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The Princeton union. [volume] (Princeton, Minn.) 1876-1976, September 11, 1902, Image 2

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VALUEDAT$1,648,0,33 The Real and Personal Property Val=
uation of Mille Lacs County
Foots Up this Sum.
County Board Increases Realty Val-
uation of County Over $200,000
-=Other Figures.
The assessed valuation of the real
and personal property of Mille Lacs
county as equalized by the county
board amounts to $1,648,033, as against
$1,259,994 a year ago which included
the realty valuation as equalized in
1900. This represents an increase of
$388,039. The realty valuation this
year amounts to $1,275,256, an increase
of $324,187 over that of two years ago,
while the personal property valuation
shows an increase of $63,862 over a year
ago. The county board of equalization
increased the realty valuation of the
county $216,363, while the personal
property was increased almost $6,000.
The realty valuation of Borgholm was
raised over $38,000, while Bogus Brook
was raised $13,000. The township of
Princeton, including the unorganized
towns was increased from $237,236 to
$285,704. The town of Bobbins was
raised over $13,000, while Greenbush
in the equalization was lowered nearly
$5,000.
The value of all land in the county,
other than town 'and city lots, in
cluding structures and improvements,
amounts to $1,056,344. The value of
structures on land, exclusive of town
and city lots, amounts to $81,869. The
value of town and city lots, exclusive
of structures and improvements, makes
a total valuation of $78,708. The value
of structures and improvements on all
town and city lots amounts to $140,204.
The value of all land in the county, ex
clusive of structures and improvements
amounts to $932,489. The value of all
improvements is placed at $41,986.
The average value of land per acre in
the county is $2.74, and including the
improvements the value per acre is
$3.11.
The following table shows the real
and personal property valuations of the
county as equalized by the county board
with comparisons with valuations one
and two years ago: Real Pers'l Real Pers'l
1902 1902 1900 1901
Bogus Brook $85,314 $19,360 $68,817 $18,056
Borgholm 70,621 14,486 41,526 12,220
*EastSide 29,762 2,698 1,512
Foreston Vil. 8.321 5.614 7,247 5,243
tGreenbush 127,566 30,623 124,881 23,194
Isle Harbor 51,238 11,065 35,404 8,939
Milo 107,879 33,139 70,884 22,916
Milaca 70,333 12,213 42,916 8,101
MUaca Vil 56,901 89,389 51,550 73,148
*Onamia 52,304 4,874 4,681
^Princeton 285,704 30,046 249,438 26,020
Princeton Vil 175,160 96,833 161,039 88 668
Robbms 69.849 11.171 74,051 10.674
South Harbor 33,161 5.829 23,326 5.543
$1,275,256 $372,777 $951,079 $308,915
*Ea,st Side and Onamia included with Prince
ton township in 1900. tPage township organ
ized from part ot Greenbush since 1900 iln
cluding unorganized towns.
Bolt the Boodlers.
The power of money in politics is in
creasing.
Money is used to corruptly influence
the ballot. Laws against this debauch
ment are brazenly violated and the vio
lators go unwhipt of justice.
But that isn't all.
Money is used by the lobby. The
third house controls too much legisla
tion.
How shall the people, then, protect
themselves? They cannot stop men
from buying votes. They cannot abol
ish the lobby. There is just one way.
And that way is to strike at the foun
tain head of political corruption.
Bolt the boodlers.
If every honest citizen would swear
a solemn oath never to vote for
a man, whatever his politics may be,
who secures his nomination by corrupt
methods, there would be an end of
these things.
And that is the only way you can
purify politics.
An independent voter is the noblest
work of God.
The man who brags that he has
voted his party ticket from top to bot
tom for twenty years is either a liar or
a fool. Every honest, intelligent voter
has had occasion to scratch his party
ballot. Make a practice of scratching
the man who is nominated by corrupt
methods.
Bolt the boodlers.St. Paul News.
Track-Laying Machine.
A track-laying machine is used in
Pennsylvania which, with a crew of 40
men, puts down two miles a day. It is
a huge crane, 60 feet long, which pro
jects forward over the road, and it
hauls behind it a train of 16 flat, cars
loaded with ties and rails. Both rails
and ties are seized at the proper junc
ture by the machinery and placed on
the road in front of the train, forming
the track over which it passes. The
best thing to build the road to good
health is golden grain belt beer. Get a
case of this pure, delicious and nour
ishing beverage and use it regularly.
