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The Princeton union. [volume] (Princeton, Minn.) 1876-1976, September 04, 1902, Image 6

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CHAPTER VIIIContinued
Nevertheless, conscience was not
be deniedan after many futile be
ginnings, the fateful letter got itself
written, and she went out mail it
at the office. A it happened, the
"Belle Julie" was slowing for a land
in g, and the office was closed. And
since she would by means entrust
the letter the outside mail box,
she waited till the clerk should re
turn.
The doors giving upon the saloon
deck forward were open, and she
stepped out. The crew was grouped
about the uptilted landing-stage, and
he was therethis man for whose
future she was about become an
swerable.
One glimpse of his face, haggard
and woe-begone beyond any imagin
ings of hers, slew her resolve on the
eve of its accomplishment, and she
turned and ran back the state
room, saying over and over to her
self as she fled: "Oh, I can't! I
can't!and yet I must!"
I was noon before she opened her
door again a the luncheon call, and
went aft bring her aunt to the ta
ble. What she had endured in the
interval, none might knowno even
the sympathetic invalid, who more
than once looked askance a the
troubled eyes with their downcast
lids.
A their end of the table, the talk
rippled about the bank robberyan
when Capt. Mayfield mentioned the
fact of the $10,000 reward which had
been offered, Charlotte was moved
to say:
"That seems dreadfully barbarous
to set a price on the head of a hu
man being."
A gentleman across the table took
it up.
"But, Mi ss Farnham, would you
have us turn thief-catchers for the
mere honor of it?"
"For the love of justice, or not a
all she rejoined.
The gentleman demurred and went
into details to prove his position
and the details only served to af
front Charlotte's sense of the fitness
of things.
"Do you mean say that you
would accept the reward, Mr. La
trobe?" she asked.
"Certainly I shouldanyon
would."
She knew the frank admission
stood for public opinion, and went
dumb. She might call the reward
blood-money and refuse to touch it
but only those of her own circ le
would know and belie ve the truth.
And the wretched man himself would
always believe that she had sold him
for a price.
That evening, after dinner, she
sought the captain to ask a ques
tion.
"Do you know the law in Louisiana,
Capt. Mayfield? This man who robbed
the bankwha would his penalty
be?"
I don't know, precisely. Twenty
years in the chain-gang, I should
say."
The "Belle Julie" was pausing a
a small hamlet on the west bank of
the river, and the captain pointed
to a squad of prisoners in chains,
repairing a breach in the levee.
"That's where he'll land when they
catch him," he added. "He'll have
to be pretty tough to outlive Iiis
sentence."
And Charlotte turned away with a
sob at the catching of her breath.
CHAPTER IX.
I any conflict between duty and
inclination it is only the final step
which is irrevocablean in Char
lotte's case this step was the mailing
of her letter. Al through the long
afternoon she had tried vainly to
screw her courage to the sticking
point, and had failed. But when she
went to bed with the thought that
she would surely do it in the morn
ing, she had overlooked the fact that
an outraged conscience fights best
in the night watches.
That was why she had to get a
midnight and dress, and go out to
have the dreadful thing over with be
fore ever sleep would come, if haply
it might come then.
But once again fate intervened.
While she was hurriedly dressing,
the whistle sounded for a landing
and when she reached the office, it
was again closed. A before, she
stepped out on the saloon deck to
wait. The great electric searchlight
just over her head made the landing
as light as day, and when she reached
the rail the landing-stage was just
coming aboard for the departure.
Two men whose duty it was cast
off ran out on the tilting platform
and dropped to the ground. One of
them fell clumsilybu the other ran
up the bank and loosened the moor
ing line. The steamer began
swing off, and the man ran back
his companion, who seemed to be
unable to ris e.
"Get a move on youse!" bellowed
the mate.
Then Charlotte saw that the fallen
man was disabled in some way, and
that the other was trying to lift him.
The mate swore out of a full heart.
"Come aboard, or I'll skin ye alive,
A Knave of Conscience
By FRANCIS LYNDE.
