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The Princeton union. [volume] (Princeton, Minn.) 1876-1976, October 16, 1902, Image 8

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016758/1902-10-16/ed-1/seq-8/

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NOT ACCEPTABLE
INDICATIONS ARE THAT OPERA
i
TORS' PLAN WILL HAVE TO
TO BE MODIFIED.
TATEMENT BY MITCHELL
fcLAIMS HE CANNOT STATE AT-
i TITUDE OF WINERS AT
PRESENT TIME.
IEONY JJIFFE&ENT
THE TERMS, WHILE OTHERS
OPPOSE IDEA.
Wilkesbarre, Pa., Oct. 15.From a
thorough, canvass of the situation as
it exists now there is every indication
for believing that the new arbitration
Jplan proposed by the presidents of
the coal companies for ending the
miners' strike will not be accepted in
Its present form. There is a division
of opinion among the strikers, but
there is no doubt that a majority feel
that the offer to have the president
of the United States select an arbitra
tion commission along the lines sug
gested by the operators is not fair,
and that it unduly limits the president
in naming the board. The miners, it
is safe to say, will abide by the ad
vice of their national president,
whose judgment they have the utmost
confidence President Mitchell de
clines to say how he personally looks
upon the proposition, but he gave to
the press the following statement:
Mr. Mitchell's Statement.
"I fully appreciate with what anx
iety the people of the country are
awaiting the end of the coal strike.
The coal operators have not addressed
the miners' union or its officers in
making their public statement. It is,
therefore, impossible for me to state
the attitude of the miners at this
time. I am now, as I have always
been, deeply solicitous of the inter
ests of the public and the welfare of
the mine workers who have been on
strike for the past five months. A for
mal statement defining our position
and intentions will be issued just as
soon as we are posssesion of the
full meaning of the proposition of the
Qperators."
Refused to Answer Questions.
This statement was made by him
at 8 m, alter a silence lastSg all
day. He had no intention of making
it until the correspondents represent
ing newspapers all over the country
called on him in a body and informed
him that the general public desired to
have an answer to the proposition of
the operators. After giving it he was
asked many questions regarding ths
attitude of the men and the probabil
ity of the acceptance or rejection of
the new offer, but he had no reply to
make to any of these questions. He
denied that he had any 'knowledge of
what the new offer of the operators
was until it became public property
and also denied that he was tele
phonic communication with President
Roosevelt. His attention was called
to the fact that most of the informa
tion from Washington indicated that
the pioposition would be accepted and
that the strike was near an end, but
he sternly maintained that neither his
officers nor the rank and file of the
men had done anything to cause such
an impression to go out
District Presidents Silent.
The district presidents also maintain
silence as to their personal opinion on
the proposition excepting President
Fahy, who, after he arrived from Bos
ton, gave an inkling as to how he view
ed the new turn ot affairs. In reply to
a question he said:
"The strike cannot be settled with
out the consent of the men. We are
not dealing gold bricks of any kind,
and you can make any deduction from
that you want."
There will be a conference during
the day between Mr. Mitchell, the
three district presidents and Secretary
Treasurer Wilson, who will arrive
here It is fully expected that the sen
timent of all the strikers will be
known befoie night and that action
will be taken accordingly There is
talk of a convention being called, but
there is nothing definite on which to
base this talk. When Mr. Mitchell
was asked if he and the district offi
cers had power to end the strike he
said that it is the rule of the organ
ization that no settlement can be made
by the officers of the union without
the consent of a delegate convention.
It is practically certain that Mr. Mitch
ell's voice will be followed in the con
ference. While he has not said a
word as to what he will do, it is free
ly predicted by those who understand
the situation that he will advise a re
fusal of the proposition.
Viewed in Different Lights.
The rank and file of the miners view
the new proposals in different lights
and make strong arguments according
to their views. Those who are op
posed to accenting the new offer look
ppon the -operators' last move as a
jrounter-proposition to Mr. Mitchell's
offer to arbitrate made in the tempor
ary White House at Washington. They
compare the two offers and pick out
(what they allege to be many flaws
^Their greatest objection to it is that
jthe operators dictate to the president
,from what class of men he shall se
ilect the arbitrators and charge the
loperators with lack of faith in the
[president when they do not give him
la free hand to pick the men he wants
Another objection to it is that the
^1
VIEWS
SOME MEN FAVOR ACCEPTING
president is limited to four men in
Selecting the jurist on the commission.