Order of the nearest dealer, or be sup
plied by Henry Veidt, Princeton.
Dogs Kill Many Sheep.
Ed. Grass came in'from the town of
Orwell to-day and reports a wholesale
slaughter of sheep on the J. H. Grass
and Col. Brush farms in that town,
two dogs having killed anywhere from
60 to 70 sheep Tuesday and Wednesday
nights.Fergus Falls Journal.
PI
LJ
V4
3
*~"i.r~*u ~i ~i. -\j -\_m^
OBITUARY &
^^0^^^**^^m^^*m^*^^^^^^^
Dennis Kaliher.
Last Sunday night at 11 o'clock Den
nis Kaliher, one of the oldest settlers
in this section, passed away at the age
of eighty-eight years. For some time
he had been in very feeble health, the
result of the infirmities of old age.
With his wife he had been living with
his son Michael, who has been running
the old homestead on which Mr.
Kaliher settled in 1863. The funeral
was held last Tuesday forenoon at 10
o'clock at the Princeton Catholic
church, Rev. Fr. Levings officiating.
It was attended by a large number of
friends and relatives of the family and
the interment was at Oak Knoll ceme
tery.
The pall bearers were all grand child
ren of the deceased, and were Eugene
and Earl, sons of Dennis A. Kaliher,
Charles and Edward, sons of John Ka
liher, Fred Dugan and Arnold, sons of
the daughters, Mrs. Dugan and Mrs.who
Buck.
Dennis Kaliher was born in Cork,
Ireland in 1814. At the age of thirty
years he emigrated to this country and
landed at Boston. He worked for
some time in the cotton mills of Lowell
and later moved by emigrant wagon to
Springfield, Ills., where he remained
some time and then moved to Indiana.
In 1858 he moved to Minnesota, locat
ing for a time at Elk River, and in the
year 1863 he took up a homestead in
the township of Blue Hill on which
farm he resided until his death. In
1858 he was married to Julia Dannahy.
Nine children were born to them, six
of whom are now living. Three of the
children died in infancy. The chil
dren now living are John, Dennis A.,
Michael and William, and two daugh
ters, Mrs. James Dugan and Mrs. O.
H. Buck. There are thirty-five grand
children and eight great grand chil
dren living. The eight great grand
children are the grand children of
John Kaliher, who married one of the
daughters of Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Chad
bourne, who are the great grand par
ents on the Chadbourne side of the,
family.
The wife of Dennis Kaliher survives
him. Time was most indulgent and
considerate with this aged couple who
lived together fifty-four long years and
reared a family of good sturdy children
who with their children and children's
children live near to the old home
stead.
Mr. Kaliher was a type of those hon
est, enterprising and sturdy emigrants
who came to this country years ago,
penniless and with no resources nor
learning other than what-Nature had
bestowed upon them. It was these
early pioneers who joined with the
people of New England and the east
ern states and moved into the rich em
pire of the west where they settled
and made homes of their own and be
came industrious citizens, and in so
doing aided in building up and deT
veloping a great country that they
have had reason to be proud of.
Dennis Kaliher lived a long and
useful life of hard and honest toil.
He was blessed with a large family
that grew up around him whose suc
cess in life he beheld with much pleas
ure in his later years, for their suc
cess was but a reflection of his own.
He had learned his lessons in the
school of experience and profited
thereby. With hard and patient toil
came many blessings. Truly there
was for him no cause for complaint.
He had lived long and journeyed far
across the plains of this life into the
valley of Old Age where life and death
so often seem to touch unconsciously.
Frederick Paul.
Last Monday night Frederick Paul,
an old resident of this section, died sud
denly at the home ofbis daughter,
Mrs. Fritz Kunkel. Mr. Paul had been
living with his daughter. Monday he
was at work as usual and herded cattle
during the day. He retired at night
feeling as well as usual, and was taken
with cramps at midnight and died in a
short time. Deceased was about sixty
five years of age, and came to America
about forty years ago. He has several
children living. He was married twice,
both wives being dead. The funeral
was held this afternoon at the German
Lutheran church of Princeton, Rev.
