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The Princeton union. [volume] (Princeton, Minn.) 1876-1976, October 31, 1901, Image 3

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016758/1901-10-31/ed-1/seq-3/

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Great Northern Railway.
ST. PAUL, MINNEAPOLIS, PRINCETON
AND SANDSTONE.
GOING EAST.
Mora
PRINCETON
Ar. Elk River
Le. Anoka
Le. St. Paul.
Ar. Minneapolis.
Le Anoka
Ar. Elk River.
Le. PRINCETON
Milaca
Mora
Ar. Sandstone
Ex. Sun.
6:00 a. m.
6:50 a. m.
7:25 a. m.
7:53 a.
8:35 a. m.
8:59 a.m.
9:40 a.m.
10 05 a. m.
GOING WEST.
4:45 p.
5:10 p.
5-35 p.
6 10 p.
6:52 p.
7:80 p.
7:54 p.
9:10 p.
m. m.
m.
m. m. m. m.
m.
ST. CLOUD TRAINS.
GOING WEST.
Le. Milaca Bridgeman.
Ar. St. Cloud
9:40 a. m.
10:30 a. m.
12:25 p. m.
2:00 p.m.
MILLE LACS COUNTY.
TOWN CLERKS.
Bogus BrookHenry Gustafson Princeton
BorgholmJ. Heron Bock
GreenbushChas. E. Slater Princeton
Isle HarborOtto A. Haggberg Isle
MilacaOle Larson Milaca
MiloR. N. Atkinson Foreston
PrincetonErnest Sellhorn Princeton
RobbinsWillie Anderson vineland
South HarborT. Norton Cove
East SideGeo. W. Freer Opstead
OnamiaBenjamin Cotton Onamia
PageL. D. Chamberlain Page
VILLAGE RECORDERS.
J. M.Neumann ^Foreston
W. Goulding Princeton
W. Hissam Milaca
NEIGHBORING TOWNS.
BaldwinL. Berry Princeton
Blue HillThomas E. Brown Princeton
Spencer BrookG. C. Smith. Spencer Brook
WyanettOle Peterson Wyanett
LivoniaChas. E. Swanson.... Lake Freemont
PRICES O THE
Princeton Roller Mills and Eleyator.
Wheat, per bushel
^orn,
Vestal, per sack
Flonr, (100 per cent) per sack
Banner, per sack
Ground Feed, per cwt
Coarse Meal, per cwt
Middlings Shorts, per cwt
Bran, percwt
All foods delivered free anywhere Princeton
PRINCETON
MarketReport
Wheat, No. 1. Northern,
Elye,
Oats, Hay,
Corn, (new)
Flax,
POTATOES
OhiOb,
Qurbanks.
Hose,
Triumphs,
$ 61
44 32
(i 00
40
1.20
63(a65
4o(ao0 45(a47
PKATERNAL -:-LODGE
NO. 92, A & A
Regular communications,2d and 4th
''fir \s. Wednesday of each month.
JXS A A CASWELL, W. M.
W M. CORDINEK, Sec'y.
PKINCETON LODGE,
NO. 93, of
Regular meetings every Tuesday eve
ng at 8 o'clock.
A. A. CASWELL, C.
W V4NWORMEH, K. R. & S.
O M.,
Tent No. 17.
Regular meetings every Thurs
day evening at 8 o'clock, the
^laccabeehall.
FRANK PETERSON, Com.
N. M. NELSON. R. K.
Hebrou Encampment.
No. 42,1.0. O.F.
Meetings, 2nd and 4th Mondays
at 8 o'clock p. M.
M. C. SAUSSER, C. P.
D. W. SFAULDING, S. W.
JO S. CRAIG, Scribe.
PRINCETON LODGE
NO. 208,1. O O.F.
',r
Regular meetings every Fndav evening at 7:30
o'clock. O. B. NEWTON, N. G.
BATES R. Sec.
PKINCETON CAMP, W A.
No. 4032.
Regular meeting every fourth Thursday even
ing of each month, at 8:00, in the hall over post
office. Visiting members cordially invited.
H. E. WHITE, V. C.
A. II. SMIT H. Clerk.
ESPEY LODGE,
No. 193, A O W
Regular meetings every
first and third Monday even
ings of each month in the
hall over postofflce.
A. C. SMITH, M. W.
M. CUTLER. Rec.
COUCH KILLER
PREVENTS
Dr. Seth Arnold, Med bori.^VlooniockeUli.%'.'