Neither are they sure, they say, that
labor would be represented, because
the proposal does not speficially say
so, but add that they have no assur
ance thtt "a man of prominence, emi
nent as a sociologist" would cover
this objection.
Many Favor Proposition.
A great many of the strikers think
the proposition should be accepted
and that the miners should trust to
President Roosevelt to do the best un
der the conditions laid down by the
coal road presidents. An argument
was made by one miner that Mr. Mitch
ell could "hot well afford to turn down
the proposition after already offering
to permit the president to select the
members of the commission. He
thought the president would appreci
ate the trust put in him and see that
the miners had fair play. Others in
the same class thought that not much
harm w6uld be done by accepting the
proposition, but that in the end much
good will result.
There is still a third view held by
miners and that is to refuse to accept
the plan offered and make a counter
proposition embodying some of the
suggestions contained in the operators'
offer. One proposition suggested was
that the operators, the miners and the
president each select a number of
men to act as a board. This was men
tioned to President Mitchell, but he
would make no comment on it.
INSULT TO ROOSEVELT.
How Mr. Gompers Views Operators'
Proposition.
Washington, Oct. 15. President
Gompers of the American Federation
of Labor, with whom Mr. Mitchell has
been in constant communication and
consultation, declined all requests of
newspapers for an expression of opin
ion on the proposition of the coal oper
ators, but during the night stated his
views to the Associated Press. Mr
Gompers said:
"You can readily understand that I
want to leave the whole matter in the
hands of Mr. Mitchell and his col
leagues. I am particularly anxious not
to say anything that might be con
strued otherwise. I will say that in
my opinion the proposition made by
the operators, at least so far as their
designation of who should be invited
to go on the commission or arbitration
is concerned, is an insult to the presi
dent of the United States. I desire that
the president should use his discretion
in the selection of the personnel of the
commission By indirection it would
seem from the operators' proposition
that the president has evil designs on
the mine owners. No one believes this,
The operators indicate what class of
men should be selected for the per
sonnel of the commission.
"For instance, they say that an ex
pert mining engineer experienced in
the mining of coal and other minerals
and not in any way connected with
coal mining properties, shall be one of
the members. In other words, this one
must be an expert miner out of a job.
One Must Be an Operator.
This member must either have been
employed in the mines as an expert or
must expect or hope to be employed in
the future. Another must be an emi
nent sociologist. Well, who? Must
he be a speculative sociologist, a theo
rist or what? Another member is to
be some man actively participating in
the mining and selling of coal and fa
miliar with the commercial value as
well as the physical part of the busi
ness. This must certainly be one of
the operators or one of their repre
sentatives. No other man familiar
with the commercial features of the
business in those fields fits that de
scription.
"In the classes of persons from
whom the mine owners prescribe tho
commission shall be selected there is
to be not a single representative of the
man who digs coal, the man who works
in and about the mine.
"Now, as a matter of fact, the'entire
question of selection and appointment
of a commission should be left to the
president of the United States Mr.
Mitchell has said that he will be per
fectly satisfied with whomever the
president selects. If the mine owners
are to be permitted to suggest who
shall constitute the arbitration com
mission, why in all fairness should it
not follow that Mr. Mitchell should
likewise be permitted to make sug
gestions as to the personnel of the
commission? i hope that the president
will decline a act on this proposition
of the mine owners unless he is given
a free hand."
Two names suggested for members
of the commission of arbitration are
Carroll D. Wright, the commissioner
of labor, and E. W. Parker, statistician
of the United States geological sur
vey.
HAVE ANOTHER PLAN.
Operators Will Consider That of Man
ufacturers' Committee.
New York, Oct. 15.The regular
weekly meeting of the coal operators
was preceded by a conference with a
committee of the National Associa
tion of Manufacturers and at the con
ference the salient points of a plan
to settle the anthracite coal strike
were submitted to the manufacturers.
The operators will consider the plan
while the mine workers are reaching
a conclusion in regard to the proposal
of the arbitration submitted to Presi
dent Roosevelt at Washington* A
member of the manufacturers' com
mittee said that he knew the associa
tion's plan would be acceptable to Mr.
Mitchell. The same member of the
committee said that the manufactur
ers' plan would be considered by the
operators if the mine workers reject
the plan submitted to the president.
