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The Princeton union. [volume] (Princeton, Minn.) 1876-1976, March 20, 1902, Image 3

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15
Great Northern Railway.
ST. PAUL, MINNEAPOLIS, PRINCETON
AND SANDSTONE.
Le.St.Paul Ar. Minneapolis
Ar. Elk River
Le. PRINCETON
Mora
GOING BAST. Ex. Sun.
6:00 a. m.
6:50 a.m.
7:25 a.m.
7:53 a.
8:35 a. m.
8:59 a. m.
9:40 a. m.
10.05 a. m.
GOING WEST.
Le. Sandstone
Mora Milaca
PRINCETON.
Ar. Elk River
Le. Anoka
Ar. Minneapolis
Ar. St. Paul
4:45 p-m.
5:10 p. m.
5:35 p. m.
6:10 p. m.
6:52 p. m.
7:20 p. m.
ST. CLOUD TRAINS.
GOING WEST.
Le. Milaca.
Bridgeman
Ar. St. Cloud
GOING EAST.
Le. St. Cloud
Bridgeman Ar, Milaca
These trains connect at St. Cloud with trains
Nos. 1 and 3.
WAY FREIGHT.
GOING EAST.Tuesday, Thursday & Saturday.
Le. Milaca PRINCETON Elk River
Ar. Anoka
GOING WEST.Monday, Wednesday & Friday.
Le. Anoka I 9:40 a.m.
ElkRiver 10:30 a. m.
PRINCETON 112:25 p.m.
Ar. Milaca I 2:00p.m.
11:10 a.m.
12:25 p.m.
2.30 p.m.
4:10 p.
MILLE LACS COUNTY.
TOWN CLERKS.
Bogus BrookHenry Gustalson Princeton
BorgholmJ. Herou Bock
GreenbushR. A. Ross Princeton
Isle HarborOtto A. Haggberg Isle
MilacaOle Larson Milaca
MiloR. N. Atkinson Foreston
PrincetonErnest Sellhorn Princeton
RobbinsWm. Anderson Vineland
South HarborA. E. Peterson Cove
East SideGeo. W. Freer Opstead
OnamiaW. N. Peterson Onamia
PageL. D. Chamberlain Page
VILLAGE RECORDERS.
J. M.Neumann Foreston
J. W. Goulding Princeton
Geo. McClure Milaca
NEIGHBORING TOWNS.
BaldwinL. Berry Princeton
Blue HillThomas E. Brown Princeton
Spencer BrookG. C. Smith. ..Spencer Brook
WyanettJ. A. Krave Wyanett
LivoniaChas. E. Swanson Lake Freemont
PRICES OB1
THE
Princeton Roller Il ls and Elevator.
Wheat, per bushel
Corn, Oate,
50
RETAIL.
Vestal, per sack
Floar, (100 per cent) per sack
Banner, per sack
Ground Peed, per cwt
Coarse Meal, per cwt
Middlings Shorts, per cwt
Bran, per cwt
$1.90
1.80
1.40
1.25 120
95
.90
85
All poods delivered free anvwhere in Princeton.
PRINCETON
Market.Report
Wheat, No. 1. Northern,
Rye, Oats, Hay, Corn, Beans, Ohios, Burbanks,
Rose, Triumphs,
$ 68
47
1 00
65 65 65
FRATERNAL. -:-LODGE
N O. 92, A & A. M.
Regular communications, 2d and 4th
Wednesday of each month.
B. D. GRANT, W. M.
A. CHADBOTJRNE, Sec'y.
PRINCETON LODjGE,
N O. 93, of
Regular meetings every Tuesday eve
8 o'clock.
L. W. PIERSON, C. C.
LARSON, R. & S.
K. O. M.
Tent No. 17.
Regular meetings every Thurs
day evening at 8 o'clock, in the
Maccabee hall. O. PETERSO N, Com
N. M. NELSON. R. K.
Hebron Encampment.
No. 42,1.0. O.F.
Meetings, 2nd and 4th Mondays
at 8 o'clock p. M.
M. C. SATJSSER, C.
D. W. SPAULDrNG, S. W.
Jos. CRAIG. Scribe.
PRINCETON LODGE
N O. 208,1. O O.
Regular meetings every Friday evening at 7:30
o'clock. O. B. NEWTON, N. G.
H. H. BATE S, R. Sec.
PRINCETON CAMP, W A.,
No. 4032.