Stamm officiating^
The side walk along the north side
of the property where A. N. Lenertz
lives is very much on the bum. There
are many broken plank in the walk
and in its present condition the walk
is unsafe for pedestrians and should be
fixed at once, or the village may have
a damage suit on its hands. How nice
such a walk as this will look with our
new deDt a short distance away. This
is not the only piece of bad walk in
town. The village council should hold
a side walk session.
Half Rate Excursions
Great Northern Railway
Good Roads Convention
St. Cloud, Minn., Sept. nth and 12th.
For the above Convention the Great
Northern Railway will sell half-rate
Excursion tickets from Princeton
St. Cloud and return, good going
tember 10th, 11th and 12th good
turning until Sept. 13th.
AAA. Sunday and Weekday
Announcements.
METHODIST.
Topics for next Sunday: Morning,
"The Bible Study for Our Day even
ing, "My Punishment Greater than I
Can Bear,"the words of Cain.
Rev. Gratz met with the young peo
ple of the church after service last Sun
day night to discuss plans for bible
study the coming winter. The mem
bers of the Epworth league will meet
weekly with Rev. Gratz for systematic
bible study. It is the intention to have
some literary diversion along with the
course of bible study
CONGREGATIONAL,.
The forty-seventh annual convention
of the State general Congregational
association will be held at Fergus Falls
September 17,18 and 19.
Owing to the absence of the pastor
is away on his vacation, there will
be no services morning or evening.
Sunday school and Christian Endeavor
at usual hours.
SPIRITUALISTS.
Mrs. C. Tryon will speak at Farn
ham's hall next Sunday on "Notes
from the Convention."
To the Voters of Sherburne County:
Being unable to see a great many of
you before the coming primary elec
tion next Tuesday, kindly allow me at
this time, through these columns, a
few words, personally, to you.
I am a native of the "Green Moun
tain State," a "Vermont Yankee."
My first vote was given to Lincoln,
when I was serving as a soldier the
last two years of the civil war, and I
have always voted the Republican
ticket.
Since coming to Minnesota from my
native state, about twelve years ago,
I have lived in Sherburne county, and
since I have been holding an office in
this county most of you know my
record as a citizen and official.
It would be presumptive on my part
to assert any claim over my opponents
to the office I seek, nor do I presume
to say that I am in any sense perfeot
or that I have unwittingly made no
mistakes. Nevertheless, I have tried
to serve you all alike fairly and faith
fully, to the best of my ability, and
should I receive a re-election shall con
tinue to do the same or better if I can.
I appreciate the kind support you
have given me in the past, and I shall
always be grateful to you for the
honors conferred.
Now I am willing to leave the mat
ter with you, to say by your votes next
Tuesday, whether I shall again be your
candidate as county treasurer or not.
I am very sincerely yours,
H. C. HASTINGS.
Elk River, Minn., Sept. 10, 1902.
THE PRIKCETOfr UyiOK: THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 1902.
_-
Church Topics a* %&
Ladies!-
Don't buy your spring and sum
mer goods, silks, shirt waists,
separate skirts, etc., until you
have examined our line.
Gentlemen!
Call and see our line of hats,
mackintoshes and rain coats.
Save Your Money
by buying dry goods, and gro
ceries from
ER. D. BYERS.t
Dr. C. F. Walker's
Dental Parlors
now located
I in the
Oddfellow's new building,
where Dr. Walker
will attend
to his I
Princeton
appointments
from the
1st to 20th I
of each
month.
la Cambridge
aist to 28th
of each month,
office over
Qouldberg &
Anderson's
store.
to
Sep
re-
MMMM
.W,\'^H
1 BERG'S
BARGAINS
Choice patterns in
Prints, Percales
and Ginghams
Very pretty designs and goods
of the best wearing quality,
Gents Hats
New stock, latest styles.
Stylish and Up-to-Date.
Our Grocery
Department
Includes a fine line, both staple
and fancy. Look over our stock.
John N. Berg.
Princeton, Minn.
Pianos
An Organs
Any style or grade.
Old instruments taken in part payment.
Time given to suit purchasers.
Call and see new Pianos
and Organs now on hand.
Room 4,2nd Floor. I. O. O. Block.
Mrs. Guy Ewing,
Princeton, Minn.
HE HAS CURED THOUSANDS
Given up to Die.
Dr Re a
Next regular professional visit to
PRINCETON,
Monday, Sept. 29th,
From noon until 6 P. M., at the
Commercial Hotel.
Returning every month. Consult him while
the opportunity is at hand.