The operators began their meeting
Immediately after the conference with
the manufacturers and at the close of
the meeting President Baer of the
Heading said that no statement would
be given out regarding it.
Haitian Troops Busy.
Port au Prince, Oct. 15.Troops of
the provisional government now oc
cupy Verettes and are menacing St.
Marc. Mohtrouis lias been evacuated
by the revolutionists. The United
States cruiser Cincinnati has arrived
here from Cape Haitien.
Men Prefer That to Proposal ofth
Operators.
Wilkesbarre, Oct. 15.Strike head
quarters presented an animated scene
all day and evening. The news of the
operators' proposal to arbitrate spread
through the region quickly, and a
crowd soon gathered and lingered
around the hotel all day. President
Mitchell had many visitors who called
to get the news. In the early hours
the situation appeared mixed, but to
ward noon reports came in from out
lying ^districts to the effect that many
men looked unfavorably upon the op
erators' proposition, which gave an in
dication of what might be expected.
This was a damper on the enthusiasm
of the citizens generally, who thought
they saw a ray of hope for the end
ing of the strike. As an indication of
how some of the men felt, a local
leader, who was among the strikers
in the outskirts of the city, came into
headquarters and quoted the men as
saying that they would rather go down
to a straight defeat than to surrender
to the employers on the conditions
they propose.
REACHES SUPREME COURT.
Status of Silver to Be Defined by the
United States Tribunal.
Washington, Oct. 15.An important
case which raises the question of the
constitutionality of the legal tender
provisions of the Bland-Allison act of
1878 was submitted without argument
in the United States supreme court
during the day. The case originated
in Michigan in 1897. Stephen Baldwin
was indebted to Fred A. Baker to the
extent of $364 and in payment tender
ed 364 silver dollars. Baker refused
to accept the silver, alleging that it
was not legal^oney. Baldwin brought
suit in the state courts of Michigan
to compel acceptance and those courts
sustained him. Baker brought the
suit to the supreme court on a writ
of error.
WILL LOSE MILLIONS.
New York Fruit Growers in Urgent
Need of Coal.
Rochester, N. Y., Oct. 15.Michael
Doyle, representing the Fruit Growers'
association of New York, has tele
graphed to Governor Odell that unless
an immediate supply of anthracite'
coal can be obtained fruit growers in
Western New York will lose at least
$3,000,000. Hundreds of thousands of
bushels of apples are now rotting in
orchards and the evaporating industry
is at a standstill. Memorial to Gladstone.
London, Qct. 15. The library at
Hawarden erected as a national memo
rial to the late William E. Gladstone,
and which cost $50,000, was opened by
Earl Spencer during the day. The
building contains the deceased states
man's valuable collection of books.
Crowds of visitors attended the cere
monies. Among the speakers who
paid tribute to the memory of the dead
premier was Andrew Carnegie.
TELEGRAPHIC BREVITIES.
Minnesota clubwomen are in session
at Albert Lea.
Attorney General Knox spoke on the
trusts at Pittsburg.
Two inches of snow fell at Cadillac,
Mich., and a two hours' storm occurred
at Marquette.
King Edward is at Newmarket to
attend the opening day of the second
October race meeting there.
The collapse of the roof of a mine
at Lobo, near Linares, Spain, has re
sulted in the death of seven persons.
Arguments in the application of the
Union Pacific Railroad company tor
an injunction against its striking
shopmen have been concluded at
Omaha, and the court hag taken the
matter unaer advisement.
United States Senator Nelson pump
ed a handcar five miles in* order to
make connections with a train for
Two Harbors where he spoke in the
evening. The senator's train ran into
a wreck near Wolff Junction and could
proceed no further.
MARKET QUOTATIONS.
Minneapolis Wheat.
Minneapolis, Oct. 14.WheatDec,
68%@68%c July, 69%@69%c. On
TrackNo. 1 hard, 71 %c No. 1 North
ern, 6"%c No. 2 Northern, 68%c.
Sioux City Live Stock.
Sioux City, la., Oct. 14.Cattle-
Beeves, [email protected] cows, bulls and
mixed, [email protected] stockers and feed
ers, [email protected] yearlings and calves,
[email protected] [email protected]
Duluth Grain.
Duluth, Oct., 14.WheatCash No.
1 hard, 72c No. 1 Northern, 70^c
No. 2 Northern, 68^0 No. spring.
