OCR Interpretation


The Princeton union. [volume] (Princeton, Minn.) 1876-1976, October 23, 1902, Image 3

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016758/1902-10-23/ed-1/seq-3/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 3

Great Northern Railway.
ST. PAU L, MINNEAPOLIS, PRINCETON
AND SANDSTONE.
GOING BAST. Ex. Sun.
6:11 a. m.
7:01 a. m.
7:36 a.m.
8:03 a.
8:45 a. m.
9:10 a.m.
9:55 a. m.
10.15 a. m.
Le. Sandstone
Mora Mllaca
PRINCETON.
Ar. Elk River
Le. Anoka
Ar. Minneapolis.
AT. St. Paul
Le. St. Paul.
Ar. Minneapolis
Le. Anoka
Ar. Elk River.
Le. PRINCETON
Milaca Mora
Ar. Sandstone
GOING WEST.
4:45 p.m.
5:10 p.m.
5:49 p. m.
6:10 p. m.
6:48 p. m.
7:20 p. m.
7:54 p. m.
9:10 p. m.
ST. CLOUD TRAINS.
GOING WEST.
Le. Milaca I 9:40 a.m.
Bridgeman 9.47 a.m.
Ar. St. Cloud 110:40 a.m.
GOING EAST
Le. St Cloud 8-00 p. in.
Bridgeman.. 8:53p.m.
Ar Milaca 9:00 p. m.
These trains connect at St. Cloud with trains
Nos. 1 and 3.
WAY FREIGHT.
GOING EAST.Tuesday, Thursday & Saturday.
Le. Milaca 11:10 a. m.
PRINCETON 13:25p.m.
ElkRiver 2-30p.m.
Ar. Anoka 5:00 p.
GOING WEST.Monday, Wednesday & Friday.
Le. Anoka
ElkRiver
PRINCETON
Ar Milaca
9-10 a. m.
10:30 a. m.
12.05 p.m.
1*25 m.
M1LLE LACS COUNTY.
TOWN CLERKS.
Bogus BrookHenry Gustafson Princeton
BorgholmJ. Herou Bock
GreenbushR. A. Ross Princeton
Isle HarborOtto A. Haggberg Isle
MilacaOle Larson Milaca
MiloR. N.Atkinson Foreston
PrincetonErnest Sellhorn Princeton
RobbmsWm Anderson Vineland
South HarborA E. Peterson Cove
East SideGeo W. Freer Opstead
OnamiaW. N. Peterson Onamia
PageJ. Huglen Page
VILLAGE RECORDERS.
J. M. Neumann Foreston
J. W. Gouldmg Princeton
Geo. McClure Milaca
NEIGHBORING TOWNS.
BaldwinL. Berry Princeton
Blue HillThomas E. Brown Princeton
Spencer BrookG. C. Smith. ..Spencer Brook
WyanettJ. A. Krave Wyanett
LivoniaChas. E. Swanson Lake Freemont
PRICES O THE
Princeton Roller MF sand Elevator.
Wheat, No 1 Northern,
Wheat, No 2 Northern,
Corn, old,
Corn, new,
Oats,
RETAIL.
Vestal, per sack
Flour, (100 per cent) per sack
Banner, per sack
Ground Feed, per cwt
Coarse Meal, per cwt
Middlings Shorts, per cwt
Bran, per cwt
82.05
195
1.55
1.20 1.20
.95 .85 .75
All poods delivered free anvwhere in Princeton.
PRINCETON
Market Report.
PRINCETON LODGE,
N O. 93, of
Regular meetings every Tuesday eve
8 o'clock.
W PIERSO N, C. C.
LARSON, K. & S
O. M.,
Tent No. 17.
Regular meetings every Thurs
day evening at 8 o'clock, in the
Maccabee hall. O. PETERSON, Com.
N M. NELSON. R. K.
Hebron Encampment.
No. 42,1. OO. F.
Meetings, 2nd and 4th Mondays
at 8 o'clock p. M.
C. SAUSSER. C.
W. SPATTLDING, S. W.
Jos CRAIG, Scribe.
PRINCETON LODGE
NO. 208,1. O O.F.