.and $1 00 Prepared only by
C. A. Jack, the druggist.
Tot Causes Night Alarm.
"One night my brother's baby was
taken with Croup," writes Mrs. J. C.
Snider, of Crittenden, Ky., "i seemed
it would strangle before we could get a
doctor, so we gave it Dr. King's ^New
Discovery, which gave quick relief and
permanently cured it. W always
keep it in the house to protect our
children from Croup and Whooping
Cough. I cured me of a chronic bron
chial trouble that no other remedy
would relieve." Infallible for Coughs,
Colds, "throat and Lu ng troubles 50c
and $1.00. Trial bottles free at C. A.
Jack's.
lit
9:40 a.
9:46 a.
10-45 a.
m. m.
m.
GOING EAST.
Le. St. Cloud
Bridgeman.
Ar Milaca
These trains connect at St. Cloud with trains
Nos. 1 and 3.
3 25 p.
4:23 p.
435 p.
m. m. m.
WAY FREIGHT.
QOING EAST.Tuesday, Thursday & Saturday.
Le. Milaca 111:10a.m.
PRINCETON 12:25p.m.
ElkRiver 2-30p.m.
Ar. Anoka I 4:10p.m.
GOING WEST.Monday, Wednesday & Friday
Le. Anoka.
ElkRiver...
PRINCETON
Ar Milaca
is 16 ounces of pure
i coffee to the pound.
Coated Coffees are
:r.I/ al out 14 ounces
cf coffee and two
ounces of eggs,
glue, etc. of no
value to you but^
money in the pocket
cf the roaster.
J. Van Rhee,
Hag* just received
a large line of...
61
40 32
RETAIL.
S2.00
1.90 1.50
1.15 1.13
.-J5
90
Crockery
W will sell you both plain and
decorated ware at lowest prices.
J.VANBHEE,
PEASE, MINN.
HE HAS CURED THOUSANDS
Given up to die.
Dr. Doran
Next regular professional visit to
PRINCETON,
A Commercial Hotel,
Friday, Nov. 1 5
Returning every month. Consult
him while the opportunity
is at hand
DR. DORAN has no superior in diagnosing
and treating diseases and deformities. He will
give 50 for any case that he cannot tell the
disease and where located in five minutes.
All curable medical and surgical diseases,
acute and chronic catarrh, and special diseases
of the eye, ear, Rose and throat, lung disease,
early comsumption, bronchitis bronchial ca
tarrh, constitutional catarrh, dyspepsia, sick*
headache, stomach and bowel troubles, rheu
matism neuralgia sciatica, Bright's disease
diabetes, kidney, liver, bladder, prostatic and
female diseases, dizziness nervousness, indi
gestion, obesity, interrupted nutricion. slow
growth in children, and all wasting disease in
adults. Many cases of deafness, ringing in the
ears, loss of eyesight, cataract, cross eyes, etc.,
that have been improperly treated or neglected
can be easily restored. Deformities, club feet,
curvature of the spine, disease of the brain,
paralysis, epilepsy, heart disease, dropsy,
swelling of the limbs, stricture, open sores,
pain in the bones, granular enlargements and
all long-standing diseases properly treated.
Young, middle-aged and old, single or married
men and all who suffer from lost manhood,
nervous debility, spermatorrhoea, seminal
losses, sexual decay, failing memory, weak
eyes, stunted development, lack of energy, im
poverished blood, pimples.impediments to mar
riage: also blood and skin diseases, syphillis,
eruptions, hair falling, bone pains, swellings,
sore throat, ulcers, effects of mercury, kidney
and bladdei- troubles, weak back, burning
urine, passing urine too often, gonorrhoea,
gleet, stricture, receive searching treatment.
prompt relief and cure for life.
Cancers, Tumors, Goiter, Fistula, Piles
varicocele and enlarged glands with the sub
cutaneous injection method, absolutely with
out pain and without the loss of a drop of
blood, is one of his own discoveries, and is the
most really scientific and certainly sure cure of
the nineteenth century. No incurable cases
taken. Consultation to those interested, $1.00.
R. REA & (jo.,
Minneapolis, Minn. T,ouisville. Kv.
Twenty.Four Bottles ofSatisfaction
Otherwise Known as a Case of
HAMM'S
BEER Supplied by Agents Everywhere,
orTHECL HAMM BREWING CO.,
St Paul, Minn.
