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The Princeton union. [volume] (Princeton, Minn.) 1876-1976, October 24, 1901, Image 3

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016758/1901-10-24/ed-1/seq-3/

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Great Northern Railway.
ST. PAUL. MINNEAPOLIS, PRINCETON
AND SANDSTONE.
GOING BAST
l.e Sandstone
Mora
Milaca
PRINCETON
Ar Elk River
Lie Anoka
Ar Minneapolis
*r St Paul
L.e St Paul
Ar Minneapolis
Le Anoka
4ir ElkRiier
Le PRINCETON
Milaca "Mora
4r handstone
Wheat, No. 1 Northern,
Rye,
Oats, Hay, corn, (new)
Ex Sun
6 00 a in.
6 50 a m.
7 25 a
7 53a
8 35a
8 59 a
9 40am
10 05 a
GOING WIST
4 45pm
5 10pm
5 35p
6 10pm
6Mpm 720pm 7 54
9 10
ST. CLOUD TRAINS.
GOING WEST.
L.e Milaca
Bridgeman
\T bt Cloud
9 40 a
9 46 a
10 45 a
GOING EAST
Le St Cloud 3 25pm
Bridsreman 4 2.1
Milaca 4 35pm
These trains connect at St Cloud with trains
Nos 1 and 3
WAY FREIGHT.
i. orvo EAST Tuesday, Thursday & Saturday
Le Milaca 11 10 a
1 PRINCETON 13 25
Elk River 2 30pm
Ar Anoka 4 10p
GOING WE ST Monday, Wednesday & Friday
^e Anoka *0 a
Elk River 12 29
a
PRINCET ON 12 25
Ar Milaca 2 00
MILLE LACS COUNTY.
TOWN CLERKS
Bogus BrookHenry Gustaf son
BorgholmJ Heron
GreenbushChas E Slater
Isle HarborOtto A Haggberg
MilacaOle Larson
ivIiloR. N Atkinson
PrincetonErnest Sellhorn
RobbinsWillie Anderson
South HarborT Norton
East SideGeo W Freer
OnamiaBenjamin Cotton
PageL Chamberlain
VILLAGE RECORDERS.
1 Neumann
W Goulding
W Hissam
Princeton
Bock
Princeton
Isle
Milaca
Foreston
Princeton
Vineland
Cove
Opstead
Onamia
Page
Foreston
Princeton
Milaca
NEIGHBORING TOWNS.
BaldwinL Berry Princeton
Blue HillThomas E Brown Princeton
Spencer BrookG C. Smith Spencer Brook
WyanettOle Peterson Wyanett
HvomaChas E Swanson Lake Freemont
PRICES OF THE
Princeton Roller Mills and Elevator.
Wheat per bushel
Corn, (old)
Gate,
S 60
48
RETAIL.
\ffcetal, pereai-k
P'our, (100 per cent) per sack
Banner, per sack
around Feed per cwt
Joarse Meal, per cwt
Middlings fchorts, per cs\t
Bran per cwt
AH ^ood delivered free anywhere in Princeton
$2 00
1 90
1 -50
1 15
1 15
90
0
PRINCETON
MarketReport
$ bO
44 30
00
40
1 20
POTATOES
OhlOs,
Tiurbanks, rlose,
Triumphs
b0(ab5
45
40(cr4
4.1
FRATERNA L. LODGE
NO. 92, A & A. M.
Regular communicationa, 2d and 4th
fi\cv.Wednesday of each month
*MS A A CASWELL W
WM COHDINEK Sec
PRINCETON LODGE,
NO. 93, of
Regular meetings e\ery Tuesday eve
8 o'clock
A A CASWELL
ANWORMFH E 4,S
O. M.,
Tent No. 17.
Regular meetings e\ ei Thin s
day evening at 8 clock in the
"Vlaccabee hall
rRAMvPEtFasoi Com
N NELSON
Hebron Encampment.
No. 42,1.0 O.F
Meetings 2nd and 4tn Mondays
at 8 clock
SAUSSER
W SPATJLDING W
Jos CBAIG, Scribe.
PRINCETON -:-LODGE
NO. 208,1. O O.F.
Regular meetings every Fndav evening at 7 30
clock O 13 NhVVlON N
B\ILS Sec
PRINCETON CAMP, W A.,
No. 4032.