Regular meetings every Friday evening at 7:30
o'clock. A B. CHADBOURNE, N. G.
S. BRIGGS, R. Sec.
PRINCETON CAMP, W A.,
No. 4032.
Regular meetings 1st and 3rd Saturdays of
each month, at 8:00 p. M., in the hall at Brick
yards. Visiting members cordially invited.
N ED C. KELLEY, V. C.
J. P. ZIMMERMAN. Clerk.
FOR SALESix Poland China boar
pigs. Inquire S. Winsor, Route 2,
Princeton, Minn. 53-2t
AND FEED BARN.
CLAQGETT & TILLEY, Props.
Princeton, Minn.
Single and Double Rigs
at a floments' Notice.
Commercial Travelers' Trade a Specialty.
HE HAS CURED THOUSANDS
Given up to Die.
Dr.JRe a
Next regular professional visit to
PRINCETON,
Monday, Oct. 27th,
Prom noon until 6 P.M at the
Commercial Hotel.
Returning every month. Consult him while
the opportunity is at hand.
DR. REA has no superior in diagnosing and
treating diseases and detormities. He will
give S50 for any case that he cannot tell the dis
ease and where located in five minutes.
All curable medical and surgical diseases,
acute and chronic catarrh, and special diseases
of the eye, ear, nose and throat, lung disease,
early consumption, bronchitis, bronchial ca
tarrh, constitutional catarrh, dyspepsia, sick
headache, stomach and bowel troubles, rheu
matism, neuralgia, sciatica, Bright's disease,
diabetes, kidney, liver, bladder, prostatic and
female diseases, dizziness, nervousness, indi
gestion, obesity, interrupted nutrition, slow
growth in children, and all wasting disease in
adults. Many cases of deafness, ringing in the
ears, loss of eyesight, cataract, cross eyes, etc.,
that have been improperly treated or neglected
can be easily restored. Deformities, club feet,
curvature of the spine, diseases of the brain,
paralysis, epilepsy, heart- disease, dropsy,
swelling of the limbs, stricture, open sores,
pain in the bones, granular enlargements and
all long-standing diseases, properly treated.
Young, middle-aged and old, single or married
men and all who suffer from lost manhood,
nervous debility, spermatorrhoea, seminal
losses, sexual decay, failing memory, weak
eyes, stunted development, lack of energy, im
povished blood, pimples, impediments to mar
riage, also blood and skin diseases, syphillis,
eruptions hair falling, bone pains, swellings,
sore throat, ulcers, effects of mercury, kidney
and bladder troubles, weak back, burning
urine, passing urine too often, gonorrhea, gleet,
stricture, receive searching treatment, prompt
relief and cure for life.
Cancers, Tumors, Goiter, Fistula, Piles
varicocele and enlarged glands with the sub
cutaneous injection method, absolutely without
pain and without the loss of a drop of blood, is
one of Ms own discoveries, and is the most
really scientific and certainly sure cure of the
nineteenth century. No incurable cases taken.
Consultation to those interested, $1.00.
DR. REA & CO.,
Minneapolis, Minn. Louisville, Ky.
T. F. NORTON,
Real Estate,
Loans and Insurance.
COVE, MINN.
I have 100 good business lots for sale at this
place at reasonable prices, also lots, blocks,
and acres suitable for summer homes on
Murray Beach,
affording a mile of beautiful sandy beach with
fine shady drives through large oak, maple,
birch, and basswood timber, on the south
shore of
Beautiful Mille Lacs Lake,
the geographical center of Minnesota and the
future great health and summer resort of the
northwest. I also have some fine
Timber and Meadow Lands
in Mille Lacs and adjoining counties, and im
proved lands near to school, church, and store.
The Mille Lacs Country
offers all the advantages of the far frontier in
cheap lands and business opportunities, and
yet we are in the very heart of the State
WRITE FOR PRICES.
Bortingfqn
Reclining Chair Cars
Are in service on all our through
passenger trains. They are the
most roomy and comfortable that
can be built.
The aisles are carpeted.