(Copyright, 1900, by FrancU Lynda.)
wmmmm
ye skulkin'"
Charlotte held her breath while it
was doing, and was near crying out
in sheer enthusiasm when it was
done. Then she saw the face of the
chief actor in the red furnace glow
it was the face of the man she was
constrained to denounce.
She turned away at the sight, but
the harsh voice of the mate called
her back. There was trouble afoot
for the rescuer, who was facing the
mate and trying to explain.
It was all over in a moment. Char
lotte saw the mate try to spurn the
disabled negro, and saw the white
man step between. Then the mate's
right arm shot out in a mighty blow
at the peacemaker, who was stand
ing just within the low guard with
his back to the river.
She looked to see him hurled to his
death in the brown flood and what
she did see was scarcely less horrify
ing. The fugitive had stepped aside,
and the mate, carried off his feet by
the impetus of his own blow, stum
bled on the low rail ana dropped in
to the river.
Charlotte saw instantly what would
happen. If the mate were not
drowned outright, the devouring pad
dle wheel would swiftly overtake him
and batter the life out of him. But
what did happen was more astound
ing. Like a flash the man whom the
mate would have sent to the death
which was to be his own sprang
overboard fairly upon the shoulders
of the struggling bully, carrying him
deep under water just as the roaring
wheel was about to engulf him.
All this Charlotte saw and the
rescue of both a few minutes later,
the mate insensible and the other in
the throes of exhaustion and when,
it was over she was fain to go back
to her room, with her letter to Mr.
Galbraith still in her bosom. For
heroism is a law unto itself, and were
a man guilty of a thousand crimes,
the woman does not live who could
give him up to justice on the heels
of such a deed.
CHAPTER X.
When Charlotte had made sure of
the pseudo deck hand's identity in
the forenoon of the second day out
she had thought the assurance un
assailable and had conducted herself
accordingly. But when she awoke
late on the morning following the
brave rescue of the mate, assurance
had departed.
With the admission of the smallest
doubt, she could by no means go on
with her plan of betrayal until the
doubt was removed and, not know
ing what else to do, she went to the
captain to find out if possible all he
knew about the mate's rescuer.
The interview was most unsatisfac
tory. She led up to the subject by
telling the captain the story of the
rescue, and so was privileged to ask a
few questions about the rescuer. Did
the captain know him? And, above
all, did the captain know the day and
hour when the man had joined the
crew?
Capt. Mayfield knew no more than
that the man's name was John Gavitt,
and that he had joined some time dur
ing the day of departure from New
Orleans. He was a sick tramp, work
ing his way home to some small river
town in Iowa.
So the doubt remained unsolved,
after all, and her hands were tied un
less it could be removed. She could
think of no other expedient, save an
interview with the man himself, and
this she knew was impossiblein its
bringing about and in any definite re
sult that could accrue. For if she
could bring herself to question him,
surely he would lie in his own behalf.
And yet it was the impossible
thing that happened. For that even
ing just at dusk, while she was stand
ing on the guard upon which her
stateroom window opened, she heard
a step on the stair leading from the
deck above. A man descended slowly,
and when he came near enough she
recognized him. She let him go until
her opportunity was all but lost
then, plucking courage out of the
heart of desperation, she recalled
him.
"One moment, if you please 1
want to speak to you," she faltered
and he turned obediently and stood
before her.
Followed a pause, surcharged with
the electricity of things ominous. He
was generous enough to come to her
rescue.
"You have something to say
to me?"
"Yes I want to ask you at what
time you joined the crew of the
Belle Julie."
The question did not surprise him,
nor did he attempt to evade "it,
though he knew to what it would
lead.
"Between twelve and one o'clock
the day before yesterday."
"Will you tell me where you wert
at 11 o'clock that day?"
lI
HE LIFTED HIM BODILY.
THE PRINCETON UKION THURSDAY, SEPTEMBERIV 1902.
"Yes, if you ask me."
"I do ask you."
"I was in a certain public building that she had recanted, and to bewail
in New Orleans, as near to you as bis broken ideal.
