the poor, who think
of it, who brood over it and then, in
despair, resolve to strike a great blow,
as they *think, for the good of their
fellow men. But that is not anarchy.
Czolgosz," (the Russian woman pro
nounced the name with the greatest
ease) "Czolgosz may have been in
spired by me, but if he was he took
the wrong way of showing it."
The police are not entirely satisfied
with Miss Goldman's story. When
Captain Schuettler and Detective
Hertz discovered her at the home of
one Norris at 303 Sheffield avenue she
denied her identity.
When the interviews were over Cap
tain Luke Colleran, chief of detectives,
served a warrant on Miss Goldman,
charging her with conspiracy to mur
der the president. The warrant was
sworn to by Captain Colleran.
WANTS HIM TREATED FAIRLY.
Must President Believes Czolgosz
Have Been Crazy.
Buffalo, Sept. 10.For the first time
since the would-be assassin was taken
from his sight President McKinley
mentioned Czolgosz during the day.
He asked what had been done with his
assailant and was told that he was be
ing held a prisoner here.
"He must have been crazy," said
President McKinley. "I never saw the
man until he approached me at the
reception."
"He is an anarchist," the president
was told.
"Too bad, too bad," was the reply.
"I trust that ho will be treated with
all fairness."
The president was told that from all
parts of the world messages of sym
pathy had arrived. He was also told
that the American public had shown
great grief over the "misfortune and
had demonstrated that he has a strong
ferip upon the affections of his fellow
countrymen.
He was deeply touched and said that
NJQUEUIDENCE OF A PLOT.
Cleveland Police Fail to Implicate
gK, Friends of Czolgosz.
ff Cleveland, Sept. 9.Superintendent
Conners of the police department has
given an ofiicial statement to the asso
ciated Press regarding the alleged an
archist plot to take the life of the
president. He states that the Cleve
land police have been following up" the
meager threads of evidence, but they
can find no proof whatever that such
a Plot existed.
It is quite evident that Leon Czol
gosz was an element of discord in his
own family and that he never was pop
ular even with his own people: His
taciturn disposition and queer ways
estranged him from relatives and
mends and his socialistic tendencies
appear to be regarded as the vagaries
of a weak mind. According to a state
ment made by Detective Doran Czol
gosz received $70 fsom his people on
account of his^quity in the farm near
this city. This amount was paid to
him by his brother Jacob's wife as
Part payment for his interest, Leon de
siring to leave the city, his interest to
revert to the brother Jacob. The farm
was subsequently sold and Leon still
has $50 coming to him on account.
The statement that Czolgosz receiv
ed $45 from Newburgh anarchists to
take him to Chicago is evidently pure
surmise ami finds no credence with
the authorities.
There is a strong impression among
residents of Newburgh that a ring of
anarchists exists in that locality and
that they are working in conjunction
with Chicago anarchists.
EXAMINATION OF CZOLGOSZ.
Insists He Alone Planned and Carried
Out Attack on President.
Buffalo, Sept. 10.Czolgosz has
made no additional admissions to the
police officials and nothing that they
have learned. fr.om him aided toward
a solution of the criminal side of the
case. He still insists that he alone
conceived, planned and- carried out the.
crime and that he alone must answer
for it. He admits that he attended
meetings at which Emma Goldman
spoke, and where he and his fellow
anarchists discussed their propaganda
of murder, but steadfastly denies that
any of them bad a part in his plan.
His talks with them were fairly gen
eral, he says, and he did not divulge
to them any feature of his scheme to
come here and kill the president. His
statement on that feature made on
Saturday created the impression that
he acknowledged a general talk with
his associates on this particular crime,
but he now says there was no occasion
for that impression. He is to be sub
jected to another cross-examination by
District Attorney Penny, but the re
sults are problematical. The stories
that the prisoner is wearing out phys
ically and mentally under the strain
of his crime, imprisonment and the
ordeal of questioning are denied by
the police, who say that there is no
appreciable change in his general con
dition.
EXPECT AMERICA TO ACT.