Regular meetings 1st and 3rd Saturdays of
each month, at 8:00 p. in the hall at Brick
yards. Visiting members cordially invited.
N ED KELLEY, V. C.
J. F. ZIMMERMAN. Clerk.
NOTICE.
Persons holding county orders and warrants
numbered as lollows:
COUNTY REVENUE.
1036, 1037, 1038, 1034, 1040, 1041. 1039, 1044, 1045,
1046, 1047, 1048, 1049, 1042, 1043. 1050, 1051, 1052
1053, 1054, 1055, 1056, 1057. 1058, 1059, 1060, 1061,
1063, 1064, 1062, 1065, 1066, 1067, 1068, 1069, 1070
1071, 1072, 1073, 1074, 1075, 1076, 1077 1078 107
1080, 1081, 1082. 1083, 1084, 1085,4,6,"O5,, 108 1087 1088
1089 1090. 1091, 1092, 1093 1094 1095 1097 1098
22&. ,!&- HS1'1102'.Ue3
"069
690. 911, 1107, 1108, 959, 1110, 907 908, 1124
981, 1126, 1127, 1128, 1130, 1133 1184 1129 1132
838, 929, 818. 1172, 1198, 1199 1195 1155 1156
1157, 1158, 1159, 1160. 1161 1162 1163 1164 1174'
1182. 1183, 1184, 1167, 1168. 1169 1192 1194 1177
1109, 1189, 1193, 1190, 1210, 1150 1151 1152 1219
1188, 1213, 1220, 1173, 1224
COUNTY POOR.
1830,1944.
Will please present to the county treasurer
Princeton, Minn., for payment, as interest on
the above named orders and warrants will
cease thirty days from and after this date.
Dated March 20.1902.
K. H. BURRELL,
County Treasurer, Mllle Lacs Co.
IMPROVED
FARMS
Fine meadows, pastures, timber and
brush lands listed and sold at reason*
able rates. If you wish to sell your farm
call on or address the undersigned, giv
ing price, terms, discription, character
and improvement of same. Intending
buyers will receive complete informa
tion upon application. We can suit
your wants.
Larson*Schmidt
Land Co.
PRINCETON, MINN.
Office in Carew Block.
9:40 a.m.
9:46 a. m.
10:45 a. m.
3:25 p.m.
4:23 p.m.
4:35 p. m.
smp YOUR
Furs, Hides,
Pelts, Wool
TO
McMillan Fur & Wool Co.
MINNEAPOLIS, MINN.
Write for Circular.
Burlington
Compartment
Sleeping Gars
on the, Burlington Lim-
ited, from Minneapolis
and St. Paul to Chicago,
are the most elegant and
comfortable that money
can build.
[email protected]
4 50
50
$1 [email protected] 50
POTATOES ASK YOUR HOME AGENT
TO SEND YOU BY THE
BURLINGT ON
Twenty-Four Bottles of Satisfaction
Otherwise Known as a Case of
HAMM'S
BEER Supplied by Agents Everywhere,
orTHEQ. HAMM BREWING CO..
St Paul, Minn.
If you taste
it for fclje
names sake,
You'll use it
for its
goodness'
sake.
UNCLE
SAHS
wmm
VHISKEY
Its pure
Tha^s sure.
SOLO ANO CUARANTTCO ft*
DEALER* AND DRUO&STS.
tTPAULANB DISTILUMCftAT
MWNIAWU*. KFN7 EMINCHCC. It*.
BALTIMOBtC. a
THE PBINCETOK UNION:
ELECTION ECHOES.
Belated Township Election Returns off
Mllle IA CS County.
EAST SIDE.
Supervisors: Andrew Sehlin, chair
man, T. C. Messorsmith and H. John
Anderson clerk, Geo. W. Freer treas
urer, John Skretting assessor, Peter
Sehlin justice of the peace, Thomas
Page constables, C. P. Hern wall and
Oscar Anderson road overseer, Aug
ust Hagland tax voted, $125 road and
bridge, $125 town. Herd law voted
down No. of votes cast, 18.
ONAMIA.
Supervisors: E. W. Cundy, chair
man, John E. DeMers and A. G. Flock
clerk, W. N. Peterson treasurer, Gust
Johnson assessor, M. E. Olson justice
of the peace, John Smith and Tom
Smithers constable, John Bolster
road overseers, Gust Johnson and John
Lindquist tax voted,$225 No. of votes
cast, 27.
