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The Princeton union. [volume] (Princeton, Minn.) 1876-1976, January 30, 1902, Image 4

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THE PRINCETON UNION
By R. C. DUNN.
PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY.
TERMS, $1.00 Per Year in Advance.
$1.25 If Not Paid in Advance.
OFFICE FIRST S EAST OF COURT HOUSE.
Q. I. S1APLES,
Soilness Manager.
GEO. P. WRIGHT,
Editor.
HE Minnesota legislature will con
vene in extra session next Tuesday to
take up the tax bill and consider it.
KING EDWARD in addressing parlia
ment the other day said that the Boer
war "might now be regarded as ap
proaching its conclusion." Well, it is
an awful long conclusion, to say the
least.
ANDREW CARNEGIE in a speech re
cently said that there is nothing that
success and happiness of the working
man so much depends upon as a good
managing wife. And Andrew told the
truth.
HE courts have decided that munic
ipalities have the right to make long
time contracts with private parties
or corporations, notwithstanding the
guardians of the people sometimes
make these contracts at exhorbitant
prices, which in time prove a burden
on the people. The proper thing for
villages and cities to do is to always
make contracts with themselves.
HE following little gem is from the
Youths' Companion and our readers
will have no trouble in recognizing the
"genus philanthropist:" "Dr. Edward
Everett Hale recently described the
philanthropist of thirty years ago as
a man with long hair who did not
know what he was talking about.' The
world now possesses better specimens
of the genus philanthropist, and al
though the species described by Dr.
Hale still survives, it is called by an
other name."
W E have received the first number
of "the Chippeway Herald," published
monthly oy the Indian pupils of the
boarding school at the White Earth
Indian reservation. In its "apology"
it says it is an educational newspaper
devoted to the interests of Indian edu
cation in general, and to the education
of the Indian on the reservation in par
ticular. Indian Agent Michelet pro
moted the publication which ought to
prove of considerable value in further
ing the interests of education, civiliza
tion and citizenship among the Indians
of White Earth and adjoining reserva
tions.
HE price of lumber has reached a
figure where eastern dealers claim
they can buy Canadian lumber and pay
the duty of $2 and do as well, if not
better, than by buying the American
product. The Duluth News-Tribune
says "Pew important sales have been
made in this market for some time,
but two lumber concerns in the United
States alone have bought an aggregate
Of 240,000,000 feet of Canadian lum
ber recently. A Saginaw firm has
bought 140,000,000 feet of Canadian
lumber for delivery there, aad a Bos
ton firm has bought 100,000,000 feet for
delivery at Tonawanda. These two
purchases are equal to one-half the en
tire cut of the Duluth-Superior mills
for a season. A prominent Buffalo
lumber dealer says he would not be
surprised to see 700,000,000 feet of lum
ber go from Canada to those markets
this year.
OBJECTIONS to the primary election
law are being heard in some quarters
already. In small cities where the law
is operative, it is claimed that the pro
visions of the law are impracticable
because the election must be conducted
on strict party lines, while in many
small municipalities city elections are
often held without any division of
party sentiment, the issues being of a
purely local nature. The city clerk of
Ely complains of the law and says:
'City campaigns here have always
been on non-partisan lines, and the
names of the political parties have
never appeared on the tickets. About
5 per cent of the voters are Democrats.
The primary law divides it on political
lines, and the citizens do not know
quite how to go at their election.
Aldermanic candidates, who get $10 a
year if they are elected, object to pay
ing $10 to get on the primary election
ballots." The complaint because of
the fact that the fee of $10 to get on
the primary ballot offsets the emolu
ments of office is a rather poor one, as
a man who would serve on a council
for the salary of $10 a year that might
be in the office, loves the almighty
dollar just a little too much. In some
places they are allowing the law to go
by default, candidates being nominated
by petition, so as to avoid all the need
less machinery of the primary law.
For municipal elections in smaller
cities the law is not the thing*
v.1
N
i the coming decade. I the face of
statistics and the possibilities any pol
icy that will in any way retard the
growth of our foreign trade should be
discouraged. Our foreign trade has
been developing by leaps and bounds.
In 1880 our exports of manufactures
amounted to $102,800,000 and has grown
to $412,100,000, while our exports of
agricultural products has increased
from $685,900,000 in 1880 to $943,000,000
in 1900. Our trade with Asia and
Oceania has increased from $18,500,000
in 1880 to $104,700,000 in 1901, the trade
for the past year including $20,000,000
worth of exports for Hawaii. While
in the last twenty years our trade with
Europe has increased over 75 per cent,
that with North America over 200 per
cent., and with South America 100 per
cent, our trade in Asia and Oceania
has in the same time increased over
500 per cent, and is yet in its infancy.