The chairs are Luxuriously
upholstered. Toilet rooms
are provided at each end
of the car. Are lighted by
gas (on the Limited by
electricity), and heated by
steam in cold weather.
A porter is in attendance to care
for the comfort of passengers.
It would seem that you could
travel very comfortable in one
of these cars, would it not?
ASK YOUR .'HOME AGENT
TO MAKE TOUR TICKET
READ BY THIS LINE.
PROFESSIONAL CARDS.
Q.
ROSS CALEY, M. D.,
PHYSICIAN AND SUBGEON.
Office and Residence over Jack's Drugstore.
Tel.Rural, 3tf
Princeton, Minn.
JLVERO L. MCMILLAN,
LAWTEB.
Office in Odd Fellows' Building.
Princeton, Minn.
A.ROSS,
ATlk)BNEY AT LAW.
Office in Carew Block,
Main Street. Princeton.
BUSINESS CARDS.
ALIHER & SMITH,
BABBEB SHOP & BATH BOOMS.
A fine line of Tobacco and Cigars.
Main Street, Princeton.
A. ROSS,
VNDEBTAKEB.
Coffins and Caskets, from the cheapest to the
best grades always on hand.
An embalming fluid used which brings dis
colored corpses back to natural color.
Also dealer in granite and marble monuments.
Princeton Minn.
A C. SMITH,
Dealer in
FBESH AND SALT MEATS,
Lard, Poultry, Fish and Game in Season
Telephone 51.
Princeton, Minn.
V. WICKLUND,
VNDEBTAKEB and EMBALMEB
Is always ready to attend, dress and keep
from discoloring acute infectious diseased
bodies until time for funeral.
Coffins and caskets always on hand.
Also a full line of granite and marble monu
ments. Telephone call 52.
Office Main street, Princeton, Minn.
S. LONG
Has built up a splendid business
and earned an enviable reputation
by handling only dependable
SHOES.
AGENTS FOR
W.LDOUGLAS SHOES
BEST IN THE WORLD.
A Case of
HAMM'S
BEER Wi Prove a Splendid Tonic for
the Tired Housewife*Supplied by
Agents Everywhere, or THEO.
HAMM BREWING CO.. St Paid,
Minn.
UNCLE SAMS
MONOGRAM*
WHISKEY^
You'll find it every
where. Ask for
it by name.
The price is right.
So is the quality.
Crowned a Peer for
Cheer.
Sold by
Dealers
and Druggists, i
BENZ
-aof*s
tPfeul and
Minneapolis
I PktitieriesalA
Eminences
\Battimore.^
THE PBIKCETOH UKMXN? THTTRSDAT, OCTOBER 23, 1902.3QS391- WM^^^^^^W^fW^, 3
CONVENTION OF ANTHRACiTE
MINERS DECLARES OFF THE
GREAT STRIKE.
ACCEPTS ARBITRATION PLAN
VOTE IS UNANIMOUS AT TH E
CLOSE OF A LONG AND
WARM DEBATE.
WILL MEET NEXT FRIDAY
PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT CALLS
TOGETHER THE ARBITRATION
COMMISSION.
Wilkesbarre, Pa., Oct. 22.With a
shout that fairly shook the convention
building the representatives of the
147,000 mine workers, who have been
on strike since last May, officially de
clared off at noon the greatest con
test ever waged between capital and
labor, and placed all the questions in
volved in the struggle into the hands
of the arbitration commission ap
pointed by the president of the United
States. When the news was flashed
to the towns and villages down in the
valleys and on the mountains of the
coal regions the strike-affected inhab
itants heaved a sigh of relief. Many
days have gone by since more wel
come news was received. Everywhere
there was rejoicing, and in many places
the end of the strike was the signal
for impromptu town celebrations.