66^c. To ArriveNo. 1 hard, 72c
No. 1 Northern, 10y2c Dec, 68c Mav,
70%c Nov., 70c FlaxCash, $1.21*1.
St. Paul Union Stock Yards.
St. Paul, Oct. 14.CattleChoice
butcher steers, [email protected] choice
butcher cows and heifers, $3.50 5.50
good to choice veals, [email protected]
Hogs$6.65,@7.15. SheepGood to
choice, [email protected] lambs, [email protected]
Chicago Union Stock Yards.
Chicago, Oct. 14.CattleGood to
prime steers, [email protected] poor to me
dium, [email protected] stockers and feed
ers, $2.25 4.90 cows and heifers,
$1.505.50 Texas steers, $3.004.00.
HogsMixed and butchers, $6.85)
7.45 good to choice heavy, [email protected]
7.60 rough heavy, [email protected] light.
$6.40 7.25 bulk of sales, $6.85 7.05.
SheepGood to choice, [email protected]
Iambs, [email protected]
Chicago Grain and Provisions.
Chicago, Oct. 14.WheatDec,
70%c May, [email protected]%c CornOct.,
58%c Nov., 55c Dec, 48%@48%c:
May, 42%c July, 41%c OatsOct.,
30%c Dec, [email protected] May/*31%@
32c PorkOct., $16.90 Jan., $15.65
May, $14.85. FlaxCash ^Northwest
ern, $1.25 Southwestern, $1.23 Oct.,
$1.2^3 Nov., $1.23% Dec, $1.23
May, $1.26%. ButterCreameries, 16
@23c dairies, [email protected] Eggs20%c
PoultryTurkeys, [email protected]%c
HE PRrNOETOlj XTKIO^ frj*imsi)A,T?OCfrOB^Il 16, 1902.
man in ASn A I A VHHMaTiM SW?S1K SST1 S *V,./ *S
STRAIGHIT
vchick
ens. [email protected] "I
TO THE
Constitution of Minnesota
Hon. Peter E. Hanson, Secretary of State
Sir: Pursuant to Chapter 157 of the General
Laws of 1887, I herewith file in your office
Synopses of Amendments to 'the Consti
tution of the State of Minnesota as pro
posed by the General Laws of the State
of Minnesota enacted at the General Ses
sion of the Legislature in 1901 and the
Extra Session in 1902, as well as a synop
sis of Chapter 150 of the GeneraI"Laws of
1901, being an Act involving the taxation
of railroad property, to be submitted to
the electors of the State for adoption or
rejection at the next General Election.
Yours respectfully,
W. B. DOUGLAS,
Attorney General
SYNOPSES OF AMENDMENTS TO
THE CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE
OF MINNESOTA PROPOSED BY THE
LEGISLATURE OF THE SAID STATE
AT THE GENERAL SESSION IN 1901
AND THE EXTRA SESSION IN 1902,
AS WELL AS A SYONPSIS OF CHAP-
TER 150 OF THE GENERAL LAWS
OF 1901,-PROPOSING AN INCREASE
OF THE CROSS EARNINGS TAX
UPON RAILROAD PROPERTIES.
I.
Pursuant to the provisions of Section
32a, of Article IV of the State Constitu
tion, the Legislature by Act approved
April 6, 1901, known as Chapter 150 of the
General Laws of 1901, present to the elec
tors of the State for rejection or approval,
the following, to wit.
Section 1 That every railway company
owning or operating any line of railway
situated within, or partly within, this
state shall, during the year 1903, and an
nually thereafter, pay into the treasury
of this state, as taxes upon all property
within this state owned or operated for
railway purposes by such company, in
cluding equipment, appurtenances, ap
pendages and franchises thereof, a sum
of money equal to four (4) per cent of the
gross earnings derived from the operation
of such line of railway within this state,
and the payment of such taxes shall be in
full and in lieu oZ all other taxes upon the
property and franchises so taxed. The
lands acquired by public grant shall be
and remain exempt from taxation until
sold or contracted to be sold or convened
as provided in the respective acts whereby
such grants were made or recognized
Sec. 2. The term "the gross earnings
derived from the operation of such line
of railway within this state," as used
section one (1) of this act, is hereby de
clared and shall be construed to mean all
earnings on business beginning and end
ing within the state, and a proportion of
earnings on all interstate business passing
through, into or out of the state as the
mileage operated within the state bears
to the entire mileage operated by such
company.