Germans Look for an Active Crusade
Against Anarchy Over Here.
^Jjerlin, Sept: 11.Everybody here
rejoices in the Reassuring dispatches
as to the condition of President Mc
Kinley. Public interest in the out
come has in no way abated. A fine
picture of McKinley in the window of
the office of The Lokal Anzeiger at
tracted crowds, those who studied it
commenting upon his characteristic
features.
The German papers unanimously
point out that anarchist propaganda
will continue to constitute a common
danger and they recommend common
precautions.
"Great states should unite," says
one journal, "In -fighting criminals
who indiscriminately organize, execute
and celebrate assassination in Amer
ica and Europe. Everywhere in Eu
rope the energetic action of the United
States against anarchism would be
hailed with satisfaction."
The Cologne Gazette, semi-official,
says: "Europe has already done so
much to check anarchism that it can
now leave the problem to Americans,
who are eminently practical people
and who will doubtless devise means
of rooting out the evil in their own
country. Europe will look with the
greatest interest to the inauguration
of such a crusade and will doubtless
learn something to its own advantage.-'
PARTLY CONCOCTED AT BUFFALO
Further Information Regarding an An
archist Conspiracy.
New York, Sept. 10.A special to
The Herald from Buffalo says:
From two sources, each of which is
unimpeachable, it is learned that the
police of the Unit ed States are nearly
ready to draw a dragnet and capture
a host of anarchists, all of whom are
believed to be concerned in the plot
to murder President McKinley and
other representatives of the. govern
ment.
Emma Goldman is believed to be a
leader in the conspiracy. She was
here in Buffalo, the day before Presi
dent McKinley arrived. The police of
this city have questioned a relative of
hers, from whom much information of
value was obtained. The Goldman
woman's arrest, it is asserted, will oc
cur in a few hours, if, indeed, it has
not already been effected. Evidence
is not lacking that the plot was at
least partly concocted in Buffalo.
INTESTINES NOT INJURED.
Physicians Gratified by the Result of
the Operation.
Buffalo, Sept. 8.The operation up
on President McKinley lasted almost
an hour. Ether was administered. A
five inch incision was made where the
ball entered the abdomen and its
course Was followed until the physi
cians became satisfied that the kid
ney had not been touched or the in
testines perforated, and that it had
lodged, probably, in the muscles of
the back, where it could do no harm
for the present. The intestines were
lifted out through the incision and
carefully examined and the utmost
confidence exists that there was no
injury. The physicians were exceed
ingly gratified at the result and pro
nounced the operation a complete suc
cess.
Howljl Trained
^O^iclus to Beat
vH^3the
fT is not an easy matter to train a horse to trot a
world's record, but when the feat is accomplished
all the hard work is forgotten. This is what Cres
ceus has gone through since I took him in hafid
this season.,^ The general preparation he receive^ in the spring con-
sisted of a great-many slow miles, gradually increasing the speed
until 2:30 was readied, and letting him step the last quarter of the
inile at a faster speed.
After that a few fast miles followed at from 2:12 to 2:15. This
plan has been followed with him, and I have always depended upon
his getting into condition after this stage has been reached.
at H-
Cresceus is a very hearty eater. has about 14 quarts of oats
a day and also a small quantity of timothy hay. Then after his
work is done and his toilet made he eats about 12 pounds of Cali-
fornia wild oat hay cut and cured with the oats in it.
This is stronger feed than I ever gave any other horse in my
charge, and he seems to require it all.
ONE PECULIARITY ABOUT HIS EATING 16 THAT HE WILL NOT
EAT HI8 OATS UNLESS HE HA8 A BUCKET OF WATER HANDY FROM
WHICH HE CAN DRINK AT ODD INTERVALS.
Cresceus is shod with plain flat shoes in front weighing seven
and one-half ounces each, with a trifle more weight on the outsicle
of the shoes than on the inside, and the toe is well rounded.