The anthracite coal region from its
largest cityScrantondown to the
lowliest coal patch, has suffered by the
conflict, and everyone now looks for
better times. While the large army
of mine workers and their families,
numbering approximately 500,000 per
sons, are grateful that work is to oe
resumed on Thursday, the strikers
have still to learn what their reward
will be. President Roosevelt having
taken prompt action in calling the ar
bitrators together for their first meet
ing on Friday, the miners hope they
will know by Thanksgiving day what
practical gain they have made. The
vote to resume coal mining was a
unanimous one and was reached only
after a warm debate. The principal
objection to accepting the arbitration
proposition was that no provision was
contained in the scheme to take care
of those men who would fail to get
back their old positions or would be
unable to get any work at all. The
engineers and pumpmen get better pay
than other classes of mine workers
and they did not wish to run the risk
of losing altogether their old places
and be compelled to dig coal for a liv
ing This question came up the pre
vious day and was argued right up to
the time the vote was taken. No one
had a definite plan to offer to overcome
the objection and the report of the
committee on resolutions that the
Strike Be Declared Off
and that all issues be placed in the
hands of the arbitration commission
for decision was adopted without the
question being settled. A few mo
ments before adjournment, however, a
partial solution was reached, when a
delegate in the farthest corner of the
hall moved that the problem be placed
in the hands of the executive boards
for solution, and his suggestion was
adopted. The principal speech of the
day was made by National Secretary
Treasurer W. B. Wilson, who practi
cally spoke for President Mitchell and
the national organization. In a strong
argument he counselled the men to
accept arbitration, the very plan the
strikers themselves had offered, re
turn to work and trust to the presi
dent's tribunal to do them justice.
The question of taking care of all
men who will fail to get work imme
diately will be a serious one for the
union. There is no doubt the execu
tive boards will take care of the en
gineers, firemen and pumpmen, but
there will be thousands of other classes
of mine workers who will have to be
looked after. In some places hundreds
will not be able to get work for weeks,
and in other' localities where the
mines are in very bad condition, there
will be no employment for many work
men for some months. Now that the
strike is over the volume of relief money
will decrease and the local unions
will be compelled to call upon the na
tional organizations for assistance
when the money now in hand runs out.
With the close of the great conflict will
also end in a few days, probably with
the passing of this week, the assess
ment now being levied on all bitumin
ous mine workers affiliated with the
union. The officials who care to talk
of the situation feel confident that the
national body will come to the assist
ance and help of all those who stood
out during the suspension.
Will Repair Mines at Once.
Hundreds of men, needed to repair
the mines and otherwise place them
in condition for operation, win be at
work in the morning, the convention
having decided that this was impera
tive in order to get the men at work
quickly and satisfy the country's de
mand for cjoal. AH the locals will
Jbold meetings at once at which in
structions will be given the members
regarding their application for work.
The proceedings in the convention
indicate that there will be some fric
tion in some of the local organizations
over many little questions which will
jcome up in connection witn the men
returning to the mines.
President Mitchell received many
congratulatory telegrams from all
over the country after the news spread
that the strike was ended. On his re
turn to headquarters he was asked for
expression of his views on*the
action of the convention "and in reply
he said:
'"I am well pleased with the action
of the anthracite mine workers in de
ciding to submit the issues which cul
minated in the strike to the commis
sion selected by the president-of the
United States.
"The strike itself has demonstrated
the power and dignity of labor. Con
servative, intelligent trade unionism
has received an impetus, the effect of
which cannot be measured. I earnestly
hope and firmly believe that both labor
and capital have learned lessons from
the miners' strike which will enable
them to adopt peaceful, humane and
business methods of adjusting wage*
differences in the future."'
Mitchell Notifies Roosevelt.
After Mr. Mitchell had notified
President Roosevelt of the action of
the convention and had received a
reply to the effect that the commission
would meet in Washington on Friday,
he sent out the official announcement
through the press to the strikers that
the strike was off. It was addressed
to all miners and mine workers in the
anthracite region.
After the miners had called the
strike off they unanimously adopted
resolutions thanking all national, state
and municipal governments, all organ
izations and individuals throughout
the world for assistance rendered the
miners during their great struggle.
President Mitchell has not made any
arrangements regarding his future
movements. He does not know
whether he will go to Washington on
Friday. The miners' leader will act as
the attorney for the rr =n at all ses
sions of the commission and will have
with him several assistants. Head
quarters here will be kept open prob
ably until after the award of the arbi
tration commission is announced.
STRIKE REGION JUBILANT.