Sec. 3. All acts and parts of acts not
Inconsistent herewith regulating the pay
ment, collection, time of payment, en
forcement, or reports involving the
amount of taxes upon the gross earnings
of railroad companies within this state, or
providing penalties for the non-payment
of such taxes, are hereby made applica
ble to this act so far as may be and all
acts and parts of acts inconsistent with
the provisions of this act are hereby re
pealed.
.Sec. 4. Upon failure to pay the amount
of such taxes legally due upon the dates
heretofore provided by law for the pay
ment thereof, in addition to existing rem
edies, collection may be enforced in a
civil action brought the name of th
State of Minnesota in the district court
of any county
Sec. 5. This act shall be submitted to
the people of this state for their approval
or rejection at the next general election
for the year 1902
(The omitted provision refers to the
method of printing the ballot and submit
ting the act for ratification
TUs act provides for an increase
of the amou nt of taxes collected by
tlie State upon the property of the
railroads situated within the State,
from three per cent upon the gross
earnings derived from the operation
of such lines of railway with in the
State, to a. snm ot money equal to
four per cent upon the gross earn
ings deriied from the operation of
such lines of railway therein.
Under the terms of the Constitu
tion aboie referred to, this Act of
the Legislature must be submitted
to legal oters of the State, and will
become operative if adopted by a
majority of such electors voting at
the next general election.
II.
By an Act of the Legislature of the
State of Minnesota, approved February
28, 1901, and known as House File No.
100, it is proposed to amend Article
Eight (8), Section Six (6) of the Consti
tution
This Section as now existing reads as
follows.
Section 6. The permanent school and
university fund of this State may be in
vested in the purchase of bonds of any
county, school district, city, town or
village of this state, but no such invest
ment shall be made until approved by
the board of commissioners designated by
law to regulate the investment of the
permanent school fund and the perma
nent university fund of this State, nor
shall such loan orj investment be made
when the issue of which the same in
part would make the entire bonded in
debtedness exceed seven per cent of the
assessed valuation of the taxable real
property of the county, school district,
city, town or village issuing such bonds
nor shall such loans or indebtedness be
made at a lower rate of interest than
three per cent per annum nor for a short
er period than five (5) years nor for a
longer period than twenty (20) years, and
no change of the town, school district,
village, city or county lines shall relieve
the real property in such town, school
district, county, village or city in this
state at the time of issuing of such bonds
from any liability for taxation to pay
such bonds.
It is proposed by said act to amend the
same so as to read as follows:
Section 6 The permanent school and
university fund of this State may be in
vested in the bonds of any county, school
district, city, town or village of this
state, but no such investment shall be
made until approved by the board of
commissioners designated by law to reg
ulate the investment of the permanent
school fund and the permanent univer
sity fund of this state nor shall
such loan or investment be made when
the bonds to be issued or purchased
would make the entire bonded indebted
ness exceed fifteen (15) per cent of the
assessed valuation of the taxable real
property of the county, school district,
city, town or village issuing such bonds:
nor shall such loans or indebtedness be
made at a lower rate of Interest than
three (3) per cent per annum, nor for a
shorter period than five (5) years, nor
for a longer period than twenty (20)
years, and no change of \he town, school
district, city, village, or of county lines,
shall relieve the real property in such
town, school district, county, village or
city in this state at the time of the issu
ing of such bonds from any liability for
taxation to pay such bonds.
The effect of the above amendment,
it adopted, -will be to authorise the
investment of the permanent school
and university fund of this state for
a period of not leas than five (5) or
more than twenty (20) years, at an
interest rate not less than three (3)
per cent per annum, in the bonds of
any county, school district, city,
town, or village of this state, when
the bonds to be issued or purchased
will* not make the entire bonded
Indebtedness of such municipalities
exceed fifteen (15) per cent /of the
assessed valuation of the taxable
real property contained therein.
The substantial change proposed
by said amendme nt is to authorise
such investments when the entire
indebtedness, including the loan in
question, does not exceed fifteen (15)
per cent of the assessed valuation
of the taxable real property in such
municipalities whereas, under the
existing Constitution loans are per
mitted only where such total in
debtedness does not exceed seven
(T) per cent of the assessed valu
ation.
By An Act of the Legislature of the
State of Minnesota Approved April 13,
1901, and known as House File No 353, it
is proposed to Amend Section Sixteen (16)
of Article Nine (9) of the Constitution.