THE PRINCETON UNION: tf&TJJftSDAY, OCTOBER
Calling Out British Reserves.
That the British war office has at
l&g\ felt the necessity of calling out
the reserves to fill the depleting ranks
of the army in South Africa is made
plain by a late London cablegram.
The knowledge that this unusual
measure was contemplated came out
somewhat sooner than was expected
and in an unexpected way, but it no
less clearly reveals the purpose and dire
necessity of the government.
According to the London cable, "the
war office distributed to the police of
fices throughout the kingdom bills or
dering all reservists, militia, yeomen
and volunteers to report themselves
without delay to headquarters with the
view of active service. These bills are
accompanied by letters ordering that
the former be kept in a safe place until
telegraphic orders to post them up are
received. The police of Lancaster over
looked the letter and posted the bills,
causing widespread perturbation."
The posting of the order might possi
bly have been deferred for a few days
or even a few weeks, but it has gener
ally been recognized in England that
it must come to this sooner or later. So
unpopular has the war become that it
is now next to impossible to recruit by
voluntary enlistment the army in South
Africa, which is being decimated by
disease and Boer bullets.
The extent of Great Britain's continu
ous losses may be gathered from the
official report for September, 1901,
which shows that 24 officers and 383
men died in South Africa during the
first month of the third year of the war.
Of this number 17 officers and 170 men
were killed in action, 3 officers and 139
men died of disease, while accidental
deaths accounted for the loss of 1 offi
cer and 23 men. Besides this there
must be figured in to tell the cost of
the campaign 14 officers and 400 men
accounted for as missing and prisoners
and 60 officers and 1,926 men who were
sent home as invalids. This brings the
total of September's losses to 2,806
96 officers, 2,710 enlisted men. From the
beginning of the war up to Oct. 1,1901,
there have been 824 officers and 16,648
men who have died in South Africa. Of
this number 4,757 were killed in action,
1,623 died of wounds, 97 died in captivi
ty, 10,530 died of disease and 443 deaths
are credited to accidental causes. Be
sides this 620 are either missing or
prisoners and 57,470 have been sent
home as invalids. Of this number 423
have died and 3,774 have left the serv
ice unfit for further work.
With such losses as these and no
counterbalancing gains, with the cam
paign well along in the third year and
the end, which was long ago promised
and time and again reasserted, not yet
in sight, it is no wonder that England
is becoming tired of the terrible drain
upon her manhood and resources.
It is asserted that a few colleges have
discovered that the way to stop hazing
is to suspend the hazers. There is a
simple way to effectually stop it, if the
colleges would adopt the method, and
that is to treat the hazers just the same
as other disorderly persons who com
mit assaults. Arraignment ia criminal
court and the infliction of fine and im
prisonment would have a decidedly so
bering and salutary effect on these ob
streperous young men.
The fastest battleship in actual serv
ice in the world is of American build
and belongs to Russia. The Retvizan
has averaged 18.8 knots for twelve
hours' continuous steaming. This is
highly creditable to the shipbuilders,
but since this country is able to build
the best battleships why shouldn't this
country own the best battleships in the
world?
According to the reports of the Unit
ed States fish commission, the lobster
industry is on the decline owing to a
continual decrease in the natural sup
ply. We had not observed any consid
erable decrease in the natural supply
of certain varieties of lobster in this
locality.
Mrs. Martha Foote Crow, dean of the
woman's department at Northwestern
university, has declared against "the
indelicacies of a sorority initiation."
But why shouldn't the college girls
have some parallel barbarity to tli
masculine diversion of hazing?
Pat Crowe has offered to surrender
under certain conditions. When he
contemplates the nerve of the Bulga
rian brigands, he doubtless feels that
he is a "no account" sort of brigand
and a disgrace to the profession.
President Roosevelt seems to have
been somewhat remiss in failing to
express his gratitude to those amiable
newspaper correspondents who have
been outlining his message for him.
The museum of Stuttgart has pre
sented to the American Museum of
Natural History an icthyosaurus quad
ricissus. But there is no occasion to
get frightened it is not alive.
A Wisconsin tramp drank a quart of
whisky and died soon after from its ef
fects. And yet there are people who
insist that whisky is a bad thing to
have around.
At any rate there will be enough tes
timony in the Schley case to go
around.