Celebrations Held at Many Places
Over Ending of the Struggle.
Philadelphia, Oct. 22.Throughout
the etnire anthracite coal region the
information that the mine workers'
convention at Wilkesbarre had de
clared the strike at an end was re
ceived with rejoicing. In many sec
tions enthusiastic demonstrations fol
lowed the welcome announcement,
while at other points the news was re
ceived with quiet satisfaction. Scarcely
a dissenting voice was raised amid the
general jubilation.
The greatest excitement was dis
played in the Schuylkill region. At
Shenandoah and Mahanoy City, where
many of the Philadelphia and Reading
Coal and Iron company's mines are lo
cated, the residents appeared on the
streets en masse cheering for John
Mitchell and shouting and singing in
a delirium of delight. A regimental
band participated in the celebration
at Shenandoah, men and boys number
ing thousands following the musicians
through the principal gtreets of the
borough. Similar scenes were enacted
in most of the smaller towns, patches
and villages.
In the Panther Creek valley there
was no demonstration, but the relief
was pronounced. There is some specu
lation as to whether the pumpmen will
be re-employed by the Lehigh Coal and
Navigation company, nonunion men
having kept the pumps in operation
during the progress of the strike. The
convention's assurance, however, that
discharged men will be cared for by
the miners' organization mitigated the
feeling of uncertainty.
In the upper region the union head
quarters at all of the mining towns
and villages were thronged during the
morning by expectant crowds of strik
ers, who quickly circulated the news
and then proceeded to celebrate the
occasion in an exuberant manner. In
many sections the men whose duty it
is to prepare the mines for the miners
and laborers reported at the collieries
and the work of lowering the mules
has already begun.
WILL MEET NEXT FRIDAY.
President Roosevelt Calls Together
Arbitration Commission.
Washington, Oct. 22.Shortly be
fore 3 o'clock p. m. President Roose
velt received a telegram from Wilkes
barre, Pa., informing him that the con
vention of miners had declared off the
anthracite coal strike. The telegram
was signed by John Mitchell, chair
man, and W. B. Wilson, secretary of
the convention. Immediately upon re
ceipt of the information the following
telegram was sent to Mr. Mitchell:
"Washington, Oct. 21, 1902.
"Mr. John Mitchell, Chairman of Con
vention, Wilkesbarre, Pa.:
"Upon receipt of your telegram of
this date the president summoned the
commission to meet here on Friday
next, the 24th inst., at 10 a. m."
News of the termination of the
strike was received by the president
with great satisfaction.
Already telegrams have been sent
to the members of the commission,
notifying them of the first meeting to
be held in this city on Friday morning
and summoning them to be present.
The meeting probably will be held in
the office of Commissioner Wright, in
the department of labor. After the
commission has effected its organiza
tion, the members will call in a body
on the president to pay their respects.
At that time it is expected he will em
brace the opportunity to give the com
mission such verbal instructions as he
may intend to present to it. Besides
he may prepare a formal letter of in
structions. That was the method pur
sued at the time of the appointment of
the Pullman strike commission, of
which Colonel Wright was the presi
dent. It is understood that few meet
ings of the commission will be held in
Washington.
Episcopal Missionary Council.
Philadelphia, Oct. 22.In the pres
ence of over a score of bishops and
hundreds of clerical and laity dele
gates from all sections of the United
States, the missionary council of the
Protestant Episcopal church in Amer
ica began its sessions here during the
day. The opening service was held in
St. James church, when Bishop Gaylor
of Tennessee preached the sermon and
Bishop T/uttle of Missouri conducted
the celebration of the holy communion^
BOLOCADST IN CBICAGO
FIVE MEN LOSE THEIR LIVES
IN A SUGAR REFINING
PLANT FIRE.
DEAD MAY REACH THIRTY
Not Known How Many Men Were in
the Drying House at the Time and
Estimates Place the Loss of Life
From Thirty Down to TenFour
Men Leap From the Upper Floors
to Their Death.
Chicago, Oct. 22.Five men are
known to have lost their lives in a fire
which partially destroyed the plant of
the Chicago branch of the Glucose
Sugar Refining company, situated at
Taylor street and the Chicago river.