The Section as now existing reads as
follows:
Section 16. For the ofthere
J
~mib
i
L?
ll
*TCLM:
."M-f-y
lendin eiJconstructionpurposimprovemeng and
hIhways and bridges is
hereby created a fund to be known as the
state road and bridge fund Said fund
snail include all moneys accruing from
the income derived from investments
the internal improvement land fund, or
S'W hereafter accrue to said fund,
and shall also include all funds accruing
to any state road and bridge fund, how
ever provided.
The legislature is authorized to add to
such fund for the purpose of constructing
F ^Proving roads and bridges of this
state, by providing, its discretion, for
an annual tax levy upon the property of
this state of not to exceed in any year
one-twentieth (1-20) of one (1) mill on all
the taxable property within the state.
The legislature is also authorized to
provide for the appointment bv the gov
ernor of ths state of a board to* be known
as the state highway commission," con
sisting of three (3) members, who shall
perform such duties as shall be pre
scribed by law, without salary 09 com
pensation other than personal expenses.
Such commission shall have general su
perintendence of the construction of state
roads and bridges and shall use such
furd in the construction thereof and
distribute the same in the several
counties in the state upon an equitable
basis Provided, further, that no
county shall receive any year more
than three (3) per cent or less than one
half (V2) of one (1) per cent of the total
fund thus provided and expended during
such year and provided, further, that no
more than one-third (1-3) of such fund
accruing any year shall be expended
for -bridges, and in no case shall more
than one-third (1-3) of the cost of con
structing or improving any road or bridge
be paid by the state from such fund
It is proposed by said Act to amend the
same so as to read as follows:
Section 16 For the purpose of lending
aid in the construction and improvement
of public highways and bridges, there is
hereby created a fund to be known as the
''State Road and Bridge Fund" Said
fund shall include all moneys accruing
from the interest derived from the in
vestments in the internal improvement
land fund, or that may hereafter accrue
to said fund, and shall also include all
funds accruing to any state road and
bridge fund however provided
The legislature is authorized to add to
such fund for the purpose of construct
ing or improving roads and bridges of the
state, and providing its discretion for
an annual tax-levy upon the property of
this state, of not to exceed in any one
year one-tenth (1-10) of one mill on all
the taxable prorerty within the state
The existing Constitution author
izes legislation providing for a levy
of a state tax of 1-20 of one mill for
the purpose of building roads and
bridges, and provides for its use
under the direction of a State High
way Commission in such counties
as shall contribute at least double
the amou nt of the State moneys ex
pended by said Commission for such
purpose, subject also to certain
other limitations.
By the proposed change, a tax of
1-10 of one mill is authorized to be
levied for this purpose the High
way Commission is abolished, and
the result, if the proposed amend
ment is adopted, will be to place
the distribution of such funds in the
hands of the Leg'stature, without
limitation or restriction.
IV
By an act of the legislature of the State
of Minnesota, known as chapter one (1)
of the Laws of the Extra Session of 1902,
It is proposed to amend sections one (1),
two (2) and three (3) of article nine (9)
of the constitution.
The sections as now existing read as
lows
"Section 1 All taxes to be raised in
this state shall be as nearly equal as may
be, and all property on which taxes are
to be levied shall have a cash valuation,
and be equalized and uniform throughout
the state., provided, that the legislature
may, by general law or special act, au
thorize municipal corporations to levy
assessments for local improvements upon
the property fronting upon such improve
ments, or upon the property to be bene
fited by such improvements, or both,
without regard to a cash valuation, and
in such manner as the legislature may
prescribe, and provided, further, that for
the purpose of defraying the expenses of
laying water pipes and supplying any
city or municipality with water, the leg
islature may, by general or special law,
authorize any such city or municipality,
having a population of five thousand or
more, to levy an annual tax or assess
ment upon the lineal foot of all lands
fronting on any water main or water
pipes laid by such city or municipality
within corporate limits of said city, for
supplying water to the citizens thereof,
without regard to the cash value of such
property, and to empower such city to
collect anj such tax assessments, or fines
or penalties for failure to pay the same,
or any fine or penalty for any violation
of the rules of such city or municipality
in regard to the use of/water, or for any
water rate due for the same
And provided further, that there may
be by law levied and collected a tax upon
all inheritances, devises, bequests, lega
cies and gifts of every kind and descrip
tion above a fixed and specified sum, of
any and all natural persons and corpora
tions. Such tax above such exempted
sum may be uniform, or it may be grad
ed or progressive, but shall not exceed
a maximum tax of five per cent.