I am now. Is that sufficiently defi-
nite?"
"It is. I thoughtI had hoped until Cairo was reached, but such was
oh, why did you do it?" she burst the pregnant fact, and to this over-
out.
know what you would say.
was willing to work I was not willing the drama
to beg. I know it was all wrong, from
^nariotte put her fingers in her your point of view, but I should be and two men dropped from its out
ears to shut out the clamor of pro
fanity but the man on the bank
was deaf to it. Running to the
moonng-post, he took a turn of the
line around it, and snubbed the
steamer's bow back to the bank.
Then, casting off, he darted back to
the disabled one, lifted him bodily
to the guard, and climbed aboard
himself.
sorry to think that I did what I be
lieved to be wrong."
"Surely you must know it
wrong."
"No, I don't. If I did, you would
be relieved of what I conceive to be bundle and one of the attackers in
a painful duty. I should surrender hot pursuit, followed immediately by
myself a once." "Ll"
"Then" you are not sorry? I saw great eye of the searchlight over her
you yesterday afternoon, and hoped head swung slowly shoreward, and
you were." ~1~~saw
"I was sorry thenand am now
for the very good reason that I have
lost the money."
"Lost it?" she gasped.
"Yes." And he told her about the
hiding of the treasure and its disap- clasped the manacles upon the wrists
pearance
"Oh, dear!" she said "that makes
it all the harder."
"For you to do what you must?
You mustn't think of that. I
shouldn't have made restitution in
any event."
"Then you know what I must do?"
"Assuredly. I knew it yesterday. It
was merciful in you to reprieve me
even for a few hours, but it was
wrong."
"Wrong!" she burst out. "Is it
generous to say that? Are you so
indifferent that you think everyone
else is indifferent?"
"I know you are not indifferent
you couldn't be. But you must be
true to yourself. Will you go to the
captain now?"
"I thought of doing that at first,"
she began. "It seemed to be what I
ought to do. But when Ir savV what
would happen that I should be
obliged"
"I understand. We must guard
against that. You must not be
dragged into it. But since you can't
go to the captain, what will you do?"
"II wrote a letter to Mr. Gal
braith."
"And you have not yet sent it?"
"No otherwise I shouldn't have
spoken to you."
"To be sure. But now you must re
write it, without signing it, and send
it. I suppose you have described me
so the officers will have no difficulty?"
"Ye-es that is, I tried to. But why
mustn't I sign it? They will pay no
attention to an anonymous letter
and, besides, it seems soso cow
ardly."
"They will telegraph to every river
town within an hour after it reaches
New Orleans you needn't doubt that.
And as for its being cowardly, it is
nothing of the kind. It is your duty
to point me out, and when that is
done your responsibility ceases. There
are plenty of people who can identify
me if I am taken to New Orleans."
"It is very dreadful," she mur
mured "only you don't seem to
realize it at all."
"Don't I? You must remember that
I have been arguing from your point
of view. I shall escape if I can do
it without taking advantage of your
candor."
By this time her fear of him had so
far departed that she asked him vs hat
he would do.
"I shan't try to run away. So far
you have bound me by your frank
ness. When the officers appear, my
parole will be at an end. Is that
fair?"
"It is more than fair. I can't un
derstand."
"Can't understand what?"
"How you can do thishow you
could do what you, did last night, and
yet"
He finished the sentence for her.
"And yet be a robber of banks. I
suppose it is a bit puzzlingfrom
your point of view. But there are
many things indivisible by any rule
of two. May I go now?"
She suffered him, and when he was
gone she went to her room to re
write her letter. She finished it and
hurriedly gave it to the night clerk,
and straightway knew that her peace
of mind was wrecked for the remain
der of the voyage.
Such, indeed, was the fact. After
time enough had elapsed to admit of
the letter reaching New Orleans she
became a coward of lanaings, fear
ing lest she should see him taken.