Statistics show that thirty years ago
Japan's total foreign commerce was
only $30,000,000, or $1 per head of popu
lation. Now it Is $300,000,000, or $7
per head of population. Of this amount
the United States in 1900 received
$52,500,000. Japan has but 40,000,000
people to-day, while China is a coun
try larger than the United States, with
400,000,000 population. In all China
there is less than 500 miles of railroad,
and her annual foreign trade is less
than $250,000,000, or a little over 60
cents per capita. Within the next 25
years China will be gridironed with
raihoads, and many closed ports will
then be treaty ports. China, by force
of circumstances beyond her own con
trol, is undergoing an awakening and
assuming that her foreign trade only
reaches in 25 years $5 per head, it
makes the enormous aggregate of
$2,000,000,000. Our exports to China
in 1900 were less than $50,000,000. Ten
years ago we sold them only $1,000,000
worth of manufactured cotton goods,
while in 1900 we sold them $10,000,000,
a gain of 1,000 per cent. While we
sold China only $6,000,000 worth of
flour in 1900, even that was a gain of
200 per cent, in 10 years.
A writer says: "It does not seem ex
travagant to assume that within 10
years the consumption of flour in China
wilt average 25 pounds per year per in
habitant, which would require $1,600,-
000,000 bushels of wheat. To be even
more moderate, and assume that the
Oriental trade in 10 years calls for only
one bushel of wheat per year per in
habitant, that would increase the de
mand of the world 600,000,000 bushels
add at least 15 cents per bushel to the
value of wheat in the northwest, and
put more than $30,000,000 additional
per annum into the pockets of the
farmers in Minnesota and North Da
kota alone. Some of our officials who
have been stationed in the Orient esti
mate that the foreign trade of China
will aggregate at least $3,000,000,000 in
25 years. It is very modest to assume
that one-third of this trade, or $1,000,-
000,000, will come to the United States,
and at least three-fourths of it will
come to Seattle or other ports on the
Puget Sound".
COMMERCIAL CONQUEST, i to 7,819,107 pouitfe, valued,at over half
It was in 1890 when James G. Blaine a million dollars, and in 1900 17,296,872
was before the senate committee on pounds were shipped, the value of
finance advocating a broaden commerce which was $1,211,259. It is said that
provision in the McKiniey tariff bill in Texas and contiguous territory one
that he smashecThis silk hat by bring- million dollars in Japanese money is
ing his fist down^upon it "while making expended annually for raw cotton.
an argument for a policy that would These figures only indicate the possi
broaden our foreign trade, and it will bilities of this Oriental trade
be remembered that the author of the To meet the rapidly
dw.tul,1I1|g
President McKiniey in that memor- Conn., two steel freight and passenger
of all whoihear,. it an,d read it. Both
of these men have passed away and
history alone will tell whether their sels complete will aggregate fully 28
views on our national commerce were
able speech delivered the day before ships that will be 630 feet in length
he was shot ai still fresh in the minds and each have a gross tonnage of 21
000 tons. The amount of steel re
quired in the construction of these ves
things, point to a still larger growth and capable of generating a speed of
M,~ _,., _,- r_ 14 knots per hour. The magnitude of
The exports of flour from Puget
Sound ports in 1896 amounted to 462,
487 barrels valued at $1,090,935 while f" 7 L*l
In ic.ni 1 i*7 vi' "Pillsbury's Best" or "100 Per Cent
Great Northern road carried across
cific.
meet the rapidly developin They re-quire more pay.
000 tons, including about 4,500,000
right or wrong. Whatever our policy rivets and 40 miles of wire in the in-
and whatever are the conditions under stallation of their electrical equip-
which our foreign trade is being de- ment. Each will be provided with two ever you put them,
veloped, it is a fact that the growth of propelling twin screw engines of the
our foreign trade during the last two very best and most improved design of
decades has been wonderful, and all modern times, and of about 10,000 h. p. 7
the carrying capacity of these mighty
by the mind when it is noted that to
transport a full cargo of these vessels
would require fully 2,500 ordinary rail
way freight and passenger cars, or 125
solid trains of 20 cars each.
Mention is made of thes*1
in 19011,037,58 3 barrelos were*exported
the value of which was $2,965,746.