Sec 2 The legislature shall provide
for an annual tax sufficient to defray the
estimated (ordinary) expenses of the
state for each year and whenever it
shall happen that such ordinary expenses
of the state for any year shall exceed
the income of the state for such year,
the legislature shall provide for levying
a tax for the ensuing year sufficient,
with other sources of income, to pay the
deficiency of the preceding year, together
with the estimated expenses of such en
suing year.
Sec. 3 Laws shall be passed taxing
all moneys, credits, investments in bonds,
stocks, joint stock companies, or other
wise and also all real and personal prop
erty, according to its true value in
money but public burying grounds, pub
lic schoolhouses, public hospitals, acad
emies, colleges, universities and all semi
naries of learning, all churches, church
property used for religious purposes, and
houses of worship, institutions of purely
public charity, public property used ex
clusively for any public purpose, and
personal property to an amount not ex
ceeding in value two hundred dollars fdr
each individual, shall, by general laws,
be exempt from taxation.
It is proposed by said chapter to amend
the same so as to read as tollows
Section 1 The power of taxation shall
never be surrendered, suspended or con
tracted away. The legislature shall pro
vide for an annual tax sufficient tojiefray
the estimated ordinary expenses of the
state for each year, and whenever It
shall happen that such ordinary ex
penses for any year shall exceed the In
come of the state for such year tne
legislature shall at its next general ses
sion provide for levying a tax sufficient
to pay such deficiency. And whenever
the income of the state from other
sources shall be sufficient to defray all
of its ordinary expenses without the levy
of any annual state tax, such tax levy
shall be omitted. All taxes to be raised
in this state shall be as nearly equal as
may be and shall be levied and collected
for public purposes only and all property
on which taxes are to be levied, except
as herein otherwise provided, shall have
a cash valuation, and shall be equalized
and uniform throughout the state pro
vided that whenever the levy of a tax
for state purposes is omitted as above
provided, the taxes levied for local pur-
poses sMall be upon a valuation of the-^_J
property within the several counties and
the subdivisions thereof, which shall be
equalized and uniform throughout each
county. The legislature may by general
or special law authorize municipal cor
porations to levy assessments for local
improvements upon the property fronting*
upon such improvements, or upon proper- IS
ty benefited thereby, or both,, without re
gard to a cash valii&tion, in such
manner2*
as the legislature may prescribe. There
may be levied and collected an annual**-.
tax upon franchises granted by public/^**
authority, addition to the tax on the*
real property and other personal property
of the person cr corporation holding such
franchise, or in lieu of a tax on such
franchise alone, err 'n lieu of a tax on^
such franchise and the personal property""*
used connection -with the exercise of
the same, there may be imposed such tax.
upon the gross earnings of the oerson
or corporation holding such franchise as
the legislature may determine, and said
tax shall be apportioned between the
state, counties and municipalities where
such franchise is exercised, in the same
manner as real estate taxes are appor
tioned. There may be levied and col
lected a transfer tax not to exceed 5
per centum upon the estates of decedents,
above a fixed and specified sum, which
tax may be uniform or graded or pro
gressive. There may be levied and col
lected a registry tax upen all real es
tate mortgages which shall be in lieu of
all other taxes on the debt secured by
such mortgages and a tax upon the in
come from all credits owned by persons
or corporations, as such credits are now
or may be hereafter defined by law, and
also on the income arising from all per
sonal property, and also uoon the income
of all persons or eoroorations above the
sum of Sd.,000 per annum, not arising
from such credits or from such personal
property, 01 from property otherwise
taxed this stat Such income tax
shall be uniform throughout the state,
and may be graded or progressive or
both, and shall be levied at a rate not
to exceed 10 per centum upon the income
from such credits-, and upon the income
from personal property, and at a rate
not exceeding 4 per centum upon such
other income Laws shall be passed tax
ing all real and personal property pro
vided that credits and personal property
shall not be subject to other taxation
than the income 01 registry tax herein
authorized, while the law imposing such
income or registry tax shall be in force
provided, public burying grounds, pub
lic schools, public hospitals, public li
brary associations, colleges, universities
and all seminaries of learning, all church
es and church property used exclusively
for religious purposes, and institutions
of nurely pubV- charitv, and public prop
erty used, exclusively for public purposes,
and personal property to an amount not
exceeding 300 to each individual shall be
exempt from taxation, but such personal
exemption shall not be allowed to more
than one member of the same family.