SOUTH HARBOR.
Supervisors: W. A. Wallace, chair
man, S. E. Tilley and James Corwin
clerk, A. E. Peterson treasurer, J. W.
Eynon assessor, G. Wilkes justice of
the peace, Enos Jones constable, John
Sandborg road overseers, G. Wilkes,
U. Smith, Joe Shrain and Fred Leopke
tax voted, $245 No. of votes cast, 44.
ROBBINS.
Supervisors: Herbert Shepherd,
chairman, J. H. Faught and G. A. Or-'
ton clerk, Wm. Anderson treasurer,
A. P. Jorgenson assessor, C. N. Arch
er justice of the peace, C. N. Archei
constable, Matt. Ross road overseers,
J. F. Warren, C. J. Orton and Matt
Ross motion made and carried that
the town board locate and purchase a
suitable place for burial ground tax
voted, five mills No. of votes cast, 37.
MILACA.
Supervisors: C. A. Hess, chairman.
Gust Nojstrom and Fred Ahlquist
clerk, O. E. Larson treasurer, E.
Nelson assessor, Chas. Swanson jus
tice of the peace, J. M. Stowe consta
bles, Barnej Oeffler and O. O. Thornp
son road overseers, Jacob Larson, S
Lindford, Frank Larson and Jim Han
son tax voted, $850 No. of votes cast,
66.
How to Sew -on Buttons.
A button is a knob or ball, fastened
to a garment in such away that it will
go through a button hole or loop, and
hold different parts of a garment to
gether.
They are made of horn, wood, mother
of pearl, etc.
In sewing on buttons, draw the
needle through the material from the
upper side, to conceal the knot under
the button.
A large button should be sewed on a
cloak with a smaller one under it, and
on the wrong side of the garment,
which will prevent the cloth from tear
ing. Each button should have the
same number of holes. The stitching
should never be crossed, but sewed
lengthwise. Place a pin across the
top of the button, then, after sewing it
on securely, remove the pin, which
will loosen the stiches. Then bring
the needle out between the top of the
button and the cloth, and wind the
thread tightly around the stitches four
times. This will allow room for the
button chole. Fasten the thread by
bringing the needle through to the
wrong side, and taking several stitches
under the small button.
In sewing on buttons for other gar
ments, place a pin across the top, and.
after removing it, bring the needle out
between the button and the material,
wind the thread tightly around the
stitches, as in sewing on the cloak but
ton. Bring the needle through to the
wrong side, and fasten by taking sev
eral stitches over each other.
A boot button, or one with a shank
should be sewed on over and over, the
stitches being lengthwise.Mrs. Blair,
instructress in sewing at the Minnesota
domestic school, in the Farm Students
Review.
Toted the Bridge Bonds.
At the election last week the
town of Elk River voted for bonding
the town for $15,000 to erect a bridge
across the Mississippi river, the propo
sition carrying by a vote of 252 to 20.
It is now up to Otsego county across
the river in Wright county to follow
suit and vote bonds to make a sufficient
sum to build the bridge. The cost of
the bridge is estimated at $20,000, ex
clusive of approaches.
Capital Stock Increased.
The Minnesota Midland Electrio Ry.
Co. of Little Falls has been granted
permission by the State railway and
warehouse commission to increase its
capital stock to $300,000. The company
intends to build east to Mille Lacs lake
and will transact a general freight and
passenger business. The company in
tends in the near future to build its
line into the surrounding country trib
utary to Little Falls.
Not E Z.
Princeton has a horse dealer by the
name of Mark. He is E. Mark, but
not an E. Z. Mark.Bemidji Pioneer.
When you wake up with a bad taste
your mouth you may know that you
need a dose of Chamberlain's Stomah
and Liver Tablets. They will cleanse
your stomach, improve your appetite
and make you feel like a new man.a
They are easy to take, being sugar
coated, and pleasant in effect. For
sale by Princeton Drug Co.
Murdered at Nlckerson. t"'
At 3 o'clock on Monday afternoon of
last week Otto Johnson of Milaca was
found lying near the^ railroad track
about a mile south of Nickerson in a
dying condition and died shortly after.
The bodywas picked up and taken to
Nickerson. When picked up he bore
evidences of having been beaten over
the head, his skull being fractured,
and he was found to have been shot
under the chin, the bullet passing up
and lodging in the brain near the left
temple. On his person was found a
watch bearing his name and a few dol
lars were found in his pockets. No
one seemed to be able to identify him.