Tike Valley Forge Movement.
r, I?|j[ creditable to the American peo
[nletttiat monuments and memorial tab
u's, hare been erected on most of the
portant battlefields where American
god was shedyluring the war for in
endence. Th valor displayed at
Stinker Hill, Saratoga, Yorktown and
ilsewhere has been fittingly commemo
rated in granite or in marble. Not un
til a few days ago, however, was a
monument erected on that historic
sground where the Revolutionary sol
diers did not fight the British, but
where they fought against cold, hunger
and disease, suffering greater losses
than in many of the pitched battles in
which they were engaged.
If Washington's little army had not
held together at Valley Forge, there
probably would have been no "crown
ing grace" of Yorktown hence the
Daughters of the Revolution quite
properly selected the anniversary of
the surrender of Cornwallis as the day
for the unveiling of the shaft built
with money raised by them in memory
of the Revolutionary soldiers who died
at Valley Forge during that dreary
winter of 1777-78.
It is hardly creditable to the coun
try that the site of that winter cam
paign, which counted for so much in
the history of the Revolution, should
Jiave been so long neglected.
There is a very general public senti
ment that Valley Forge should be pre
served as a public park. A proposi
tion was advanced in the Pennsylvania
legislature a few years ago to make it
a state park,, but nothing came of it.
Last year a bill was introduced in con
gress to establish a national park at
Valley Forge, but it did not pass. I
is hoped that the erection of this mon
ument may awaken patriotic public in
terest In Pennsylvania and elsewhere
In the movement to preserve this his
toric site.
Hall Calne I Politics.
The campaign of Hall Caine, who is
running for member of the Manx parli
ament In behalf of the town of Ram
say, Isle of Man, will be watched with
interest wherever the works of this
strenuous novelist are read. His plat
form is characteristically radical. First
of all, Mr. Caine wants to nationalize
the steamship service connecting the
Isle of Man with England, running it
without profit.
Then he applies himself to the Manx
steam and street railroads and would
furnish the same radical system to
them. Land must be treated in a some
what simliar manner, the Manx parlia
ment controlling the drainage, cultiva
tion and tree planting. The banks, of
course, are included in this nationaliza
tion scheme, by which Mr. Caine be
lieves that such financial scandals as
occurred in the Isle of Man last year
would be avoided. Mr. Caine points out
that the primary factor in Manx pros
perity is the island's popularity as a
holiday resort and that it must prosper
or decline as it meets the needs of the
visitors.
The injection of so much dynamic
force as that represented by Hall
Caine's personality and works into a
single body as small as the Manx par
liament could hardly fail to be follow
ed by interesting results. The legisla
tive proceedings would themselves take
on something of the character of the
most dramatic of his novels.
A remarkable duel with sabers has
taken place near Leghoi'n between
Lieutenant Rerivera of the artillery
and Signor Ferini. They fought sev
enty-two rounds, and, although actu
ally slashing and thrusting at one an
other for an hour and forty minutes,
they both escaped with slight cuts.
American prizefighters would be
ashamed of themselves if they did not
do better execution than that.
The theft of $74,010 worth of stamps
from the vault of the wholesale depart
ment of the Chicago postofflce is the
largest stamp robbery ever committed
In this country. The crime resembles
in some particulars the recent robbery
of a smelter in California and suggests
considerable familiarity with the prem
ises on the part of the thieves.
There is living in Portland, Me., a
man named Marcus A. Hanna. Th
remarkable thing about it is that he
has never tried to utilize the coinci
dence in name with th at of a distin
guished Ohio statesman as an argu
ment to secure an office.
Secretary Long estimates that $98,-
910,384 will be required for extending
the navy and maintaining it during
the fiscal year 1903, an increase over
last year's naval appropriations of
$21,000,000. Wh not make it an even
hundred million?
Inventors would do well to turn their
attention to the production of a bullet
proof coat for the use of deer and
moose hunters. Five men have been
killed and nearly a score wounded thus
far this season in the Maine woods.
The Anglo-Saxon Review, which cost
$5 a number, is to be given up as a
failure. The great mass of the Anglo
Saxon people will probably be able to
get along without it.
Canada declines to recognize Ameri
can divorces. That's all right. The
Dominion can't be blamed for wanting
to protect borne industry.
31, 1901
i
harmful. WORLD.
l*^l*Mfc"Mt"tt*iti-^t'-*l.*^l^^~~-^
change in the habits of living.
WATER.