Nor was Griswold without his
nerve-wrenchings, though as the voy
age grew older he began to take
heart of grace. In the ordinary
course of things, Miss Farnham's let
ter should have reached New Orleans
in time to have procured his arrest
at Greeneville but when the Mis-
issippi town was passed, and many
others farther on, he began tuv fear
had no means of knowing that
her letter had Iain on the clerk's desk
1 -1
"It was the old story of one man's the St. Louis landing,
plenty and another's need."
"But surely"
sight Griswold owed his first sight of
It was at the landing, at the very
end of the long period of suspense,
that Charlotte saw the final act in
"-s- "w 'f wa,o cm wxuxig-, irom *"c ovvm^ stage was poised air,
Th swing stage was poised in air
ward end and dragged the mooring
line to a ring in the levee pavement,
is And then, while she looked, there was
a scuffle of four, a darting away of
one of the Julie's me
wit1h
cnu vvll/ 1 a slua
1
a small
she the prisoner's face and the
?Hnt of metal when the officer hand
cuffed him.
Whereupon her eyes filled and she
saw no more. For, when all was said,
it was she and no other who had
of the man who was on his way to
punishment.
[TO BE CONTINUED.
T. F. NORTON,
Real Estate,
Loans and Insurance.
COVE, MINN.
I have 100 good business lots for sale at this
place at reasonable prices, also lots, blocks,
and acres suitable for summer homes on
Murray Beach
affording a mile of beautiful sandy beach with
fine shady drives through large oak, maple,
birch, and basswood timber, on the south
shore of
Beautiful Mille Lacs Lake,
the geographical center of Minnesota and the
future great health and summer resort of the
northwest. I also have some fine
Timber and Meadow Lands
in Mille Lacs and adjoining counties, and im
proved lands near to school, church, and store.
The Mille Lacs Country
offers all the advantages of the far frontier in
cheap lands and business opportunities, and
yet we are in the very heart of the State.
WRITE FOR PRICES.
CLARd STURMANTank
Tubular Well Contractor
Andfneale
finK Mills and Stock
All kinds of Pumps, Wells and "Wind Mills
repaired. Anything in the well line promptly
attended to. Charges reasonable. Satisfaction
guaranteed. PRINCETON, MINN
Burlington
Reclining CHair Cars
Are in service on all our through
passenger trains. They are the
most roomy and comfortable that
can be built.
The aisles are carpeted.
The chairs are luxuriously
upholstered. Toilet rooms
are provided at each end
of the car. Are lighted by
gas (on the Limited by
electricity), and heated by
steam in cold weather.
A porter is in attendance to care
for the comfort of passengers.
It would seem that you could
travel very comfortable in one
of these cars, would it not?
ASK YOUR HOME AGENT
TO 3IAKE YOUR TICKET
READ BY THIS LINE
TO MHUI
Take Home
Twcnty-Four Bottles of Satisfaction
Otherwise Known as a Case of
HAMM'S
BEER
Supplied by A tents Everywhere,
orTHEQ. HAMft BREWING CO.,
St Paul, Minn.
PROFESSIONAL CARDS.
ROSS CALEY, M. D.f
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON.
Office and Residence over Jack's Drug Store.
Tel.Rural, 35.
Princeton, Minn.
JLVERO L. MCMILLAN,
LA WYER.
Office in Odd Fellows' Building.
Princeton, Minn.
J.A.
ROSS,
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
Office in Carew Block.
Main Street. Princeton.
BUSINESS CARDS.
ALIHER & SMITH,
BARBER SHOP & BATH ROOMS.
A fine line of Tobacco and Cigars.
Main Street. Princeton.
A. ROSS,
UNDERTAKER.
Coffins and Caskets, from the cheapest to the
best grades always on hand.
An embalming fluid used which brings dis
colored corpses back to natural color.
Also dealer in granite and marble monuments,
Princeton Minn
A.
C. SMITH,
Dealer in
FRESH AND SALT MEAl'S,
Lard, Poultry, Fish and Game in Season.
Telephone 51.
Princeton. Minn.