After the inquest the body was taken
down to Sandstone and held for identi
fication. In the meantime inquiries
were made by some of his friends and
a nephew went up to* Sandstone and
identified the body, which was brought
to Milaca and was buried last Satur
day. Johnson was a married man and
leaves a wife and three children. He
had resided at Milaca for some time,
and was known as a sober and indus
trious fellow who was not likely to get
into trouble. There is a mystery sur
rounding the case and the authorities
are working hard to find the guilty
parties. Some parties are under sus
picion and are being held at Sand
stone.
Helped Themselves to Clothes.
When Louis Fryhling opened his
tailor shop yesterday morning he dis
covered that burglars had entered his
shop during the night and helped
themselves to most of his finished work,
consisting of several pairs of trousers
and two suits of clothes, besides a
jacket belonging to Mrs. J. N. Berg
that with a skirt had .been left to be
pressed. The thieves broke in through
the rear window that was fastened
down with nails. An old piece of iron
had been used to pry the window up
and inside it was an easy matter to
help themselves to the clothes. On
the work table by the window are the
marks of a heel, the nail prints show
ing that the thief wore a good sized
shoe, the heel measuring two and one
half inches in length. Other marks on
the table looked like they were made
by an overshoe or rubber. The thieves
after gaining an entrance to the shop
proceeded to try on the clothes, and
evidently took with them what they
could wear, as some clothes, including
a pair of pants and an overcoat, were
left behind. There is no clew to the
thieves. There was quite a crowd in
town during the evening and among
them some on the tough order, though
there is no means of telling who did
the work. Mr. Fryhling places his
loss at about $75. Mr. Fryhling wishes
to state that he will pay for all goods
belonging to his customers.
Bad Case of Smallpox.
Last Sunday Dr. Tarbox was called
to see Chas. Hoover ill with smallpox
near Freer, and it was found that the
man had about as bad a case of small
pox as one could have. Dr. Tarbox
said is was the worst case of smallpox
he ever saw. Hoover has been work
ing with a crew of several men at
Lantz's mill and caught the disease
from some one in that locality. He is
single and when the doctor found him
he was alone in one of the camps ap
parently left to fight his battle with
the loathsome disease alone and single
handed. He has been sick thirteen
days with the disease and there is no
telling how many have been exposed
to it. The men he was working with
have scattered. The town board of
Greenbush was notified of the case and
quarantined it last Monday. It seems
rather strange that a case of this char
acter.should have been allowed to go so
long without the authorities being
notified.
Sudden Change in the Weather.
From sunny South to the artic re
gions in the space of a few hours beats
flying. This is what we were treated
to last Saturday and Sunday. At noon
Saturday there was the first thunder
storm of the season, with the rumbling
of thunder and vivid lightning. A
hail storm followed and the air turned
chilly. The wind whipped around
from the south to the northwest, and
by supper time there was every appear
ance of a good old fashioned blizzard.
The wind blew a fair gale, and these
conditions lasted over Sunday, when
the weather cleared and the thermome
ter commenced to travel bulbward at a
very rapid rate, so that Monday morn
ing it was ten below with a stiff breeze
as an accompaniment. It was a chilly
St. Patrick's day, to say the least, but
the weather commenced to moderate
in the afternoon.
Entertainment for Farmers.
Last Friday night an entertainment
was given at the opera house in honor
of the visiting farmers. The commit
tee got up a very good program and
some of the members of the institute
corps delivered short addresses. Hon.
T. B. Terry made an address on "The
Wife's Share" showing her worth and
influence on the farm. Henry Van
Dreser's remarks on "Middlin' Good
Eggs" was in a humorous vein and oc
casioned much laughter. B. W. Mc
Keen spoke on "Patriotism" and farm
life environments. C. A. Dickey gave
recitation on "Ruben in the City."
Mrs. Cooney sang a solo and there was
music by the male quartette. There
was a very good attendance.
THERE ARE
NO GOOD
MICROBES
By Dr. CLIAS METCff NIKOFF, Russian Zoologist
and Entomologist
|ETWEEN SIXTY AND SEVENTY DIFFER-
ENT MICROBES INFEST EACH HEALTHY
MAN. A birth man is not inhabited by any
microbes, but immediately afterward the surface
of the skin and the mucous membranes are rapidly
populated. They derive their sustenance from the
air and from the water used to bathe the infant,
developing in summer with much greater swiftness than in winter.