Behind he is shod with the ordinary hind shoes with very small
heels, and they are grooved as deeply as possible to prevent him
from breaking. Grooving his shoes is the only change that has
been made in his shoeing since I started to work him the year he
was coming 2 years old.
ifctfMlll.l,litt.^UMJl..Mtl....i...ll^..^.J.l..vl....l.....l....il...,jM.tt.,..^....|...
Four More Hot
Summers Coming
LL astronomers knowthat the
face of the sun is blanketed
with absorbing vapors, while
its interior is much hotter
than the glowing shell that
we see. Strip off the vapor
ous blanket entirely, and
the surf ace of the earth would probably burst into
smoke and flame in the instantaneous gush of
unbearable beat that would be poured upon it.
Whenever, as occurs periodically, though not
always to the same extent, the solar vapors are.
thinned, the heat from within leaps out through
the weakened shell and strikes the earth and the
other nearby planets as with a breath of fire from the suddenly
opened door of a blazing furnace.
That is what happened this summer, and the immediate agency
that flung open the furnace door and sent forth the destroying blast
is the mysterious power whose visible manifestation is the presence
of black sun spots. BiTt it is a mistake to suppose that the sun spots
themselves exercise any direqt influence upon the weather or that
there must be spots on the sun whenever there is extraordinary heat
ontheearth. _.
THE SPOTS ARE SIMPLY INDICATORS OF THE SUN'S CONDI-
TION, RESEMBLING IN THAT RESPECT THE ERUPTIONS ON THE
FACE OF A SMALLPOX PATIENT. THEY TELL THE STORY OF THE
SUN'S INTERNAL CONVULSIONS AND INDICATE SOME OF TH E
PLACES ON ITS SURFACE WHERE THE PENT UP FORCES ARE
BUR8TING OUT.
The sun is subject to strange physical disorder, which shakes its
system to the very center and, like a malarious disease, recurs in more
or less regular periods, but with varying intensity. I fact, the
similarity to some of the recurrent diseases that afflict humanity goes
BO far that there is a kind of jdouble period in the sun spot cycle, and"
we have now arrived at the beginning of the great primary period of
the cycle, which is marked by_intensineation of the solar disturbances.
Hence the fierce blasts of the destroying sunshine that dried and
parched the air, dissipated its gathering moisture, scattered the
assembling stormclouds and out of a cloudless sky dropped scorching
atmospheric sheets upon the cornfields of the west until the very soil
seemed on the point of catching fire.
FOR THE NEXT FOUR YEARS THESE GIGANTIC OUTBURSTS
WILL INCREASE IN FURY, AND A CORRESPONDING SERIES OF TER-
RESTRIAL SEASONS, MARKED BY GREAT EXCESSES OF TEMPER-
ATURE, SUDDEN CONTRA8TS AND EXTRAORDINARY CYCLONIC DIS-
TURBANCES, WILL FOLLOW.
Next, the Aerial Auto
By HAMRI POUTOfiER, Farrjous Preocb A"ton?oMlist
*5 S"5a
World's Record
By GEORGE H. KETCHAn
#u *nn* win immtmnmit| |rnnunmmi "1'ii iim 1'ii'umn
By
GARRETT
P.SERVISS
Astronomer
HE GREAT MOTOR RACES OF TH E
FUTURE WILL BE IN THE AIR,
WHERE NO COW, NO LUMBERING
j, WAGONS CAN BAR THE WAY.
THERE WILL BE NO DUST AND NO
8T0NES. WE WILL GO A3 A
BULLET GOESIN UNIMPCBCD
FLIGHT.
of the great engines of destruction in the future. I will be a
moving steel fort, carrying its guns, magazines, and defenders.
5 I have read of chariot races that gave mad excitement to ancients,
but ndrer did the maddest emperor approach in variety, in sensations
in physical danger, in exasperation of nerves, in strain of mind, those
entailed in a motor contest over rough roads at 60 miles an hour. *?$M
The armored motor will be one
I
'-25L
-it
it*
'-1'L
,4
1
'i
'J
ja-i^a
&k&H

xml | txt