I V. WICKLUND,
UNDERTAKER and EMBALMER
Is always ready to attend, dress and keep
from discoloring acute infectious diseased
bodies until time for funeral.
Coffins and caskets always on hand.
Also a full line of granite and marble monu
ments. Telephone call 52.
Office Main street, Princeton, Minn.
HE HAS CURED THOUSANDS
Given up to Die.
Dr. Rea
Next regular professional visit to
PRINCETON,
Monday, Sept, 29th,
From noon until 6 P.M.. at the
Commercial Hotel.
Returning every month. Consult him while
the opportunity is at hand
DR. REA has no superior in diagnosing and
treating diseases and deiormities. He will
give $50 for any case that he cannot tell the dis
ease and where located in five minutes.
All curable medical and surgical diseases,
acute and chronic catarrh, and special diseases
of the eye. ear, nose and throat, lung disease,
early consumption, bronchitis, bronchial ca
tarrh, constitutional catarrh, dyspepsia, sick
headache, stomach and bowel troubles, rheu
matism neuralgia, sciatica Bright's disease,
diabetes kidney liver, bid elder, prostatic and
female di! ea:es dizziness, nervousness, indi
gestion, obesity, interrupted nutrition, slow
growth in children in all wasting disease in
adults. Many cases of deafness, ringing in the
ears, loss of eyesight, cataract, cross eyes, etc.,
that have been improperly treated or neglected
can be easily restored Deformities, club feet,
curvature of the spine, diseases of the brain,
paralysis, epilepsy, heart' disease, dropsy,
swelling of the limbs, stricture, open sores,
pain in the bones granular enlargements and
all long-standing diseases properly treated.
Young, middle-aged and old, single or married
men and all who suffer from lost manhood,
nervous debility, spermatorrhoea, seminal
losses, sexual decay, failing memory, weak
eyes, stunted development lack of energy, im
povished blood, pimples, impediments to mar
riage: also blood and skm diseases, syphillis.
eruptions hair falling bone pains, swellings,
sore throat ulcers effects of mercury, kidney
and bladder troubles, weak back, burning
urine, passing urine too often, gonorrhea, gleet,
stricture, receive searching treatment, prompt
relief and cure for life.
Cancers, Tumors, Goiter, Fistula, Piles
varicocele and enlarged glands with the sub
cutaneous injection method, absolutely without
pain and without the loss of a drop of blood, is
one of his own discoveries, and is the most
really scientific and certainly sure cure of the
nineteenth century No incurable cases taken.
Consultation to those interested, Si.00.
DR. REA & CO.,
Minneapolis, Minn. Louisville, Ky.
T3h
Great Northern Railway.
ST. PAUL, MINNEAPOLIS, PRINCETON
AND SANDSTONE.
Le. Sandstone
Mora Milaca
PRINCET ON
Elk River
Anoka Minneapolis.
St. Paul
Ar.
PRICES O THE
Princeton Roller Mills and Elevator,
Wheat, per bashel
Corn, Oats,
RETAIL.
Vestal, per sack $2.10
Flour. (100 per cent) per sack 2 00
Banner, per sack 1.55
Ground Feed, per cwt 1 35
Coarse Meal, per cwt 130
Middlings i.io
Shorts, per cwt .95
Bran,per cwt 75
All pood?delivered free anvwherein Princeton.
PRINCETON
Market Report.
Wheat, No. 1. Northern, 59*
Oats, 26
Corn, 50
Rye, 40
Flax, 1.25
Potatoes, ]4
rn^
3 Horrible
Tortures of
Rheumatism can be overcome and
the dreaded disease
expelled from you*
system by the use ol
eosr
ISSATTJ.JOHMSOHS FwSateflDd Guaranteed QaiySy
C. A. JACK, Druggist.
'5?Vf if
GOING EAST. Ex. Sun.
6:11a.m. 7:01 a. m.
7.36 a. m.
8:03 a.
8:45 a. m.
910 a.m.
9:55 a. m.
10.15 a. m.
St. Paul.
Minneapolis.
Anoka
Elk River....