Provided further, that nothing this act
contained shall be construed to affect,
modify or reoeal any law providing for
tho taxation of the gross earnings of
railroads.
The effect of the above amendment,
If adopted, -will be to amend the ex
isting Constitution, as follows:
1st. To prohibit the legislature
from surrendering or contracting
away the power of taxation.
2nd. To pr^%ide that -whenever
the income of the State derived
other than from direct taxation up
on real and personal property shall
be sufficient to defray all the ex
penses of the State, and the direct
tax levied for such purpose is Omit
ted, taxes for local purposes shall
be levied upon the taxable property
of the county, which shall be equal
and uniform throughout the county
as distinguished from being equal
and uniform throughout the State.
3rd. To authorize municipal cor
porations to le^y assessments for
local improvements under and pur
suant to special, as distinguished
from general, laws.
4th. The Legislature is authorized
to provide for the levy and collec
tion of an annual tax upon fran
chises granted by public author
ity, in addition to the tax on real
and personal property of the person
or corporation holding the same.
5th. The Legislature is authorized
to pro-tide a tax upon the gross
earnings of any person or corpora
tion holding such a franchise, con
ditioned that such gross earnings
tax may be in lieu of a tax upon the
franchise or upon the franchise and
personal property at well.
6th. Authority is conferred upon
the Legislature to provide for the
levy and collection of a registry
tax upon all real estate mortgages
whi ch shall be in lieu of all other
tax on the debt secured by such
mortgage.
7th. The Legislature is authorized
to provide for a tax upon incomes
in excess of $1,000 per annum, not
arising from credits or personal
property or from property other
wine taxed in this State, and also
a tax upon the income derived from
credits as well as from personal
property. Such tax shall be uniform
throughout the State and may be
graded, or progressive, or both, and
shall be levied at a rate not to ex
ceed ten percentum upon incomes
derived from credits and personal
property, and at a rate not exceed
ing four per cent per annum upon
such other income. In case of the
imposition of the registry tax above
referred to, or of an income tax
arising from credits or personal
property, all credits and personal
property owned by the party
against -whom such registry or in
come tax is Imposed is exempted
from all taxation while the law im
posing such income or registry tax
is in force.
In other words, where an income
tax upon salaries or earnings of in
dividuals is provided for, all per
sonal property and credits must still
be subjected to taxation, while in
case of the imposition of an income
tax arising from credits and per
sonal property or of a registrj tax
such credits and personal property
are exempted from taxation.
Sth. The Legislature is authorized
to exempt personal property of each
individual to the extent of $300,
pro-tided the same shall not apply
or be allowed to more than one
member of the same family.
9th. Other provisions of the ex
isting constitution involving the
subject of taxation are preserved
and continued in force.
W. B. DOUGLAS,
Attorney General.
July 3rd, A. D. 1902.
E
A Cabin.
On Warren'sCostly Island off the coast of
Maine, is being erected what is properly
described as "a palatial log cabin. I
is composed of spruce logs, and costs the
tidy little sum of $75,000. The entire Isl
and on which this summer palace is erect
ed was purchased by the late William
Folwell of Philadelphia. Mr. Folwell died
before the completion of the hquse. ln
work fs now superintended by his son,
William H. Folwell, Jr. Some Idea of the
size of the "cabin" may be gained from
consideration" of the fact that there are
twenty-two sleeping rooms on the second
floor. On the ground floor there is a fire
place of brick -and granite, the mantel
pieces being of marble, twelve feet in
length, three in width and nme inches
thick, the whole piece of work weighing
some forty tons.New York Tribune.
A Kansas mule balked the other day,
and thereby contributed to the fund of
real life romance. How? Well, the lone
eared quardruped was being driven by
an angry father in chase of his eloping
daughter .and the mule stopped to think
it over long enough to let the anxious
couple have the knot tied.
HeHow charmingly you sing. She
Do you really think so? HeOh, yes. in
deed. I never listen to you without wish
ing you were where my folks in Colorado
could hear you.Chicago American,
ii'-^l
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