Regular meeting every fourth Thursday even
ng of each month, at 8 00, in the hall over post
otllce Visiting members cordially invited
E WHITE,
A SMITH Clerk
ESPEY LODGE,
No. 193, A. O. U. W
Regular meetings every
first and third Monday even
ings of each month in the
hall over postofflce
A SMITH W
CUTLER Rec
IRMAi
A KM
COUCH KILLER
K'
IIMPTlPiN
UUi^OUiv
AD Druggists, 23c. 50c, *nd 1 00 Prepared only Ijv
Dr. Beth Arnold, Med Corp Wooniocket I
C. A. Jack, the druggist.
Tot Causes Night Alarm.
"One night my brother's baby was
taken with' Croup," writes Mrs. J. C.
Snider, of Crittenden, Ky., "it seemed
it would strangle before we could get a
doctor, so we gave it Dr. King's New
Discovery, which gave quick relief and
permanently cured it. We always
keep it in the house to protect our
children from Croup and Whooping
Cough. It cured me of a chronic bron
chial trouble that no other remedy
would relieve.'' Infallible for Coughs,
Colds, Throat and Lung troubles 50c
and $1.00. Trial bottles free at C. A.
Jack's. HE HAS CURED THOUSANDS
Given up to die.
Dr. Doran
Next regular professional visit to
PRINCETON,
At Commercial Hotel,
Friday, Nov. 1 5
Returning every month. Consult
him while the opportunity
is at hand
DR DORAN has no superior in diagnosing
and tieating diseases and deformities He will
give 50 for any case that he cannot tell the
disease and where located in five minutes
All cm able medical and surgical diseases,
acute and chronic catarrh, and special diseases
of the eye ear, Rose and throat lung disease,
early comsumption bronchitis bronchial ca
tarrh constitutional catarrh dyspepsia, sick
headache stomach and bowel troubles rheu
matism neuralgia sciatica Bright disease,
diabetes kidney liver bladder, prostatic and
female diseases dizziness nervousness, indi
gestion obesity interrupted nutricion, slow
growth in children and all wasting disease in
adults Many cases of dealness ringing in the
ears loss of eyesight, cataiact cross eyes etc
that have been improperly tieated or neglected
can be easily restored Deformities club feet,
cuivatureof the spine disease of the brain
paralysis epilepsv, heart disease dropsy,
swelling of the limbs strictuie open sores
pain in the bones granular enlargements and
ill long-standing diseases properly tieated
Young, middle-aged and old, single or married
men and all who suffer from lost manhood
neivous debility speimatorrhoea seminal
losses, sexual decay failing memory weak
eyes stunted development lack of energy im
poverished blood pimples impediments to mar
riage also blood and skin diseases syphillis,
eiuptions hair falling, bone pains, swellings,
sore throat, ulcers effects of mercury kidney
and bladder troubles, weak back, burning
mine passing urine too often gonorihoea
gleet stricture receive searching treatment,
prompt rehei andcmefoi life
Cancers, Tumors, Goiter, Fistula, Piles
vancocele and enlaiged glands with the sub
cutaneous miection method absolutely with
out pain and without the loss of a diop of
blood is one of his own discoveries and is the
most really scientific and ceitainly sure cure of
the nineteenth century No incurable cases
taken Consultation to those interested 00
Du REA &, Co
Minneapolis Minn Touisville Kv
QGAR
[MODELS OP MERIT I
PRE-EMINENTLY POPULAR
INTHE GREAT NORTH WEST..
W S CONRAD
SOLE DISTRIBUTOR.
ST.PAUL. MINNEAPOLIS.
A Case of
HAMM'S
BEER Will Prove a Splendid Tonic for
the Tired Housewife*Supplied by
Agents Everywhere, or THEO.
HAMM BREWING CO.. St Paul,
Minn.
A BRAVE IRISHMAN.
Canaries aa Weather Prophets.
"I have heard of all soits of barome
ters, or, rather, weather signs, but I
know of no more reliable weather
prophets than my birds," said a Balti
moie lady who owns several canaries.
"I can almost always tell when it is go
ing to rain by the distinctness with
whioh I can hear the trains at night,
but the birds are even more reliable
than that. If I hear thern singing in
the morning early, befoie I take the
coverings of their cages off, I know
that the day will be a good one, no
matter if it is raining at the moment,
but if they do not sing I am sure there
will be bad weather before the day is
over. I have never known them to fail,
and I never think of going shopping or
calling unless the birds sing in early
morning. That is why I never get
caught in the rain, as many of my
friends do. That poor weather bureau
man, who makes so many mistakes in
his prophecies, ought by all means to
get himself some canaries."Baltimore
Sun.
The Cautions Cossack.
Says a Russian traveler: "The Cos
sack bears himself as if there was al
ways a Kirgheez with a spear before
and a Bashkir with a drawn sword be
hind him. He always appears angry
and extremely cautious, as if he were on
the battlefield watching his enem and
careful of attack from behind. Com
ing into contact with a stranger, the
Cossack looks at him with a searching,
scrutinizing eye his talk is like that
heard in a cross examination at the
bar his interrogations are catching
questions. So they are all, the men and
the women, the young and the old.