PRINCET ON
Milaca Mora
Sandstone
GOING WEST.
4:45 p- m.
5:10 p- m.
5:49 p. m.
6.10 p. m.
6.48 p. m.
7:20 p. m.
7:54 p. m.
9:10 m.
ST. CLOUD TRAINS.
GOING WEST.
Le. Milaca 9.40 a. m.
Bridgeman 9:47 a.m.
Ar. St. Cloud "j 10.40a.m.
GOING EAST.
Le. St. Cloud 8:00p.m.
Bridgeman 853 p.m.
Ar Milaca 9:00 p. m.
These trains connect at St. Cloud with trains
Nos. 1 and 3.
WAY FREIGHT.
GOING EAST.Tuesday, Thursday & Saturday.
Le. Milaca 11:10 a.m.
PRINCET ON 12-25p. m.
Elk River 2:30 p.m.
Ar. Anoka 5-00p.m.
GOING WEST.Monday, Wednesday & Friday.
Le. Anoka.
Elk River...
PRINCET ON
Ar. Milaca
9:10 a. m.
1030 a. m.
12 05 p. m.
1 25 p. m.
MILLE LACS COUNTY.
TOWN CLERKS.
Bogus BrookHenry Gustafson Princeton
BorgholmJ. Herou Bock
GreenbushR A. Ross Princeton
isle HarborOtto A. Haggberg Isle
MilacaOle Larson Milaca
MiloR. N. Atkinson Foreston
PrincetonErnest Sellhorn Princeton
RobbmsWm. Anderson Vineland
South HarborA. E. Peterson Cove
East SideGeo. W. Freer Opstead
OnamiaW. N. Peterson Onamia
PageJ. M. Huglen Page
VILLAGE RECORDERS.
J. M. Iseumaim Foreston
W. Goulding Princeton
Geo. McClure ..Milaca
NEIGHBORING TOWNS.
BaldwinL. Berry Princeton
Blue HillThomas E. Brown Princeton
Spencer BrookG. C. Smith. ..Spencer Brook
WyanettJ. A. Krave Wyanett
LivoniaChas. E. Swanson Lake Freemont
1
59(2 61
50
FRATERNAL, -:-LODGE
NO. 92, A. F. & A. M.
G.\cj,
Regular communications.2d and 4th
Wednesday of each month.
B. D. GRAN T, W. M.
A. B. CHADBOURNE, Sec'y.
PRINCETON LODGE,
NO. 93, K. of P.
Regular meetings every Tuesday eve
lingnt 8 o'clock.
L. W. PIERSOS. C. C.
J. L. LARSON, K. R. & S.
K. O. T. M.,
Tent No. 17.
Regular meetings every Thurs
day evening at 8 o'clock, in the
Maccabee hall. O. PETERSO N. Com.
N. M. NELSON. R. K.
Hebron Encampment.
No. 42,1.0. O.F.
Meetings, 2nd and 4th Mondays
at 8 o'clock p. M.
M. C. SATJSSEP. C.
D. W. SPAULDING, S. W.
Jos. CRAIG. Scribe.
PRINCETON LODGE
NO. 208, I. O. O. F.
Regular meeting!? everv Friday evening at 7:30
o'clock. A. B. CHADBOURNE. N. G.
L. S. BRIGGS, R. Sec.
PRINCETON CAMP, JU. W. A.,
No. 4032.
Regular meetings 1st and 3rd Saturdays of
each month, at 8:00 p. M.. in the hall at Brick
yards. Visiting members cordially invited.
NED C. KELLEY. V.
J. F. ZIMMERMAN.' Clerk.
Right
Relishable. PRIME
PURE and
PALATABLE
A
Peer
for Cheer.
UNCLE
SArfe
MONOGRAM
WHISKEY
This popular beverage
Pleases the man who
Is seldom satisfied.
SoM by Dealers and OrttfyisU:
Dtu? -Pau! and
DCf| Minneapolis.
&SONS
Distilleries at fJW.
fainence.fyandBaMmm,

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