^hllilUlfallllllMlilli.iliiuUl.ii^.ui^ti^^
rt
Brakes Needed For
The Middle Aged
tlP'W^|ll"RH|fl|i||fW||^i||f|W|i||i|it &
[S one approaches the middle
milepost in life he must ad
just himself to changing
conditions. must then,
if ever, realize the impor-
tance of elimination. O
EATING LESS AND
BETTER.
sixtie th birthday. Some men by inheritance and others by habits of
life have moved more rapidly than others toward this point. I has
been said that a woman is as old as she looks and a man as old as he
feels, but as a matter of fact both are as old as their arteries. I
other words, the elasticity of their arteries and other parts of their
structures is an expression of their youthfulness.
O general principles one at this time should make no radical
IT 18 A GREAT MISTAKE TO ATTEMPT TO REDUCE RAPIDLY AN
ACCUMULATION OF FAT WHICH IS THE RESULT OF YEARS OF EX-
CE8SIVE EATING AND LACK OF PROPER EXERCISE.
A man of 5 0 should limit his diet to almost half what it was when
was 3 0 or during the growing period. should drink large
quantities of water, for water is the greatest eliminator of accumu-
lating poisons. I you would wish to wash out the earthy materials
which tend toward stiffness and brittleness of the arteries and joints,
use the greatest solvent of earthy salts we havenamely, PURE
A judicious amount of exercise should be indulged in. Excessive
athleticism is always objectionable to the young and the old as well.
Free indulgence in walking out in the open air is excellent. The
city streets will do for this. Horseback riding is good. All of these
should be indulged temperately and the increase gradual.
Temperance in all things is the great essential. Radical abstemi-
ousness either in diet or drink is not called for but I do believe
that as we approach the middle of life the use of alcohol should be
diminished rather than increased, and unless this can be done grace-
fully alcohol should be ruled out altogether.
A man as he approaches middle life needs some stimulant or
nerve bracer. Probably tobacco, judiciously indulged, is the least
BUT IN EXCESS I BELIEVE IT IS MORE DANGEROUS THAN AL-
COHOL BECAUSE IT IS MORE RESPECTABLE AND HARDER TO
AVOID.
I would sum up the essentials along these lines or for this period:
Cultivate temperance in all things, cheerfulnes s, optimism, the ability
to move gracefully along the lines of least resistance, the disposition
to avoid obstruction and friction, the appreciation of fun but not
frivolity, and A N EVER ABIDING LOVE FOR ALL THE
TheAmerican Conscience
IsAll Right-But It'sAsleep
is consoling to know that
notwithstanding our failure
to dischar ge our civic duties
many df the currents of our
national life flow smoothly
on, for the daily and obscure
labors of the vast majority
of our fellow citizens con-
tinue year after year in all
By Dr.
I. N. LOVE
Of
New York
WORKING LESS. I other words, as he ad-.
vances along down the hill of life he should culti-
vate an ability to put on the brakes, be satisfied to
do less work, but, better workindeed O LESS
O EVERYTHING AND TRY O O I
You ask, When is the middle milepost reached
I varies in different individuals. I ranges from the fortieth to the
I By
WAYNE
I M&cVEAGH I
E /Ittorijey
General of trje
United States
the different phases of our national existence.
The laborers themselves have been sowing and
reaping, working steadily at the tasks appointed'
them, taking the sunshine and the rain, mutely
enduring the sufferings and the burdens given them to bear, and
acquitting themselves worthily as good men and women ought to do
at
Daily confronting of the daily task and doing it with patience,
contentment and courage are as true today as ever, while it is also
true that the recompense of such deserving labors, while less propor-
tionately, is actually far greater in all measures, material and spirit-
ua l, than ever befor e, so that after all abatement we may regard the
past with abundant gratitude and the future with absolute confidence,
while on the threshold of the new century it is still true that THE
HAPPIEST O POLITICAL FORTUNES I S O E A N
AMERICAN CITIZEN, and that fortune is sure to grow happier
"with the process of the suns." The present paralysis of our moral
courage, our present cowardly toleration of loathsome corruption and
its kindred evils, which seem to seriously threaten our peaceou
present animal lust for blood, and the general degradation of the
national spirit, will prove to be only temporary evils and will soon
pass away, for THE AMERICAN CONSCIENCE I S NOT DEAD,
BUT SLEEPETH, and, even if we do not, our children will return to
the old ways and the old faith. Let me repeat once more those
inspired words of the first great American: "The nation shall under
God have a new birth of freedom, and government of the people, by
the people and for the people shall not perish from the earth."
i
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