The insolence of their young children
and aged persons makes a revolting im
pression. Probably all Russia was in
the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries
as the Cossacks are at presentpower
ful, harsh, insolent, half savage."
THE FRXNTCETOK IJKION: THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1901.
Orderly Riley, Wfco M*t Death With
a. Laugh.
"Courage, fidelity, honesty, are the
soldier's cardinal virtues, which, sum
med up, read the plain and simple do
ing of, one's duty. And it was in Bice
Graves' battery before Fort Donelson
that the virtues of the Confederate sol
dier were tried to the uttermost," said
the old staff officer.
"Among them all Tom Riley, the or
derly, shone out resplendently, for he
went to certain death against orders
because he thought it was his duty.
Gia\es'nattery had been got up in the
lower part of Kentucky. 'No married
man nor men with sweethearts need
applj' had been the order of the cap
tain in organizing it. And the battel
looked the part They were the*dare
dev lis of Donelson. They would sing
while they shot and crack jokes repuls
ing a charge. The captain had made
Riley orderly to keep the wild Irishman
in oider Between the two there was
an affection almost brotherly.
"On the second day of Donelson
Graves' battery was in a mighty tight
box. The battery had been ordered
into the line pits, and it seemed to the
men that about a million bluecoats
were shooting at them. For hours thej
lay under the leaden storm. The enemy
kept coming closer and closer. Some
thing had to be done. To show one's
head above the trenches meant death.
'Run out a gun and let 'em have it,
boys,' said Graves.
"One round was fired, but It seemed
only to bring down on that spot every
Federal gun reach. To- reload the
Confederate piece one man had to show
himself. The gunner sprang to his
place, rammer in hand. The piece was
reloaded, but the cannoneer fell dead.
Again the gun from Graves' battery
spoke. A second time it was reloaded,
and a second cannoneer lay dead beside
his piece.
"Time after time this was repeated.
The dead piled up about the gun. The
entire Federal fire concentrated in an
effort to silence it. It took two
mening
now for one shot. The battery boys
had quit joking. They lay grim and de
termined in the pit. As one fell the oth
ers moved up toward the gun. The
nearest would say, 'Goodby, fellows,'
and jump to his place, only to fall a
mmnte later. The captain had ordered
Tom Riley to stay behind when the bat
tery went into the pits, but scarcely
had the^jmen got settled before Riley
appeared.
'I couldn't help it, sir,' he said to
Graves and took his place among the
mpn. Slowly death worked its way
along the line toward Riley. Now he
was three, then two and one before the
captain knew it. Then Graves saw the
danger.
'Come here, Riley,' he cried. 'You
are not a gunner. You are my orderly.
You have no business there.'
"The cannoneer before Riley fell
dead The wild Irishman seized the
rammer and turned to the captain. 'It
is my duty, sir,' he said.
"Then, as though on parade, but with
desperate swiftness, he began to load
the gun. A shot knocked him to his
knees, but he staggered up again and
finished the woik. Then he turned and
bowed in the direction of the bluecoats.
'Why don't ye learn how to shoot?'
he yelled.
"He stepped back into cover and fell
bleeding fioni half a dozen wounds.
'I wouldn't 'a' given 'em the satis
faction o' knowing it,' he murmured
faintlj.
"Two of the men picked him up ten
derly and began to carry him to the
rear. They parsed Graves, and Riley,
looking up, saw tears in his captain's
ejres.
"The orderly, already dying, was re
called to life. He forced a bloody laugh.
"'Shure, captain, darlint,' he cried,
'don't ye mind. Why, I ain't had so
much fun since me mither died.'
"And Tom Riley tiied to salute, but
died before he could quite manage it."
Louisville Courier-Journal.
THE BIRTH OF THE MOON.
When the Earth -Was a Sphere of
Lava, Molten ana Flattened.
i The earth revolves on its axis once
fr 24 hours. Millions of 5 ears ago the
day was 22 hours millions of years be
fore it was 21 hours. As we look back
ward into time we find the earth re
volving faster and faster. There was
a time, ages ago, long before geology
begins, when the earth was rotating in
a day of five or six hours in length. In
the remotest past the earth revolved in
a day of aboutfive hours. It could re
volve no faster than this and remain a
single unbroken mass.
It was at this time that the moon
was bornseparated, broken off from
the parent mass of the earth. The
earth was then a molten, flattened
spheie of lava. Its whole body was
fluid The tides, which now are small,
superficial and, so to say, local, weie
then universal and immense They oc
curred at short intervals. The whole
suiface of our globe was affected.