The list of dead will certainly be much
greater than five and may reach as
high as thirty. The estimates run all
the way from that number down to
ten. Only one of the five men whose
bodies have been recovered has been
identified. His name is Frank Roth
enberg, foreman skull crushed in
leaping from fifth story.
The fire broke out with an explosion
in the drying house, which is seven
stories in height and stands close to
the main building of the plant, which
is fourteen stories high. A third struc
ture is four stories high. The two
smaller buildings were completely de
stroyed and the larger building was
badly damaged. The fire spread after
the explosion with such rapidity that
it was impossible for the men in the
upper stories of the drying house to
make their escape and it is the number
of men believed to have been at work
on the seventh floor that caused the
uncertainty in the list of dead. Some
of the employes who made their es
cape say that there were twenty or
thirty and others say that there were
not more than ten at work when the
fire broke out. Whatever the number,
all are dead. Four men leaped from
the upper floors and all met death.
The fifth man in the list of dead is an
electrician, who is known to have en
tered the building and was there at
the time of the fire. He is supposed to
be dead, for the reason that all the
firemen and laborers about the burned
building say that no man made his
escape from the upper floors. Frank
Moore was working on the fourth floor
and made his escape by sliding down
the water pipe. He declared that none
of the men in the floors above him
were able to get away.
It is not likely that the number of
dead will be known with accuracy
within twenty-four hours. The day
house and the other smaller building
of the plant are a mass of red hot
debris, and it will be impossible to
search the ruins for several hours. It
will take considerable time to com
plete the work after it shall have been
commenced.
Secretary Glass of the refining com
pany said at 2 o'clock a. m. that he
estimated the loss at $500,000.
GENERAL MILES ROBBED.
Insignia and Jewels Stolen From a
Honolulu Hotel.
Honolulu, Oct. 15.Lieutenant Gen
eral Nelson A. Miles arrived here on
the 9th of this month on the transport
Thomas and remained in Honolulu two
days, during which he paid a visit to
Pearl harbor and examined the Hon
olulu coast line where forts are to be
erected. On the evening of the 10th
the general was the victim of a rob
bery, which for a time was thought
to mean the loss of some valuable
documents. Some of the general's in
signia and jewels was stoien from the
rotunda of the Hawaiian hotel. The
thief took advantage of a dance and
reception given at the hotel to the
distinguished visitors and was de
tected early in the evening. On thi
following day the valise was recovered
a short distance from the hotel. It
had been cut open, the "jewelry and in
signia taken, but the papers left un
touched.
General Miles resumed his journey
on the Thomas on Oct. 11.
CASUALTIES OF THE YEAR.
Nearly Three Thousand People Killed
in Railway Accidents.
Washington, Oct. 22.The number
of persons killed in train accidents
during the months of April, May and
June last, as shown by a bulletin is
sued by the interstate commerce com
mission during the day giving the re
ports made by the railroad companies,
was 140 and the injured 1,810. Acci
dents of other kinds, including those
sustained on or off cars, etc., swell
the aggregate to 616 killed and 9,520
injured, or a total of 10,136 casualties.
The total casualties during the fiscal
year ended June 30, last, including the
above figures, was 2,819 killed and
39,800 injured. The number of em
ployes killed shows a diminution of
68 per cent since 1893, when the safety
appliance act was passed, and this de
crease has occurred notwithstanding
the much increased number of men
employed.
Embezzler Commits Suicide.
Hartford, Conn., Oct. 22.John H.
Wadham, aged sixty-five, a clerk in the
office Of Comptroller Chamberlain,
committed suicide by hanging himself
in a washroom at the capitol late in
the afternoon. A note was found In
the coat pocket of the dead man and
it stated that he was an embezzler.
Congressman Russell Dying.
Danielson, Conn., Oct. 22.Congress-
man Charles A. Russell is not expected
to live through the night. His physi
cian fears the end is only a question of
hours. Late in the day Mr. Russell
began to lose strength and early In
the evening was In a semi-consciousl
condition.
Yi "T~ jiSi
r-

xml | txt