Prom Puget^ Sound ports last year
$3,566,719 bushels of wheat were HENRY LITTLE., manager of the
shipped. James J. Hill in his recent Pillsbury-Washburn Milling Co., says pointed time for the beer a pail of
speech at Fargo made the statement he believes the interstate commerce water, and no sooner had he appeared
that during the months of September, law and its operation is farcical. He
flour sack, it really begins to look as if
"we are the people."
October and November of last year the says: "The commission is composed of an ale of a time. The act was an insult
eminent men, and I think they are
___ __-___ uuu uu
the continent for export to ttie Orient doing the very best they can, but as and cherished ties and the long add
60,000 bales of cotton, and could not constituted under the existing law, it tangled names of those present. The
deliver any more because of the lack might as well attempt to regulate the perpetrator of the crime was pounced
of boats to transport it across the Pa-, seasons as the traffic problems which upon and badly beaten for his rash act!
The other transcontinental lines concern this country." It'seems that One of MB assailants was named
1
was
can tell a like story, all going to show the law which created the commission Trzebiatowski and when he
how the trade with the Orient is grow- gave it a pair of eyes and endowed it brought into court it is said that they
ing. At the port of San Francisco the with a few reasoning powers, but left had to try him on the instalment plan
exports of raw cotton in 1895 amounted* off its, hands and feetr
9
pK RUM-INATIONS.
S
bill accepted the^rovisibris suggested trade the Great Northern SteamsbiD r A 1.
T3i cauisuip Brainerd has a spear factory. The
by Blaine. The words of the late Co. is having built at New London *v 1 ,1
UOD'
y^ocuger the point and got the factory started
A convict
two ships
to show what one steamship company
alone is doing to get in readiness to
handle the growing trade with the
people across the Pacific. Our trade
with Australia promises to be very
large. Our exports of manufactures
of steel and iron to that country in
creased from $663,259 in 1890 to $2,853,-
641 in 1900. During the same period
the increase in other exports was as
follows: Machinery from $487,22"" to
$2,306,866 leather from $320,766 to
nearly $2,000,000 boots and shoes $136
to $1,174,497 cotton manufactures
$70,265 to $622,228. It must be re
membered that all this growth in
trade has been made in comparatively
a very short time, and with trade con
ditions against us in many" respects.
With the opening of a canal across the
Isthmus of Panama and the construc
tion of large and fast going ships the
trade of this country with Australia
and Asiatic points will develop at a
very rapid rate.
Take our trade with Canada right
here at our very doors. We have de
veloped a big trade with our cousins
across the border, and in competition
with British trade and with a tariff
against us. The total amount of our
exports to Canada in 1890 amounted to
$34,000,000 while in 1900 it amounted to
over $83,000,000. Our exports of iron
and steel manufactures to Canada in
1890 was less than one million dollars,
while in 1900 we sent over ten million
dollars worth of this class of goods.
Ten years ago we sent Canada in a
single year a little over $600,000 in
agricultural machinery, while in 1900
we sent to that country goods of this
character to the amount of oyer $5,-
000,000. Exports of cotton manufac
tures have increased from $204,475 in
1890 to $2,321,763 in 1900. Our trade
with British South Africa has in
creased from $3,252,875 in 1890 to $16,-
269,482 in 1900. In 1890 we sent to
that country $40,000 in flour while in
1900 we sent over $800,000 worth of
flour. The increase in the rum trade
was about the same, indicating that
this great American product goes
right along hand in hand with the
march of trade. The trade in bread
stuffs and provisions increased from
about $110,000 in 1890 to over $3,000,-
000 in 1900.
The wonderful development in the
trade of this country in all parts of the
civilized world only shows that Yankee
ingenuity and enterprise is circling
the globe, and the scope and variety
of our manufactures and the whole
someness of our food products is such
that there is no resisting the temta
tion to use them. When an American
made locomotive can awaken the
echoes of Palestine and the valley of
the Nile, when an American-made
plow can turn the soil of. Africa and
South America, when a Hottentot can
go to an African orgie attired in
irn
Th
8
knoc
a
an
A
levianthans can only be fairly grasped lingering illness. He had not taken a
\Mj
A printer is always a man of letters.
The colored man is always lucky at
sports. He always wins on a fowl.
The employes of the Fox river paper
mills over in Wisconsin are on a strike.
busiqess men of that place all talked to
*uHobson, heJ of Merrima. and merry
smack fame, will retire from the ser
vice anndl entetre If the women
vo
-politics.
coul
Babies are becoming popular as
rawing rooms pets in England. They
are certainly a drawing card where-
a 3
oll
ba-
ter the
mig hd
Missouri peniten-
an
Pta
Dtheed dtm
Wa
S
1
S
Wha
Illinois farmer is dead after a
drink of water for forty years,
about "Golden Grain Belt?"