DR. REA has no superior in diagnosing and
treating diseases and detormities. He will
give S50 for any case that he cannot tell the dis
ease and where located in five minutes.
All curable medical and surgical diseases,
acute and chronic catarrh, and special diseases
of the eye, ear, nose and throat, lung disease,
early consumption, bronchitis, bronchial ca
tarrh, constitutional catarrh, dyspepsia, sick
headache, stomach and bowel troubles, rheu
matism, neuralgia, sciatica, Bright's disease,
diabetes, kidney, liver, bladder, prostatic and
female diseases, dizziness, nervousness, indi
gestion, obesity, interrupted nutrition, slow
growth in children, and all wasting disease in
adults. Many cases of deafness, ringing in the
ears, loss of eyesight, cataract, cross eyes, etc.,
that have been improperly treated or neglected
can be easily restored. Deformities, club feet,
curvature of the spine, diseases of the brain,
paralysis, epilepsy, heart, disease, dropsy,
swelling of the limbs, stricture, open sores,
pain in the bones, granular enlargements and
all long-standing diseases, properly treated.
Young, middle-aged and old, single or married
men and all who suffer from lost manhood,
nervous debility, spermatorrhoea, seminal
losses, sexual decay, failing memory, weak
eyes, stunted development, lack of energy, im
povlshed blood, pimples, impediments to mar
riage also blood and skin diseases, syphillis,
eruptions, hair falling, bone pains, swellings,
sore throat, ulcers, effects of mercury, kidney
and bladder troubles, weak back, burning
urine, passing urine too often, gonorrhea, gleet,
stricture, receive searching treatment, prompt
relief and cure for life.
Cancers, Tumors, Ooiter, Fistula. Piles
varicocele and enlarged glands with the sub
cutaneous injection method, absolutely without
pain and without the loss of a drop of blood, is
one of his own discoveries, and is the most
really scientific and certainly sure cure of the
nineteenth century. No incurable cases taken.
Consultation to those interested, $1.00.
DR. REA & CO.,
Minneapolis, Minn. Louisville, Ky.
NORTHWESTERN HOSPITAL
PRINCETON, MINN.
Long Distance 'Phone 313.
Centrally located. All the comforts of home
life. Unexcelled service. Equipped with every
modern convenience for the treatment and the
cure of the sick and the invalid. All forms of
Electrical Treatment. Medical Baths, Massage,
x-ray Laboratory, Trained Nurses in attend
ance. Special advantages obtained in this in
stitution for the treatment of chronic diseases
ana diseases of women, eitner medical or sur
gical, and for the legitimate care of confine
ment cases.
Open to the profession. Any physicia in
good standingj caJn&
-L
th
non-contagiousn dis
bringn patients here and at-
imBe
eases admitted. Charges reasonable.
MISS. MARY SHORTELL,
Superintendent.
HENRY COONEY,
Medical Director.
A ALDRICH,
Eye. Ear, Nose and Throat Specialist
That's All Right.
"Your trousers made by
L. Fryhling? That's all
right."
This query and response are fre
quently made. They fit and so do
the trousers.
It is worth while paying for our
work. You get style and workman
ship here, and thus you are assured
of satisfaction.
L. Fryhling',
THE TAILOR.
NEW
Merchandise
I have received a new stock of
Fall and Winter goods. Can
supply your wants in
Trousers,
Jackets, Duck Coats,
Gloves,
Mittens, Hosiery,
Underwear,
Etc., Etc.
In quality and variety my
stock of Underwear will match
any in town, and as to prices I
assure you I am on the
Ground Floor.
A. N. LENERTZ.
S. LONG
Has built up a splendid business
and earned an enviable reputation
by handling only dependable
SHOES.
AGENTS FOR
W.L.DOUGLAS SHOES
BEST IN THE WORLD.
Great Northern Railway.
ST. PAUL, MINNEAPOLIS, PRINCETON
AND SANDSTONE.
Le. Sandstone
Mora Milaca
PRINCETON..
Elk River
Anoka Minneapolis
St. Paul
GOING EASiT.
St. Paul.
Minneapolis.
Anoka
Elk River.
PRINCETON
Milaca Mora
Sandstone
GOING WEST.
Ar.
PRICES O E
Princeton Roller HillsT ail Eleyator.
Wheat, No. 1 Northern,
Wheat, No. 2 Northern,
Uorn, Oats.