The organs of digestion become the most densely overgrown. Dr.
Muller of Berlin has described more than thirty species of vegetal
life which inhabit the cavities of the mouth. Many of these are
conducted from the mouth into the cavities of the digestive organs
and can be recognized in the stomach and intestines. Fr om the
small intestine the microbes pour into the large intestine, where
they are joined by a large number of new species. Of all parts of
the human body the large intestine is the most abundantly provided
with these organisms, having at least forty different species.
I DO NOT BELIEVE, AS DO SOME SCIENTISTS, THAT CER.
TAIN MICROBES PLAY A USEFUL ROLE IN THE HUMAN CON-
STITUTION. I CONDEMN THEM AL AS BANEFUL.
I may be asked in defense of the microbes why, if they are all
pernicious, they have not been eliminated a long time ago simply
through the operation of the law of natural selection. I is because
THE MAJORITY O ORGANS WHICH GIVE SHELTER
O THE VEGETABLE ORGANISMS ARE THEMSELVES
USELESS I NOT INJURIOUS O THE HEALTH O
THE BODY. For example, the sebaceous follicles of the skin are
the homes of numerous colonies. Now, these follicles have become
valueless to the organs and simply represent a debris of the fleece
which comes from the skin of animals. Similarly, the stomach is
something of a larder for our food and which we could dispense with
without serious consequences. There exist, in fact, at this moment
four people who are living comfortably without stomachs.
Of all parts of the digestive apparatus the small intestine alone
is indispensable to life, and even it is of a length disproportionate to
its function. Instead of having an intestine measuring from six to
seven yards long, man should be content with one-third of that
length. This the successful operations of curtailment prove. As
for the large intestine, it no longer fulfills a useful end, but serves
merely to house numerous harmful microbes.
If man were to be somewhat modified, he would certainly be
more healthy. THE TENDENCY O EVOLUTION O RE-
DUCE AND ATROPHY THESE ORGANS SHOULD E
AIDED MEDICINE AND SURGERY. I brief, we ought
to assist in perfecting ourselves!
Industrial I
Concentration Its Benefits
A LIFE
OF EASE NOT A
HAPPY ONE
By RUSSELL SAGE. Financier
By MARTIN A. KNAPP, Chairman f
the Interstate Commerce Commission
O THIS TIME I SEE N O REASON
WHY THE PRESENT PROSPERITY AY
NOT CONTINUE INDEFINITELY. This
belief I hold mainly because of the dominant place
of the United States in the production and com
merce of the world.
Our ability to undersell competitors in foreign
markets should increase our export trade, and will do so, in my
judgment, if other nations are sufficiently prosperous to maintain
and enlarge their purchasing power.
ON THE WHOLE, I BELIEVE THAT THE CONCENTRATION OF
INDUSTRIES, PERMITTING THE GREATER ECONOMIES OF ASSO-
CIATION, WILL CONSERVE AND STRENGTHEN THE FINANCIAL
BASIS OF OUR DEVELOPMENT.
I expect better returns to the farmer than now, not so much, if
at all, from higher prices as from more profitable results of improved
and less expensive methods of cultivation.
I predict that the selling prices of merchandise and manufactured
articles generally will materially decline because the supply of goods
produced at low cost will increase relatively faster in the next few
years than the consuming demand both at home and abroad.
VERY man has a right to live his own life and
when he has money to spend it as he sees fit. Hav
ing in mind the recent retirement of Mr. William
C. Whitney, I cannot see how a man of talent who
has led an active life and been a factor in great
and diversified business undertakings can suddenly
sever all business connections and really enjoy
himself as much as he had hitherto. Such a man's mind must con-
tinue active, and after his experience I should think it would be
difficult for him not to wish to keep in touch with the changes and
the march of business events. I is hard to overcome habit, and in
success in business lies a very keen pleasure.
A SUCCESSFUL MAN USUALLY STRIVES FOR NEW AND
GREATER SUCCESSES, AND AS THESE COME HIS ENJOYMENT
INCREASES. I AM UNABLE TO THINK OF A LIFE OF ALL EASE
AS A HAPPY LIFE. IT IS A GREAT SATISFACTION TO MAKE
A THING GROW AND WATCH ITS GROWTH.
Every man to his liking. Mine is to sit at my desk and keep
?los to what is going on in the changing world of finance and trade..
Mi"
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