\ad the corresponding lunar tides in
the fluid, molten moon were indefinite
ly greater still.
Our day is now 24 hours the distance
of the moon is now 240,000 miles.
When our day was about five hours
long, the moon was in contact with the
earth's surface. It had just broken
away from its parent mass Is the
length of the terrestrial day increased,
so did the distance of the moon. The
two quantities are connected by in
exorable equations. If one varies, so
must the other. Whenever the rotation
time of a planet is shorter than the
period of revolution of its satellite, the
effect of their mutual action Is to ac
celerate the motion of the satellite and
to force it to move in a larger orbit
to increase its distance, therefore.
The day of the earth is now shorter
than the monththe period of revolu
tionof the moon. The moon Is there
fore slowly receding from us, and it has
been receding for thousands of cen
turies. But the day of the earth is, as
we have seen, slowly growing longer.
The finger of t,he tides is always press
upon the rim of our huge flywheel
and slowly but surely lessening the
speed of its rotation. So long as the
terrestrial day is shorter than the
lunar month, the moon will continue to
recede from us.Professor E. S. Hol
den Harper's Magazine.
SIMPLE REMEDIES.
Diluted ammonia is good for insect
bites and stings.
A raw egg swallowed at once upon
getting a fishbone in the throat beyond
the reach of the finger, it is said, will
dislodge it and carry it ddwn.
A simple remedy for indigestion is
the white of an egg beaten to a stiff
froth and stirred into a wineglassful
of cold water. This should be taken
after each meal.
Tor burns and scalds, when no other
remedy is at hand, try the effect of a
piece of rag steeped in vinegar and
hound round the scar This is espe
cially useful when cooking, for the
vinegar is generally at hand.
To cure a severe ease of colic take a
teaspoonful of salt in a pint of water
drink and go to bed. This is one of the
speediest remedies known. It will also
prove efficacious in reviving a person
who seems almost dead from a heavy
fall.
Preparing: For a Journey.
Jerome K. Jerome recalled, with
reverence, a habit of his methodical
uncle who, before packing for a jour
ney, always "made a list." This was
the system which he followed, gather
ed from his uncle's own lips
Take a piece of paper and put down
on it everything jou can possibly le
quire. Then go over it and see that it
contains nothing you can possibly do
without.
Imagine yourself in bed. What have
jou got on? Very -well put it down,
together with a change You get up
What do jou do? Wash yourself.
What do jou wash yourself with?
Soap. Put down soap. Go on till jou
have finished. Then take your clothes.
Begin at your feet. What do you wear
on jour feet? Boots, shoes, socks. Put
them down. Work up till you get to
3 our head. What do you want besides
clothes? Put down everything.
This is the plan the old gentleman al
ays pursued. The list made, he would
go over it carefully to see that he had
f01 gotten nothing. Then he would go
over it again and stuke out eveiything
it was possible to dispense with Then
he would lose the list.
The Backslider.
"Many years ago," says the Provi
dence Journal, "in a village not 20
miles from Providence a revival vv as in
piogress. A young man, one of indis
tinguishable twin brothers who had
previously been observed, as was sup
posed, in an attentive attitude at the
meeting, rose for prayers, walked to
the anxious seat, and there waileu and
iLoaned to such good purpose that the
deacons were sure he was on the high
toad to salvation.
The next day he was overheard in
the back yard at home chopping wood
and swearing painfully at a refractory
leg. When remonstrated with for his
sudden backsliding, he merely said,
"Oh, brother Jim couldn't go to the
meeting last night, so I went and hol
lered for him."
Meant What It Said.
"No," said the impecunious one, "you
can't believe all that you see in the
newspapers."
"Are you prepared to specify?" the
other man asked.
"I am. I saw a statement in the
financial columns that money was easy,
but when I tried to negotiate a loan I
found that the reverse was true."
"You misunderstood the paragraph.
It didn't say the people were easy."
Judge.
jjisilMsmmitii
i By HAMILTON W. MABIE
^'T"iniHMaj'HnwHrMHH"ufl'r'^^
...1* ^..ii^.^.i^.i....,i..- i... i..-.
Science Is Making
The World Rich
Two new forces have come into playcombination or co-opera-
tion on a vast scale and the application of science to industry. I all
the leading countries of the world the practical sagacity of men, co-
operating with science, is revolutionizing processes in every depart-
ment of business and is opening sources of wealth which are inex-
haustible. Nothing, apparently, can arrest society from becoming
enormously rich, and, so far as can be foreseen, the forces which
make for prosperity will move with accelerated speed in the future.