How
Our lumbermen up in Itasca coupty
are living on moose meat. This is al
together too luxurious a bill of fare for
a lumberman. He is whole log or none.
A Blackduck barber wanted to charge
a colored lawyer from Bemidji the sum
of $5 for a shave as he said he had to
take great chances shaving in the dark.
With the weather a little more on
the winter order the winter tourist
advertisements look a little bit more
attractive. But the price is just the
same.
The water in Lake Erie has been
falling at a rapid rate during the past
four years. If this keeps up the navi
gation Erie will in time be a thing
of the past.
Schwab while in Budapest discov
ered a nephew who was supporting a
wife and family on $5 per week. He
will bring them to this country where
he can trust them better.
The Cambridge correspondent of the
Isanti News says that four editors were
on the Cambridge depot platform all
at one time on a certain day last week.
It was a sort of sanctumonious affair.
The Pere Marquette railroad is talk
ing of buying the "Walker" road as a
feeder. They think with this new
piece of road that they will be able to
give the traveling public and the ship
pers better runs.
Vandiver of the St. Peter Journal put
his "Hot Tamales" in his pocket and
went down to Washington to get navi
gation on the Minnesota river closed,
in the interest of the trapping industry
along that river.
There was a rumor that the Rural
Telephone Co., intended to adopt the
Marconi system of communication be
tween here and Cambridge, but no
such proposition can be entertained
until the latter place erects its water
tower to be used as a receiving station.
St. Louis experienced an earthquake
shock one day last week. That spade
full of Louisiana Purchase dirt must
have disturbed the equilibrium. It is
now in order for the St. Louis papers
to try and make the nervous ones be
lieve it was simply a shock of Kansas
corn.
A lecturer compares Duluth to the
ancient city of Tyre. Is that what the
Zenith city is coming to? No wonder
Charley Towne moved down onto Wall
street. It is to be hoped that Bede
will tak,e a tumble to himself and go
back to the green pastures and still
waters of Pine county.
There was a Polish wedding in the
town of Pike Creek in Morrison county
last week, at which all the "skis" foIr
1
S
1U
w^as mirth and revelry such as only a
Polisu wedding can produce. Now it
is just as essential to have beer at one
of these affairs as it is the bride.
There are three B's in the bonnet of
miles around were present and there friends have been pleased with goods they If
every guest at a Polish wedding, and
they are bride, bridegroom and beer.
But there was one guest present who
thought he would play a joke on the
company by bringing in at the ap-
!i*~
with the ale o" nature than. was
and one calculated to rend asunder old
.U1.UU. uuojr Oilo ww uu.uu.uuwu u\j J. OUU OSUUUC1 U1XI
on account of his
nam~"t- ...-4. v
SMITH E
TH PREMIER
WILL FULLY MEET
YOUR EVERY TYPE
WRITER REQUIRE-
MENT. BUILT RIGHT
WORKS RIGHT.
USED BY THE LEAD
INC MANUFACTURERS
AND MERCHANTS
EVERYWHERE,
BECAUSE THE
MOST ECONOMICA
TO OWN.
PRINTED'MATTERJrREE.*
T/lESMITfl
PREMIER
TYPEWRITER
COMPANY
No. 325 Hennepin Ave. Minneapolis, Mini).
Garfield said:
It is the unexpected that always
happens
You wouldn "ft ait until -\om ne\t birth
day to get voui house insured
So don put off taking out an endowment
policy to a time that may never come
To-day is the time and the
HOME LIFE
OF NEW YO*K,
is the company It latest statement
proves it the most progressive company in
America
For the \eiy best there is in insurance
you must see
GUY EW1NG, Special Agent,
Princeton, Minn.
Room 4 I O O Block
S. LONG
Has built up a splendid business
and earned an enviable reputation
by handling only dependable
SHOES.
AGENTS FOR
WIDOUGLAS SHOES!
BESTIN THE WORLD.
A Friendly Talk
nav
yo,u
PrInceto
til.'
not already ou customers, give us
a trial iare you are pleasedr speak a kind word
to your neighbors, if not, tell us as every
article leaves our store with a guarantee to
please
We have secured the agency for
fo
.there
faou
"Whitret Stam Coffees"s
from Columbus, Ohio,
in one pound packages,
25c" 30Poultryd35c, can
Food"
Pike
A,s,
fo
25c per package.