RETAIL.
Vestal, per sack 3 82.05
Flour, (100 per cent) per sack 1 95
Banner, per sack 1.55
Ground Feed, per cwt 1.20
Coarse Meal, per cwt 1.20
Middlings .95
Shorts, per cwt 85
Bran, per cwt .75
All poods delivered free anywhere in Princeton.
PRINCETON
Marketjteport.
Wheat, No. 1. Northern, 60
Wheat, No. 2 Northern. 58
Oats, 28
Corn, 50
Rye, 40
Flax, 1.25
Potatoes, [email protected]
FRATERNAL LODGE
Si NO. 92, A. & A. M.
Regular communications,2d and 4th
Wednesday of each month.
B. D. GRAN T, W. M.
A. B. CHADBOURNE, Sec'y.
PRINCETON LODGE,
NO. 93, K. of P.
Regular meetings every Tuesday eve
8 o'clock.
L. W. PIERSO N, C.
LARSON, K. R. & S.
K. O. T. M.,
Tent No. 17.
Regular meetings every Thurs
day evening at 8 o'clock, in the
Maccabee hall. O. PETERSON, Com.
N. M. NELSON. R. K.
Hebron Encampment.
No.42,I.OO.F.
Meetings, 2nd and 4th Mondays
at 8 o'clock P. M.
M. C. SAUSSER, C. P.
D. W. SPATJLDING, S. W.
Jos. CRAIG, Scribe.
PRINCETON LODGE
NO. 208,1. O. O.F
Regular meetings every Friday evening at 7:30
o'clock. A. B. CHADBOURNE, N. G.
L. S. BRIGGS, R. Sec.
PRINCETON CAMP, M. W. A.,
No. 4032.
Regular meetings 1st and 3rd Saturdays of
each month, at 8:00 p. M in the hall at Brick
yards. Visiting members cordially invited.
NED C. KELLET, V. C.
J. F. ZIMMERMAN. Clerk.
A reliable every day
drinking whiskey,
honestly meritorious
and always of
standard excellence
UNCLE
SAMS
MONOGRAM
WHISKEY
5old b% Dealers and Dru$#sfcs.
BENZ Oatiffenes at
t, SONST^ Emmcnce.Ky and
Baltimore lid
V\
4 45 p. m.
5 10 p. m.
5*49 p. m.
6 10 p. m.
6 48 p. m.
7-20 m.
7:54 p. m.
9.10 p.m.
ST. CLOUD TRAINS.
GOING WEST.
Le. Milaca 9:40a.m.
Bridgeman 9:47 a.m.
Ar. St. Cloud 10-40a.m.
GOING EAST.
Le. St.Cloud 8'00p.m.
Bridgeman 8:53p.m.
Ar Milaca 9:00p.m.
These trains connect at St. Cloud with trains
Nos. 1 and 3
WAY FREIGHT.
GOING EAST.Tuesday, Thursday & Saturday.
Le Milaca 111:10a.m.
PRINCET ON
Elk River
Ar. Anoka
"I
12-25 p.m.
2-30 p.m.
I 5 00 p.
GOING WEST.Monday, Wednesday & Friday.
Le. Anoka
Elk River..
PRINCET ON
Ar. Milaca
9-10 a. m.
10 30 a. m.
12:05 p. m.
1-25 p.m.
MILLE LACS COUNTY.
TOWN CLERKS.
Bogus BrookHenry Gustaf son Princeton
BorgholmJ. Herou Bock
GreenbushR. A. Ross Princeton
Isle HarborOtto A. Haggberg Isle
MilacaOle Larson Milaca
MiloR. N. Atkinson Foreston
PrincetonErnest Sellhorn Princeton
RobbinsWm. Anderson Vineland
South HarborA. E. Peterson Cove
East SideGeo. W. Freer Opstead
OnamiaW. N. Peterson Onamia
PageJ. M. Huglen page
VILLAGE RECORDERS.
J. M. Neumann Foreston
W. Gouldmg Princeton
Geo. McClure Milaca
NEIGHBORING TOWNS.
BaldwinL. Berry Princeton
Blue HillThomas E. Brown Princeton
Spencer BrookG. C. Smith. ..Spencer Brook
WyanettJ. A. Krave Wyanett
LivoniaChas. E. Swanson Lake Freemont
/*M
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