Prosperity is the product of three agenciesthe energy of the
human spirit, which must and will find expression for itself the
creative genius of the human mind, fashioning every kind of tool,
machine and method, and the inexhaustible storage of force and
material in the earth.
PLACE SUCH A BEING AS WAN IN SUCH A WORLD AS THIS AND
GIVE HIM TIME FOR DEVELOPMENT, AND NOTHING CAN KEEP HIM
PROM BECOMING IMMENSELY RICH.
If this is not in the order of Providence, then we have no data in
any department for interpreting that order.
Vows of poverty will not keep the world poor society might as
well vow not to recognize the law of gravitation or the flow of the
tides. I is written in man's nature and in his world that he must
either become rich or commit suicide.
I do not know what new principles for the distribution of wealth
may be applied to society in the time to come there will certainly be
gfMt changes, and they will be beneficent ones. Great perils will
Come with them, but society has always faced great perils. God has
saved it so many times when men had given it up that I have ceased
to despair about the future.
But, whatever changes may be made in the distribution of wealth,
nothing will or can be done to check or limit its production, because
men will not tolerate any curtailment of their energies. The hub-
banding and the multiplying of forces by combination on a great
scale will be better regulated than at present, but the principle having
been discovered, its immense utility will not be surrendered.
Mr. Beecher once said that the great test of humanity is yet to
come. That test will come when the world has got through with its
drudgery and, well fed, well clothed and well housed, can afford to
give itself up to the full play of life.
WHEN THAT DAY COMES, SOCIETY WILL BE TESTED AS IT HAS
NEVER BEEN TESTED.
I will be a question then of the strength of man's spirit as com-
pared with the immense material comfort which he has created.
That that period will present great temptations is beyond ques-
tion. Those temptations will be different from but not less searching
than the temptations of an age of poverty, with its perils of meanness,
sordidness, hardness of spirit and of brutal and indifferent selfishness.
The good English bishop of the last century who said that it was very
hard to be a Christian on less than a pound a week put a great fact
in a very concrete form.
If prosperity has its perils, it also has its great opportunities. Of
late years the practice of giving according to one's means* lias become
almost universal. Last year this country $70.000,000one-half
of 1 per cent of the entire profit of the 12 monthv.a* given by
private donors for educational uses. The rills of beneficence and
charity that once flowed like tiny streams through mall communities
have widened in our day to be Hudsom, Amazon* and At^si^ippis
and are enriching continents where they once enriched localities.
,With increased prosperity hah come much the iullc- recognition
of social obligations that society has known pnd much the most com-
plete development of the social con?ciou-mc--,. I as in this rich
age that one of its wealthiest men declared that the time will come
when IT WILL BE A DISGBACE FOR A MAX TO DIE rJCII.
There is really no alternate the world cannot remain poor if it
would by the very law of its life society is bound to become lich.
IT IS NOT A QUESTION, THEREFORE, WHETHER THE PERIL CAN
BE AVOIDED IT IS SIMPLY A QUESTION WHETHER MEN CAN BE
BRACED TO MEET IT.
THE MENACE of MORMONISM
By AVs. ANNIE n'KEAN WHITE
E Mormons control Utah absolutely. They have
the balance of power under normal conditions in
Idaho, Wyoming, Colorado, Xevada, Arizona and
Kew Mexico. They have strong colonies in Ore
gon, California, Washington and Montana.
WHEN THE TIME ARRIVES, THEY
WILL VIRTUALLY CONTROL ELEVEN
STATES INSTEAD O NINE, two less than necessary to enable
them to prevent any constitutional amendment.
All they ask is for Christian America to remain indifferent sev-
eral years. They will do the rest.
A movement for a constitutional amendment should have been
made immediately following the Roberts controversy, but the inter-
denominational council of women is now working for this end, and
this fall the active campaign will begin. I will be waged by Chris-
tian American women stronger than the warfare against Roberts.
Congressjmust act in the coming session, and the polygamy ques-
tion will then be settled forever.
SHOULD CONGRESS SHIRK THEN ONLY A FIERCE RELIGIOUS
WAR WILL WIPE FROM AMERICAN LIFE THIS INFAMOUS STAIN
WHICH 18 THROWN UP TO OUR MISSIONARIES IN CHINA AND
3
|[r ^......a. |y i
E are standing only at the beginning
of the age of prosperity. Me
have never known wealth in such
vast amounts as they know it today,
and they are only at the beginning
of the full play of these tremen
dous forces which are to create
wealth of a scale undreamed of by the great financiers and organizers
of trade in the earlier times.
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