A full supply of Chicken Grit, Oyster
Shell, Clover-meal, Oil-meal and
Eftood-meal at lowest prices.
AT Tel. 23
WALKERS
NORTHWESTERN HOSPITAL
PRINCETON, MINN. 'Phone 63."
Centrally located Apartments light, well
heated and ventilated Trained nurses in at
tendance Operating room fitted with all mo
dern essentials for up-to-date surgery An in
stitution fully equipped with every appliance
and convenience for the care and treatment of
the Invalid and the Sick, as Electrical Appara
tus, Medical Baths, Massage, Swedish Move
ment, etc.
Contagious diseases not admitted Charges
reasonable and according to needs of patient
HENRY C. COONEY,
Physician and Surgeon-in-Chief.
A. G. ALDRICH, M. D.e
(ESTABLISHED 1899.)
This is a new brick building, fitted in ap
proved style with every necessity for tbe treat
ment of any class of cases
The staff consists of the following medical
gentlemen
Dr. C. W. Bishop,
Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat
Dr. W. Wright,
General Surgery and Gynecology.
Dr. T. L. Armitage,
General Medicine and Diseases of Women
and Children
Terms reasonable For further information
apply to
PETERSON,
Superintendent
Princeton, Minn
PROFESSIONAL CARDS.
O.C.
TARBOX, M. I).,
PHYSICIAN AND STJBGEON.
County Physician of Mille Lacs county
Surgeon of Great Northern E
Office over Jack's Drug Store Telephone 18
Residence Cor Central ave and Oak street
Princeton
r* ROSS CALEY, M. D.
BUSINESS CARDS.
ALIHER & SMITH,
BARBER SHOP & BATH ROOMS.
A fine line of Tobacco and Cigars
Mam Street, Princeton
A. ROSS,
UNDERTAKER.
Coffins and Caskets from the cheapest to the
best grades always on hand
An embalming fluid used which brings dis
colored corpses back to naturar%olor
Also dealer in granite and marble monuments.
Princeton
A C. SMITH,
I WICKLUND,
T. F.
"creased 100o per cent in
We want to talk
youh groceries. aabout
th3 lasbfinesf two years This is good proof that our
bou
i
Ear Nos and Throat.
E
Miss WINIFRED AN LOON, Superintendent
PETERSON'S SANITARIUM,
Min
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON
Office in Pieison Block
Princeton,
J.A.
ROSS,
Min
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
Office in Carew Block,
Main Street. Princeton
1
Mln
Dealer in
FRESH AND SALT MEATS,
Lard, Poultry, Fish and Game in Season
Telephone 51
Princeton Minn.
UNDERTAKER, EMBALMER.
A new and complete assortment of coffins,
and caskets always on hand Bodies prepared
and kept from discoloring and full charge
taken of funeral services, if desired
TillhSr ej nagon trust och tiliverkar
sjelf likkistorna.
Office Mam street, Princeton, Minn
Pianos, Organs.
Having accepted a position with the Metro
politan Music Co of Minneapolis, I am pre
pared to sell pianos or organs on the most
reasonable terms and easy payments I shall
take special pains to get you what you want
Write or call on me at Princeton, Minn
Mrs. Annie Ewing.
NORTONI
Real Estate,
Loans and Insurance.
COVE, MINN.
I have 100 good business lots for sale at this
place at reasonable prices, also lots blocks,
and acres suitable for summei homes on
Murray Beach,
affording a mile of beautiful sandy beach with
fine shady drives through large oak, maple,
birch, and bassTvood timber, on the south
shore of
Beautiful Mille Lacs Lake,
the geographical center of Minnesota and the
future great health and summer resort of the
northwest I also have some fine
Timber and Meadow Lands
in Mille Lacs and adjoining counties, and im
proved lands near to school, church, and store.
The Mille Lacs Country
offers all the advantages of the far frontier in
cheap lands and business opportunities, and
yet we are the very heart of the State
WRITE FOR PRICES.
FROST & CO.'S
Sale Stables
Headquarters for the sale
of all classes of Horses.
Choice Farm Mares a Specialty.
All stock guaranteed as represented.
Telephone 2588
12 Second St. N. Minneapolis, riinn.
DON'T E FOOLEDI
Take the genuine, original
ROCKY MOUNTAIN TEA
Made only by Madison Medl*
cine Co., Madison. Wis.
keeps yon well. Our trade
mark cut on each package.
P^?"'.?* cents. Never ol4
In bulk. Accept no aukatl*
iMATCDiM* tutc. Ack your druggist*

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